WBEZ | turkey http://www.wbez.org/tags/turkey Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Italy's debate on gay marriage http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-28/italys-debate-gay-marriage-112495 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Dauno Settantatre.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Dauno Settantatre)" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216768911&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Italy&#39;s gay marriage debate continues</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Last week the European Court of Human Rights ruled in favor of three same-sex couples who had brought a case against the Italian government. The court ruled that the European Convention on Human Rights provides a right to the legal recognition of same-sex relationships. Unlike most EU countries, Italy does not recognize gay civil unions or same sex marriage. Italy&rsquo;s Prime Minister has vowed to pass legislation recognizing gay civil unions and recent polls show that a majority of Italians, about 51 percent, support marriage equality. Barbie Latza Nadeau, Italy bureau chief for The Daily Beast, joins us to discuss the debate around gay marriage in Italy and the latest ruling from the European Court of Human Rights.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="http://twitter.com/@BLNadeau">Barbie Latza Nadeau</a> is the Italy bureau chief for The Daily Beast.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216769329&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Turkey&#39;s shift in the fight against ISIS</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Today Turkey&rsquo;s President, Recep Tayyip Erdo─čan, said that Turkey cannot continue the peace process with the Kurds as long as Kurdish militants continue to carry out attacks. This week Turkey bombed sites in Northern Iraq thought to be camps of the Kurdistan Workers Party(PKK). Erodgan also announced that his country would grant permission for the U.S. to use Turkish airspace in a joint effort to create an &ldquo;ISIS free zone&rdquo; along its border with Syria. The announcements come as Erdogan faces heavy criticism at home for harassment of journalists and government crackdowns on free expression.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="http://twitter.com/@hbarkey">Henri Barkey</a> is the director of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson Center.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216769748&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EcoMyths: Do you need a car to access nature?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Even though at times cities and nature seem to be at odds, EcoMyths Alliance believes the two are not as disconnected as they may seem. For our monthly EcoMyths segment, Kate Sackman will tell us why city-dwellers, with an itch to experience the wilderness, can do so without using a car.</p><p><strong>Guest: </strong></p><ul><li>Kate Sackman is the founder and president of <a href="http://twitter.com/@EcoMyths">EcoMyths Alliance</a>.</li><li>John Cawood is the education program coordinator for <a href="http://twitter.com/@Openlands">Openlands</a>.</li><li>Gil Penalosa is the founder and board chair of <a href="http://twitter.com/@880CitiesOrg">8-80 Cities</a>.</li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 15:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-28/italys-debate-gay-marriage-112495 Illinois man in terrorism case negotiating possible deal http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-man-terrorism-case-negotiating-possible-deal-111358 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP72537487970.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>An attorney for a suburban Chicago man accused of trying to join al-Qaida-affiliated fighters in Syria says the defense has begun negotiations with prosecutors on a possible plea deal.</p><p>Abdella Ahmad Tounisi&#39;s attorney, Molly Armour, disclosed the development at a Thursday status hearing in U.S. District Court in Chicago. She told the judge the sides are in &quot;preliminary plea negotiations.&quot;</p><p>The 20-year-old was arrested at O&#39;Hare International Airport in 2013 trying to board a plane for Turkey. Prosecutors say the then-teenager from Aurora hoped to join Nusra Front.</p><p>Tounisi pleaded not guilty to attempting to provide material support to a terrorist group. His maximum prison term would be several decades. Prosecutors typically recommend lower sentences if defendants agree to plead guilty.</p><p>Tounisi&#39;s next hearing is set for March 25.</p></p> Thu, 08 Jan 2015 09:38:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/illinois-man-terrorism-case-negotiating-possible-deal-111358 Turkey, ISIS and the Kurds http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-17/turkey-isis-and-kurds-110957 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP752837511821.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Although Turkey&#39;s role in the fight against ISIS remains complicated, this week the country offered more assistance in training moderate Syrian rebels. We&#39;ll discuss Turkey&#39;s place in the actions against ISIS with political science professor Michael M. Gunter.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-turkey-s-growing-role-in-combating-isis/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-turkey-s-growing-role-in-combating-isis.