WBEZ | Republican http://www.wbez.org/tags/republican Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Donnelly wins Senate, but Republicans still control Indiana http://www.wbez.org/news/donnelly-wins-senate-republicans-still-control-indiana-103739 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/RS6648_hr110712b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Last night&rsquo;s celebrations for Democrat Joe Donnelly&rsquo;s big upset in the U.S. Senate race is getting doused by cold hard reality today. That&rsquo;s because Republicans can now claim to have supermajorities in both chambers of the Indiana legislature.</p><p>While the GOP already had a supermajority in the Senate, a few key wins gives it a supermajority in the House as well. Republicans now have 69 members in the House, two more than the 67 needed for a supermajority in the 100-member house.</p><p>&ldquo;We have had excellent candidate recruitment and Hoosiers have elected a group of leaders who already have a track record of job creation. The majority of our new members are small business owners who have experience meeting payroll, balancing budgets, thinking about the bottom line, and creating and retaining jobs,&quot; Indiana House Speaker, Brian Bosma (R), said Wednesday while meeting with the entire Republican House Caucus.</p><p>One race that helped the GOP is the victory in the Democratic stronghold of Lake County, outside Chicago. That&rsquo;s where Republican Hal Slager won in the 15th House District, which includes the town of Schererville.</p><p>Having a supermajority allows Republicans to conduct business without Democrats present.</p><p>In each of the past two years, House Democrats have walked out to stall Republicans from pushing through measures like school vouchers and right to work laws.</p><p>But Democrats won&rsquo;t be able to do that anymore.</p><p>Despite its new power, Bosma says the GOP will work in a bipartisan fashion.</p><p>&ldquo;Hoosiers told us they want their state to live within its means, promote job creation and prepare today&rsquo;s students for tomorrow&rsquo;s jobs. Hoosiers have spoken, and have elected 19 new members to our Caucus,&rdquo; Bosma said.</p></p> Wed, 07 Nov 2012 17:14:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/donnelly-wins-senate-republicans-still-control-indiana-103739 Presidential campaign hits Illinois http://www.wbez.org/story/presidential-campaign-hits-illinois-97373 <p><p>Let the hand shaking and baby kissing begin.</p><p>The Republican presidential candidates are out in full force in Chicago suburbs ahead of Tuesday's primary. Mitt Romney kicked off Friday's campaign madness with an early visit to diner Pancakes Eggcetera in Rosemont, IL. Romney shook hands, told some jokes, posed for pictures and even kissed a baby.<br> <br> "I always [take the] chance to hold 'em and kiss 'em," Romney said to nearby diners, "Particularly if the diapers are dry."</p><p>As supporters ate pancakes and scrambled eggs, Romney spoke about how the high gas prices are hurting families and&nbsp; touted his experience in the private sector, calling President Barack Obama a "lightweight" on economic issues. He also encouraged the audience to help get their friends and neighbors to the polls next week.</p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332755252-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2012-march/2012-03-16/webromneyraw316.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>"I need you all to vote, and by the way, you're allowed to vote multiple times by getting a friend to go with you - I know this is Chicago I had to clarify," he said.</p><p>Romney wasn't the only presidential candidiate hitting the pavement in Illinois on Friday. Rick Santorum is scheduled to speak to high schoolers in Arlington Heights, IL, in the afternoon, as well as lead a rally there later in the evening. Even President Obama was in town--he held two fundraising events in downtown Chicago. Candidates New Gingrich and Ron Paul were spotted shaking hands around the state earlier in the week.<br> <br> But it's not all fun and games on the campaign trail.<br> <br> Democratic US Rep. Jan Schakowsky protested with women outside the Romney event Friday morning, holding signs that said, "Keep Your Mitt(s) off birth control. Romney has said he'd get rid of Planned Parenthood if elected. Schakowsky called the pledge "unacceptable."<br> <br> The Republican candidates are expected to continue their campaigning next week, before Tuesday's primary election.</p></p> Fri, 16 Mar 2012 18:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/presidential-campaign-hits-illinois-97373 Taking the pulse of GOP voters in Illinois http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-10/taking-pulse-gop-voters-illinois-95422 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-10/EIYQ_Republican_Debate_Colo.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Political commentator <a href="https://twitter.com/#%21/lennymcallister" target="_blank">Lenny McAllister</a> was in Iowa last week for that state's caucus. Tuesday, New Hampshire headed to the polls and<em> Eight Forty-Eight</em> listened back to McAllister’s play-by-play musings from his 72 hours in Iowa. Then, former Illinois Gov. Jim Thompson, Republican pundit <a href="http://www.fokn.com/FOKN/David_Dring.html">David Dring</a> and McAllister joined <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> to examine how the Illinois GOP will assert itself during the early primary season. <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> also looked at what the Prairie State has traditionally looked for in a Republican candidate. Listeners joined the conversation by calling <strong>312-923-9239,</strong> e-mailing&nbsp; <a href="mailto:848@wbez.org">848@wbez.org</a> or tweeting <strong><a href="http://twitter.com/848" target="_blank">@848</a></strong>.