WBEZ | turkey http://www.wbez.org/tags/turkey Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Explosion in Heart of Istanbul's Tourist Area Kills at Least 10 http://www.wbez.org/news/explosion-heart-istanbuls-tourist-area-kills-least-10-114452 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-504660554_custom-16e76ee82e527c519956d338cbf69a2f98481411-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res462764263" previewtitle="Ambulances and police are seen at the blast site after an explosion in Istanbul's central Sultanahmet district. At least 10 people were killed and 15 wounded in a suicide bombing near tourists in central Istanbul's historic Sultanahmet district."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Ambulances and police are seen at the blast site after an explosion in Istanbul's central Sultanahmet district. At least 10 people were killed and 15 wounded in a suicide bombing near tourists in central Istanbul's historic Sultanahmet district." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/12/gettyimages-504660554_custom-16e76ee82e527c519956d338cbf69a2f98481411-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 389px; width: 620px;" title="Ambulances and police are seen at the blast site after an explosion in Istanbul's central Sultanahmet district. At least 10 people were killed and 15 wounded in a suicide bombing near tourists in central Istanbul's historic Sultanahmet district." /></div><div><div><p>At least 10 people are dead and more than a dozen wounded after an explosion struck a historic district in Istanbul on Tuesday morning. Civilians and tourists are among the victims from what officials say was a suicide blast in Sultanahmet Square, site of the famed Blue Mosque.</p></div></div></div><p>After the blast, speculation immediately began to fly over who might be responsible. Many fingers pointed at ISIS because of the apparent target &mdash; a historic cultural area that&#39;s popular with tourists.</p><p>Turkish President Reccep Tayyip Erdogan says police believe the explosion, which reportedly struck near where a 3,500-year-old Egyptian Obelisk of Theodosius stands, was the work of a suicide bomber with ties to Syria. Erdogan delivered a lengthy televised address in the wake of the attack.</p><p><strong>Update at 12:50 p.m. ET: At Least 8 Germans Killed</strong></p><p>Confirming and providing new detail about earlier reports, German Chancellor Angela Merkel says eight Germans are among the dead in Istanbul.</p><p>Both Merkel and German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier spoke of the country&#39;s losses today, saying that in addition to those killed, nine German nationals were severely injured, reports NPR&#39;s Esme Nicholson.</p><p>&quot;International terror changes the places of its attacks but its goal is always the same &mdash; it is our free life in free society,&quot; Merkel said, according to the AP. &quot;The terrorists are the enemies of all free people, indeed, the enemies of all humanity, whether in Syria or Turkey, in France or Germany.&quot;</p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/462763104/462764870" title="NPR embedded audio player" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong>Update at 8:20 a.m. ET: Syrian National Is Identified</strong></p><p>Most of the people killed were foreigners, says Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus, who also said police had identified the bomber as a 28-year-old Syrian national.</p><p><em>Our original post continues:</em></p><p>NPR&#39;s Peter Kenyon, who&#39;s based in Istanbul, says the blast was strong enough that he heard it from 3 miles away. Peter spoke to British photojournalist Johnny Green, who happened to be visiting the square at the time of the attack. Here&#39;s how Green described the scene:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;We&#39;d come out of the Blue Mosque and were just walking onto this boulevard. We were just in the corner, just out of sight. So we heard it, rather than saw. Then, people were just running in every direction. Some people were running towards the action, to help. And other people were just fleeing.... We were very much caught between a rock and a hard place.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>Tourists frequently visit the area of the blast, drawn by the green open space and a cluster of historic sites such as the Hagia Sophia and elements of the Hippodrome of Constantinople.</p><p>Reporting on the nationality of some of the victims,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/live-10-killed-at-least-15-wounded-in-explosion-in-istanbuls-sultanahmet.aspx?pageID=238&amp;nID=93736&amp;NewsCatID=341">Hurriyet Daily News&nbsp;</a>reports, &quot;Six German citizens, one Norwegian and one Peruvian were among the ... wounded people rushed to the Haseki Hospital, Doğan News Agency has reported.&quot;</p><p>The news outlet adds that in the mayhem that followed the attack, a police vehicle crashed and flipped on its side, its siren still blaring. Video from the scene shows a crowd of onlookers gathered to flip the vehicle back upright.</p><p>Tuesday&#39;s attack is the latest in a string of terrorist activity in Turkey. In October, some 100 people were killed in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/10/10/447413438/at-least-30-killed-in-turkey-twin-blasts-at-peace-rally">a double bombing in Ankara</a>. In December, a blast at an Istanbul airport killed one person. And police said they&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/12/30/461467647/isis-new-year-s-eve-bombing-plot-foiled-in-turkey-officials-say">foiled another double bombing&nbsp;</a>in Ankara that was timed to strike on New Year&#39;s Eve.</p><p>&quot;Basically, folks here in Istanbul have been on edge for weeks,&quot; Peter says, &quot;wondering if something was going to blow up here.&quot;</p><p>This story will be updated.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/12/462763104/explosion-in-heart-of-istanbuls-tourist-area-kills-10?ft=nprml&amp;f=462763104" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 12 Jan 2016 13:22:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/explosion-heart-istanbuls-tourist-area-kills-least-10-114452 The refugees stranded in Greece http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-30/refugees-stranded-greece-113995 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20921696859_bb9c386da0_z.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Society)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235459198&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Closed European borders put pressure on Greece</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The investigation into the Paris attacks has revealed that at least two of the attackers traveled to France via Greece, mixed in with the refugees coming in from Syria. Since the attacks several European countries have closed their borders, stranding a large number of would be asylum seekers and migrants in Greece. Dr. Zaher Sahloul, the former president of the Syrian American Medical Society, has just returned from working with refugees in Lesbos, Greece. He joins us to discuss the latest developments.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong><em>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-eb161a56-5a2e-1c33-89d6-7c4604afff8c"><a href="http://twitter.com/sahloul">Dr. Zaher Sahloul</a> is former president of the Syrian American Medical Society. He&rsquo;s just returned from Greece.