WBEZ | turkey http://www.wbez.org/tags/turkey Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Kurdish diaspora and geopolitics http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-08-21/kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics-110685 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP433719952932.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>PKK Kurdish fighters are on the U.S.&#39;s list of terrorist organizations, but the U.S. supports its fight against the jihadist Islamic State. Ali Ezzatyar, lawyer and scholar on the Middle East, joins us to discuss the Kurds&#39; changing role in the region.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Kurdish diaspora and geopolitics " on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-08-21/kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics-110685 Non-profit sees greater need for food assistance http://www.wbez.org/news/non-profit-sees-greater-need-food-assistance-109276 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2013-11-29 at 9.53.20 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been a holiday season of breaking records at <a href="http://www.ajustharvest.org/">A Just Harvest</a>, a Rogers Park nonprofit that feeds the hungry.</p><p>The organization serves hot dinner daily to anyone who shows up, but during the run-up to Thanksgiving and Christmas it also distributes &ldquo;holiday kits,&rdquo; uncooked turkeys and traditional fixings, to families that want to prepare the foods at home.</p><p>&ldquo;Saturday we gave away turkeys and kits, and we had folks lined up for two blocks,&rdquo; said Rev. Marylin Pagan-Banks, executive director of A Just Harvest. &ldquo;People lining up and standing in the cold and bearing the weather in order to provide for their families.&rdquo;</p><p>Pagan-Banks said the organization had never seen that before, and that by Thanksgiving week it had already distributed 305 of the kits, with four weeks to go until Christmas.</p><p>Last year, A Just Harvest gave away 380 kits for the two holidays together &mdash;a number that it seems certain to beat this year.</p><p>In part, Pagan-Banks blames <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/economy/illinois-residents-lose-220-million-dollars-snap-benefits-109035">cuts that kicked in this month </a>to the federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP, also known as the food stamp program.</p><p>Congress declined to renew an increase in funding to the program that had gone into effect in 2009 as part of the Recovery Act. For a family of four, this amounts to $36 less per month of food assistance.</p><p>&ldquo;Folks already struggle towards the end of the month, because the allotment wasn&rsquo;t enough to start with,&rdquo; said Pagan-Banks. &ldquo;And so it&rsquo;s the end of the month, and it&rsquo;s a holiday where traditionally there are different types of food that are eaten, they cost more, turkeys are not cheap, and there&rsquo;s just no way to make ends meet.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 29 Nov 2013 08:49:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/non-profit-sees-greater-need-food-assistance-109276 Did Norman Rockwell ruin Thanksgiving turkey? http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/did-norman-rockwell-ruin-thanksgiving-turkey-109193 <p><p dir="ltr"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Norman-Rockwell_Freedom-from-Want%20%283%29.jpg" style="height: 386px; width: 300px; float: left;" title="Norman Rockwell. Freedom from Want, 1942. Lent by the Norman Rockwell Museum, Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust. All Rights Reserved. (SEPS by Curtis Licensing)" /><strong>&#39;Freedom from Want&#39;</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Later this month, millions of Americans will sit down to Thanksgiving dinners of unevenly cooked turkey &mdash; dinners that look suspiciously like the one in Norman Rockwell&rsquo;s&nbsp;&quot;Freedom From Want&quot; painting now on display at the Art Institute of Chicago.</p><p dir="ltr">The overcooked white meat will require pools of gravy to choke it down, and undercooked globs of dark meat will get quietly pushed into the garbage (or microwave).</p><p dir="ltr">Sure, some cooks have devised strategies around these pitfalls, but with 20 degrees between cooking temperatures for the leg and the breast, it&rsquo;s a rare bird that comes out perfectly done all the way around.</p><p dir="ltr">So who&rsquo;s to blame for this culinary crime? And why do we endure this ritual torture like another year of Uncle Charlie&rsquo;s corny jokes? &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Looking for answers</strong></p><p dir="ltr">John Caveny, who raises Bourbon Red Heritage turkeys on <a href="http://www.cavenyfarm.com/">his farm</a>&nbsp;in Monticello, Ill, echoed what many of America&#39;s top chefs have been saying for years: turkeys should not be cooked whole if you want the best tasting bird.</p><p dir="ltr">Caveny follows a &quot;Cook&rsquo;s Illustrated&quot; method of dry brining his turkey parts with three parts kosher salt and one part baking powder, then leaving them covered in plastic wrap for a couple of days in the fridge.