WBEZ | activism http://www.wbez.org/tags/activism Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Why Didn't The World Say 'We Are All Kenyans' Last April? http://www.wbez.org/news/why-didnt-world-say-we-are-all-kenyans-last-april-113845 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-469714924a_custom-fafbf4e548679cc02a4e691cd7157c83bce625e7-s1300-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res456382193" previewtitle="A woman in Nairobi attends a concert in honor of the victims of the terrorist attack that took 147 lives at Garissa University College in April."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="A woman in Nairobi attends a concert in honor of the victims of the terrorist attack that took 147 lives at Garissa University College in April." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/17/gettyimages-469714924a_custom-fafbf4e548679cc02a4e691cd7157c83bce625e7-s1300-c85.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="A woman in Nairobi attends a concert in honor of the victims of the terrorist attack that took 147 lives at Garissa University College in April. (Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>When you search for #ParisAttacks, you get nearly 2.2 million results on Google.</p></div></div></div><p>When you search for #KenyaAttacks, you get about 300.</p><p>The Parisian response is a reaction to the terrorist attacks last Friday, which took 129 lives and injured far more. People around the world have expressed solidarity. Facebook users are coloring their profile photos with the red-white-and-blue French flag, and the hashtags #PrayforParis, #WeAreAllParisians and #ParisAttacks are trending on Twitter.</p><div id="res456362117">But Kenya has suffered two terrorist attacks of similar scale. In the 2013 attack on Westgate Mall in Nairobi, 67 died. The attack on Garrissa University College in eastern Kenya on April 2 killed 147.</div><p>When those attacks happened, the world wasn&#39;t silent &mdash; people spoke up using #KenyaAttacks and #GarissaAttacks. But the response wasn&#39;t nearly as strong.</p><div id="res456362660" previewtitle="Evans Wadongo of Kenya wonders whether people are so used to bad news from Africa that a terrorist attack doesn't generate a lot of attention."><div><div><p>The same can be said about recent terrorist attacks in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/11/12/455784294/more-than-30-reported-killed-in-beirut-bombing-of-hezbollah-area">Lebanon.</a></p></div></div></div><p><img alt="Evans Wadongo of Kenya wonders whether people are so used to bad news from Africa that a terrorist attack doesn't generate a lot of attention." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/17/_mg_8814_custom-bb6238f73a9259b8741a758869e97b87eff90b2d-s500-c85.jpg" style="height: 206px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Evans Wadongo of Kenya wonders whether people are so used to bad news from Africa that a terrorist attack doesn't generate a lot of attention." /></p><p>To hear a Kenyan&#39;s perspective, I spoke with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/01/18/373803890/smoke-got-in-his-eyes-and-inspired-a-new-kind-of-lamp">Evans Wadongo</a>, 29, who grew up in a rural district and now lives in Nairobi, where he runs&nbsp;<a href="http://sustainabledevelopmentforall.org/about-us/about-us.html">Sustainable Development For All</a>, a nonprofit group that promotes solar power, education and economic betterment.</p><p><strong>What was your reaction to the news from Paris?</strong></p><p>It&#39;s a shock &mdash; something you don&#39;t expect to happen in Europe, really. For me, the shock was also about the magnitude of it &mdash; the fact that there were multiple locations and the scale of the damage.</p><p><strong>Did you have the same kind of reaction when Kenya was struck by terrorists?</strong></p><p>It was unexpected and very shocking.</p><p><strong>Do you think the world&#39;s reactions to the events in Paris and Kenya were different?</strong></p><p>Certainly it&#39;s different. More people are standing up for the French people and trying to support them.</p><p><strong>How does that make you feel?</strong></p><p>We are definitely feeling there&#39;s more value attached to humanity if a tragedy happens in Europe.</p><p><strong>Why do you think that is? Racism?</strong></p><p>For certain people it may be a bit of racism, but I also feel it&#39;s a lack of understanding. It&#39;s just that people are so used to negative things coming out of certain parts of the world &mdash; of Africa, of Asia, of South America. It&#39;s the norm. People expect bad things to happen. When something bad happens in Europe or the U.S., it&#39;s unusual. If something bad happens in some other part of the world, it&#39;s usual.</p><p><strong>Does that make you angry?</strong></p><p>It kind of makes me angry, but it also makes me feel that we need to have more positive stories coming out of Africa so when something bad happens, more people will feel sympathy with the situation.</p><p><strong>Any other reasons you can think of for the difference in reaction?