</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235459527&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The implications of pro-Kurdish activist Tahir Elci&#39;s murder</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">A prominent Kurdish lawyer and human rights activist, Tahir Elci, was killed in Turkey over the weekend. He was shot, after a battle with police and after making a statement to journalists, where he called for an end to violence between the Turkish government and the Kurdish group the PKK. Elci had faced death threats after saying the PKK is not a terrorist organization. A curfew was imposed in the city where the killing took place, with police afraid Elci&rsquo;s death could lead to more violence and unrest. Taner Akcam is a professor at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University, joins us to discuss the implications of Elci&rsquo;s killing.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-eb161a56-5a2f-d550-7bc3-69c756ff8e16"><em>Taner Akcam is a professor at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at <a href="http://twitter.com/ClarkUniversity">Clark University</a></em>.</span></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 30 Nov 2015 14:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-30/refugees-stranded-greece-113995 Turkey, Russia Promise Not To Go To War Over Downing Of Russian Fighter Jet http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-25/turkey-russia-promise-not-go-war-over-downing-russian-fighter-jet <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/1125_russia-turkey-624x416.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_96763"><img alt="Protesters hold placards and shout slogans as they take part in an anti-Turkey picket outside the Turkish embassy in Moscow on November 25, 2015. Turkey shot down a Russian war plane on the Syrian border on November 24, sending tensions spiraling as Russian President Vladimir Putin warned Ankara its &quot;stab in the back&quot; would have serious consequences. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/11/1125_russia-turkey-624x416.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Protesters hold placards and shout slogans as they take part in an anti-Turkey picket outside the Turkish embassy in Moscow on November 25, 2015. Turkey shot down a Russian war plane on the Syrian border on November 24, sending tensions spiraling as Russian President Vladimir Putin warned Ankara its “stab in the back” would have serious consequences. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)" /><p>Tensions are still running high, a day after Turkey shot down a Russian fighter jet that it says strayed into its airspace and did not respond to warnings. Russia disputes both assertions.</p></div><p>The Russian captain who survived the downing of the plane says he was flying over Syrian territory, and also says Turkey did not issue any warnings. Both Turkey and Russia promised today not to go to war the incident, but there are still many questions about what the fallout might look like.</p><p><a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/11/25/turkey-russia-promise-no-war" target="_blank"><em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s</em></a> Indira Lakshmanan gets the latest from&nbsp;Nadia Bilbassy-Charters, Washington bureau chief for Al Arabiya news channel.</p></p> Wed, 25 Nov 2015 14:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-25/turkey-russia-promise-not-go-war-over-downing-russian-fighter-jet The Strange Truth Behind Presidential Turkey Pardons http://www.wbez.org/news/strange-truth-behind-presidential-turkey-pardons-113943 <p><div id="res457267346" previewtitle="Liberty, a 45-pound turkey, is seen at the White House before being pardoned in 2011. The bird died two years later due to heart failure."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Liberty, a 45-pound turkey, is seen at the White House before being pardoned in 2011. The bird died two years later due to heart failure." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/ap_111123024197_wide-bb97f38d470ca664eca35b4c644209fdf6f7a139-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="Liberty, a 45-pound turkey, is seen at the White House before being pardoned in 2011. The bird died two years later due to heart failure. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)" /></div><div><div><p>The annual presidential turkey pardoning event at the White House, which took place again today, is a peculiar one. Presiding over his sixth one last year, even President Obama seemed confused by it all.</p></div></div></div><p>&quot;It is a little puzzling that I do this every year,&quot; Obama said, &quot;but I will say that I enjoy it, because with all the tough stuff that swirls around in this office, it&#39;s nice once in a while to just say, &#39;Happy Thanksgiving.&#39; &quot;</p><p>He says a lot more than that. He makes embarrassing dad jokes, while his daughters stand next to him, about turkeys with punny names &mdash; and how they will live out their golden years in splendor. (Though &quot;years&quot; is a stretch. More on that below.)</p><p>&quot;Time flies &mdash; even if turkeys don&#39;t,&quot; Obama said Wednesday before looking off to his right for his daughter Sasha&#39;s approval.</p><p>There&#39;s always lots of laughter for a lighthearted moment the day before Thanksgiving, but the truth behind the turkey pardons is a strange and sad tale with a long and myth-filled history.</p><p>So, who are these overstuffed fowl? Where did they come from? And how did this whole thing get started, anyway? We try to answer those questions, and more:</p><div id="res457260183" previewtitle="A class of fifth-grade students from Eisenhut Elementary School in Modesto, Calif., cheered for their favorite turkey as Foster Farms staffers picked the prized bird for this year's turkey pardon."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="A class of fifth-grade students from Eisenhut Elementary School in Modesto, Calif., cheered for their favorite turkey as Foster Farms staffers picked the prized bird for this year's turkey pardon." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/ap_383413758639_wide-b95a9ff3bf3cfdb25ee267fcf8f65980364331ac-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="A class of fifth-grade students from Eisenhut Elementary School in Modesto, Calif., cheered for their favorite turkey as Foster Farms staffers picked the prized bird for this year's turkey pardon. (Scott Smith/AP)" /></div><div><p><strong>1. Where did they find these turkeys?</strong></p></div></div><p>This year&#39;s birds are from an industrial turkey farm in Modesto, Calif., Foster Farms. This year&#39;s chosen ones are named Tom One and Tom Two. Not very creative, but they were given new ceremonial names &mdash; Honest and Abe &mdash; voted on in a Twitter poll&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/11/24/taking-home-title-who-will-be-years-national-thanksgiving-turkey">promoted by the White House</a>. The names were submitted from hundreds of kids from California.</p><div id="res457357330">&nbsp;</div><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p dir="ltr" lang="en">Meet &quot;Honest&quot;. He&#39;s 22 inches tall and loves Country music <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TurkeyPardon2015?src=hash">#TurkeyPardon2015</a> <a href="https://t.co/guZ2q2MQPt">pic.twitter.com/guZ2q2MQPt</a></p>&mdash; NatlTurkeyFederation (@TurkeyGal) <a href="https://twitter.com/TurkeyGal/status/669199677863157764">November 24, 2015</a></blockquote><script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script><p>Just Tom One--Abe, in this case--stood in front of the president.