</p><p><em>Music Button: Orgone, "Impala", from the CD Killion Vaults, (Ubiquity)</em><br> &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 10 Jan 2012 14:47:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-10/taking-pulse-gop-voters-illinois-95422 Congressman Joe Walsh says he'll run for re-election in new 8th District http://www.wbez.org/story/congressman-joe-walsh-says-hell-run-re-election-new-8th-district-94752 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-December/2011-12-09/joe walsh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh (R-Ill.) announced Thursday night that he will run for re-election in Illinois’ newly-drawn 8th Congressional district in the western suburbs.</p><p>The state’s congressional boundaries have changed since new census data was released last year. But Republicans have sued the Illinois Board of Elections over the new boundaries, saying they heavily favor Democrats.</p><p>Walsh, a Republican with Tea Party support, currently lives in the newly-drawn 14th Congressional district. If he had run in that district, Walsh would have faced a tough primary opponent against fellow freshman Republican U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren.</p><p>“It didn’t just feel right to me to stay out in the 14th (District) in a nice, safe Republican district, take out another Republican in a primary, when the Democrats have drawn an 8th District, my old district – my current district – a new 8th District and reconfigured it to be very Democratic and we Republicans are just going to let that seat go,” Walsh said Thursday night. “It didn’t feel right.”</p><p>Walsh made the announcement to Cook County Tea Party supporters at a bar near Wrigley Field. The Chicago ballpark lies outside the 8th Congressional District.</p><p>Walsh still needs to win the Republican primary, which occurs March 20.</p><p>If he wins, Walsh could face a Democratic opponent, possibly Tammy Duckworth, Raja Krishnamoorthi or another candidate who has not yet filed.</p></p> Fri, 09 Dec 2011 03:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/congressman-joe-walsh-says-hell-run-re-election-new-8th-district-94752 Indiana Gov Daniels is out, but Pawlenty will make presidential campaign announcement Monday http://www.wbez.org/story/indiana-gov-daniels-out-pawlenty-will-make-presidential-campaign-announcement-monday-86884 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-May/2011-05-22/Tim Pawlenty_Getty_Darren McCollester.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Less than 48 hours after Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels announced his decision not to enter the 2012 race for the White House, another Midwestern Republican with gubernatorial experience is set to take the plunge.</p><p>On Monday, the former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty will announce that he is officially entering the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination.</p><p>Pawlenty has long been considered a likely candidate, but Monday's announcement will formalize a process that's been playing out for the last two years as various Republican hopefuls have been testing the waters.</p><p>But the field Pawlenty will enter on Monday is considerably smaller than some had predicted, following the decisions of Daniels, former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, and businessman Donald Trump not to enter the race.</p><p>As for Pawlenty, he can take comfort in knowing he's entering a smaller field thus far and does so with higher name recognition than, say, Mitch Daniels though he's essentially tied with Rick Santorum.</p><p>According to a recent <a href="http://www.gallup.com/poll/147584/Huckabee-No-Clear-GOP-Front-Runner.aspx">Gallup poll</a>, the former Minnesota governor has 48 percent name recognition among Republicans, essentially tied with 47 percent for Santorum, the former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Daniels, the Indiana governor, has 35 percent name recognition.&nbsp;</p><p>But the same poll showed T-Paw with four percent support for the nomination, the same as Daniels. That's far behind Mitt Romney's 20 percent.</p><p>NPR's Martin Kaste <a href="http://www.npr.org/2011/04/25/135409599/tim-pawlenty-the-young-reaganite-comes-of-age">profiled Pawlenty</a> for <em>The Spark</em>, a series on the GOP presidential candidates.</p><p>On Sunday, Daniels cited family concerns as the main reason he elected not to enter the race.</p><p>"In the end, I was able to resolve every competing consideration but one," said the former Bush White House budget chief, disclosing his decision in a middle-of-the-night e-mail to supporters. "The interests and wishes of my family, is the most important consideration of all. If I have disappointed you, I will always be sorry."</p><p>A two-term governor, Daniels had considered a bid for months and was pressured by many in the Republican establishment who longed for a conservative with a strong fiscal record to run. He expressed interest in getting in the race partly because it would give him a national platform to ensure the country's fiscal health would remain part of the 2012 debate.</p><p>But Daniels always said his family — his wife and four daughters — was a sticking point.</p><p>Had he entered, Daniels would have shaken up an evolving field that lacks a front-runner against President Barack Obama and that has been unpredictable in its early stages. Daniels had donors and grass-roots supporters at the ready for a national fundraising and political organization that some aides privately said would rival those of announced candidates.</p><p>Instead, Daniels becomes the latest Republican to opt against a bid as the GOP searches for a Republican to challenge Obama in 2012.