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-turkey-s-growing-role-in-combating-isis" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Turkey, ISIS and the Kurds" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 17 Oct 2014 11:32:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-17/turkey-isis-and-kurds-110957 Turkey's role in the conflict with ISIS http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-07/turkeys-role-conflict-isis-110906 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP146696076907.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The battle for control of the Syrian border town of Kobani continues. Despite U.S. airstrikes, ISIS has been advancing. Turkey&rsquo;s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has called for more support for the rebels. We&#39;ll take a look at Turkey&#39;s role in the conflict with Henri Barkley of Lehigh University.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-oct-7/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-oct-7.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-oct-7" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Turkey's role in the conflict with ISIS" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 07 Oct 2014 11:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-07/turkeys-role-conflict-isis-110906 ISIS' control over Turkey http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-25/isis-control-over-turkey-110854 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP271060793441.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Earlier this week, ISIS returned 46 hostages to Turkey, which has said it will not engage in military operations against the terrorist organization. We discuss Turkey&#39;s complicated relationship with ISIS with professor Henri Barkey.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-september-25-2014/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-september-25-2014.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-september-25-2014" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: ISIS' control over Turkey" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-25/isis-control-over-turkey-110854 Kurdish diaspora and geopolitics http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-08-21/kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics-110685 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP433719952932.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>PKK Kurdish fighters are on the U.S.&#39;s list of terrorist organizations, but the U.S. supports its fight against the jihadist Islamic State. Ali Ezzatyar, lawyer and scholar on the Middle East, joins us to discuss the Kurds&#39; changing role in the region.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Kurdish diaspora and geopolitics " on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-08-21/kurdish-diaspora-and-geopolitics-110685 Non-profit sees greater need for food assistance http://www.wbez.org/news/non-profit-sees-greater-need-food-assistance-109276 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2013-11-29 at 9.53.20 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been a holiday season of breaking records at <a href="http://www.ajustharvest.org/">A Just Harvest</a>, a Rogers Park nonprofit that feeds the hungry.</p><p>The organization serves hot dinner daily to anyone who shows up, but during the run-up to Thanksgiving and Christmas it also distributes &ldquo;holiday kits,&rdquo; uncooked turkeys and traditional fixings, to families that want to prepare the foods at home.</p><p>&ldquo;Saturday we gave away turkeys and kits, and we had folks lined up for two blocks,&rdquo; said Rev. Marylin Pagan-Banks, executive director of A Just Harvest. &ldquo;People lining up and standing in the cold and bearing the weather in order to provide for their families.&rdquo;</p><p>Pagan-Banks said the organization had never seen that before, and that by Thanksgiving week it had already distributed 305 of the kits, with four weeks to go until Christmas.</p><p>Last year, A Just Harvest gave away 380 kits for the two holidays together &mdash;a number that it seems certain to beat this year.</p><p>In part, Pagan-Banks blames <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/economy/illinois-residents-lose-220-million-dollars-snap-benefits-109035">cuts that kicked in this month </a>to the federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP, also known as the food stamp program.</p><p>Congress declined to renew an increase in funding to the program that had gone into effect in 2009 as part of the Recovery Act. For a family of four, this amounts to $36 less per month of food assistance.</p><p>&ldquo;Folks already struggle towards the end of the month, because the allotment wasn&rsquo;t enough to start with,&rdquo; said Pagan-Banks. &ldquo;And so it&rsquo;s the end of the month, and it&rsquo;s a holiday where traditionally there are different types of food that are eaten, they cost more, turkeys are not cheap, and there&rsquo;s just no way to make ends meet.