WBEZ | Kate Sackman http://www.wbez.org/tags/kate-sackman Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en EcoMyths: Do wildlife need our help in winter? http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-do-wildlife-need-our-help-winter-109743 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/EcoMyths Wildlife winter.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>With the extra-frigid winter we&#39;ve slogged through, it boggles my mind that <em>any</em> wildlife can survive so many sub-zero days outdoors. It has been hard enough for humans. So at EcoMyths we wondered: how do animals survive this challenge within our vast urban landscape? For our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths">regular segment</a> on <em>Worldview</em>, Jerome McDonnell and I explored this topic with wildlife expert Bill Ziegler, Senior Vice President of Collections and Animal Programs at the <a href="http://www.czs.org/CZS/Brookfield/Zoo-Home.aspx">Brookfield Zoo</a>.</p><p><strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/134285676&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe>Can Wild Animals Be Homeless?</strong></p><p>Bill explained that &quot;many of our native animals are, in fact, homeless because their habitats have been disappeared or dwindled, not just in Illinois, but also further afield.&nbsp; In a well-intentioned effort to beautify our cities and neighborhoods, we have gradually almost completely replaced native habitats that once provided both food and shelter for thousands of species of birds, animals, and insects.&quot;</p><p>Bill continues, &quot;Based on positive motivations, we have planted beautiful exotic flowers, bushes, and trees from other parts of the world. We have cleared oak forests and drained wetlands to build safe, dry homes. And we have replaced our messy native tall grass prairies with pristine lawns so that our kids can play soccer and baseball in the yard.&quot;</p><p><strong>Some Fixes Are As Simple as Falling Off A Log</strong></p><p>Whether inadvertent or not, in many places only small pockets of habitat remain for native creatures such as red fox, white tailed deer, opossum, frogs, salamanders, and songbirds. But even with forest preserves and parks, Bill encouraged us to take steps to help wildlife find food and shelter in residential areas. In our own yards and parks, it can be as simple as keeping a pile of leaves or old hollow logs in the yard over the winter to provide homes for small animals.</p><p>In the summer we can prepare friendly year-round habitat by planting groupings of bushes to provide &ldquo;micro-habitat&rdquo; sanctuaries with seeds and berries for food.</p><p>Bill also emphasized the importance of providing connections between wild spaces. In some parts of Illinois we are fortunate to have many natural greenways due to the efforts of the County Forest Preserves and other conservation organizations. Preserving corridors and providing new connections between separate open areas are essential to the health of the animals, so that they can move easily from place to place to find additional food, shelter, and breeding grounds.</p><p><strong>Where Palm Trees Sway</strong></p><p>Not only did Bill enlighten us on wildlife habitat in Illinois, we also discussed the recovery of panther populations in Florida and vast habitat losses and restoration efforts in Southeast Asia. Development in Florida has drastically reduced the cypress swamps and pinelands which the panther inhabits. Now living in only 5% of its former habitat, the panther is more likely to venture out into human territory. Efforts are underway to expand the Florida Panther habitat so they can live and breed in the large interconnected spaces they need. In much of Southeast Asia, such as Sumatra and Borneo, where rainforests are being clear-cut to make way for profitable palm oil plantations, thousands of plant and animal species have been displaced.Much of the land has become a monoculture &ndash; home to a single species of plant. Orangutans and tigers are being driven out, as are the indigenous people who depend on these forests. In spite of agreements to make these plantations more sustainable, habitats continues to be lost and damaged.