WBEZ | death http://www.wbez.org/tags/death Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en New exhibit takes unique look at death, food and remembrance http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/new-exhibit-takes-unique-look-death-food-and-remembrance-109974 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/death exhibit.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When someone passes away today, it&rsquo;s pretty common for friends and family to reminisce about them over food and drink. Just think about all those casseroles and cookies that pile up or about hoisting a glass at an Irish wake.</p><p>It turns out, in some ancient cultures, that use of food went, well, further.</p><p>A new show at the University of Chicago&rsquo;s Oriental Institute opens Tuesday, and it takes an unusual look at death. The show&rsquo;s called <a href="http://oi.uchicago.edu/museum/special/remembrance/" target="_blank">&ldquo;In Remembrance of Me: Feasting with the Dead in the Ancient Middle East</a>.&rdquo;</p><p>It examines how we&rsquo;ve remembered our loved ones across cultures and time, and the ways people have tried to control how they&rsquo;ll be thought of too. It highlights some ancient Middle Eastern cultures that believed souls lived on in monuments and needed to be fed so later generations could just come and hang out with them.</p><p>&ldquo;Cultures all over world, in all different periods in all areas of the world have done this, have had some way of maintaining contact their deceased ancestors,&rdquo; said Emily Teeter, a research associate and special exhibits coordinator at the Oriental Institute.</p><p>&ldquo;In Egyptian theology, they thought they would live forever, as long as they were remembered by the living,&rdquo; she said, adding that this ancient culture believed part of the soul lived on in monuments, and keeping those souls alive required lots and lots of food.</p><p>She pointed to a stone slab with an engraving of a couple who were unmistakably Egyptian, with angular black wigs, jeweled collars.</p><p>All over the monument, there are tiny carvings of birds, oxen, bread, even beer. Teeter said those are instructions on what to bring the couple to keep them alive: They wanted a thousand each of oxen, birds, bread and beer.</p><p>&ldquo;The Egyptian dead were apparently constantly hungry,&rdquo; Teeter said. &ldquo;...To stay alive you need to eat, and their whole goal with mummification, with creating these monuments, is to live eternally.&rdquo;</p><p>Teeter said the couple - who died more than 4,000 years ago -- even planned ahead on what to do once all their descendants had passed away, and there was no one to bring them food anymore. The engraving says that if visitors don&rsquo;t happen to have 1,000 oxen on them, it&rsquo;s enough to just pray for the food.</p><p>And it&rsquo;s not just the ancient Middle East where rites like this happened. At an excavation site in Vatican City, University of Chicago Divinity School Dean Margaret Mitchell saw tubes sticking out of burial sites. She said that was so people could pour in beverages to share with their dead loved ones.</p><p>Mitchell said some Roman catacombs had tables for people to eat between rows of burial urns.</p><p>&ldquo;Whether the dead can still eat a Twinkie or can still drink a good glass of merlot, it&rsquo;s a way of tenderly caring for the dead,&rdquo; Mitchell said.</p><p>The monuments go beyond providing the living with that connection to the dead, or assuring the dead will keep getting fed. In some cases, these statues and stones let people control how they&rsquo;ll be remembered.</p><p>The exhibit&rsquo;s showpiece is a replica of an ornately carved memorial stone of a man named Katumuwa. He&rsquo;s in fancy dress, sitting at a banquet table full of food, looking relaxed and happy in the afterlife. Before he died, commissioned it himself.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not just &lsquo;Pete was here,&rsquo; but it&rsquo;s even bigger,&rdquo; Mitchell said. She likened this memorial stone to the huge monument Illinois politician Roland Burris has had built, even though he&rsquo;s still very much alive.</p><p>It&rsquo;s like saying, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not going to leave it to the winds or your children to decide how you&rsquo;re going to be remembered, but I want to steer that process myself,&rdquo; Mitchell said. &ldquo;In some ways, the monuments are like a fist to the sky that says, I refuse to be forgotten.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p><em>Lynette Kalsnes is a WBEZ producer/reporter covering religion, culture and science. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 05:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/new-exhibit-takes-unique-look-death-food-and-remembrance-109974 Morning Shift: Tips for your summer BBQ http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-02/morning-shift-tips-your-summer-bbq-108268 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/BBQ-Flickr- digital vincent.