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;This allows the moisture, salt and baking powder to go back and forth through the muscle,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It imparts the flavor of the salt, and the baking powder raises the pH of the meat, tenderizing it a little. It works well, and even better well when you&rsquo;ve cut turkey into pieces first.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Similarly, Julia Child&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbur.org/npr/165471083/comfort-and-joy-making-the-morning-edition-julia-child-thanksgiving">famously recommended</a>&nbsp;disassembling the bird and then reconstructing it for the table and chef&nbsp;<a href="http://www.seriouseats.com/2008/11/in-videos-cooking-thanksgiving-sous-vide-turkey-with-grant-achatz-alinea.html">Grant Achatz recommends</a>&nbsp;breaking it down, cooking the breast, thighs and legs sous vide&nbsp;(a high tech boil in a bag system) and saving the other bits for gravy.</p><p dir="ltr">So if top chefs and turkey farmers recommend breaking down the bird first, why do so many of us insist on keeping it whole? Caveny blames the Norman Rockwell painting.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Prior to that, meat was usually cut up in the kitchen and brought to the table sliced or at least into more manageable portions than a whole turkey,&quot; he said.</p><p dir="ltr"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Roy-Lichtenstein_Turkey%20%281%29.jpg" style="float: right; height: 264px; width: 300px;" title="Roy Lichtenstein. Turkey, 1961 is also on display at the 'Art and Appetite' exhibit in the Thanksgiving gallery. Private collection. (Estate of Roy Lichtenstein.)" /><strong>Is it Rockwell&rsquo;s fault? </strong></p><p dir="ltr">I recently took in Rockwell&#39;s famous painting at the Art Institute of Chicago&rsquo;s new exhibit, &quot;Art and Appetite.&quot; Curator Judith&nbsp;Barter&nbsp;said the one hundred paintings and sculptures in the exhibition are about much more than just food.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Freedom From Want,&rdquo; for example, depicts a sense of abundance and security that so many Americans longed for in the post-Depression era. And what better than a whole honking turkey &mdash; not some measly platter of slices &mdash; to say abundance?</p><p dir="ltr">But&nbsp;Barter&nbsp;pushes back on the notion that there weren&rsquo;t a lot of whole turkey roasters in the years prior to Rockwell&rsquo;s painting.&nbsp;She said the recipes, texts and paintings she studied for the exhibit indicated that &quot;whole turkeys were common in the 19th century.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">Food historian and Roosevelt University emeritus professor Bruce Kraig generally agreed.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When turkeys first arrived in Europe in the 16th century, they were cooked whole in various ways,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Roasting was one of them and boiling was another very popular way. Roasting whole turkeys seems to run right through colonial cookery and the 19th century.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Kraig points to a page in the first American cookbook, &ldquo;American Cookery&rdquo; by Amelia Simmons, published in 1796.&nbsp;<a href="http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/coldfusion/display.cfm?ID=amer&amp;PageNum=18">The recipe</a>&nbsp;for roasted turkey calls for a stuffing of wheat bread, suet, eggs, sweet marjoram, sweet thyme, pepper, salt and &ldquo;a gill of wine.&rdquo; (It also recommends serving the bird with cranberry sauce and mashed potatoes, but also mangoes. Talk about early fusion recipes!)</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Breeding a bigger bird&nbsp;</strong></p><p dir="ltr">But Kraig points out that turkeys of Simmons&#39; era were relative waifs compared to their modern chesty cousins.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The modern broad breasted turkey was bred and crossbred throughout the 19th century with the intention of making them fatter and larger with very big breasts,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;This was in direct response the whole mythic story of turkey at the first Thanksgiving.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The turkeys got so busty, in fact, that by the time the Broad Breasted White (today&rsquo;s dominant breed) came along in the late 1940s, it could no longer have sex and could procreate only through artificial insemination.</p><p dir="ltr">Despite this lack of fun, the breed grows quickly and produces prodigious amounts of (easily dried out) white meat. Earlier breeds, and indeed heritage birds, grow slower, sport more fat and offer a more even ratio of dark to white meat, thus making them easier to cook evenly.</p><p dir="ltr"><b>Breaking from tradition&nbsp;</b></p><p dir="ltr">So it&rsquo;s not so much Rockwell&rsquo;s fault, per se. It&rsquo;s that Rockwell&rsquo;s painting coincided with a revolution in turkey breeding &mdash; one that produced giant breasts that are harder to cook evenly with legs and thighs attached. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Caveny says he can tell by the way the breastbone lies on the bird in Rockwell&rsquo;s painting that the artist was depicting a heritage bird &mdash; not an industrial Broad Breasted White &mdash; on his the table. So those who cling to Rockwell&rsquo;s whole-bird ideal are probably trying to pull it off with a different breed entirely.</p><p dir="ltr">Janet Fuller is the former food editor of the Chicago Sun-Times and a current writer for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/">DNAInfo Chicago</a>. A couple of years ago she wrote a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/food/8688787-423/bird-deconstructed-cooking-turkey-in-parts-ensures-tender-meat-richest-gravy.html">story in the Sun-Times</a>&nbsp;urging folks to give up the ghost of the whole turkey for a more edible bird.</p><p dir="ltr">She even served the cut-up version at her own Thanksgiving dinner. I asked her, did anybody squawk?</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;No,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It worked great. The leg meat, in particular, was amazing &mdash; falling off the bone in the braising liquid, which became my gravy. It is some extra work because you do it in stages, but it was fantastic.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Monica Eng is a producer at WBEZ and co-host of the food podcast&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/chewing-fat-podcast-louisa-chu-and-monica-eng">Chewing the Fat</a>. Follow her on Twitter <a href="http://twitter.com/monicaeng">@monicaeng</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 19 Nov 2013 16:01:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/did-norman-rockwell-ruin-thanksgiving-turkey-109193 A landmark Turkish trial, climate change and conflict and jazz diplomacy http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-07/landmark-turkish-trial-climate-change-and-conflict-and-jazz-diplomacy <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP552456348912.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We discuss the conviction of former Turkish army chief and its reflection of Turkish politics. New research connects conflict around the world to climate change. Tony Sarabia and a U.S. Department of State official introduce us to the vibrant tunes born out of cold war jazz diplomacy.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F104438210&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-climate-change-s-impact-on-conflict-and.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-climate-change-s-impact-on-conflict-and" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: A landmark Turkish trial, climate change and conflict and jazz diplomacy" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Wed, 07 Aug 2013 10:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-07/landmark-turkish-trial-climate-change-and-conflict-and-jazz-diplomacy California prison hunger strike and a look at what Brazil protests accomplished http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-16/california-prison-hunger-strike-and-look-what-brazil-protests <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP070202071711.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We take a look at the California prison hunger strike and mass incarceration. Then, we get an update on the Brazilian government&#39;s response to last month&#39;s protests. And protesting continues in Turkey.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101325390&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-california-prison-hunger-strike-and-a-lo.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-california-prison-hunger-strike-and-a-lo" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: California prison hunger strike and a look at what Brazil protests accomplished" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Tue, 16 Jul 2013 11:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-16/california-prison-hunger-strike-and-look-what-brazil-protests Taking sides: Let's talk turkey Thanksgiving Eve on the Morning Shift http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2012-11/taking-sides-lets-talk-turkey-thanksgiving-eve-morning-shift-103910 <p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/8198891427/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/lanlardpecanwhoe.jpg" style="height: 411px; width: 620px;" title="Chocolate pecan pie by celebrity pastry chef Eric Lanlard at Nielsen-Massey Vanillas in Waukegan, Ill. (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></p><div class="image-insert-image ">This Wednesday, Thanksgiving Eve, I&#39;ll be on<a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia"> <em>The Morning Shift</em></a> with Tony Sarabia taking your calls to help solve your Thanksgiving food questions. To ask a question, please call 855-848-5551 or email <a href="mailto:morningshift@wbez.org?subject=Thanksgiving%20food%20question">morningshift@wbez.org</a> &mdash; and please remember to leave your callback number.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">I&#39;m not the only cook in the house. Did you know <a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/tsarabia-0">Tony</a>, also host of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/radio-m"><em>Radio M</em></a>, was once a pastry cook, at <a href="http://www.spiaggiarestaurant.com/">Spiaggia</a> no less?