WBEZ | documentary http://www.wbez.org/tags/documentary Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The evolution of "the other" in French society and cinema http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-20/evolution-other-french-society-and-cinema-113878 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Bartosch%20Salmanski.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Bartosch Salmanski)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/233973993&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">French society, cinema, and &quot;the other&quot;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">To anyone familiar with the French film mini-genre known as &ldquo;banlieu cinema,&rdquo; the tragic terrorist attacks in Paris of a week ago would not have come as a surprise. For the past thirty years, French filmmakers have examined the growing powder keg of growing hopelessness in the housing projects of suburban France. We&rsquo;ll talk with James Austin, associate professor of French and associate faculty member in the Film Studies program at Connecticut College. He writes extensively about the banlieu film genre in books and articles like &#39;Destroying the Banlieu: Reconfigurations of Suburban Space in French Film&#39;.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6cd8b2db-269d-eaaa-46fc-81622277a31c">James Austin is an associate professor of French at <a href="http://twitter.com/conncollege">Connecticut College </a>and an associate faculty member in the Film Studies program. He frequently writes and lectures on Proust film,and French identity.</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/233974885&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The state of documentary film</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The documentary film has become a driving force of engagement and opinion. Films like &#39;An inconvenient truth, and Citizen Four are mirrors of public conscience about issues like the environment, health care, government spying, the treatment of dolphins and the economy. Talking with us about the current state of the documentary film genre is Jill Godmillow, one of the founders of independent American cinema, and a pioneer of documentary film.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6cd8b2db-26a0-db4b-1da3-28866d15bb6b">Jill Godmilow is one of the founders of independent American cinema. She is an Academy Award Nominee </span>and a professor emerita of <a href="http://twitter.com/@NotreDame">Notre Dame University</a>, she is currently at work on a book about the documentary film form.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/233975546&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Weekend Passport: The Landfill Harmonic</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll tell us about a band of street kids in Paraguay that takes garbage from landfills and recycles them into musical instruments.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong><em>&nbsp;</em></p><ul><li><em>Nari Sarimon is one of the founders of <a href="http://twitter.com/pasfardarts">Pasfarda Arts and Cultural Exchange</a>.</em></li><li><em>Mina Zikri is music director of <a href="http://twitter.com/@OistrakhSymph">Oistrakh Symphony of Chicago.</a> </em></li><li><em><a href="http://twitter.com/AlejandroARiera">Alejandro Riera</a> is from the Latino Cultural Center of Chicago.</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">&nbsp;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 20 Nov 2015 14:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-20/evolution-other-french-society-and-cinema-113878 Chicago music legend Syl Johnson’s life now a documentary film http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-10-23/chicago-music-legend-syl-johnson%E2%80%99s-life-now-documentary-film <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/syl johnson Rob Hatch-Miller.png" alt="" /><p><p>The music of Syl Johnson has been sampled by everyone from the hip hop group the Wu Tang Clan to the Beastie Boys to Public Enemy and Kanye. But long before that, Johnson was tearing up stages around Chicago with his gritty brand of soul music. He had lots of respect from fellow musicians, but he never reached the heights of fame like contemporaries Al Green or Marvin Gaye.</p><p>A new documentary is trying to change that. <a href="http://syljohnsonmovie.com/"><em>Syl Johnson: Any Way The Wind Blows</em></a>&nbsp;screens Friday as part of the Chicago International Film Festival. We talk with the film&rsquo;s director<a href="https://twitter.com/robhatchmiller?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor"> Rob Hatch-Miller</a>.</p></p> Fri, 23 Oct 2015 13:06:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-10-23/chicago-music-legend-syl-johnson%E2%80%99s-life-now-documentary-film Documentary shows Rhymefest reunite with his father http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-10-02/documentary-shows-rhymefest-reunite-his-father-113157 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/rhymefest father.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Che <a href="https://twitter.com/RHYMEFEST?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">&ldquo;Rhymefest&rdquo;</a> Smith has accomplished quite a bit while working with some of the biggest names in hip hop. He has a Grammy, a Golden Globe, and an Oscar. And, as an activist, he&rsquo;s worked hard to give back by getting involved with young people here in his hometown of Chicago.