</strong></p><p>More people know about ISIS as opposed to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/04/07/398004455/amid-the-chaos-in-somalia-al-shabab-expands-its-terrorist-reach">al-Shabab</a>&nbsp;[an Islamist group that originated in Somalia and was responsible for both Kenyan attacks]. ISIS has taken root in so many countries but people pay less attention to al-Shabab, which follows the same ideology.</p><p><strong>What reaction to the Paris event are you hearing from your acquaintances in Kenya?</strong></p><p>People are hoping this will create more awareness that this thing can happen anywhere, there should be more support. Terrorism is terrorism. We all need to come together and support each other and condemn what happened in one voice.</p><p><strong>When people say, &quot;We are all Parisians&quot; do you feel left out?</strong></p><p>I don&#39;t see any problem with people saying that. But they should say the same thing if something bad happens in any part of the world. If it happens in Nigeria, say, &quot;We are all Nigerians.&quot;</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://bc.ca/radio/q" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Wed, 18 Nov 2015 15:34:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/why-didnt-world-say-we-are-all-kenyans-last-april-113845 Global Activism: Iram Shah follows her deceased daughter's dream http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-iram-shah-follows-her-deceased-daughters-dream-113689 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/sonia shah 3.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-c3d8542e-dee7-e6b0-4fdc-597de6b7aea5">Pakistani-American and Winnetka, Illinois teenager, Sonia Shah, traveled and studied around the world with her mom, Iram. Sonia would see, up close, the despair and hopelessness some girls face in the developing world. She started the Kulsoom Foundation for Girls to build a school for girls in Pakistan, because she wanted girls to have the future that her mother provided for her. But before the school was completed, Sonia tragically died in a 2012 auto accident at age 18. Since then, Iram has carried on her daughter&#39;s work, renamed as the <a href="http://soniashahorganization.com/">Sonia Shah Organization</a>. Iram says that Sonia has more influenced her life in death, than she ever did in life. Iram will</span> update us on the school and how it was rebuilt after a 2014 bombing.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/231721257&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-c3d8542e-dee9-7e0a-1cab-0c806366e34a">EVENT: Sonia Shah Organization</span><a href="http://soniashahorganization.com/events-page/annual-fundraiser/"> annual gala</a></strong></p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c3d8542e-dee9-7e0a-1cab-0c806366e34a">Saturday, November 20th, 2015, 6:30pm</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c3d8542e-dee9-7e0a-1cab-0c806366e34a">Pearl Banquets (adjacent to Holiday Inn Express)</span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c3d8542e-dee9-7e0a-1cab-0c806366e34a">1480 W. Lake St., Roselle, IL</span></p></p> Thu, 05 Nov 2015 09:23:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-iram-shah-follows-her-deceased-daughters-dream-113689 Chicago girl receives threat for aiding Syrian protesters with social media http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/chicago-girl-receives-threat-aiding-syrian-protesters-social-media-112832 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150904 Alaa bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When Alaa Basatneh was six months old her parents moved from Syria to Chicago. Alaa went to school here but always paid close attention to news from the Middle East. In 2010 what became known as &ldquo;The Arab Spring&rdquo; transformed the region, and Alaa watched closely. She was only&nbsp;nineteen years old and living in the United States, but as Alaa tells her friend Zainab Khan, she&nbsp;felt she had to get involved.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Thu, 03 Sep 2015 09:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/chicago-girl-receives-threat-aiding-syrian-protesters-social-media-112832 Fighting polio in Pakistan http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-11/fighting-polio-pakistan-112177 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP%20PhotoK.M.%20Chaudary2.jpg" style="width: 571px; height: 350px;" title="(Photo: AP/KM Chaudary)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209894622&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Vaccination issues in Pakistan</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Polio has been eradicated in most of the world but Pakistan hasn&rsquo;t been able to get rid of the disease. The numbers were in decline until the Taliban issued a ban on polio vaccinations. Soon, fatal attacks ensued against vaccine and health workers. Every Last Child is a documentary about some of the people affected by Pakistan&rsquo;s polio crisis. The film&rsquo;s director, Tom Roberts, and infectious disease specialist and Pakistani-American physician, Aisha Sethi join us to discuss the film and the polio epidemic in Pakistan. Every Last Child premiers in Chicago on Friday at the Gene Siskel Film Center.