</p><p><strong>Healthy Wildlife Habitat is Healthier for Humans Too</strong></p><p>Although the protection of any particular single species may seem unimportant, it turns out that the restoration of native habitats is actually important to the human species as well. Why? Because native plantings absorb rainwater to prevent flooding and refill our groundwater wells; forests absorb excess CO2 from the atmosphere moderating the rate of global warming; native plants attract and support the insects that depend on them; the native insects support the diets of the birds and mammals which in turn help the local plants to thrive by pollinating and spreading their seeds. There is no need to take extreme measures, like throwing out all our exotic plants and flowers from other areas of the world. These help make the landscape beautiful. But non-natives can also co-exist with healthy populations of native plants. Including native plants as part of your landscape can complement your colorful garden and also provide important habitat for local creatures. ;</p><p><strong>One Green Thing You Can Do: <u>Incorporate Native Plants</u></strong></p><p>Bill recommended consulting your local nurseries for advice on incorporating native plants into your yard. Not only will you be helping the wildlife, but your plants will be easier to care for!</p><p>Listen to today&rsquo;s EcoMyths Worldview podcast (link this) to hear the whole interview on the value of snow! To learn more about this myth, listen to the podcast of today&rsquo;s show or go to the <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/">EcoMyths Alliance website</a> to read further about the how we can help wildlife in winter and all year long.</p></p> Tue, 11 Feb 2014 09:48:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-do-wildlife-need-our-help-winter-109743 EcoMyths: Effect of Global Warming on freshwater fish http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-effect-global-warming-freshwater-fish-109240 <p><p><strong><u>Let&rsquo;s Get Reel: Warmer Lakes and Streams Devastate Freshwater Fish </u></strong></p><p>If you had wonderful, lazy days fishing at the lake with your grandpa, you would bait the hook, reel in a couple of good sized perch, and bring them back for Grandma to cook.&nbsp; Those days are under threat now, and not just because of our obsession with Twitter and <em>Angry Birds Star Wars</em>.</p><p>We&rsquo;ve all heard about many changes due to of global warming like melting glaciers and unstable, unpredictable weather. But did you know it also affects freshwater fish? Today, Jerome and I talked with <a href="http://www.nwf.org/">National Wildlife Federation</a> spokesperson Frank Szollosi, M.S. to find out why some of our favorite fish species are declining or under threat.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/121871672" width="100%"></iframe>Recreational fishing is a big industry with $26 billion spent by consumers every year, according to a newly released <a href="http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/Reports/Archive/2013/09-04-13-Freshwater-Fish-Climate-Change-Report.aspx">study on freshwater fish by the National Wildlife Federation</a>. Climate change is warming water to the point that cold-water fish species are not only driven north, but are dying. Frank told us that fish species are grouped into three different types of species: cold water, cool water, and warm water fish. Cold water fish become very vulnerable with increasing temperatures, making fish more susceptible to &ldquo;pollution, parasites, and disease&rdquo; according to the study. Species that are unable to migrate to colder, more hospitable waters often fail to reproduce in their native habitat and the populations die out.</p><p>Warmer air temperatures cause increased water temperatures, Frank says. In addition, warm air causes greater evaporation and can lower water levels, resulting in warmer water. Pollution also compounds the impact of warming waters. In the Great Lakes, the western basin of Lake Erie has a significant problem with enormous algae blooms that deplete oxygen from the water, making the water uninhabitable for fish.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="182" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ecomyths fish.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Data from this test is posted and available to Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network, an international group that assesses the impact of climate change and other conditions on freshwater lakes. These scientists maintain that as summer wears on and the water heats up, nitrogen and phosphorous from waste emptying into the lake will increase the growth of algae, turning Lake Lillinonah in Bridgewater, CT into a thick, smelly and slimy green soup. (AP Photo/Lisa Poole)" width="275" /></div><p>Climate Change will accelerate unless we cut our carbon footprints. Frank reminded us that we can make small daily choices that add up. Easy energy efficient changes at home can make a difference, like lowering the thermostat a few degrees in the winter and switching out some of your light bulbs for fluorescents or LEDs. It may not seem like much, but when thousands of us cut our energy usage, we cut down global-warming producing carbon into the atmosphere. Frank gave us hope, but also made it clear that we have to play our part to ensure we don&rsquo;t lose precious fish species in the wild.