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 29 Nov 2013 08:49:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/non-profit-sees-greater-need-food-assistance-109276 Did Norman Rockwell ruin Thanksgiving turkey? http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/did-norman-rockwell-ruin-thanksgiving-turkey-109193 <p><p dir="ltr"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Norman-Rockwell_Freedom-from-Want%20%283%29.jpg" style="height: 386px; width: 300px; float: left;" title="Norman Rockwell. Freedom from Want, 1942. Lent by the Norman Rockwell Museum, Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust. All Rights Reserved. (SEPS by Curtis Licensing)" /><strong>&#39;Freedom from Want&#39;</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Later this month, millions of Americans will sit down to Thanksgiving dinners of unevenly cooked turkey &mdash; dinners that look suspiciously like the one in Norman Rockwell&rsquo;s&nbsp;&quot;Freedom From Want&quot; painting now on display at the Art Institute of Chicago.</p><p dir="ltr">The overcooked white meat will require pools of gravy to choke it down, and undercooked globs of dark meat will get quietly pushed into the garbage (or microwave).</p><p dir="ltr">Sure, some cooks have devised strategies around these pitfalls, but with 20 degrees between cooking temperatures for the leg and the breast, it&rsquo;s a rare bird that comes out perfectly done all the way around.</p><p dir="ltr">So who&rsquo;s to blame for this culinary crime? And why do we endure this ritual torture like another year of Uncle Charlie&rsquo;s corny jokes? &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Looking for answers</strong></p><p dir="ltr">John Caveny, who raises Bourbon Red Heritage turkeys on <a href="http://www.cavenyfarm.com/">his farm</a>&nbsp;in Monticello, Ill, echoed what many of America&#39;s top chefs have been saying for years: turkeys should not be cooked whole if you want the best tasting bird.</p><p dir="ltr">Caveny follows a &quot;Cook&rsquo;s Illustrated&quot; method of dry brining his turkey parts with three parts kosher salt and one part baking powder, then leaving them covered in plastic wrap for a couple of days in the fridge.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;This allows the moisture, salt and baking powder to go back and forth through the muscle,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It imparts the flavor of the salt, and the baking powder raises the pH of the meat, tenderizing it a little. It works well, and even better well when you&rsquo;ve cut turkey into pieces first.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Similarly, Julia Child&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbur.org/npr/165471083/comfort-and-joy-making-the-morning-edition-julia-child-thanksgiving">famously recommended</a>&nbsp;disassembling the bird and then reconstructing it for the table and chef&nbsp;<a href="http://www.seriouseats.com/2008/11/in-videos-cooking-thanksgiving-sous-vide-turkey-with-grant-achatz-alinea.html">Grant Achatz recommends</a>&nbsp;breaking it down, cooking the breast, thighs and legs sous vide&nbsp;(a high tech boil in a bag system) and saving the other bits for gravy.</p><p dir="ltr">So if top chefs and turkey farmers recommend breaking down the bird first, why do so many of us insist on keeping it whole? Caveny blames the Norman Rockwell painting.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Prior to that, meat was usually cut up in the kitchen and brought to the table sliced or at least into more manageable portions than a whole turkey,&quot; he said.</p><p dir="ltr"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Roy-Lichtenstein_Turkey%20%281%29.jpg" style="float: right; height: 264px; width: 300px;" title="Roy Lichtenstein. Turkey, 1961 is also on display at the 'Art and Appetite' exhibit in the Thanksgiving gallery. Private collection. (Estate of Roy Lichtenstein.)" /><strong>Is it Rockwell&rsquo;s fault? </strong></p><p dir="ltr">I recently took in Rockwell&#39;s famous painting at the Art Institute of Chicago&rsquo;s new exhibit, &quot;Art and Appetite.&quot; Curator Judith&nbsp;Barter&nbsp;said the one hundred paintings and sculptures in the exhibition are about much more than just food.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Freedom From Want,&rdquo; for example, depicts a sense of abundance and security that so many Americans longed for in the post-Depression era. And what better than a whole honking turkey &mdash; not some measly platter of slices &mdash; to say abundance?</p><p dir="ltr">But&nbsp;Barter&nbsp;pushes back on the notion that there weren&rsquo;t a lot of whole turkey roasters in the years prior to Rockwell&rsquo;s painting.&nbsp;She said the recipes, texts and paintings she studied for the exhibit indicated that &quot;whole turkeys were common in the 19th century.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">Food historian and Roosevelt University emeritus professor Bruce Kraig generally agreed.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When turkeys first arrived in Europe in the 16th century, they were cooked whole in various ways,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Roasting was one of them and boiling was another very popular way. Roasting whole turkeys seems to run right through colonial cookery and the 19th century.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Kraig points to a page in the first American cookbook, &ldquo;American Cookery&rdquo; by Amelia Simmons, published in 1796.&nbsp;<a href="http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/coldfusion/display.cfm?ID=amer&amp;PageNum=18">The recipe</a>&nbsp;for roasted turkey calls for a stuffing of wheat bread, suet, eggs, sweet marjoram, sweet thyme, pepper, salt and &ldquo;a gill of wine.&rdquo; (It also recommends serving the bird with cranberry sauce and mashed potatoes, but also mangoes. Talk about early fusion recipes!)