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p dir="ltr" lang="en">Meet &quot;Abe&quot; He has a wingspan of 6 feet and has a macho man strut style <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TurkeyPardon2015?src=hash">#TurkeyPardon2015</a> <a href="https://t.co/zdw0qZGDYe">pic.twitter.com/zdw0qZGDYe</a></p>&mdash; NatlTurkeyFederation (@TurkeyGal) <a href="https://twitter.com/TurkeyGal/status/669200272107941888">November 24, 2015</a></blockquote><script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Tom Two was selected as an alternate. Don&#39;t worry, both of their lives were spared &mdash; temporarily, anyway. The Toms were chosen out of a flock of 50, which were whittled down to a dozen finalists and picked in front of a class of fifth-graders. Foster Farms manager Joe Hedden&nbsp;<a href="http://bigstory.ap.org/article/63b2e9b5271d4503bea4392872bc0fbd/turkey-chosen-presidential-pardon-thanksgiving">said</a>&nbsp;Tom One was a clear winner because of his personality. He apparently really likes to strut his stuff (he gobbled quite a bit at the crowd gathered at the White House), Hedden said before parting ways with the turkeys, who boarded a first-class flight to Washington called, not kidding,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.modbee.com/news/article45524970.html">Turkey One</a>.</p><p>&quot;We want to present the president with a well-mannered and socially skilled turkey that&#39;s going to act right on the big day,&quot; Hedden said.</p><p><strong>2. Do they always get the turkeys from the same place?</strong></p><div id="res457281113" previewtitle="Men dressed as Secret Service agents stand guard next to Tom One and Tom Two, this year's turkey and alternate."><div data-crop-type=""><div class="image-insert-image "><strong><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/gettyimages-496023924_wide-bad7d3aee7611c359d04776598d0ce3cc2301828-s1200.jpg" style="width: 620px; height: 348px;" title="Men dressed as Secret Service agents stand guard next to Tom One and Tom Two, this year's turkey and alternate. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)" /></strong></div></div><div><div><p>No. Here&#39;s the thing: This is an event run by the National Turkey Federation. Yes, even turkeys have lobbyists. (They have offices four blocks from the White House.) The group is so involved in the event that it even paid for the turkeys to take a presidential-style motorcade from the farm to the airport flanked by fake Secret Service agents.</p></div></div></div><p>The men in dark suits with earpieces are all part of the show, as are faux presidential decals depicting a turkey wearing a pilgrim hat at the center of the &quot;Seal of the National Turkey of the United States.&quot; The chairman of the federation usually picks a turkey from his home state, and this year the chairman is Jihad Douglas, president of Aviagen Turkeys, a &quot;<a href="http://www.modbee.com/news/article45524970.html">supplier of turkey breeding stock</a>.&quot;</p><p><strong>3. When and why did this begin?</strong></p><p>This whole thing got started in 1947 when Harry Truman was president. And that has actually been a source of confusion. Bill Clinton in his 1997 pardoning ceremony proclaimed that Truman was the first to pardon a turkey. But that&#39;s not true. The<a href="http://www.trumanlibrary.org/trivia/turkey.htm">Truman Library issued a statement in 2003</a>&nbsp;saying:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;The Library&#39;s staff has found no documents, speeches, newspaper clippings, photographs, or other contemporary records in our holdings which refer to Truman pardoning a turkey that he received as a gift in 1947, or at any other time during his Presidency. ... Truman sometimes indicated to reporters that the turkeys he received were destined for the family dinner table.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>So, Truman was the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.eatturkey.com/why-turkey/history">first to receive</a>&nbsp;a ceremonial turkey from the National Turkey Federation (and the Poultry and Egg National Board), but he ate it (as did Eisenhower). And that was the intention of the gift &mdash; to raise the profile of the bird and maintain its institutionalization as a Thanksgiving and Christmas staple.</p><p>The tradition of giving turkeys to the president goes much further back, though, than industry groups&#39; involvement. From 1873 to 1913, a turkey dealer from Rhode Island named Horace Vose, known as the &quot;Poultry King,&quot; became the unofficial turkey provider to the White House for Thanksgiving and Christmas, according to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.whitehousehistory.org/pardoning-the-thanksgiving-turkey">White House Historical Society</a>. In 1913, Vose got some competition from a former Kentucky congressman, who claimed his bird tasted better because it was fed a diet of red peppers. After Vose died in 1913, it was something of a free for all.</p><div id="res457262109" previewtitle="President John F. Kennedy reaches out to touch a 40-pound turkey at the White House in 1963. The presentation was made on behalf of the nation's turkey industry."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="President John F. Kennedy reaches out to touch a 40-pound turkey at the White House in 1963. The presentation was made on behalf of the nation's turkey industry." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/ap_31330392127-5e6ae6aff3709c1fe956df636d02117f0ad9ba3c-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 464px; width: 620px;" title="President John F. Kennedy reaches out to touch a 40-pound turkey at the White House in 1963. The presentation was made on behalf of the nation's turkey industry. (Harvey Georges/AP)" /></div><div><div><p><strong>4. OK, so if it wasn&#39;t Truman, then who was the first to pardon a turkey?</strong></p></div></div></div><p>It depends on your definition of &quot;pardon.&quot; An&nbsp;<a href="http://www.whitehousehistory.org/questions/which-president-started-the-tradition-of-pardoning-the-thanksgiving-turkey">1865 dispatch</a>&nbsp;from White House reporter Noah Brooks is the oldest-known account of a presidential turkey clemency. It was about&nbsp;Abraham Lincoln&nbsp;sparing a turkey two years earlier. It was a Christmas turkey that his son Tad had taken a liking to.</p><p>John F. Kennedy&nbsp;appears to have been the first to let a Thanksgiving turkey go. &quot;We&#39;ll just let this one grow,&quot; he said. The&nbsp;LA Times&nbsp;headlined that 1963 event &mdash; in which a sign hung around the turkey&#39;s neck that read, &quot;Good eating, Mr. President&quot; &mdash; as a &quot;<a href="http://www.nbcnews.com/news/other/presidential-turkey-pardons-not-long-history-you-might-think-f2D11663410">presidential pardon</a>.&quot;</p><p>Richard Nixon&nbsp;also chose not to eat that particular bird and sent it to a petting zoo instead.</p><div id="res457263362" previewtitle="President Ronald Reagan is startled as John Hendrick (center), president of the National Turkey Federation, presents him with a turkey in 1984."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="President Ronald Reagan is startled as John Hendrick (center), president of the National Turkey Federation, presents him with a turkey in 1984." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/ap_8411160115-01f655b83dec0156917b3323b0cd19aa1f8abd8d-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 464px; width: 620px;" title="President Ronald Reagan is startled as John Hendrick, center, president of the National Turkey Federation, presents him with a turkey in 1984. (Scott Stewart/AP)" /></div><div><div><p>Ronald Reagan&nbsp;in 1987 was technically the first president to use the word &quot;pardon&quot; about a turkey, but it was really just a way to deflect questions about the Iran-Contra scandal and whether he would pardon key players involved &mdash; Oliver North and John Poindexter. The bird, &quot;Charlie,&quot; was already headed for a petting zoo, but after Sam Donaldson of ABC News pressed Reagan on whether he&#39;d pardon North and Poindexter, Reagan&nbsp;<a href="http://www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/speeches/1987/112387d.htm">responded</a>, &quot;If they&#39;d given me a different answer on Charlie and his future, I would have pardoned him.&quot;</p></div></div></div><p>Two years later,&nbsp;George H.W. Bush&nbsp;formalized the turkey pardoning ceremony, giving birth to the modern-day tradition.