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/physicians/aisha-sethi.html">Dr. Aisha Sethi</a> is an&nbsp;Assistant Professor of Medicine at the&nbsp;University of Chicago. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Tom Roberts is the director of <a href="https://zeitgeistfilms.com/film/everylastchild">Every Last Child</a>.</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209894205&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: Vanavevhu</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Vanavevhu helps support child headed households in Zimbabwe. The organization runs a candle making, beekeeping, and organic gardening program. The social enterprise projects help to provide food, healthcare, education and training to the families of child headed households. Recently, they were able to secure a small retail space in Bulowayo where they now sell their products. This year, they mark their 5th anniversary. Elizabeth Mhangami, founder and executive director of Vanavevhu stops by to give us an update on the work they&rsquo;re doing in Zimbabwe.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/Vanavevhu">Elizabeth Mhangami</a> is the founder and executive director of <a href="http://www.vanavevhu.org/">Vanavevhu</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 14:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-11/fighting-polio-pakistan-112177 EcoMyths: 'Am I too busy to care for Nature?' http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-am-i-too-busy-care-nature-112178 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/EcoMyths-Too Busy to Care.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-469d6eaa-e435-a786-2000-ec52a15fc8cb">With our busy lives, caring for the environment can seem overwhelming, but <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/">EcoMyths Alliance</a> says that being more green takes less time and effort than you may think. For this months<a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths"><em> EcoMyths</em></a> segment, we ask two experts to help bust the myth that you&rsquo;re &ldquo;too busy to care for Nature&rdquo;. Kevin Ogorzalek of the <a href="http://www.humansandnature.org/">Center for Humans and Nature</a> and John Barrett with the <a href="http://http://www.brushwoodcenter.org/index.html">Brushwood Center</a> at Ryerson Woods, will tell us how doing just a little, every day, makes a huge difference.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/200816449&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-469d6eaa-e437-56ea-31f9-018b3cc87cfd">Most of us do actively care for nature &ndash; we just don&#39;t necessarily recognize or celebrate it. We already show we care in obvious ways, such as by volunteering at nature centers or donating to a cause, but also in smaller daily activities, like going outside to read a book in the park, or choosing a microbead-free face wash at the store.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>It&#39;s a significant sign of caring that, for example:</strong></p><p dir="ltr">&middot; Caring as a leisure activity:<a href="http://www.nps.gov/aboutus/faqs.htm"> 292 million people visited our national parks in 2014</a>, while<a href="http://www.waza.org/en/site/zoos-aquariums"> 700 million people showed curiosity about wildlife by visiting global zoos and aquariums</a></p><p dir="ltr">&middot; Caring as consumers: A 2014 survey by<a href="http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/press-room/2014/global-consumers-are-willing-to-put-their-money-where-their-heart-is.html"> Nielsen</a> found that 55 percent of global online consumers across 60 countries say they are willing to pay more for products and services provided by companies that are committed to positive social and environmental impact</p><p dir="ltr">&middot; Caring at home: Eg: the growing trend to<a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/bqlywujwzz4sx05/NGASpecialReport-Garden-to-Table.pdf"> grow our own veggies</a> (35% of all households in America, or 42 million households, are growing food at home or in a community garden, up 17% in five years, according to National Gardening Association 2014 report); Meatless Mondays campaigns are now active in<a href="http://www.meatlessmonday.com/the-global-movement/"> 36 countries</a>; and Bicycle Friendly Communities, including Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Denver and Lexington, Ky., have more than doubled their bike commuter share since 2000, according to the<a href="http://bikeleague.org/content/bicycle-commuting-data"> League of American Bicyclists</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">The trick is overcoming busyness as usual: Being too busy for X is a sign of our times&mdash;but it only takes a second to think to yourself, &quot;if I do X or Y One Green Thing, that has an impact on the environment over time.&quot; That step-wise approach to green thinking can be tough to start, but once you get in the habit, it becomes routine.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>So What? </strong></p><p dir="ltr">Consciously caring about nature may seem insignificant, but the more we &nbsp;recognize our personal connection to nature, the more likely we are to make a positive difference.