</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Breeding a bigger bird&nbsp;</strong></p><p dir="ltr">But Kraig points out that turkeys of Simmons&#39; era were relative waifs compared to their modern chesty cousins.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The modern broad breasted turkey was bred and crossbred throughout the 19th century with the intention of making them fatter and larger with very big breasts,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;This was in direct response the whole mythic story of turkey at the first Thanksgiving.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The turkeys got so busty, in fact, that by the time the Broad Breasted White (today&rsquo;s dominant breed) came along in the late 1940s, it could no longer have sex and could procreate only through artificial insemination.</p><p dir="ltr">Despite this lack of fun, the breed grows quickly and produces prodigious amounts of (easily dried out) white meat. Earlier breeds, and indeed heritage birds, grow slower, sport more fat and offer a more even ratio of dark to white meat, thus making them easier to cook evenly.</p><p dir="ltr"><b>Breaking from tradition&nbsp;</b></p><p dir="ltr">So it&rsquo;s not so much Rockwell&rsquo;s fault, per se. It&rsquo;s that Rockwell&rsquo;s painting coincided with a revolution in turkey breeding &mdash; one that produced giant breasts that are harder to cook evenly with legs and thighs attached. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Caveny says he can tell by the way the breastbone lies on the bird in Rockwell&rsquo;s painting that the artist was depicting a heritage bird &mdash; not an industrial Broad Breasted White &mdash; on his the table. So those who cling to Rockwell&rsquo;s whole-bird ideal are probably trying to pull it off with a different breed entirely.</p><p dir="ltr">Janet Fuller is the former food editor of the Chicago Sun-Times and a current writer for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/">DNAInfo Chicago</a>. A couple of years ago she wrote a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/food/8688787-423/bird-deconstructed-cooking-turkey-in-parts-ensures-tender-meat-richest-gravy.html">story in the Sun-Times</a>&nbsp;urging folks to give up the ghost of the whole turkey for a more edible bird.</p><p dir="ltr">She even served the cut-up version at her own Thanksgiving dinner. I asked her, did anybody squawk?</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;No,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It worked great. The leg meat, in particular, was amazing &mdash; falling off the bone in the braising liquid, which became my gravy. It is some extra work because you do it in stages, but it was fantastic.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Monica Eng is a producer at WBEZ and co-host of the food podcast&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/chewing-fat-podcast-louisa-chu-and-monica-eng">Chewing the Fat</a>. Follow her on Twitter <a href="http://twitter.com/monicaeng">@monicaeng</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 19 Nov 2013 16:01:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/did-norman-rockwell-ruin-thanksgiving-turkey-109193 A landmark Turkish trial, climate change and conflict and jazz diplomacy http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-07/landmark-turkish-trial-climate-change-and-conflict-and-jazz-diplomacy <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP552456348912.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We discuss the conviction of former Turkish army chief and its reflection of Turkish politics. New research connects conflict around the world to climate change. Tony Sarabia and a U.S. Department of State official introduce us to the vibrant tunes born out of cold war jazz diplomacy.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F104438210&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-climate-change-s-impact-on-conflict-and.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-climate-change-s-impact-on-conflict-and" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: A landmark Turkish trial, climate change and conflict and jazz diplomacy" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Wed, 07 Aug 2013 10:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-08-07/landmark-turkish-trial-climate-change-and-conflict-and-jazz-diplomacy California prison hunger strike and a look at what Brazil protests accomplished http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-16/california-prison-hunger-strike-and-look-what-brazil-protests <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP070202071711.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We take a look at the California prison hunger strike and mass incarceration. Then, we get an update on the Brazilian government&#39;s response to last month&#39;s protests. And protesting continues in Turkey.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101325390&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-california-prison-hunger-strike-and-a-lo.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-california-prison-hunger-strike-and-a-lo" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: California prison hunger strike and a look at what Brazil protests accomplished" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Tue, 16 Jul 2013 11:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-16/california-prison-hunger-strike-and-look-what-brazil-protests