</p><p><strong>5. What happens to the turkey afterward?</strong></p><p>This is where the story turns very sad. They are sent to a farm in Virginia, where a former governor&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/presidents-pardon-turkeys-history/">raised his own turkeys</a>, but they do not live very long. In fact, every pardoned turkey is dead except for two &mdash; &quot;Cheese,&quot; the second half of last year&#39;s duo (&quot;Mac&quot; died in July of this year), and &quot;Courage,&quot; pardoned in 2009.</p><p>These birds, though, are bred to be eaten. Many industrially grown turkeys are fattened up with a&nbsp;<a href="http://minnesotaturkey.com/turkeys/fun-facts/">protein-rich diet of corn and soybeans</a>. They can&#39;t fly, because they are too big; their bone structures can&#39;t hold up all that weight for very long; and their organs fail if they&#39;re kept alive too long.</p><p>These unfortunate facts have been a sore point for animal-rights activists, like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, better known as PETA, which listed its complaints, including&nbsp;<a href="http://www.peta.org/features/white-house-turkey-pardon/">noting the fates</a>&nbsp;of the recent &quot;pardoned&quot; birds. Others, including writers at the&nbsp;Washington Post&nbsp;and Vox, have called the pardon &quot;<a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2013/11/26/the-turkey-pardon-is-americas-dumbest-tradition/">America&#39;s dumbest</a>&quot; and &quot;<a href="http://www.vox.com/2014/11/24/7276353/white-house-turkey-pardon">most absurd holiday tradition</a>.&quot;</p><p>But the turkey federation, of course, pushes back on that notion.</p><p>&quot;Think of the meaning of Thanksgiving,&quot; argued Keith Williams, vice president for communications and marketing at the turkey federation. &quot;It&#39;s always been about the presentation of the National Thanksgiving Turkey &mdash; symbolic of the blessings of agriculture we have in this country. It becomes a time for the president to recall with the nation our blessings and celebrate the beginning of the holiday season.&quot;</p><div id="res457263813" previewtitle="Unfortunately for the birds, pardoning a turkey doesn't actually keep the meat off the White House table."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Unfortunately for the birds, pardoning a turkey doesn't actually keep the meat off the White House table." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/ap_111024072162-e724028a843c9deda5fdd517890bb1007dcffe48-s200-c85.jpg" style="height: 186px; width: 250px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Unfortunately for the birds, pardoning a turkey doesn't actually keep the meat off the White House table. (Matthew Mead/AP)" /></div><div><div><p><strong>6. Why do presidents pardon turkeys? Don&#39;t they eat turkey at Thanksgiving?</strong></p></div></div></div><p>That irony may account for Obama&#39;s puzzlement. He also joked last year that he was saving those turkeys from a &quot;terrible and delicious fate.&quot;</p><p>People are full of contradictions.</p><p>It&#39;s clearly been difficult for politicians to say on camera that they would eat the bird presented to them, especially as America has grown away from an agricultural society and grown up with Disney movies heavy on the personification of animals. Americans are far more removed from the actual process of how their food makes its way to their table.</p><p>&quot;Your grandmother (1940s) would have killed her own and prepared it,&quot; Williams notes. &quot;Since the 1950s, it became more convenient for families to have the dressed turkeys (all ready to cook), which they bought from the butcher or their grocery store. Few people actually hunt and dress their own food &mdash; we thankfully have the farmers who grow and deliver food to us.&quot;</p><p>(Side fact: The turkey federation actually provides dressed turkeys to presidents, too. Obama has donated his.)</p><p>The turkey federation seems potentially open to a return to the days when presidents ate the turkeys presented to them.</p><p>&quot;The pardoning was a recent custom begun with President George H.W. Bush,&quot; Williams pointed out.</p><p>Some traditions are hard to change. It&#39;s something to think about after you walk through the grocery store, pick out that turkey &mdash; and sit down at the Thanksgiving dinner table.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/25/457253194/the-strange-truth-behind-presidential-turkey-pardons?ft=nprml&amp;f=457253194" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Wed, 25 Nov 2015 14:18:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/strange-truth-behind-presidential-turkey-pardons-113943 StoryCorps Chicago: Thirty Years of Talking Turkey http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-thirty-years-talking-turkey-113939 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 151125 Marjorie Carol bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><div>For more than 30 years, Marjorie Klindera and Carol Miller have spent Thanksgiving Day together. But instead of sitting around a dining room table, the two sit around a bank of telephones.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>That&#39;s because Marjorie and Carol both work at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line. It&rsquo;s a toll-free phone number for people who need help cooking turkeys.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Even with the Internet the talk line gets more than 10,000 phone calls each Thanksgiving. Marjorie and Carol are two of the longest-serving experts.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em><a href="http://www.storycorps.org">StoryCorps&rsquo; </a>mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 25 Nov 2015 13:16:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-thirty-years-talking-turkey-113939 Premium, Young And Natural: The Turkey Labels We Cluck-Cluck Over http://www.wbez.org/news/premium-young-and-natural-turkey-labels-we-cluck-cluck-over-113931 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/turkeylabel1small-20167402ee4463d2d75a28d16c0e95bed248cad0.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res456509177" previewtitle="&quot;Free-range&quot; turkeys at Maple Lawn Farms in Fulton, Md., in November 2014. In some cases, turkeys labeled &quot;free-range&quot; roam freely on a farm. But in the vast majority spend most of their time in crowded houses, consumer advocates say."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="&quot;Free-range&quot; turkeys at Maple Lawn Farms in Fulton, Md., in November 2014. In some cases, turkeys labeled &quot;free-range&quot; roam freely on a farm. But in the vast majority spend most of their time in crowded houses, consumer advocates say." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/18/freerangeturkeys_custom-29a1348c257ac2d6fcb709339028d89cc25928f6-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 409px; width: 620px;" title="&quot;Free-range&quot; turkeys at Maple Lawn Farms in Fulton, Md., in November 2014. In some cases, turkeys labeled &quot;free-range&quot; roam freely on a farm. But in the vast majority spend most of their time in crowded houses, consumer advocates say. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>You&#39;re at the grocery store, shopping for Thanksgiving dinner. You&#39;ve grabbed sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts and cans of pumpkin. If you&#39;re from the Midwest like I am, you&#39;re also gearing up for green bean casserole.</p></div></div></div><p>But when you approach a refrigerated section of the store piled high with turkeys, you&#39;re suddenly inundated with labels: natural, fresh, no hormones, young, premium and so on. Pretty soon, your head is spinning, so you grab the nearest one. As you head to the checkout line, you wonder if you&#39;ve just made an ethical choice or been duped.