</p><p dir="ltr">&middot; Caring inspires action, conscious or not: Caring is a catalyst for behavior. For example, turning off the lights is an easy daily action that illustrates caring. It doesn&#39;t necessarily take time to integrate that with things you already do in daily life &ndash; it just takes making a conscious choice.</p><p dir="ltr">&middot; Conscious discussion can inspire movements. The transcendentalist poets in 19th century caused a ripple effect on the way our society relates to nature: Thoreau and Emerson talking about writings of nature, inspired John Muir, whose writing celebrated wilderness protection, the spaces themselves which inspired Ansel Adams, who in turn took photos that captured the country&#39;s imagination.</p><p dir="ltr">&middot; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Going further. Turning caring into greater action can mean varying degrees of sacrifice. But caring enough to make a short-term sacrifice, like paying a little more now for renewable energy to get to the point where it actually costs less than fossil fuels has potential for greater payback than meets the eye. Turning &quot;simple actions&quot; that we used to do by rote into more meaningful actions can be a source of pride.</p><p dir="ltr">People care for nature in ways big and small in their daily lives, often without thinking about it at all&hellip;The more we can celebrate how we do care, the more we can work those conscious changes into our lives to affect even greater change.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>One Green Thing</strong></p><p dir="ltr">This Earth Day, take a moment to think about ways in which your daily actions demonstrate care for the environment.</p></p> Tue, 14 Apr 2015 09:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-am-i-too-busy-care-nature-112178 Friends honor disabled brother's legacy http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/friends-honor-disabled-brothers-legacy-111510 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150206 Scott Nance Adam Ballard.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Scott Nance and Adam Ballard are part of a network of disability activists who frequently shut down intersections and grind business to a halt in order to draw attention to the needs of the disabled.</p><p>Nance and Ballard had volunteered separately to scope out the site of the group&rsquo;s next protest when they met.</p><p>Nance hadn&rsquo;t planned to be on the same bus as Ballard that day. But when the two friends interviewed at Access Living earlier this month for StoryCorps, they agreed it was a fitting place for their friendship to begin. Since then, the two have been arrested together for protesting for the rights of people living with disabilities.</p><p>Ballard uses a wheelchair and though he has been disabled his entire life, only sought out a community of other disabled people as an adult. That came after he had an accident that put him in a nursing home for several months.</p><p>Nance, on the other hand, was born with an audio disability, as were his brother and sister. But Nance&rsquo;s brother Devin also had physical, developmental, growth, learning and speech disabilities. For many years, Scott Nance acted as his brother&rsquo;s personal attendant. But then Devin died suddenly and tragically. &quot;That put me in a really dark place,&quot; Nance says. &quot;And I didn&#39;t crawl out of that hole until we did this march in front of the White House.&quot;</p><p>Nance was passing out flyers with other disability activists in Washington, DC, when he had a realization. A woman asked him why he was there and &quot;in that moment I had to challenge myself and think. And I gave her an honest answer. I&#39;m here for my brother.&rdquo;</p><p>&quot;He died at the age of 26,&quot; Nance says, of his brother Devin. &quot;And that&#39;s ridiculous that we live in a society where that still happens. He was someone who loved life. Loved playing catch. Loved going out in the community. He died alone and he never should have been in a position to die alone like that.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;I never met Devin,&rdquo; Ballard says. &ldquo;You entered my life after all that had gone down. But a couple years ago I think we were out drinking and it happened to be Devin&#39;s birthday so I offered a toast to your brother. And I said, &lsquo;Here&#39;s to your brother because if he&#39;s even halfway responsible for the man you are now then I&#39;m really sad that I didn&#39;t know him.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p></p> Fri, 06 Feb 2015 09:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/friends-honor-disabled-brothers-legacy-111510 Snowden in Russia, solidarity with Guantanamo and helping children in Ghana http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-18/snowden-russia-solidarity-guantanamo-and-helping-children-ghana-108100 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP398694333112.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We talk with a lawyer representing Guantanamo detainees about his decision to participate in the ongoing hunger strike for a week. Writer Julia Ioffe joins Worldview to talk about how the Russians have handled the Edward Snowden case. Two local teachers take their passion for education to Ghana.