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Want to know what cuts would be best for your next BBQ? Butcher Bob Levitt lets us know how you can throw the BBQ of your dreams. And NPR host Scott Simon discusses why he decided to tweet about his mother&#39;s final days.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-34.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-34" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Tips for your summer BBQ" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Fri, 02 Aug 2013 08:27:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-02/morning-shift-tips-your-summer-bbq-108268 After Aaron http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/after-aaron-104940 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/aaron%20swartz%20flickr%20sage%20ross.jpg" style="height: 496px; width: 620px;" title="Aaron Swartz (Flickr/Sage Ross)" /></div><p>I am still wearing my best black wool dress. I am drained from crying, and from staying awake late last night reading tributes online. I am thinking about what it means to be a suicide survivor. I have just been to <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-born-internet-activist-aaron-swartz-dies-26-104883">Aaron Swartz&rsquo;s funeral</a>.</p><p>I have known Aaron&rsquo;s partner, Taren, for 12 years. We share a mutual best friend &ndash; mine from high school, hers from college. In the time I&rsquo;ve known Taren we have been bridesmaids together in two different weddings. We have traveled together, confided in one another and offered one another advice. I know that in losing Aaron Swartz the world lost a great visionary, a public intellectual, and a technological pioneer. I know his death and the controversy surrounding it have become an international news story. But ever since I learned of Aaron&rsquo;s death I have been looking at this tragedy through the lens of my friend&rsquo;s deep personal loss.</p><p>According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention some 34,000 people die by suicide every year in the U.S. But that number is dwarfed by the number of &ldquo;survivors,&rdquo; the devastated friends, family and loved ones suicide leaves behind.</p><p>In their grief, survivors experience shock and depression, understandably, but also anger, sometimes even anger towards the deceased. There is also guilt: the sense they could or should have done more before it was too late.</p><p>I saw those emotions unfurled at Aaron&rsquo;s funeral. The service took place in a small synagogue in Highland Park, Ill., a suburb north of Chicago. There were no flowers, but no protestors either, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/westboro-baptist-church-aaron-swartz-anonymous_n_2479019.html">despite earlier threats from the Westboro Baptist Church</a>. Aaron&rsquo;s body lay in a wooden casket outside the sanctuary. Jewish law dictates that the body of the deceased not be alone for an instant before he is buried, so a dedicated mourner sat in a folding chair beside the coffin and prayed over Aaron while mourners filed into the hall.</p><p>Taren delivered the first eulogy, staring from the podium into a sea of dark suits. She looked spent and wan; her large eyes were ringed with dark circles and her hair hung down in a curtain beside her face. But she laughed as she recounted how she and Aaron had shared a grilled cheese sandwich and a bowl of mac n&rsquo; cheese &ndash; his favorites &ndash; at a happy hour in New York the night before his death. How he had promised to reward the diligent cleaning of her inbox with one cuddle for every email deleted, how he had woken her up one Saturday morning, imploring, &ldquo;I need to talk to you about Bayesian statistics.&rdquo;</p><p>OK, she had said that day, but could she wake up a little bit first? No, he insisted. This was very important. They spent the next several hours working out a complex mathematical equation, &ldquo;trying to remember how to do multivariable calculus,&rdquo; and, it seemed from her account, feeling very lucky to have one another.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;That is what Aaron meant to me,&rdquo; Taren said. &ldquo;These simple moments of joy.&rdquo;</p><p>But Taren shared other memories, too: how tired Aaron seemed in recent weeks, how overwhelmed and helpless he felt. She and Aaron&rsquo;s other friends and mentors &ndash; including Tim Berners-Lee, the godfather of the World Wide Web, and copyright activist Lawrence Lessig &ndash; painted a picture of a remarkable young man, but also a very vulnerable one. In their memorials, Aaron did not come across as depressed &ndash; just backed into a corner. Aaron, it seems, was surrounded by people who adored him, and yet he felt alone. Even the people closest to him did not realize just how alone he felt.</p><p>Aaron&rsquo;s father, Robert, has already been quoted today saying that his son &ldquo;didn&rsquo;t commit suicide,&rdquo; that MIT and the government were responsible for his death. But Mr. Swartz also said he blamed himself for not doing enough to protect his son.</p><p>Aaron&rsquo;s defense attorney, Elliot Peters, admitted to feeling &ldquo;disappointed&rdquo; in Aaron. But he also seemed angry that he wouldn&rsquo;t have the chance to defend Aaron in court, and spun out his never-to-be-realized fantasy: that day when a jury would have found Aaron not guilty, and they would have been able to &ldquo;get the last word.