</p><p>This scenario has become part of the Thanksgiving experience for many shoppers. If you&#39;re like me, you may have told yourself that, someday, you&#39;ll learn what all those labels actually mean. Well, today is that day. Because this is your guide to the utterly confusing world of turkey labels &mdash; a glossary for the wannabe informed Thanksgiving shopper.

</p><p><strong>Fresh</strong></p><p>

What you might think it means:&nbsp;The turkey was slaughtered this morning (or maybe yesterday) and was rushed to my local grocery store, where consumers like me will taste the difference!

</p><div id="res456504555" previewtitle="A Butterball turkey for sale in November 2014, in Centreville, Va. Terms like &quot;premium&quot; and &quot;raised without hormones&quot; tell you little about the quality of the turkey or how it was raised."><div><div><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;&quot;Fresh&quot; has nothing to do with the time between slaughter and sale. Instead, it means that the turkey has not been cooled to below 26 degrees Fahrenheit. In other words, it was never frozen. Above 26 degrees Fahrenheit, the meat can remain pliant &mdash; you can press it in with your thumb.</p></div></div></div><p><strong>Young

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means: This bird was killed at a younger age than most turkeys and is therefore more tender and delicious. Maybe it also suffered less.
</p><p>What it actually means: The bird was likely killed at the same age as most other turkeys. According to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.goodfoodjobs.com/blog/daisy-freund-senior-manager-farm-animal-welfare-american-society-for-the-prevention-of-cruelty-to-animals/">Daisy Freund</a>, an animal welfare certification expert at the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, most commercial turkeys are slaughtered at 16 to 18 weeks, compared to the roughly 10 years turkeys live in the wild. The U.S. Department of Agriculture does not define &quot;young&quot; for turkeys, but it&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/larc/Policies/Labeling_Policy_Book_082005.pdf">requires</a>&nbsp;that turkeys that lived more than a year be labeled as &quot;yearling&quot; or &quot;mature.&quot;</p><p><strong>Natural

</strong></p><p><img alt="A Butterball turkey for sale in November 2014, in Centreville, Va. Terms like &quot;premium&quot; and &quot;raised without hormones&quot; tell you little about the quality of the turkey or how it was raised." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/18/turkeylabel1small_custom-a25017d6d96cd1be0cb4cb26391a66b3e5c31c7c-s400-c85.jpg" style="height: 315px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="A Butterball turkey for sale in November 2014, in Centreville, Va. Terms like &quot;premium&quot; and &quot;raised without hormones&quot; tell you little about the quality of the turkey or how it was raised. (Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty) " /></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;The turkeys have been raised in a &quot;natural&quot; environment, wandering around in the woods or on a farm, scavenging food and gobble-gobbling their cares away.

</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;According to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/2a9bcae8-ae1e-4248-9ce7-4e752f2f91fc/Turkey_Raised_by_the_Rules.pdf?MOD=AJPERES">U.S. Department of Agriculture</a>, it means no artificial ingredients have been added to the turkey meat, and the meat is only minimally processed. But&nbsp;<a href="http://consumersunion.org/experts/urvashi-rangan/">Urvashi Rangan</a>, director of consumer safety and sustainability for Consumer Reports, says the term isn&#39;t helpful at all. &quot;It has nothing to do with whether the turkeys got antibiotics every day, were living in filthy conditions or were confined indoors,&quot; she says. Her organization is campaigning against the use of the term, which they feel misleads consumers. The Food and Drug Administration also has admitted it&#39;s a challenge to define the term and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/11/11/455506222/whats-natural-food-the-government-isnt-sure-and-wants-your-input">just asked</a>&nbsp;the public for help.

</p><div id="res456504590"><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>On that note, let&#39;s pause for a minute to answer a basic question &mdash; how exactly are most turkeys in the U.S. raised?

</p><p>&quot;The vast majority of turkeys are living in crowded houses &mdash; football field-sized sheds that are entirely enclosed &mdash; by the tens of thousands,&quot; says the ASPCA&#39;s Freund. 

She says the 30-pound birds typically have their beaks cut to prevent them from injuring or killing one another, and are allotted an average of two square feet of space. &quot;It&#39;s like living your entire life in Times Square on New Year&#39;s Eve,&quot; she says.</p><p>Meanwhile, Freund says, manure often piles up beneath the birds, and ammonia hangs thick in the air. Many turkeys are routinely given&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/11/26/247377377/did-your-thanksgiving-turkey-take-any-antibiotics">antibiotics</a>&nbsp;to prevent them from getting sick. Plus, modern turkeys have been selectively bred to mature quickly and have extremely large breasts (for more white meat). Many have trouble standing and are incapable of having sex &mdash; their large chests get in the way, Freund says.</p><p>To be clear, turkey producers must still meet basic safety standards and the meat should be safe. But terms like &quot;natural&quot; may be misleading consumers about how the birds are actually raised.</p><p>Let&#39;s look at a few more dubious labels.

</p><p><strong>Free-Range

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;These turkeys roam freely on a farm, pecking at the lush grass and getting more exercise than I do.

</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;In some cases (on some small farms), it does mean what you&#39;re picturing. But Rangan says in the vast majority of cases, &quot;free-range&quot; turkeys are raised in the standard, crowded houses. The only difference, she says, is that these birds must have &quot;access to the outdoors.&quot;</p><p>But the word &quot;access&quot; is broadly used. &quot;If the animal never even went outdoors, but you sort of opened and closed the door every day, that would suffice to label the bird as &#39;free-range,&#39; &quot; she says.</p><p><strong>Cage</strong>-<strong>Free

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;This turkey had a better life than most, because at least it wasn&#39;t stuffed into a tiny cage.

</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;This turkey&#39;s life was probably the same as most, because turkeys are not raised in cages. The conventional practice &mdash; which accounts for well over 95 percent of all commercial turkeys, according to ASPCA &mdash; is to raise them in open houses. So, calling a turkey cage-free is sort of like calling a cantaloupe cage-free.

</p><p><strong>Premium</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;This turkey is a higher grade of meat, and is more delicious and healthy.

</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;Basically, nothing. The USDA grades beef cuts with words like &quot;prime,&quot; &quot;choice&quot; and &quot;select,&quot; but premium is not one of their designations and these graded terms are not used for poultry anyway.