</p><p>Learn more about this myth! Listen to the podcast of today&rsquo;s show or go to the <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/">EcoMyths Alliance website</a> to learn more about global warming impacts on freshwater fish.</p></p> Mon, 25 Nov 2013 10:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-effect-global-warming-freshwater-fish-109240 EcoMyths: Rinsing before recycling? http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-rinsing-recycling-109244 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ecomyths recycling.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><strong><u>To Rinse or Not To Rinse: A Recycling Mystery Solved</u></strong></p><p>At EcoMyths, people ask us all the time about recycling. One of the most frequently asked questions is &ldquo;Do you need to rinse all containers before tossing them into the recycling bin?&rdquo; That&rsquo;s a great question and have often wondered that ourselves. To explore this issue on our <strong>EcoMyths</strong> segment on <em>Worldview</em>, Jerome McDonnell and I talked with engineering professor and researcher <a href="http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/directory/profiles/Eric-Masanet.html">Eric Masanet, PhD</a>, of Northwestern University.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/117664526" width="100%"></iframe>The good news is that more than half of Americans, 58%, say they recycle on a regular basis. Of the 4.5 lbs. of waste that we produce on average per person, each day, we recycle about one-third of it, according to the EPA. Not too shabby, considering how much of all that recycling reduces the amount of garbage going into landfills.</p><p>Most recycling programs in the U.S. co-mingle glass, plastic, aluminum and other recyclables into one bin. Then they are processed together in a single stream at the recycling plant. So Eric advises that most containers be emptied and rinsed out before you toss them into the bin. Yogurt still in the container? Rinse it first. Peanut butter still in the jar? Scoop out what is left, then rinse, before recycling. Why so serious? Because according to Waste Management, the company that collects half of all the curbside recycling in the U.S., a single dirty container can contaminate thousands of pounds of recyclables.</p><p><strong><u>Water you talkin&rsquo; about?</u></strong></p><p>We asked Eric if the extra water used to rinse out the containers would negate the environmental benefits of the recycling itself. He said that even with the water used both at home and at the recycling plant, there are significant water savings compared to what would be used to manufacture new containers from scratch.</p><p>Not only that, the environmental benefits of recycling go well beyond water savings, Eric says. Over the life of a product there are also significant energy savings. For instance, if your peanut butter container is recycled into plastic lumber, energy is saved because the upfront impact of extracting the oil or gas used to manufacture the plastic has been eliminated. In addition, no live trees need to be harvested to create the artificial lumber.</p><p>As a professor of materials and manufacturing that focuses on product life-cycle systems, Eric has much experience researching the economic and resource impacts that occur in manufactured products. A <em>life cycle analysis </em>starts from the time a raw material is mined, drilled, or harvested to the manufacturing and use of the product and until it is disposed of or recycled. Eric points out that when we recycle and re-purpose materials &ldquo;we cut the loop short&rdquo; of the lifecycle of a product, creating significant environmental benefits, not to mention the money that is saved.</p><p>That said, the rules regarding whether you need to rinse out your containers actually vary from city to city. It depends on who collects your recyclables and the capabilities of the facility where those items are recycled. Eric advised us to check on the regulations that apply to your city or town by going to <a href="http://www.Earth911.com">www.Earth911.com</a>.</p><p>I think that not only is Eric incredibly smart, but he makes it really easy to understand the environmental and economic impact of recycling.