</p><p>"He's a terrific talent," former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, a Republican presidential candidate, said of Daniels on CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday. "He would have been a very formidable competitor. I really thought he would be in the front-runners from Day One if he'd decided to run."</p><p>Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., the chairman of the House Budget Committee and, like Daniels, a proponent of bringing fiscal issues to the forefront of political debate, said the governor's decision was disappointing.</p><p>"I think his candidacy would have been a great addition to this race," Ryan said on NBC's "Meet the Press." The Wisconsin congressman waved off any suggestion he was considering entering the presidential race himself.</p><p>Polls show that Republican primary voters want more options in a race that includes former Govs. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts and Tim Pawlenty of Minnesota, as well as ex-House Speaker Newt Gingrich and others.</p><p>In the wake of the decisions by Mississippi Governor Barbour and Huckabee to skip the race, the clamoring among establishment Republicans for Daniels to run — including from the Bush family circle — had become ear-shattering.</p><p>"The counsel and encouragement I received from important citizens like you caused me to think very deeply about becoming a national candidate," Daniels said in the e-mail message. "If you feel that this was a non-courageous or unpatriotic decision, I understand and will not attempt to persuade you otherwise," he added.&nbsp; "I only hope that you will accept my sincerity in the judgment I reached."</p><p>Daniel had sounded more optimistic about a run in the past week than he had in months, though he never had sounded particularly enthused.</p><p>His advisers had reached out to Republicans in Iowa and other early nominating states for private conversations. But as he talked about a candidacy, he always pointed back to his family as the primary issue that would hold him back.</p><p>His wife, Cheri, filed for divorce in 1993 and moved to California to remarry, leaving him to raise their four daughters in Indiana. She later divorced, and she and Daniels reconciled and remarried in 1997.</p><p>Mrs. Daniels had never taken much of a public role in her husband's political career. So it raised eyebrows when she was chosen as the keynote speaker at a major Indiana fundraiser earlier in May.</p><p>Both husband and wife were said to be pleased with the reception they got, and advisers suggested that the outcome could encourage Daniels to run for president.&nbsp; Even so, Republicans in Washington and Indiana with ties to Daniels put the odds at 50-50.</p><p>A former budget director under President George W. Bush, Daniels used his time considering a run to also shine a spotlight on rising budget deficits and national debt, even though his former boss grew the scope of government and federal spending during his tenure.</p><p>Daniels, a one-time senior executive at Eli Lilly &amp; Co., caused a stir among cultural conservatives by saying the next president facing economic crisis "would have to call a truce on the so-called social issues."</p><p>He is looked with admiration in GOP circles for being the rare Republican who won office in a Democratic year — 2008 — in a state that Obama had won. And, since being re-elected, he has leveraged Republican majorities in the state Legislature to push through a conservative agenda.</p><p>Daniels made his intentions clear in a characteristically understated e-mail. It was sent by the governor through Eric Holcomb, the Indiana Republican Party chairman and one of Daniels' closest advisers, and confirmed by others close to the governor on the condition of anonymity to avoid pre-empting his announcement.</p><p>It ended: "Many thanks for your help and input during this period of reflection. Please stay in touch if you see ways in which an obscure Midwestern governor might make a constructive contribution to the rebuilding of our economy and our Republic.</p></p> Mon, 23 May 2011 02:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/indiana-gov-daniels-out-pawlenty-will-make-presidential-campaign-announcement-monday-86884 Hammond mayoral dispute heads to Indiana Court of Appeals http://www.wbez.org/story/business/hammond-mayoral-dispute-heads-indiana-court-appeals-84575 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-31/George Janiec.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><span id="internal-source-marker_0.7738663897975478" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">George Janiec is taking his fight to get put back on the Republican primary ballot for Hammond mayor to the Indiana Court of Appeals.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">At a brief hearing Thursday, Janiec’s attorney, Cordell Funk, said his client is appealing a ruling issued by Lake County Superior Court Judge Jesse Villalpando Jr. That ruling has kept Janiec’s name off of ballots issued for the start of early voting April 4. It is too late for Janiec to be on those ballots, but Funk said Janiec hopes to appear on ballots for election day polling on May 3.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“Obviously, not being on for any part is a problem,” Funk said. &nbsp;“But we think given that it’s a primary, those that support Janiec, knowing that he’s appealing and trying to get on the ballot, will hold off voting and won’t run in and vote for somebody else.”</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Funk said Janiec’s appeal could be taken up by the Indiana Supreme Court.