 A company can label any kind of turkey as &quot;premium.&quot;</p><p><strong>No Hormones Added</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;This bird is healthier than most because it wasn&#39;t pumped full of the hormones that turn some turkeys into the Incredible Hulk.
</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;Once again, this term is misleading. By USDA law, turkeys (and other poultry) are not allowed to be given growth hormones.</p><p><strong>Humane/Non-Certified Humane

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;Finally, a bird that has been raised according to an ethical set of principles. It was probably treated fairly and lived a decent life. Maybe it even got to kiss its loved ones goodbye.

</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;If there is no certifying agency, which there isn&#39;t for this term, the label is probably meaningless, says Rangan from Consumer Reports. That&#39;s because the USDA allows companies to come up with their own definition of &quot;humane&quot; and it gives its seal of approval if the company meets its own standards. In these cases, &quot;it probably just means they met the conventional baseline,&quot; says Rangan.</p><p>That&#39;s most of the virtually meaningless terms. Let&#39;s move on to some labels that have at least some significance.</p><p><strong>Kosher

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;The turkey was raised according to a stricter set of hygiene standards. It was probably kept cleaner and healthier. 

</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;The turkey was probably raised in the same crowded house conditions as most turkeys. The only difference is that it was slaughtered according to a set of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.growandbehold.com/index.php?page=Kosher">kosher principles</a>.</p><p><strong>Vegetarian-Fed/Grain-Fed

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;This turkey enjoyed a lush supply of greens and grains, replicating its natural diet.

</p><div id="res456504560"><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;The bird probably ate what most turkeys eat: corn. But these birds have not had their diets supplemented with animal byproducts, which does happen in some settings. The irony, though, is that turkeys are not natural vegetarians. In the wild, they eat a variety of bugs and worms, along with grass and other plants.

</p><p><strong>Raised Without Antibiotics/No Antibiotics Administered</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;These birds were never given any antibiotics of any kind.</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;These birds were given drugs only if they were sick, but not for growth promotion, feed efficiency or to prevent disease.&nbsp;That means their producers are contributing less to the risk of antibiotic resistance and to &quot;superbugs&quot;&mdash; a serious health concern. However, Rangan suggests that consumers look for the USDA label with this term, to verify that the companies have been inspected. And she points out that the label does not mean the birds were raised in more sanitary conditions &mdash; only that they were not given routine antibiotics.</p><p><strong>Organic

</strong></p><p>What you might think it means:&nbsp;These turkeys were raised on a steady diet of organic vegetables, green smoothies and Bikram yoga.</p><p>What it actually means:&nbsp;To meet the requirements for the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ams.usda.gov/about-ams/programs-offices/national-organic-program">USDA&#39;s Certified Organic program</a>, animals must have some access to the outdoors (though there&#39;s debate about whether or not most organic turkeys actually go outdoors), be fed only organic feed (non-GMO and grown without chemical pesticides) and must not be given antibiotic drugs on a routine basis. Rangan says organic conditions are &quot;significantly different&quot; from conventional conditions. And yet, she says, organic lags behind the conditions enjoyed by humanely raised birds.</p><p>Which brings us to the final section.</p><p>

There are three main organizations that have publicly available standards for &quot;humane&quot; treatment. Birds bearing these labels typically are granted real access to the outdoors, eat a diverse diet and have the opportunity to behave as they would in the wild. You can read more about the specific criteria by clicking on each name.</p><p><strong><a href="http://animalwelfareapproved.org/">Animal Welfare Approved

</a></strong></p><p>Turkeys with this label come from farms that have been audited at least once a year, and have met criteria for animal welfare, environmental protection and community well-being. According to its website, &quot;Provisions are made to ensure [the animals&#39;] social interaction, comfort, and physical and psychological well-being.&quot;

</p><p><strong><a href="http://certifiedhumane.org/">Certified Humane

</a></strong></p><p>This is also a label with clearly defined parameters for animal and environmental care. Its website says, &quot;The goal of the program is to improve the lives of farm animals by driving consumer demand for kinder and more responsible farm animal practices.&quot;

</p><p><strong><a href="http://www.globalanimalpartnership.org/">Global Animal Partnership, or GAP
</a></strong></p><p>This is a rating system with six different levels, ranging from less crowding (level one) to animals without clipped beaks spending their entire life on the same farm, with enhanced access to the outdoors
 (level five-plus).</p><p>To summarize, here&#39;s a cheat sheet:

</p><p>Labels that mean very little:&nbsp;Fresh, Young, Natural, Premium, Cage-Free, Free-Range, No Hormones Added, Humane (not certified or USDA certified)
</p><p>Labels that mean something specific:&nbsp;Kosher, Raised Without Antibiotics/No Antibiotics Administered, Vegetarian-Fed/Grain-Fed, Organic