</p><p>To learn more about this myth, listen to the podcast of today&rsquo;s show or go to the <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/">EcoMyths Alliance website</a> to read more about <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/2013/10/myth-you-must-rinse-all-containers-before-recycling-them/">how to rinse your recyclables. </a></p></p> Tue, 29 Oct 2013 09:02:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-rinsing-recycling-109244 EcoMyths: Is Solar Power Practical Yet for Homeowners? http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-solar-power-practical-yet-homeowners-108224 <p><p>My home faces south with tons of windows, so we get really warm on a typical sunny day. Does that mean I am harnessing solar power? If I wanted to install solar panels, would it save me energy and money? On <em>Worldview</em> today, host Jerome McDonnell and I explored these very questions with Dick Co, managing director of the <a href="http://www.solar-fuels.org/management-team--staff.html" title="Find others who have worked at this company">Solar Fuels Institute</a> and environmental chemistry professor at <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/search?search=&amp;company=Argonne-Northwestern+Solar+Energy+Research+%28ANSER%29+Center&amp;sortCriteria=R&amp;keepFacets=true&amp;trk=prof-0-ovw-curr_pos" title="Find others who have worked at this company">Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center</a>.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F103290717" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Dick walked us through the basics of solar power for homeowners as well as some truly &ldquo;cool&rdquo; solar-harnessing technology to make fuel (yes, liquid fuel) for practical use in the near future. But first, he helped us explore the virtues of solar. Of course, sunlight is free, in the sense that it does not have to be mined, and it&rsquo;s abundant. Dick said each year we receive a whopping 120,000 terawatts of energy from the sun, but the world&rsquo;s population uses only 16 terawatts annually. That&rsquo;s a pretty good ratio. Also, once installed, there is no harmful waste or byproduct from producing solar power. In addition, studies show that going solar may increase your home value.</p><p>Dick confirmed that my house benefits from <a href="http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/passive-solar-home-design">passive solar home design</a>, which can be done a lot more effectively if the home is intentionally designed to absorb sunlight during the day and release the heat at night. Of course, you can install solar panels on your roof, known as <a href="http://www.eere.energy.gov/basics/renewable_energy/photovoltaics.html">solar photovoltaic (PV) cells</a>. They can be installed on a tracking device that follows the sun. Finally, there is <a href="http://www.doe.gov/energysaver/articles/active-solar-heating">active solar heating</a>. This process uses a solar collector to heat water or air for later use.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="263" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Solar.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Gaiam has solarized more homes throughout the U.S. than any other company; 60,000 to date. (PRNewsFoto/Gaiam, inc.)" width="236" /></div><p>We also explored the costs to homeowners and the various state subsidies that make converting to solar affordable. Some people produce so much solar power that they actually get a rebate from their local utility for returning energy to the power grid!</p><p>To read more about this myth, listen to the podcast of today&rsquo;s show, or go to the <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/">EcoMyths Alliance</a> website to read more about the costs and benefits of home solar production.</p></p> Tue, 30 Jul 2013 10:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-solar-power-practical-yet-homeowners-108224 EcoMyths: Emerald Ash Borer destroys millions of trees in Chicago and US http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-emerald-ash-borer-destroys-millions-trees-chicago-and-us-106872 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F90022516" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong>Slash and burn: Why so many trees are cut down in the Chicago area.</strong></p><p>Say hello to a small unwelcome guest: the emerald ash borer.</p><p>This invasive wood boring beetle has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the US and millions more to come. Cutting down these trees is just one strategy to get rid of the pest and save the remaining ash forest, but as we learned here at <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/">EcoMyths Alliance</a>, it&rsquo;s not enough. For the next segment of our <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths">EcoMyths</a></em> series, Kate Sackman and Jerome McDonnell talk with Peter Gordon, city forester for Lake Forest, and David Horvath from <a href="http://www.thecareoftrees.com/">The Care of Trees</a> - both are ISA Certified Arborists.