</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">As I mentioned at the end of the <a href="http://storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-48-three-stars/elements/50a3dbb6deae9e20312df3c8">show last Wednesday</a>, we&#39;re curious about not only your turkey questions, but vegetarian too, despite what <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wbez915/posts/10151332775551000">some Facebook commenters</a> might think. Vegan, gluten-free and all questions are welcome too.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The only thing I ask: Please <a href="https://www.google.com/">Google</a> first. There&#39;s a wealth of knowledge out there. Yes, I&#39;ve cooked in Michelin three-star restaurants but when I have basic recipe questions, I too use my Google fu, and have found most reliable <a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/alton-brown/recipes/index.html">Alton Brown</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.simplyrecipes.com/">Simply Recipes</a>&nbsp;and my dear friend,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.davidlebovitz.com/">David Lebovitz</a>.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Please feel free to post your questions in the comments below too &mdash; thanks.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/8198882695/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/lanlardpecanslice.jpg" style="height: 411px; width: 620px;" title="Chocolate pecan pie by celebrity pastry chef Eric Lanlard at Nielsen-Massey Vanillas in Waukegan, Ill. (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></a></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 19 Nov 2012 11:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2012-11/taking-sides-lets-talk-turkey-thanksgiving-eve-morning-shift-103910 Turkish films try to push at boundaries http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-09/turkish-films-try-push-boundaries-102259 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Turkish%20Cinema%20AP.jpg" style="height: 405px; width: 620px; " title="Turkish director Nuri Bilge Ceylan at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival. (AP/Joel Ryan,file)" /></div><p>Heres&#39; a contest: Name just&nbsp;<em>one</em> Turkish movie. (And here&#39;s a hint:&nbsp;<em>Midnight Express </em>doesn&rsquo;t count.)&nbsp;If your mind is a blank, don&rsquo;t despair. Turkish cinema is struggling to establish an identity. It&rsquo;s part of what <a href="http://www.siskelfilmcenter.org/turkishcinema">Landscapes: A Tour of Recent Turkish Cinema</a><em>, </em>a series opening September 9th at the Siskel Film Center,&nbsp;is all about.&nbsp;</p><p>Like Turkey the country, Turkish cinema is multi-layered. There is a hilarious genre known as the &ldquo;Turkish Sci-Fi Rip-off Cinema,&rdquo; with such priceless characters as the Turkish Superman; Badi, the Turkish ET; and Seytan, the Turkish Terrorist.</p><p>Theirs is a broad, popular, largely melodramatic cinema. And there is a growing &ldquo;independent&rdquo; Turkish cinema, which is quite intellectual, and some of which deals with the anxieties, misaligned relationships, infidelities and betrayals of the middle-class. Its most recognized and much-awarded filmmaker is Nuri Bilge Ceylan (often referred to by Turks as &ldquo;N.B.C.&rdquo;), who has won at the Cannes Film Festival and whose most recent film is <em>Once Upon a Time in Anatolia</em>.</p><p>The films in the Landscapes program veer across a spectrum of themes and styles. In the opening weekend film <em>Love in Another Language</em>, the feisty your Zeynep works as a telemarketer in a phone boiler room and falls for Onur, a good-looking deaf-mute. Their one-night stand turns into a relationship challenged by Onur&rsquo;s unresolved past with his parents and Zeynep&rsquo;s attempts to organize her co-workers in a protest for better working conditions.&nbsp;The second opening weekend film, <em>Our Grand Despair</em>, is more oblique. Two buddies, Cetin and Ender, take in Sayin, a friend&rsquo;s grief-stricken sister, after her parents die in a car accident. Their male bond is put to a test both by having to care for an unstable young woman, and by both of them falling for Sayin.</p><p>An outstanding film in the series is <em>Polluting Paradise</em>, directed by Fatih Akin (who was born and works almost exclusively in Germany). In this documentary, Akin returns to &nbsp;his parents&rsquo; home town of Carmburnu, where a massive garbage landfill pollutes the soil, water and air and the residents fight an unmoving bureaucracy. <em>Honey</em>, directed by Semih Kaplanoglu, won the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. It is a beautiful, rich and sensitive portrait of a rural childhood, largely seen through the eyes of a six-year-old boy with a speech impediment, whose father keeps beehives deep in the forest.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.siskelfilmcenter.org/turkishcinema">Landscapes: A Tour of Recent Turkish Cinema</a>&nbsp;opens&nbsp;September 9th at the Siskel Film Center.</em></p></p> Fri, 07 Sep 2012 11:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-09/turkish-films-try-push-boundaries-102259 Are Turkey and Africa the keys to Europe's future? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/are-turkey-and-africa-keys-europes-future-99531 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/gul.jpg" title="Turkish President Abdullah Gul, center, poses with President Barack Obama, right, and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen as he arrives at the NATO Summit. (AP/Carolyn Kaster)" /></div><p>Editor&#39;s Note: Worldview<em> contributor Robert L. Price was at this past weekend&#39;s NATO summit and has been blog throughout the week on the summit and sustainability issues. Today, Price looks at how Western Europe made a historic bet, choosing Greece, Italy and Spain over Turkey and Africa -- and how that bet came up short.</em></p><p>In 2009, I was at a symposium in Chicago given by the <a href="http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/">Urban Affairs Association</a>. One part of the event discussed Mediterranean cities. Many lecturers and breakout sessions covered cities such as Barcelona, Naples and Athens.</p><p>Barcelona was noted for its diversity and rich cultural heritage as a result of its African roots. Spain has a Moorish tradition that clearly influenced its architectural heritage. Spanish trade with Africa, and especially the East, was one of many reasons for its past wealth and glory.</p><p>For Naples, the presenter demonstrated how its seaport was one of Italy&rsquo;s busiest, and how, for prosperity sake, the Italians should consider reorienting towards the South once more. When Italy faced south, like Spain, it knew great prosperity. Then there was Athens. Although much discussion centered on modern Athens, the presenter did not deny its ancient links to Africa, via Egypt, for centuries, if not millennia, and how Greece historically shared riches with Asia Minor.</p><p>This week I saw an <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2HPc9WPgYg">address</a> sponsored by the <a href="http://www.thechicagocouncil.org/">Chicago Council on Global Affairs</a>. Turkish President Abdullah Gul, in town for the NATO summit, was the guest speaker. His talk was quite optimistic:</p><p style="margin-left:.5in;"><em>Despite many global economic risks, the Turkish economy rests on sturdy macro foundations . . . [it has] an economy with strong public finances, sustainable debt dynamics, a sound banking system, functional credit markets. </em></p><p style="margin-left:.5in;"><em>Countries like Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen, which are now at the post-revolutionary stage of institutionalizing the change, Turkey is their most active partner. </em></p><p style="margin-left:.5in;"><em>In Africa alone, we will have 34 embassies by the end of this year, whereas we had only 12 in 2009.</em></p><p>Greece has been idealized as the cultural, philosophical and historical bedrock of Western civilization. This emotional connection had to score extra points in Greece&rsquo;s bid for European Union membership. Turkey, on the other hand, has lobbied for membership since 1959, but the Turks were perceived as too big, too poor, too Muslim or too &ldquo;other&rdquo; to join the EU.</p><p>Now look at Spain, Italy and Greece, all of which ignored their former southern Mediterranean or African trading partners. They are in financial dire straits and represent the weakest economic links of the European Union. Compare them to Turkey, a NATO member, denied admission to the EU club. It embraced its African Mediterranean relationships and now emerges as an economic model for Europe.</p><p>Any regrets, EU?</p><p><em>Robert L. Price is an architect and interior designer based in Shanghai, China. He is Worldview&#39;s arts and architecture contributor and a Global Cities co-contributor. Price also serves as Senior Associate and Technical Director for Asia at <a href="http://www.gensler.com/">Gensler</a>, a global design firm.</em></p></p> Fri, 25 May 2012 10:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/are-turkey-and-africa-keys-europes-future-99531 How the NATO peoples helped settle Chicago, Part 3 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-3-99036 <p><p>Today we conclude our capsule look at how peoples from the 28 NATO countries helped build Chicago.</p><p><strong>Belgium</strong>—As early as 1854, the government of Belgium identified 83 Belgians as living in the city of Chicago. What there was of a Belgian neighborhood in the city later developed in the few blocks around St. John Berchmans Catholic Church in Logan Square. Since the 1960s that concentration has dispersed.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Hungary-St.%20Stephen%20King_0.JPG" title="St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church--2015 W. Augusta Blvd."></div></div><p><strong>Germany—</strong>Germans were the first ethnic group to come to Chicago in great numbers. In 1850 one-sixth of the city’s population carried the “born in Germany” label. By 1900 a full 25% of Chicagoans were either first- or second-generation German.</p><p>They settled on the North Side and up the Lincoln Avenue corridor. They built churches, schools, social halls. They printed books and newspapers, and organized political clubs. They were determined to keep their culture. When one nativist mayor closed the saloons on Sunday, the city’s Germans rioted.