</p><p>But his latest project is deeply personal, involving a man that has been missing from Smith&rsquo;s life for 25 years: his dad. The new documentary<a href="https://tribecafilm.com/filmguide/in-my-fathers-house-2015"> &ldquo;In My Father&rsquo;s House&rdquo; </a>follows Smith as he moves his family into the South-side home his father grew up in, and his quest to fill emotional holes for himself, and others who didn&rsquo;t grow up with a father. Rhymefest joins us to talk about <a href="https://twitter.com/imfhfilm">the film</a> and the journey.</p></p> Fri, 02 Oct 2015 12:34:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-10-02/documentary-shows-rhymefest-reunite-his-father-113157 New documentary focuses on the Black Panthers http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-28/new-documentary-focuses-black-panthers-113083 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/bpp ap file.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In 1966, a group of six black men in Oakland decided it was time to fight back against ongoing police brutality in that city. That effort turned into one of the country&rsquo;s most notable African American civil rights groups of the late 1960s: The Black Panther Party.</p><p>Support for the party was widespread, with not only chapters around the country, but one in Algeria. The BPP was loathed by law enforcement, especially FBI Chief J. Edgar Hoover. He became obsessed with destroying the party and it seems to have worked to some degree.</p><p>The new documentary, <a href="http://theblackpanthers.com/home/"><em>The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution</em></a>, lays it all out with archival footage of the times and interviews with former party members. Producer <a href="http://www.laurensgrant.com/home.html">Laurens Grant</a> joins us to talk about what went into the making of the film.&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 28 Sep 2015 10:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-28/new-documentary-focuses-black-panthers-113083 Long-forgotten landscape architect helped save the Indiana Dunes http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/long-forgotten-landscape-architect-helped-save-indiana-dunes-110378 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jens%20Jensen%201.jpg" style="float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="Danish-born Jens Jensen helped develop Chicago’s park system. He’s also credited with helping preserve much of the Indiana Dunes. (Photo provided by Carey Lundin)" />As the temperature rises, thousands will be flocking to the <a href="http://www.indianadunes.com/" target="_blank">Indiana Dunes</a> this summer. But if it weren&rsquo;t for a little-known landscape architect, the miles of beaches along southern Lake Michigan might not exist today.</p><p>Jens Jensen first became known for his pioneering work on Chicago&rsquo;s park system a century ago. The new documentary <a href="http://www.jensjensenthelivinggreen.org/" target="_blank"><em>Jens Jensen, the Living Green</em></a> also shows his role in saving the Indiana Dunes from industrial destruction.&nbsp;</p><p>WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente recently sat down with the film&rsquo;s director Carey Lundin. She began by talking about how the Danish-born Jensen first ended up in Chicago.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jens Jensen 2.jpg" style="margin-top: 5px; margin-bottom: 5px; height: 496px; width: 620px;" title="Carey Lundin (middle) on location shooting the documentary Jens Jensen The Living Green. (Photo provided by Carey Lundin)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Carey Lundin (middle) on location shooting the documentary Jens Jensen The Living Green. (Photo provided by Carey Lundin)</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 19 Jun 2014 15:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/long-forgotten-landscape-architect-helped-save-indiana-dunes-110378 The movie that brought Naperville face to face with its teens' drug use http://www.wbez.org/news/movie-brought-naperville-face-face-its-teens-drug-use-109332 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeff%20Cagle.1_0.jpg" title="Kelly McCutcheon and Jack Kapson (Jeff Cagle)" /></div></div><p>During the 2011-2012 school year, three students from one public high school in west suburban Naperville died from drugs. Kelly McCutcheon was a senior at Neuqua Valley High School at the time, and she started asking her classmates questions about their drug use. The project turned into a documentary that stunned the well-to-do, family-focused community.</p><p>Kelly had enlisted a high school junior, Jack Kapson, &nbsp;to help with sound recording, and together they videotaped more than 20 students talking about their experiences using heroin and other drugs.</p><p>Their project was filmed starkly and informally in backyards and bedrooms and cars. The filmmakers kept the footage away from parents, teachers and police. Kelly and Jack declined to be part of this story, but they gave me permission to use any part of their movie and quote from students they interviewed.</p><p><strong>Library agrees to host Naperville&rsquo;s first look&nbsp;</strong></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/95L 400.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Naperville's 95th Street Library hosted the screening (Bill Healy)" /></div><p>Kelly and Jack asked Naperville&rsquo;s 95th Street Public Library to host the first screening of the film, which they called, &ldquo;Neuqua on Drugs.