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101620302&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-snowden-in-russia-solidarity-with-guanta.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-snowden-in-russia-solidarity-with-guanta" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Snowden in Russia, solidarity with Guantanamo and helping children in Ghana " on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Thu, 18 Jul 2013 10:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-18/snowden-russia-solidarity-guantanamo-and-helping-children-ghana-108100 Youth Voices: Truth & Choices http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/youth-voices-truth-choices-107252 <p><p>In a youth forum/expo style event, different youth organizations from across the city came together with high school students and college students to share experiences and build community and solidarity. Featuring Chicago&#39;s youth-led organizations &amp; guest speaker&nbsp;<strong>Dr. Beth Richie</strong>,&nbsp;Director of the The Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago.</p><div><div>The Ellen Stone Belic&nbsp;Institute is pleased to co-present <em>Youth Voices: Truth &amp; Choices</em> in partnership with Black Youth Project; Columbia College Student Organizations: One Tribe; The F Word; Columbia Links; Chicago Freedom School; Crossroads Fund; Fearless Leading by the Youth; Young Chicago Authors and Young Women&#39;s Empowerment Project.<br />&nbsp;</div></div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ISWG-webstory_2.jpg" style="float: left;" title="" /></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><br />Recorded live Saturday, May 11, 2013 at Columbia College.</div></p> Sat, 11 May 2013 15:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/youth-voices-truth-choices-107252 Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/ballots-babies-and-banners-peace-107639 <p><p>At the turn of the twentieth century, American Jewish women were consistently and publicly engaged in all the major issues of their day, including suffrage, birth control, and peace. The activism of American Jewish women was grounded in their gender, religious, cultural, and ethnic identities. No history of these movements in the United States is complete without analyzing the impact of Jewish women&#39;s presence.</p><p>Dr. Melissa R. Klapper is the professor of history and director of women&#39;s and gender studies at Rowan University. Dr. Klapper&rsquo;s research has received awards from sources including the American Jewish Archives Center, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Harvard University, and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Her latest book is <em>Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: &nbsp;American Jewish Women&#39;s Activism, 1890-1940</em>.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/SI-webstory_5.jpg" title="" /></p><p>Recorded live Thursdsay, May 2, 2013 at the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies.</p></p> Thu, 02 May 2013 14:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/ballots-babies-and-banners-peace-107639 James Hansen drops the mic http://www.wbez.org/blogs/chris-bentley/2013-04/james-hansen-drops-mic-106662 <p><p>In response to years of what he views as dithering and ineffectual responses by government to the problem&nbsp;<a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=3&amp;cad=rja&amp;ved=0CEwQtwIwAg&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ted.com%2Ftalks%2Fjames_hansen_why_i_must_speak_out_about_climate_change.html&amp;ei=wpBsUei3F8e3ywHL3YG4DA&amp;usg=AFQjCNFi15f09P1jsTli6kg75uWTtnSHIg&amp;sig2=9PuPlAscM2f18233maz3pw&amp;bvm=bv.45175338,d.aWc">he helped identify</a>, climate scientist James Hansen cited a moral obligation in leaving his post at NASA to campaign more actively for political and legal efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions.</p><p><a href="http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/06/29/090629fa_fact_kolbert">Hansen</a> spent more than four decades forging the scientific basis for manmade climate change. <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1988/06/24/us/global-warming-has-begun-expert-tells-senate.html">In 1988 he was among the first to sound off</a> on global warming&rsquo;s hazards, and earlier this month he announced his next paper would be his last for NASA. (<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/02/science/james-e-hansen-retiring-from-nasa-to-fight-global-warming.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=0">He told <em>The New York Times</em></a> he would continue to publish after retirement and had not ruled out taking an academic appointment.)