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“We may ask the Supreme Court to remove it from the Appeals Court and hear it without getting an Appellate Court ruling,” Funk said. “We’re weighing that option. There is a procedure to do that. We’re also weighing the timelines of what would happen or not happen. So, we have to think about that Saturday and Sunday while we’re putting stuff together.”</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Villalpando upheld an early March ruling from the Lake County Election and Voters Registration Board that removed Janiec’s name from the primary ballot.</span><br> <span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Janiec’s candidacy was challenged by a Hammond resident. The basis of the challenge was that Janiec could not run because he is a member of the city’s nonpartisan school board, which prohibits members from engaging in political activity.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Villalpando ruled Wednesday that if Janiec wants to run for mayor, he must first resign his school board post.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Janiec's lawyer contends Indiana law does not prohibit school board members from running in partisan elections.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">But election board attorney Jim Wieser said Janiec got it wrong. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“In Hammond, (school board) policy specifically says that you must be nonpartisan and you cannot be engaged at all, in any way shape or form, in partisan politics,” Wieser said. “I think if you’re someone who holds himself out to say ‘I’m nonpartisan. I’m going to only represent the schools’ interest’ and then spends eight months of the year running for a partisan mayor’s office is probably not fulfilling his oath of office.”</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">There are, however, current school board members in neighboring communities who are running for partisan offices. The county’s election board did not remove those candidates in those races.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Wieser said that’s because those candidates did not face challenges, and it’s unknown if those school districts prohibit members from engaging in partisan politics.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“In the judge’s order, (Villalpando) was very careful to say that this order applies only to this specific and unique set of circumstances,” Wieser said.</span><br> <span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Four years ago, Janiec narrowly lost the general election to Hammond’s Democratic incumbent &nbsp;Mayor Tom McDermott Jr., who is also the head of the county’s Democratic Party.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Janiec, said the fight over his access to the ballot is now out of his hands.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“I have never been through this nor do I know of anybody who has been through this,” Janiec said. “I leave it in my attorneys’ skillful hands in maneuvering through this judicial maze.”</span></p></p> Fri, 01 Apr 2011 02:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/business/hammond-mayoral-dispute-heads-indiana-court-appeals-84575 Hammond GOP mayoral hopeful out http://www.wbez.org/story/george-janiec/hammond-gop-mayoral-hopeful-out-84515 <p><p><span id="internal-source-marker_0.7241763980135641" style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">A Lake County, Indiana judge says George Janiec is ineligible to run in the Hammond mayoral primary because he is a member of the city’s nonpartisan public school board.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Lake County Superior Court Judge Jesse Villalpando Jr.’s ruling says if Janiec wants to run in the race, he’ll have to resign from the school board first.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“Janiec is the person who created this controversy and logically is the only person who can remove the condition undermining his municipal ambitions. He still has time to help himself,” Villalpando wrote in his ruling released Wednesday afternoon.</span><br> <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Four years ago, Janiec came within 500 votes of upsetting incumbent Hammond Mayor Tom McDermott Jr.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Janiec won a seat on the Hammond school board just last year, but in February, he wanted another crack at trying to become mayor of Northwest Indiana’s largest city.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Earlier this month, his candidacy was challenged by a Hammond resident on the grounds that Janiec could not run for a partisan office while holding a position on a nonpartisan board.</span><br> <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">A majority of the Lake County Election and Voters Registration Board agreed and voted to remove Janiec from the primary ballot at its meeting in early March.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Janiec challenged that ruling in Lake County Superior Court.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">“On the day before filing closed in February, 2011, as Janiec himself told the court on March 29, Janiec broke that pledge when he filed his Declaration of Candidacy for Municipal Election, declaring himself a partisan candidate for Mayor, City of Hammond,” Villalpando wrote.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Villalpando had said last week that he would rule by this Friday, April 1; instead, he ruled two days earlier than that. The judge has noted that, in this case, “time is of the essence” because early voting ballots have already been printed without Janiec’s name included.</span><br> <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Early voting starts Monday, with the primary opening on May 3.