&rdquo;</p><p>Lessig, Aaron&rsquo;s long-time friend and mentor, prepared a memorial slideshow that &ldquo;only [he] and Aaron would ever get to see,&rdquo; and told mourners they had &ldquo;lost an elder&rdquo; this week, someone wise beyond his years. But Lessig followed that by saying they had also &ldquo;lost a child,&rdquo; one who desperately needed to be protected.</p><p>They are all survivors now, searching for answers and casting blame, whether on themselves or on others. Let us be kind to them, and comfort them, and protect them however we can -- just as they have asked us to do a better job of protecting other people in pain. Let us offer <a href="http://www.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&amp;page_ID=FED822A2-D88D-4DBD-6E1B55D56C229A75">the advice given here</a>: Be kind to yourself. When you feel ready, begin to go on with your life. Eventually starting to enjoy life again is not a betrayal of your loved one, but rather a sign that you&#39;ve begun to heal.</p><p>Towards the end of the service, a young girl walked up to Taren and put her arms around her neck. It was Ada, the daughter of Aaron&rsquo;s ex-girlfriend <a href="http://www.quinnnorton.com/said/">Quinn Norton</a>. Norton <a href="http://www.quinnnorton.com/said/?p=644">wrote about her relationship with Aaron</a>, and of his love for Ada, the day after his death. &ldquo;In his darkest moments, when I couldn&rsquo;t reach him, Ada could still touch him, even if only for a moment,&rdquo; she wrote. &nbsp;</p><p>Taren must have known, because she too seemed immensely grateful for the girl&rsquo;s affection. She crisscrossed her arms around Ada. She rested her forehead on the girl&rsquo;s. And her body shook with sobs as the rabbi delivered his closing prayer.&nbsp;</p><p><em>If you&rsquo;re having thoughts of suicide please speak to someone. In the U.S. call 1-800-273-8255.</em></p></p> Tue, 15 Jan 2013 17:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/after-aaron-104940 Chicago woman, 83, dies of cold exposure http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-woman-83-dies-cold-exposure-104102 <p><p>Authorities say an 83-year-old Chicago woman was the first cold-related death of the season in Cook County.</p><p>The Cook County Medical Examiner&#39;s Office says a relative found Florence Hawkins unresponsive in her bed. She was pronounced dead at her home on the city&#39;s South Side on Tuesday.</p><p>The medical examiner&#39;s office says an autopsy on Wednesday found Hawkins died of cold exposure and that heart disease was a contributing factor.</p><p>The National Weather Service reports that the low temperature on Tuesday was 17 degrees and Monday night&#39;s low was 23 degrees.</p><p>Authorities say there were at least seven cold-related deaths in Cook County during the cold season of 2011-2012 with the first reported on Dec. 3, 2011.</p></p> Thu, 29 Nov 2012 09:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-woman-83-dies-cold-exposure-104102 Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys dies at 47 http://www.wbez.org/news/simmons-adam-yauch-beastie-boys-dead-47-98832 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/3662173894_5fcc382e81_z.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated on 5/04/2012 at 1:48 pm</em></p><p>Adam Yauch, the gravelly voiced Beastie Boys&nbsp;rapper who co-founded the seminal hip-hop group, has died at age&nbsp;47.</p><div>Yauch's representatives confirmed that the rapper died Friday&nbsp;morning in New York after a nearly three-year battle with cancer.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Also known as MCA, Yauch was diagnosed with a cancerous salivary&nbsp;gland in 2009. He had undergone surgery and radiation.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>At the time, Yauch expressed hope it was "very treatable," but&nbsp;his illness caused the group to cancel shows and delayed the&nbsp;release of its 2011 album, "Hot Sauce Committee, Pt. 2."</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The Brooklyn-born Yauch created the Beastie Boys with high&nbsp;school friend Michael "Mike D" Diamond. Originally conceived as a&nbsp;hardcore punk group, it became a hip-hop trio after Adam&nbsp;"Ad-Rock" Horovitz joined.</div></p> Fri, 04 May 2012 15:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/simmons-adam-yauch-beastie-boys-dead-47-98832 Third Lake Forest High School student dies in Metra accident http://www.wbez.org/story/student-fatally-struck-metra-train-identified-97627 <p><p>A Lake Forest High School student was struck and killed by a Metra train last weekend, the third student from the north-suburban school to be killed by a Metra train since January.</p><p>Lake Forest Deputy Police Chief Glenn Burmeister said Monday that all three student deaths were intentional. The three cases have very little in common, though all of them were male and attended the same high school. The male discovered Sunday was 18 years old, and a senior in high school.