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP090611054785_1.jpg" style="float: left; width: 264px; height: 158px;" title="Emerald ash borer. Actual size of adult ranges from 3/8 to 5/8 inches. The invasive beetle has destroyed tens of millions of ash trees over the past decade. (AP Photo/Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources, File)" /></div><p>Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an exotic insect native to China and eastern Asia. The bug hopped a ride to the U.S. in cheap wood packing material more than ten years ago. First detected in Michigan in 2002, today EAB infestation is a problem in 19 states. Most recently in <a href="http://myemail.constantcontact.com/For-Immediate-Release--Save-Your-Ash-Trees---Learn-to-ID-EAB--.html?soid=1109594220206&amp;aid=hPdylZ4kTmU">New Hampshire</a>, the state&rsquo;s department of agriculture confirmed detection on April 5<sup>th</sup>.</p><p>Aside from feeding on leaves, the adult beetles do little harm. Ruin occurs when in larva stage, EAB</p><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p>chew through trees and damage its vascular system &ndash; the tissue right under the tree bark that&rsquo;s responsible for transporting water and nutrients from the roots to the top leaves and branches.</p><p>Scientists say its continued spread across the country is most likely due to the sale of firewood from <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/emerald_ash_b/quarantine.shtml">quarantined</a> areas across state lines. Even worse: Stress from climate change, namely drought, makes the trees more vulnerable to EAB. North American ash trees have no natural resistance to this foreign guest.</p><p>Arborists explain with such a large food source for the pests, the problem is only expected to grow. According to one of the nation&rsquo;s largest tree care companies, The Care of Trees, Ash trees comprise 10 percent to 40 percent of local urban forests. Many ash trees were planted during the recent housing boom &ndash; creating a monoculture that makes them easy targets for EAB -- and they are natural reproducers.</p><p>So what to do? Initially, many communities took a wait and see approach, says Peter Gordon, city forester for Lake Forest, IL -- where 19 percent of the tree inventory is ash. EAB came to attention during the economic downturn, Gordon notes, and budget-strained municipalities had few resources for tree treatment.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="181" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP1110260175558_1.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Forester Jeff Wiegert, of the NY State Department of Environmental Conservation, points out markings left from emerald ash borer larvae on an ash tree. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)" width="240" /></div><p>&ldquo;The strategy was to see how states, count[ies] and towns handled EAB where it was first discovered,&rdquo; he adds.&nbsp; &ldquo;But now we don&rsquo;t have as many options.&rdquo;</p><p>Indeed EAB is an epidemic and can&rsquo;t be ignored, says Fredric Miller, a professor of horticulture at Joliet Junior College and a research associate with the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Ill.</p><p>&ldquo;If you choose not to do any treatment, you will be overrun,&rdquo; Miller says. &ldquo;What communities have to come to grips with is that either you are going to manage this on your schedule, or the insect will dictate the schedule.&rdquo; And that means, in part, cutting down lots of trees in our neighborhoods in an effort to stop or slow the spread of EAB.</p><p>Arborists explain the alternative for a badly infested tree &ndash; allowing it to die from EAB damage and then cutting it down &ndash; is worse, because it does nothing to prevent the beetle from paying a house visit to a neighboring tree. Also, Miller points out, dead ash trees are a dangerous liability and must be removed &ndash; they&rsquo;re structurally weak and can fall during wind or ice storms. Many of these trees line walkways and paths in neighborhoods and forest preserves.</p><p>But some trees can, and should, be saved with proper insecticide treatment, explains David Horvath, an arborist in suburban Chicago with The Care of Trees.</p><p>Horvath says that homeowners and municipalities are now charged with identifying &ldquo;valuable&rdquo; trees &ndash; generally larger (greater than 12 inches in diameter) that provide environmental benefits such as shade to decrease energy demand, a deep root system that mitigates storm water damage or simply beauty to the property.</p><p>Overall, an integrated approach &ndash; treatment, prevention and some targeted tree removal &ndash; is the best way to put the brakes on EAB, and avoid destroying urban forest, say Horvath and the other scientists EcoMyths interviewed.