</p><p>Then came World War I, and a national wave of anti-Germanism. The local Germans became more assimilated. Today, the Dank Haus in Lincoln Square serves as the city’s German-American cultural center. And along with the Irish and the Poles, Germans remain one of Chicago’s largest European ethnic groups. (Hey—those three are my ancestry!) &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Hungary</strong>—In 1890 there were fewer than 2,000 Hungarians living in Chicago. Within 30 years, that number had swelled to over 70,000. Most of the immigrants took up residence on the South Side, notably in the Burnside neighborhood. There were also Hungarian colonies in East Chicago and Joliet, and in the city around Humboldt Park. Today there is no single concentration of Hungarian settlement.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Germany-Altgeld%20%28State%20of%20Illinois%20photo%29.jpg" style="float: right; width: 300px;" title="A German immigrant to Chicago: John Peter Altgeld (State of Illinois photo)"></div><p><strong>Lithuania</strong>—As anyone who read <em>The Jungle </em>knows, many Chicago Lithuanians lived in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, while working in the Stock Yards itself. The community gradually moved southwest, while struggling to keep its ethnic identity during the years of Soviet incorporation. In the Marquette Park area, a section of 69<sup>th</sup> Street was renamed Lithuanian Plaza Court. About 80,000 people of Lithuanian background now live in Chicagoland. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Luxembourg</strong>—People from Luxembourg were living on the North Side as early as the 1840s. Within a few decades, a major settlement became established along Ridge Avenue, near St. Henry Catholic Church. A Luxembourger community also sprang up in Niles Center (Skokie). Today about 150,000 Luxembourgers live in various parts of the city and suburbs.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-Turkey-TACA.JPG" title="Turkish American Cultural Alliance--3845 N. Harlem Ave."></div><p><strong>Slovakia</strong>—Though there have been Slovaks in Chicago for over 150 years, their numbers can’t be determined with much precision, since Slovakia did not become fully independent until 1993. For much of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century, the major concentration of Slovaks was in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, with another settlement in Joliet. The more recent arrivals have gravitated to Garfield Ridge.</p><p><strong>Slovenia</strong>—Slovenia was first part of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, and later became a founding state of Yugoslavia, so tracing Chicago’s Slovenians is not always easy. The earliest local colonies were on the Lower West Side and in Joliet. Community life centered around the Catholic parish, though there was also a large secular element. Today there is a Slovenian Cultural Center in suburban Lemont.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ZZ-US-American%20Indian%20Center.JPG" title="American Indian Center of Chicago--1630 W. Wilson Ave."></div><p><strong>Turkey</strong>—Chicago’s Turkish population has always been small and dispersed. The Turkish American Cultural Alliance, located in the Dunning neighborhood, has worked to promote art, history, and Turkish heritage.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><strong>United States</strong>—Before the Europeans came, the largest Native group in current Chicago was the Potawatomi. The tribes were forced to cede their lands during the 1830s, though a few families remained. Since World War II there has been a significant migration from the reservations to urban areas. Today the American Indian Center serves the 40,000 people from nearly 100 tribes living in the Chicago area.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 May 2012 07:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2012-05/how-nato-peoples-helped-settle-chicago-part-3-99036 Worldview 4.26.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/IRAQACTORS10457.sJPG_900_540_0_95_1_50_50.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Turkey is working to block official attempts by Israel to attend the NATO summit. Chicago-area businessman and Turkey scholar <a href="http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/boards/dic/members/celebi.asp" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Mehmet Celebi</a> tells <em>Worldview</em> what’s behind the diplomatic tensions. Also, in Iraqi Kurdistan, a student Shakespeare troupe is becoming internationally recognized for performing the Bard’s plays in their original tongue. <em>Worldview</em> speaks with troupe director Peter Friedrich and actor Ahmad Muhammad Taha about Shakespeare’s role in Iraq. And Rob Cahill teamed up with Chicago bird conservationists to protect the winter home of birds that migrate through Chicago by reforesting a section of a Guatemalan cloud forest. Rob tells <em>Worldview</em> about his group, <a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a>.</p></p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 14:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-26/worldview-42612-98571