</p><p>Labels that mean the birds were raised humanely: Animal Welfare Approved, Certified Humane, GAP</p><p><em>Want more info? Check out Farm Forward&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://buyingpoultry.com/">poultry buying guide</a>&nbsp;released Nov. 18. Enjoy this story? Check out our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/12/23/370377902/farm-fresh-natural-eggs-not-always-what-they-re-cracked-up-to-be">guide to egg labels</a>.</em></p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/11/18/456414257/premium-young-and-natural-the-turkey-labels-we-cluck-cluck-over?ft=nprml&amp;f=456414257" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 24 Nov 2015 16:23:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/premium-young-and-natural-turkey-labels-we-cluck-cluck-over-113931 Why would Turkey shoot down a Russian jet? http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-24/why-would-turkey-shoot-down-russian-jet-113927 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Haberturk%20TV.jpg" title="(Photo: Associated Press/Haberturk TV)(Photo: Associated Press/Haberturk TV)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/234552776&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Turkey shoots down a Russian Jet</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Turkey shot down a Russian plane that it says violated its airspace. Turkey says it issued 10 warnings to the Russian plane before it was shot down. The Russians say the plane was flying over Syria. President Vladimir Putin called the incident a &quot;stab in the back by the terrorists&#39; accomplices.&quot; Henri Barkey, director of the Middle East Program at the Wilson Center, joins us to talk about what happened.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-a9a972c3-3b41-9e5e-a835-dd06fecadaa3"><a href="http://twitter.com/hbarkey">Henri Barkey</a> is director of the Middle East program at the <a href="http://twitter.com/theWilsonCenter">Woodrow Wilson Center</a>.</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/234552386&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Can Macri change Argentina?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Mauricio Macri has been confirmed as the winner in Argentina&#39;s presidential elections. Macri beat out the ruling party (which has been in power for more than a decade). His election marks a shift in Argentine politics. He has promised major economic reforms. We&rsquo;ll take a look at what&rsquo;s next for Argentina with Peter Prengaman, the Southern Cone news editor for the Associated Press.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-a9a972c3-3b44-2719-027b-a43b84b40867"><a href="http://twitter.com/@peterprengaman">Peter Prengaman</a> is the Southern Cone news editor for the <a href="http://twitter.com/AP">Associated Press</a>.</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/234553279&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EcoHeroes: Elevate Energy spreads energy-consciousness</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Anna Markowski believes that all Illinois residents should benefit from efficient and renewable energy. Her group, Elevate Energy, strives to create a community of energy-savvy consumers that will lobby energy companies and municipalities to aggressively seek sustainable energy sources, especially for low-income citizens. For our EcoHeroes segment, where we feature people who want to transform our environment and ecosystem, Markowski will tell us about her idea to throw &ldquo;house parties&rdquo; to have fun and educate about sustainability.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-a9a972c3-3b46-5d4e-df3c-165dbc47604d">Anna Markowski is Community Projects manager at <a href="http://twitter.com/Elevate_Energy">Elevate Energy</a>.&nbsp;</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-24/why-would-turkey-shoot-down-russian-jet-113927 Why Would Turkey Shoot Down A Russian Plane? http://www.wbez.org/news/why-would-turkey-shoot-down-russian-plane-113914 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-498587960_custom-ae5edf74411bc39249d978ba6f9ea0893329aad2-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res457239278" previewtitle="Russian President Vladimir Putin is shown during a meeting with Jordan's King Abdullah II in Sochi, Russia, on Tuesday. Putin said Turkey's downing of a Russian warplane was &quot;a stab in the back.&quot;"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Russian President Vladimir Putin is shown during a meeting with Jordan's King Abdullah II in Sochi, Russia, on Tuesday. Putin said Turkey's downing of a Russian warplane was &quot;a stab in the back.&quot;" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/gettyimages-498587960_custom-ae5edf74411bc39249d978ba6f9ea0893329aad2-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title="Russian President Vladimir Putin is shown during a meeting with Jordan's King Abdullah II in Sochi, Russia, on Tuesday. Putin said Turkey's downing of a Russian warplane was &quot;a stab in the back.&quot; (Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>Let&#39;s start with one thing that&#39;s clear and simple in Syria&#39;s messy war: Many foreign powers are engaged in the battle, and all share the goal of beating back the Islamic State.</p></div></div></div><p>This very loose grouping includes Turkey and Russia, who aren&#39;t best friends, but at least have this common interest in Syria that would seem to override any inclination to confront one another.</p><p>Alas, the Syrian conflict is riddled with complications and contradictions. Turkey is adamant about ousting Syrian President Bashar Assad, and it&#39;s upset that Russia has sent in its military to prop up his beleaguered regime.</p><p>Turkey and Russia have been eyeing each other warily since Russia became an active participant in Syria&#39;s war, and this contributed to the atmosphere of suspicion surrounding Turkey&#39;s downing of a Russian fighter plane.</p><p>&quot;Today&#39;s loss is a result of a stab in the back,&quot;&nbsp;<a href="http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/50775" target="_blank">Russia&#39;s visibly angry President Vladimir Putin said.</a></p><p>Putin claimed the Russian Sukhoi Su-24 was flying over northwestern Syria, a kilometer from the Turkish border, on a mission to bomb ISIS.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/11/24/457209382/turkey-says-it-has-shot-down-a-russian-warplane-near-border-with-syria" target="_blank">Turkey said the Russian fighter was in its airspace</a>&nbsp;and that it issued 10 warnings to the Russian pilots over a five-minute span before an F-16 shot it down with a missile.</p><p>Tuesday&#39;s episode illustrates why it&#39;s so hard to get all the foreign powers to aim in the same direction in Syria. The U.S., France, Iran, Russia, Turkey, Australia and several Arab states have all entered the fray.</p><p>Collectively, their firepower far exceeds that possessed by the Islamic State, which is believed to have about 30,000 fighters at most, and no air force.</p><p>Yet all these outside players have different priorities in Syria. Military coordination has been limited. And in many cases, they are deeply distrustful of one another.</p><div id="res457240577" previewtitle="A frame grab from video on Turkey's Haberturk TV shows a Russian warplane on fire before crashing on a hill as seen from the Turkish side of its border with Syria on Tuesday. Turkey says it shot down the Russian plane because it was in its air space. Russia says the plane was over Syria and was on a mission to bomb the Islamic State."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="A frame grab from video on Turkey's Haberturk TV shows a Russian warplane on fire before crashing on a hill as seen from the Turkish side of its border with Syria on Tuesday. Turkey says it shot down the Russian plane because it was in its air space. Russia says the plane was over Syria and was on a mission to bomb the Islamic State." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/24/ap_513204754015_custom-a5ccc7fbdd3c85d7be155e6c53cb332cc1349f5b-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 357px; width: 620px;" title="A frame grab from video on Turkey's Haberturk TV shows a Russian warplane on fire before crashing on a hill as seen from the Turkish side of its border with Syria on Tuesday. Turkey says it shot down the Russian plane because it was in its airspace. Russia says the plane was over Syria and was on a mission to bomb the Islamic State. (Uncredited/AP)" /></div><div><p>The U.S., which says the focus needs to be on defeating the Islamic State, has carried out some 8,000 airstrikes against the group in Syria and Iraq in a little over a year. The U.S. also says it wants Assad to go, but that&#39;s a secondary priority.</p></div></div><p>Turkey, meanwhile, has shouldered a greater burden than any other outside country and has multiple objectives in Syria.</p><p>Turkey has taken in more than 2 million Syrian refugees and wants to see that tide stopped. Turkey also fears that Kurdish involvement in the fighting in Syria and Iraq is seeping across its border into its own restive Kurdish areas in southeast Turkey. In addition, Russia has undermined Turkish policy by bombing Syrian rebels backed by Turkey.