&quot;</p><p>John Spears directed all of Naperville&rsquo;s public libraries at the time. &ldquo;The filmmakers were working on it up till the very end,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;And that was one thing we were nervous about, because we hadn&rsquo;t seen it either. Given all the potential legal ramifications of showing this, we were really putting a lot of trust in two high school students.&rdquo;</p><p>Library officials agreed to two showings on Wednesday evening, May 30, 2012. Advertising went out, and soon after, irate parents started calling..</p><p>Spears, the library director, remembers one phone call in particular. He received it at his desk the day before the scheduled screening. It was a parent on the other end, telling Spears, &ldquo;You cannot show this movie. It&rsquo;s going to be the destruction of my&hellip;. it&rsquo;s just&hellip;. We will sue.&rdquo;</p><p>The library decided to go forward anyway.</p><p><strong>The screening</strong></p><p>The evening of the first screening, adults and teenagers filed into the library auditorium and people waited outside for the second showing.</p><p>&ldquo;There were many, many glitches that night,&rdquo; said Denise Crosby, a longtime columnist with the Sun-Times suburban papers, including the Naperville Sun. &ldquo;There were people gathered outside waiting for the next session and there were people inside for this session and there was a long delay. But [the audience was] there for the long haul&hellip;. They wanted to see it.&rdquo;</p><p>Among the hundreds of people who came to the library that night were the principal from Neuqua Valley High School, a counselor from a nearby middle school, and a reporter from the local television station. Managers from Naperville&rsquo;s other libraries came in to deal with the overflow crowd.</p><p>The young filmmakers had altered the &nbsp;voices of some speakers they videotaped, &nbsp;and a few kids in the film tried to mask their faces. But most participants were fully visible. And, according to accounts from people who were there, &nbsp;many of the participants were seated in the audience.</p><p>&ldquo;When it finally did get started,&rdquo; Denise Crosby said, &ldquo;there wasn&rsquo;t one person that was not glued to that documentary. There wasn&rsquo;t sound being made at all.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeff Cagle.5_0.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Jack Kapson waits for video to render during an hour-long delay before the first screening (Jeff Cagle)" /></div></div></div><p><strong>The kind of thing parents heard</strong></p><p>&ldquo;The first time I tried heroin... I&rsquo;d probably say sometime during my sophomore year.&rdquo;</p><div>&ldquo;They were like snorting it and I snorted like some Adderall and they were like if you can snort Adderall you can snort this. It&rsquo;s basically like the same thing&hellip;. You&rsquo;re trying to be like happy and just like not worry about anything but you are like stressing about all these little things, and when you get high that just goes away so you can just like chill.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s gives you a really strange comfortable feeling. A feeling that everything around you is okay. It&rsquo;s kind of like a false sense of security.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Denise Crosby, the newspaper columnist, &nbsp;says that for the two kids who made the film, &nbsp;&ldquo;This really was them screaming at the community: Look. Stop. Putting your head in the sand.&rdquo;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeff Cagle.4_0.jpg" style="float: right;" title="(Jeff Cagle)" /></div></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>One mother&rsquo;s experience</strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>For another woman in the audience that night, the film was particularly painful.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Amy Miller&rsquo;s daughter Megan had died four months earlier from heroin. Megan was eighteen and a student at Neuqua when she died. The filmmakers had contacted Amy Miller beforehand to let her know that some of their interviews included stories about Megan.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>And still, Miller says she wasn&rsquo;t prepared for what happened when a girl in the film talked about going to see &ldquo;Alice in Wonderland:&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" jeff="" neuqua="" on="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/2_2_0.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Amy Miller watches the first showing of 'Neuqua on Drugs'." /></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Megan was grounded at the time &ndash; but she convinced her mom to let us go if her mom came too. And so her mom sat on the other side of the movie theater and we were just tripping balls. Like we were sweating so bad and Megan had drawn a giant heart over her eye with eyeliner &lsquo;cause she was the Queen of Hearts and she drew stripes on my face because she was the Cheshire Cat.&rdquo;</div><div>&ldquo;I had no idea,&rdquo; Amy Miller told me when I talked with her recently. &nbsp;&ldquo;And here they were rows behind me in the theater and they took acid to watch the movie. And this is the first I&rsquo;m hearing about this, sitting in the library among hundreds of people, and the girl was in the row behind me and she leaned forward and apologized to me&hellip;. And that was pretty tough, you know? That was really hard. I was angry. I was embarrassed. I was shocked. It was like my daughter, I didn&rsquo;t know her.