</p><p>Lake Forest High School Principal Jay Hoffmann released a statement to parents about the incident, writing "It is with indescribable sorrow that I am writing once again to inform you of the loss of one of our students." The student, he said, was "talented and bright" and "will be missed." Hoffman encouraged students to talk to outside organizations for support, as the high school is currently on spring break.</p><p>The two other boys were hit by Metra trains in January and March. Both were 15 years old.</p><p>Data from the Lake County Health department show there were 67 suicides in 2010, a 10 percent increase from 2009. The department established a suicide prevention task force in January.</p><p>Deputy Chief Burmeister, a member of the task force, said meetings are held monthly to look at the larger aspect of suicides in the community and how to deal with and help prevent them.</p></p> Mon, 26 Mar 2012 15:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/student-fatally-struck-metra-train-identified-97627 Apologies and Attribution: The new breaking news http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-23/apologies-and-attribution-new-breaking-news-95744 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-23/RS4540_AP110728144210.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Generations of reporters have used the phrase, "If your mother says she loves you, check it out." Though, it seemed over the weekend that maxim was ignored by some big news organizations when they reported former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno had died on Saturday - well before Paterno's actual death Sunday. So, what went wrong? Who’s to blame?<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jen-sabella" target="_blank"> Jen Sabella</a>, editor of the <em><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chicago/" target="_blank">Huffington Post Chicago</a></em> and WBEZ news desk editor<a href="http://www.wbez.org/staff/tony-arnold" target="_blank"> Tony Arnold</a> and editorial consultant Carl Lavin joined <em>Eight Forty-Eight </em>to discuss how news outlets attribute and source their news in these days of aggregation. Lavin, who says the best time to be a journalist is now, recently outlined "<a href="http://carllavin.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/10-lessons-for-newsrooms-on-accuracy-and-apologies/" target="_blank">10 Lessons for Newsrooms: On Accuracy and Apologies.</a>"</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 23 Jan 2012 14:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-23/apologies-and-attribution-new-breaking-news-95744 Postcard: Shipwreck graveyard http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-30/postcard-shipwreck-graveyard-88447 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/frontandcenter/photo/2011-06-28/88447/tombstone1.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>The Inverhuron Cemetery is a small pioneer cemetery dating back to the 1800s.</p><p>It sits nestled in the aged trees in what is now a Provincial Park along the Canadian Coast of Lake Huron. It was once a town, until a fire in 1887 burnt every building to the ground. One of the only surviving elements is the cemetery. In the middle of the cemetery is a 200-year-old maple tree, surrounded by gravestones that have worn smooth over time.</p><p>Adrienne Mason used to lead tours of the cemetery. She would sing songs, answer questions and tell stories. The tale she says garnered the most interest was the story of the unknown sailor from 1880.</p><p>“His body was found washed up on shore,” Adrienne explained. “Along with a mason jar, or preserving jar containing a gold captain’s watch, and on that watch it said ‘to my wife’. But, no one ever learned of the sailor’s identity… so it’s kind of a mystery.”</p><p>Most people buried in the cemetery are a mystery. There are about 80 tombstones, but they estimate that almost 700 people are buried in about a hectare of land, mostly in unmarked graves.&nbsp;</p><p>“Most of the markings for the graves were actually made of wood, and unfortunately have decomposed,” Adrienne said.</p><p>More than one of the people buried in the Inverhuron Cemetery died on the waters.</p><p>The water was so integral to the lifestyle in the 1800s, the back roads were often impassable and everything was shipped into the port.<br> <br> <style type="text/css"> div .inline { width: 290px; float: left; margin-right: 19px; margin-left: 3px; clear: left; } div .inlineContent { border-top: 1px dotted #aa211d; border-top-width: 1px; border-top-style: dotted; border-top-color: #aa211d; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-top: 2px; } ul { margin-left: 15px; } li { font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 1em; background-repeat: no-repeat; background-repeat-x: no-repeat; background-repeat-y: no-repeat; background-position: 0 5px; background-position-x: 0px; background-position-y: 5px; padding-left: 3px; margin-bottom: 0.5em; }</style> </p><div class="inline"><div class="inlineContent"><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter"><img alt="" src="http://www.wbez.org/sites/default/files/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-28/FNC-inset-promo.jpg" style="width: 