</p><p>In turn, Russia has consistently backed Assad and his father, Hafez Assad, for more than four decades. Syria is Russia&#39;s only real ally in the Arab world and has allowed Russia to maintain a naval base on Syria&#39;s Mediterranean coast. Russia&#39;s priority is bolstering the Syrian government and protecting its own interests in the country.</p><p>With warplanes from multiple countries over the skies of Syria, the possibility of an inadvertent confrontation has been an ongoing worry.</p><p>Turkey has shot down Syrian military aircraft in the past, claiming they strayed into Turkish airspace.</p><p>The Syrian air force has steered clear of U.S. planes since the Americans started bombing ISIS in September 2014. And the U.S. and the Russians held talks, and even staged a brief joint exercise, in an effort to avoid any mishaps.</p><p>Russia has now taken two major hits in the past month from opposing sides in the Syrian war. The Islamic State says it blew up a Russian plane full of tourists over Egypt on Oct. 31, and now Turkey has shot down a Russian warplane.</p><p>The latest episode instantly heightened tensions among the outside powers and will further complicate efforts to coordinate their military actions.</p><p>&quot;I do not know who benefits from what has happened today,&quot; Putin said.</p><p>Perhaps ISIS.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/11/24/457220948/why-would-turkey-shoot-down-a-russian-plane?ft=nprml&amp;f=457220948" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 24 Nov 2015 12:10:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/why-would-turkey-shoot-down-russian-plane-113914 A 'National Day of Action' on climate change http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-13/national-day-action-climate-change-113319 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/11922828_1037916136228305_4943296335058079293_o.jpg" title="(Photo: Facebook/Faith in Place)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/228255552&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Activists meet in Chicago and beyond for climate change action</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tomorrow, people across the U.S. will hold a &lsquo;National Day of Action&rsquo; on climate change. People will gather to express their concerns about a number of environmental issues including, climate change, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and President Obama&rsquo;s clean energy plan. We&rsquo;ll speak with Paul Getsos, national coordinator of the People&#39;s Climate Movement, the group organizing the national effort. We&rsquo;ll also speak with local organizer Pastor Booker Vance, policy director at Faith in Place, a Chicago based interreligious coalition established &ldquo;to care for the Earth through education, connection, and advocacy&rdquo;.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-17d06648-62d8-bf48-5939-a9eff8773dc7"><a href="http://twitter.com/PGGetsos">Paul Getsos</a> is the</span> National Coordinator of the <a href="http://twitter.com/Peoples_Climate">People&#39;s Climate Movement</a>. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em>Pastor Booker Vance is the policy director at <a href="http://twitter.com/faithinplace">Faith in Place</a>, based &nbsp;in Chicago.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/228255907&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Erdogan under scrutiny in aftermath of Turkish bombing</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Turkey&rsquo;s premier says the Islamic State is the prime suspect in the country&rsquo;s deadliest terror attack that occurred over the weekend. But opponents of President Tayyip Erdogan continue to hold him responsible for the suicide bombings that killed at least 97 people and injured many more. Some have said he was complicit in the attacks by stirring up nationalist anti-Kurdish sentiment. We&rsquo;ll talk about the increasing polarization in Turkey with Michael Gunter, a professor of political science at Tennessee Tech University.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-17d06648-62de-b033-18f6-1e829eaeba3a">Michael Gunter is a professor of political science at <a href="http://twitter.com/tennesseetech">Tennessee Tech University</a>. &nbsp;He has written several books on the Kurds. His most recent is &#39;</span>Out of Nowhere The Kurds of Syria in Peace and War&#39;.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/228256690&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The Canadian election heats up</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">As Canadian elections approach on October 19th, the campaign rhetoric between the candidates and their political parties has become uncharacteristically heated. The New Democratic Party (NDP), coming off stunning local wins in conservative Alberta province, is receding in the polls. The Liberal Party, led by Justin Trudeau, is gaining and the Conservative Party, led by Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, is feeling pressure and resorting to &ldquo;racist&rdquo; tactics, according to Canadian news anchor and host, Patty Handysides. She&rsquo;ll tell us why she thinks the three main parties are &ldquo;neck and neck&rdquo; for the first time in decades. Handysides is a news anchor with AM800 CKLW Radio in Windsor, Ontario and co-host of &lsquo;The Afternoon News.&rsquo;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-17d06648-62e3-5386-f851-c271adb6de4e"><a href="http://twitter.com/PattyHandysides">Patty Handysides</a> is a news anchor with AM800 CKLW Radio in Windsor, Ontario and co-host of the daily radio program, &lsquo;The Afternoon News&rsquo;.</span></em></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin-left:72pt;">&nbsp;</p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 13 Oct 2015 14:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-13/national-day-action-climate-change-113319 Italy's debate on gay marriage http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-28/italys-debate-gay-marriage-112495 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Dauno Settantatre.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Dauno Settantatre)" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216768911&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Italy&#39;s gay marriage debate continues</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Last week the European Court of Human Rights ruled in favor of three same-sex couples who had brought a case against the Italian government. The court ruled that the European Convention on Human Rights provides a right to the legal recognition of same-sex relationships. Unlike most EU countries, Italy does not recognize gay civil unions or same sex marriage. Italy&rsquo;s Prime Minister has vowed to pass legislation recognizing gay civil unions and recent polls show that a majority of Italians, about 51 percent, support marriage equality. Barbie Latza Nadeau, Italy bureau chief for The Daily Beast, joins us to discuss the debate around gay marriage in Italy and the latest ruling from the European Court of Human Rights.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="http://twitter.com/@BLNadeau">Barbie Latza Nadeau</a> is the Italy bureau chief for The Daily Beast.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216769329&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Turkey&#39;s shift in the fight against ISIS</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Today Turkey&rsquo;s President, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, said that Turkey cannot continue the peace process with the Kurds as long as Kurdish militants continue to carry out attacks. This week Turkey bombed sites in Northern Iraq thought to be camps of the Kurdistan Workers Party(PKK). Erodgan also announced that his country would grant permission for the U.S. to use Turkish airspace in a joint effort to create an &ldquo;ISIS free zone&rdquo; along its border with Syria. The announcements come as Erdogan faces heavy criticism at home for harassment of journalists and government crackdowns on free expression.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="http://twitter.com/@hbarkey">Henri Barkey</a> is the director of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson Center.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216769748&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EcoMyths: Do you need a car to access nature?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Even though at times cities and nature seem to be at odds, EcoMyths Alliance believes the two are not as disconnected as they may seem. For our monthly EcoMyths segment, Kate Sackman will tell us why city-dwellers, with an itch to experience the wilderness, can do so without using a car.</p><p><strong>Guest: </strong></p><ul><li>Kate Sackman is the founder and president of <a href="http://twitter.com/@EcoMyths">EcoMyths Alliance</a>.</li><li>John Cawood is the education program coordinator for <a href="http://twitter.com/@Openlands">Openlands</a>.</li><li>Gil Penalosa is the founder and board chair of <a href="http://twitter.com/@880CitiesOrg">8-80 Cities</a>.</li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 15:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-28/italys-debate-gay-marriage-112495