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Library head John Spears said that feeling of disconnect was common among adults the evening of the screening, and for a long time. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the one thing &nbsp;I heard over and over and over from everyone is: How could this have been happening and we didn&rsquo;t even know it?&rdquo; Underneath their confusion, he says, was shock. There was a sentiment among some people in Naperville that &ldquo;these kinds of things don&rsquo;t happen here.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I spoke to dozens of people in Naperville and I asked everyone, &ldquo;Did this harsh film make a difference?&rdquo;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Dvdsss.jpg" style="float: right;" title="The shelf life of the documentary remains to be seen (Bill Healy)" /></div></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The high school principal pointed to a student-led discussion program, which he says was being created at the same time students were making the documentary. Neuqua&rsquo;s also part of an innovative pilot program specific to heroin--it&rsquo;s a project of &nbsp;the Robert Crown Center for Health Education. That program is in two middle schools that feed into Neuqua, too.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>A parent group recently got money from the city to create parent conversation circles.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Naperville police track where users live and sometimes do surveillance on kids buying drugs on Chicago&rsquo;s West Side.</div><div>Early on in my reporting, Jack Kapson - the young filmmaker who helped create &ldquo;Neuqua on Drugs&rdquo; - said heroin was still a problem in Naperville, though he thought it had gone back underground since the film was released.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In 2013 so far, &nbsp;Naperville has had three confirmed heroin deaths&mdash;down from six in 2011. Police stress, however, that the number of overdoses means kids are still using as much as they did in recent years.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Columnist Denise Crosby says it&rsquo;s a mistake to think &ldquo;Neuqua on Drugs&rdquo; was one high school&rsquo;s story, or even Naperville&rsquo;s story. &ldquo;People started looking at this as &ldquo;Oh, this is Neuqua Valley on drugs. So that&rsquo;s Neuqua&rsquo;s problem.&rdquo; And that&rsquo;s just simply &ndash; again I cannot reiterate that enough &ndash; that is simply not the case. Yeah, Neuqua was the epicenter for this. But this issue is in all of our high schools. It&rsquo;s everywhere. In all of our communities.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The film, she says, should have been titled, &ldquo;Your High School on Drugs.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Bill Healy is an independent producer. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/chicagoan">@chicagoan</a> and on <a href="http://billhealymedia.com">his website</a>.</em></div></p> Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:33:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/movie-brought-naperville-face-face-its-teens-drug-use-109332 Set in Chicago, early 1960s doc seeks a fairer urban America http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-10/set-chicago-early-1960s-doc-seeks-fairer-urban-america-108979 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/lee_train.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Here is a glimpse of Chicago from 1961, courtesy of <em>The City of Necessity</em>, a film co-produced more than 50 years ago by a contingent of local religious organizations.</p><p>The 22-minute film was a bid to show the benefits of living in cities, using Chicago as an example. There are shots of Chicago&#39;s early midcentury skyline, a parade down State Street (Streets and San&#39;s space-age float at the 5:53 mark is worthy of pausing and replaying) and good footage of old buildings being demolished.</p><p>But the documentary&#39;s framers are also pushing for a more humane and inclusive city.</p><p>&quot;The promise of the city is not always fulfilled,&quot; narrator George Ralph intones. &quot;Often one becomes a statistic in an unemployment office.&quot;</p><p>The cameras venture out into white, black and Latino neighborhoods--and the level of poverty and dilapidation is alarming by today&#39;s standards. Race and class are noted in the documentary.</p><p>&quot;We have no ghetto, and we have no Negro ghetto,&quot; Mayor Richard J. Daley is heard saying.</p><p>Then the film provides footage to the contrary.</p><p>We see Chicago nightlife at 16:30. The montage of peep shows, tattoo parlors and the &quot;Girls Girls Girls&quot; sign set to a burlesque-grade rock and roll score is the best part of the documentary.&nbsp;</p><p>After its release,<em> the City of Necessity</em> won a Golden Gate award at the San Francisco Film Festival. A copy of the film is the U.S.. National Archives.</p></p> Tue, 22 Oct 2013 05:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-10/set-chicago-early-1960s-doc-seeks-fairer-urban-america-108979 Morning Shift: Navy Pier's future facelift has to strike balance http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-13/morning-shift-navy-piers-future-facelift-has-strike <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Navy Pier - Flickr - Bernt Rostad.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>With Navy Pier headed toward a re-design in the next couple years, can the design continue to attract so many tourists? And, Matteson, Illinois, officials are closing Lincoln Mall. What does this imply about the future economy of the south suburbs?