280px; height: 50px;" title=""></a><ul><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/about-front-and-center-%E2%80%93-depth-reporting-great-lakes-87655">About Front and Center</a></strong></li><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-06-23/front-and-center-how-chicagos-excrement-killing-fish-gulf-mexico-88234">How Chicago's excrement is killing fish in the Gulf of Mexico </a></strong></li><li><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-21/how-likely-fear-west-could-steal-great-lakes-water-88162">Could the West steal Great Lakes Water? </a></strong></li></ul><p><strong>SLIDESHOW</strong></p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-27/scientists-climb-bald-eagle-nests-measure-health-great-lakes-88390/"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-29/jim_climbing.jpg.crop_display.jpg" style="width: 116px; height: 78px; float: left; margin-left: 6px; margin-right: 6px;" title=""></a><p 12="" font-size:=""><a href="http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-29/postcard-scientists-climb-bald-eagle-nests-measure-health-great-lakes-8839"><strong>Fiesty is good:</strong><br> <strong> Healthy eagles </strong><strong> indicate healthy lakes</strong></a></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p></div></div><p>But, Adrienne says around here it’s known that the mighty Lake Huron can turn on you faster than you’d think.“The weather can at one point seem perfect. Blue sky and 30 degrees, and all of a sudden a clouds rolls across the horizon. And all of a sudden the lake becomes so destructive and frightening,” she said.</p><p>Adrienne tells the story of a captain who sank to the bottom of the lake with a brand new pair of boots around his neck, she explains how a woman once washed ashore in a current&nbsp; from the other side of Lake Huron.</p><p>“I think that having the cemetery here is a testament to that period of history, the stones themselves have stories to tell. You can feel the stories when you walk through the trails, walk through the forest,” Adrienne said. “It sets your imagine ablaze when you know you’re standing in the place where those stories took place.”</p></p> Thu, 30 Jun 2011 06:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/frontandcenter/2011-06-30/postcard-shipwreck-graveyard-88447 Was Pakistan’s government or military involved in hiding Bin Laden? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-03/was-pakistan%E2%80%99s-government-or-military-involved-hiding-bin-laden-86012 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-May/2011-05-03/113435615.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When U.S. forces found and killed Osama bin Laden, he was in a million-dollar estate, just feet from a military base and only 35 miles from the Pakistani capital of Islamabad. Reports reveal bin Laden may have hidden in the compound for years.</p><p>John O. Brennan, who serves as President Obama’s top adviser on terrorism, pledged today to “get to the bottom” of whether the Pakistani government provided help to Osama bin Laden in his decade-long efforts to avoid detection.</p><p>Pakistan’s government today denied any prior knowledge of the raid that killed bin Laden, but said it had been sharing information about the targeted compound with the CIA since 2009.</p><p><a href="http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/people/professors/lieven.aspx" target="_blank">Anatol Lieven</a> is a professor in the war studies department at King's College London and author of the book <em>Pakistan: A Hard Country</em>. He examines some of the puzzling questions surrounding Osama bin Laden.</p></p> Tue, 03 May 2011 16:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-03/was-pakistan%E2%80%99s-government-or-military-involved-hiding-bin-laden-86012 Osama bin Laden's dead, what's next? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-02/osama-bin-ladens-dead-whats-next-85934 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-May/2011-05-02/1776472.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Last night President Obama announced that al Qaeda’s founder, Osama bin Laden, was found and killed by American special forces about an hour’s drive north of Islamabad, Pakistan. We spend the hour dissecting the significance of Osama bin Laden’s death.</p><p>We'll take your calls at <strong>312.832.3124</strong>. What’s your reaction to the news? What affect do you think it will have on American national security and foreign policy? What was Pakistan's role, if any, in Bin Laden's ability to avoid capture?</p><p>Today’s panel includes:</p><p><strong>Steve Clemons</strong>, founder of the New America Foundation’s American Strategy Program and author of the blog, <a href="http://www.thewashingtonnote.com/">The Washington Note</a>.</p><p><strong>Imam Malek Mujahid</strong>, executive producer of the Chicago program <a href="http://www.radioislam.com/">Radio Islam</a>.</p><p><strong>Joseph Kechichian</strong>, security analyst for the <a href="http://www.mei.edu/">Middle East Institute</a>.</p></p> Mon, 02 May 2011 16:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-02/osama-bin-ladens-dead-whats-next-85934