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP03041601077_0.jpg" style="width: 244px; height: 159px; float: left;" title="Crews cut down trees infected with the Emerald Ash Borer, north of Whitehouse, Ohio. (AP Photo/J.D. Pooley, File)" /></div><p>According to a 2011 article in the <a href="http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/jrnl/2011/nrs_2011_kovacs_002.pdf">Journal of Environmental Management</a>, prevention and treatment may make more sense economically, too. The estimated cost of treatment, removal and replacement of EAB in all affected states from 2010 through 2020 is $12.5 billion. Prevention tactics (such as destroying egg-laying EAB and targeted tree removal) could slash those costs by up to $7.5 billion, the authors concluded.</p><p>In the Chicago area, for example, municipalities spend up to $1,100 to remove and replace one tree, according to a 2012 survey conducted by Miller and his team.&nbsp; He notes that the same tree can be treated with insecticides for more than 50 years at the same cost.</p><p>Insecticides may sound nasty, but remember the alternative: cutting down the tree or letting it die anyhow, while giving that nasty beetle a free pass for its next meal. Plus, when used correctly and responsibly, experts say, insecticides targeting EAB are not likely to harm humans or the environment.</p><p>How else are government and science addressing the spread of EAB? Interstate regulation prohibits the sale of firewood from <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/emerald_ash_b/quarantine.shtml">quarantined</a> areas. Also any wood packing material used for international trade must be fumigated or heat-treated, explains Kerry Britton, a national pathologist with the U.S. Forest Service who studies invasive forest pests.</p><p>Another strategy: Britton notes that researchers are trying to breed ash trees with natural resistance to EAB by crossing Asian ash trees that fight off the pest with vulnerable North American ash species.</p><p>&ldquo;By the time the beetle was detected, it could not be eradicated,&rdquo; Britton says. &ldquo;The goal now is to slow it down.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>One Green Thing You Can Do: </strong></p><p>Don&rsquo;t move firewood from <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/emerald_ash_b/quarantine.shtml">quarantined</a> areas. One study showed that EAB can establish on a credit card-size piece of bark.</p><p>Keep an eye out for EAB, whether in your yard or your neighborhood. Here&rsquo;s a <a href="http://www.extension.iastate.edu/pme/Publications/EAB/FAQSUL21AshTrees.pdf">helpful guide</a> to identifying ash trees and distinguishing between EAB and other problems. Realistically, your best bet is to call an <a href="http://www.tcia.org/">accredited tree care company</a> since early evidence of EAB damage occurs at the treetop level, where it&rsquo;s not visible to most folks. <strong>Now</strong> is the time to act. Treating trees by mid-May minimizes the damage by adult beetles, which emerge in the spring. If detected early, trees can be treated with insecticide rather than being cut down.&nbsp;</p><p>Think you spotted one? <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/call.cfm#sthash.59Vb2IGy.dpbs">Report</a> it to your state&rsquo;s agriculture department office or the call USDA&rsquo;s EAB toll-free hotline at 1-866-322-4512.</p><p><strong>Resources:</strong></p><p>The unofficial <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/treatment.cfm#sthash.jVmXYeMO.dpbs">EAB web site</a> with background and treatment information, a collaborative education effort by state universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service</p><p>A <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/emerald_ash_b/downloads/multistateeab.pdf">map</a> showing EAB detections across the U.S. and Canada as of December, 2012 (does not reflect the recent discovery of EAB in New Hampshire)</p><p>To save or not to save? A <a href="http://extension.entm.purdue.edu/EAB/pdf/NABB_DecisionGuide.pdf">guide</a> deciding when to treat EAB</p><p>Summary argument by <a href="http://labs.russell.wisc.edu/eab/files/2012/03/EAB-Consensus-Document.pdf">Coalition for Urban Ash Tree Conservation</a> on why ash tree conservation is preferable to wholesale tree removal</p><p><a href="http://www.slameab.info/">SLAM</a> (Slow Ash Mortality) is a pilot project in Michigan &ndash; ground zero for EAB &ndash; to slow down beetle infestation.</p></p> Mon, 29 Apr 2013 08:43:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-emerald-ash-borer-destroys-millions-trees-chicago-and-us-106872