&nbsp;</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-42.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-42" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Navy Pier's future facelift has to strike balance" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Tue, 13 Aug 2013 08:29:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-13/morning-shift-navy-piers-future-facelift-has-strike Morning Shift: Patronage, films and end-of-life care http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-19/morning-shift-patronage-films-and-end-life-care <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Elder Care-Flickr-Adams County Manor.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Today we&#39;ll find out if patronage is alive and well in Chicago, then immerse ourselves in the sound of Third Coast&#39;s ShortDocs festival. And we speak with experts about what the best way to deal with a loved one&#39;s death is.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-26.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-26" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Patronage, films and Lil B " on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Fri, 19 Jul 2013 08:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-19/morning-shift-patronage-films-and-end-life-care If you only had months to live, how would you spend them? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-06/if-you-only-had-months-live-how-would-you-spend-them-107666 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/%28Star%20Tribune%3AMike%20Rominski%29.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px; " title="Zach Sobiech, whose goodbye song 'Clouds' touched millions, died on May 20 at age 18. (Star Tribune/Mike Rominiski)" /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">On May 20, 2013, Zach Sobiech died after a four-year battle with terminal osteosarcoma. While his name might not sound familiar, you may have heard his song <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDC97j6lfyc" target="_blank">&quot;Clouds&quot;</a>&nbsp;after it went viral on YouTube earlier this year, or watched this&nbsp;<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NjKgV65fpo" target="_blank">video</a> (over 9 million views to date) on the day of his passing.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">After being told that he only had months to live, 18-year-old Zobiech decided to share his story with the world. First came the hit song, then a mini-documentary produced by none other than&nbsp;<em>The Office</em> star Rainn Wilson.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/soulpancake" target="_blank">SoulPancake</a>, a YouTube channel created by Wilson and featuring a revolving lineup of memorable characters (from Kid President to The Impression Guys), caught wind of &quot;Clouds&quot; and later teamed up with Sobiech for the groundbreaking online reality series<a href="http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzvRx_johoA8ITQgxBpeJTaDUhhIB7bfX" target="_blank"> &quot;My Last Days.&quot;</a></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Directed by filmmaker-actor Justin Baldoni, the 22-minute doc follows Sobiech and his family during his final months: a touching tribute to the Minnesota teen that manages to be charming, heartbreaking, inspiring and uplifting at the same time.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Wilson also recruited a long list of celebrity friends (including Bryan Cranston, Jenna Fischer and Jason Mraz) to lip-synch a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zxXAtmmLLc" target="_blank">music video</a> to &quot;Clouds,&quot; which Sobiech got to see just weeks before his death.</div><blockquote><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;I want to be remembered as the kid who went down fighting, and didn&#39;t really lose,&quot; said Zobiech, when asked what kind of legacy he would like to leave behind, &quot;I want everyone to know, you don&#39;t have to find out you&#39;re dying to start living.&quot;</div></blockquote><div class="image-insert-image ">The delicate subject matter of a docuseries like &quot;My Last Days&quot; may not be the easiest to watch, but perhaps that is exactly why we should. Sobiech lived more in 18 years than most people do in a liftetime: a powerful reminder for all of us to be thankful for the little things and embrace every day as if it were our last.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;It&#39;s really simple, actually,&quot; Sobiech said about trying to make the world a better place. &quot;Just make people happy.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Luckily for everyone who got the chance to know him, either in person or through his documentary, he succeeded in doing just that.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">What do you think of this phenomenon? Would you film your last days to inspire others?&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. Follow her on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/leahkristinepickett" target="_blank">Facebook</a>,<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank"> Twitter </a>or <a href="http://hermionehall.tumblr.com" target="_blank">Tumblr</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Thu, 13 Jun 2013 09:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-06/if-you-only-had-months-live-how-would-you-spend-them-107666