</p><div class="image-insert-image "><p>So-called &ldquo;doom-and-gloom&rdquo; projections of future climate change have been derided for their pessimism, or maybe more often for the unpleasantness of their messengers, to the point that addressing climate change on these terms makes one seem petulant or gauche&nbsp;&mdash; no one really wants to hear it. The national political conversation <a href="http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/23/the-issue-that-dare-not-speak-its-name/">completely buried talk</a> of the climate problem after national <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;cad=rja&amp;ved=0CD4QFjAB&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fblogs%2Fwonkblog%2Fwp%2F2012%2F10%2F25%2Fwas-u-s-climate-policy-better-off-without-cap-and-trade%2F&amp;ei=1pJsUefbKOGfyQGc9YCgBw&amp;usg=AFQjCNELqdfX3PGIgIg6XuV2rHzoCzws8g&amp;sig2=cqkwIUQlHv_4ZR5wLRnXXg&amp;bvm=bv.45175338,d.aWc">cap-and-trade legislation imploded in 2010</a>.</p><p><a href="http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/abs/ha06610d.html">Hansen&rsquo;s final paper</a>, currently in press, is scientifically rigorous, with seven pages of references, but it makes an impassioned plea for humanity to confront the consequences of climate change and fossil fuel consumption as an existential threat to society:</p><p style="margin-left:.5in;">&ldquo;Burning all fossil fuels, we conclude, would make much of the planet uninhabitable by humans, thus calling into question strategies that emphasize adaptation to climate change.&rdquo;</p><p>Such an assertion is not unexpected coming from Hansen, who has been criticized for his rhetorical flourishes, even by colleagues who respect his work. Earth won&rsquo;t turn into &ldquo;a Venus-like baked-crust CO<sub>2</sub> hothouse,&rdquo; (a claim he has made in the past), at least until the Sun&rsquo;s brightness increases over the next billion years and helps boil off the oceans. But, the paper reads, &ldquo;the planet could become uninhabitable long before that&rdquo; due to anthropogenic warming.</p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/tarsandsaction/6094275077/" target="_blank"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/james%20hansen.jpg" style="height: 457px; width: 305px; float: left;" title="James Hansen. (Milan Ilnyckyj via Flickr)" /></a>Scientifically, much of the debate fixates on nailing down the planet&rsquo;s &ldquo;climate sensitivity&rdquo; &mdash; how much warming actually occurs per unit of extra energy in the atmosphere. Looking at physical evidence of ancient climate change, the paper calibrates a computer model against times when greenhouse gas levels were comparable or higher than they are today.</div><p>The authors calculate an average warming of about 16 degrees Celsius if we burn available fossil fuels. Previous scientific publications have suggested temperature increases on that scale could practically wipe out grain production in many parts of the world, and severely diminish the ozone layer that protects us from cancer-causing ultraviolet radiation. Worse, it could get so hot in all but the world&rsquo;s very mountainous regions that anyone outside would overheat, suffering hyperthermia.</p><p>The paper &mdash;&nbsp;co-authored by Hansen&rsquo;s NASA and Columbia University colleagues Makiko Sato, Gary Russell and Pushker Kharecha &mdash; says current models exaggerate the slow response time of ice sheets, and assume the climate system&rsquo;s own inertia will forestall catastrophic changes longer than they actually will. Hansen&rsquo;s earlier research was instrumental in showing how, on a human timescale, oceans and massive ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica mask the planet&rsquo;s response to our feverish emissions of greenhouse gases. These systems have a long response time to human-made warming so, as Hansen writes, &ldquo;observed climate changes are only a partial response to the current climate forcing, with further response still &lsquo;in-the-pipeline.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Thus, his earlier dig at adaptation strategies. Broadly, there are two key categories of climate change action: mitigation and adaptation. Mitigation means pursuing efforts that limit or reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Adaptation assumes a certain amount of warming and asks what humans can do to adjust to their new environment in the future. If our current course of action even flirts with consequences like those suggested in this paper, Hansen and his co-authors suggest, adaptation will be impossible &mdash; a moot point.</p><p>By the scientific assessment of Hansen <em>et al.</em>, an extra 12 watts of energy per square meter in the atmosphere could have devastating effects. But could that much warming happen? Yes, they conclude: there are more than enough fossil fuels available to cause this warming (coal alone could do it, not to mention with the help of unconventional sources like oil sands and natural gas freed up by fracking).</p><p>&ldquo;It seems implausible that humanity will not alter its energy course as consequences of burning all fossil fuels become clearer,&rdquo; reads the paper&rsquo;s conclusion. &ldquo;Yet strong evidence about the dangers of human-made climate change have so far had little effect. Whether governments continue to be so foolhardy as to allow or encourage development of all fossil fuels may determine the fate of humanity.&rdquo;</p></p> Mon, 15 Apr 2013 21:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/chris-bentley/2013-04/james-hansen-drops-mic-106662