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Villalpando has scheduled a final hearing on the case for Thursday at 3 p.m. at his downtown Hammond courtroom. </span><br> <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> </span></p></p> Thu, 31 Mar 2011 00:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/george-janiec/hammond-gop-mayoral-hopeful-out-84515 Return of the Dems http://www.wbez.org/story/brian-bosma/return-dems-84395 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-29/AP11032818547.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" id="internal-source-marker_0.13231120258347917">The Indiana House of Representatives was back in business Monday for the first time in more than a month.</span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> When House Democrats returned to their chamber on the second floor of the Indiana Statehouse, they were greeted with applause from waiting union members.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">More than 30 Democrats had fled to Urbana, Illinois, on Feb. 22 in protest of Republican-backed legislation they deemed as anti-union, anti-teacher and anti-public schools.</span> <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Although the GOP controls the Indiana House, the party does not hold enough seats to call a quorum, so Democrats stayed away until Republican leadership agreed to amend certain bills.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">It&rsquo;s not clear if the Democrats&rsquo; tactic worked, although one proposal to enact so-called right-to-work laws was taken off the table by Republicans.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">House Democratic leader Pat Bauer views the walkout as a success.</span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> &ldquo;We won a battle but we recognize the war goes on,&rdquo; Bauer said.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">House Majority Speaker Brian Bosma successfully called the House into session at 4 p.m. Chicago time.</span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> Lawmakers wasted no time picking up where they left off; they discussed the state&rsquo;s budget and a host of bills, including one that would provide taxpayer-supported vouchers to parents who wish to send their children to private schools.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Bosma said lawmakers can&rsquo;t waste time if they hope to finish the session by the April 29 deadline.</span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;"> </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">&ldquo;(Bauer) gave me his pledge that they will in good faith try to wrap this session up in regular time and deal with the important issues that face the taxpayers,&rdquo; Bosma said.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels said lawmakers could be working long hours but didn&rsquo;t rule out the possibility of extending the legislative session.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">&ldquo;Our pro-jobs agenda of low spending, low taxes, and educational improvement is squarely in the Hoosier mainstream. The only thing &lsquo;radical&rsquo; about this session has been the decision by one caucus to walk off the job for five weeks,&rdquo; Daniels said. &ldquo;Now that it&rsquo;s finally over, let&rsquo;s make up the lost time.&rdquo;</span></p></p> Tue, 29 Mar 2011 04:36:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/brian-bosma/return-dems-84395 Illinois Republicans react to State of the Union http://www.wbez.org/story/congressman-peter-roskam/illinois-republicans-react-state-union-address <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/100610347.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Illinois Republicans are reacting to President Barack Obama's State of the Union Address. Congressman Peter Roskam represents Chicago's western suburbs. He said the president is supporting spending levels that are too high. Roskam also said the president has vowed to do away with earmarks in the past, but he hasn't lived up to those words.</p><p>&quot;[It was] super-strong on the themes and the rhetoric - and rhetoric, frankly, that we've heard before,&quot;&nbsp;Roskam said. &quot;But in terms of the follow-up, I think the president is sort of living the happy life of low expectations.&quot;</p><p>Meanwhile, Republican Congresswoman Judy Biggert said she was encouraged by the president's pledge to work to create more private sector jobs. She also said she was happy to hear the president call for more science research.</p></p> Wed, 26 Jan 2011 13:35:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/congressman-peter-roskam/illinois-republicans-react-state-union-address Congressman Aaron Schock discusses his new position on Ways and Means Committee http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/congressman-aaron-schock-discusses-his-new-position-ways-and-means-committee <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Aaron Schock_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>As the political tides shift in Washington, &quot;Eight Forty-Eight&quot; asked what it meant for Illinois legislators. Thursday, host Alison Cuddy <a href="http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/congressman-schock-his-new-position-majority/edit">spoke to Democratic Congressman Mike Quigley</a> about the first day of the 112th U.S. Congress.</p><p>Friday, &quot;Eight Forty-Eight&quot; Republican Congressman <a href="http://schock.house.gov/" target="_blank">Aaron Schock</a> joined the conversation. Schock represents Illinois&rsquo; 18th district, in western Illinois. He assumed office in 2009 and served as Deputy Minority Whip. Schock also sits on the Ways and Means and House Administration committees.</p></p> Fri, 07 Jan 2011 14:45:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/congressman-aaron-schock-discusses-his-new-position-ways-and-means-committee