WBEZ | Chicago Public Schools http://www.wbez.org/tags/chicago-public-schools Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: Catholics respond to Cardinal George’s death http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-04-20/morning-shift-catholics-respond-cardinal-george%E2%80%99s-death-111904 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/cardinal%20francis%20george%20as%20altar%20boy.JPG" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="WBEZ" /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201704719&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Mourning continues for Cardinal George</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Parishioners at Cardinal Francis George&rsquo;s boyhood church are mourning him right now. The former long-time head of the Archdiocese of Chicago died Friday from cancer. He was 78. WBEZ&rsquo;s Lynette Kalsnes went to his old church on Chicago&rsquo;s Northwest Side to learn more.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">Lynette Kalsnes</a> is WBEZ&#39;s religion reporter.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201704717&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">CPS scandal continues</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Federal investigators have opened a new avenue in their probe of Chicago Public Schools. At the heart of the probe is a $20 million no bid contract to a training organization and its ties to schools CEO Barbara Byrd Bennett who once worked for the Wilmette based company called SUPES. On Friday, investigators issued subpoenas for the records of a non-profit called The Chicago Education Fund. That group is closely aligned with both Chicago Mayor Emanuel and Governor Rauner, as well as some of the city&rsquo;s top philanthropists. So what does this all mean and how could it affect the mayor&rsquo;s efforts to get state help with teacher pension payments and the districts contract talks with the union? We talk about this moment of instability for Chicago&rsquo;s education landscape with Catalyst Chicago&rsquo;s Linda Lenz. Support Catalyst&#39;s 25 year anniversary&nbsp;<a href="http://catalyst-chicago.org/series/25th-anniversary/">here.</a></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Linda Lenz is the Founder and Publisher of <a href="https://twitter.com/CatalystChicago">Catalyst Chicago Magazine</a>.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201704711&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Gov. Rauner faces 100 days in office</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner is marking his first 100 days in office this week. Lately he&rsquo;s been touring the state on a campaign-style &ldquo;Turnaround Tour.&rdquo; As part of that - he&rsquo;s been pushing everything from policies that unions see as hostile - to the fight over budget cuts. WBEZ reporters Shannon Heffernan and Tony Arnold talk about the governor&rsquo;s first 100 days in office and how his policies have shaped the conversation over the first few months. Listen to Tony&#39;s 100 days story <a href="https://soundcloud.com/wbez/rauners-first-100-days-the?utm_source=soundcloud&amp;utm_campaign=share&amp;utm_medium=twitter">here</a>.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/tonyjarnold">Tony Arnold</a> is WBEZ&#39;s political reporter.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/shannon_h">Shannon Heffernan</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201704709&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Sound Opinions celebrates 30 years of The Breakfast Club</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">This year the film The Breakfast Club celebrates its 30th anniversary. Like other movies directed by John Hughes from that period-think Sixteen Candles, Ferris Bueller&rsquo;s Day Off and Pretty In Pink-the characters try to navigate through the emotional and physical stresses of their teenage years and try to make sense of their relationships with friends, parents and the crazy universe of high school. Hughes made that happen through his scripts, his actors&rsquo; performances, and especially through the music he chose for the soundtracks. The music in these films are the quintessential sounds of the &lsquo;80s. That&rsquo;s where Sound Opinions comes in. Sound Ops goes to the movies again Wednesday, April 22, for a <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sound-opinions-at-the-movies-the-breakfast-club-tickets-16191155181">screening of the film at the Music Box Theatre</a>. Before that event, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot stop by to talk about the influence of John Hughes and his soundtracks on the music of the 1980s.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Check out a list of Morning Shift&#39;s favorite 80s tunes along with some of our listener picks via Twitter:</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Tony:<br />Japan &ldquo;Visions of China&rdquo;<br />Roger Troutman &ldquo;I Heard it Through the Grapevine&rdquo;Jason:</p><div>Jason:</div><div>Metallica: &ldquo;Master of Puppets&rdquo;</div><div>REM &ldquo;7 Chinese Brothers&rdquo;</div><div>Elvis Costello &ldquo;Man Out of Time&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Carrie:<br />Billy Idol: &ldquo;Dancing With Myself&rdquo;<br />Bruce Springsteen &ldquo;I&rsquo;m on Fire&rdquo;<br />Modern English &ldquo;I Melt with You&rdquo;</div><div><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.38;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>From Twitter:<br />Tiffany: &ldquo;Think We&rsquo;re Alone Now&rdquo;<br />Aha: &ldquo;Take on Me&rdquo;<br />Peter Gabriel &ldquo;In Your Eyes&rdquo;<br />The Replacements: &ldquo;Bastards of Young&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/gregkot">Greg Kot</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/JimDeRogatis">Jim DeRogatis</a>&nbsp;are the hosts of WBEZ&#39;s <a href="http://www.soundopinions.org/">Sound Opinions</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 20 Apr 2015 07:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-04-20/morning-shift-catholics-respond-cardinal-george%E2%80%99s-death-111904 Morning Shift: Changes afoot for No Child Left Behind http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-04-16/morning-shift-changes-afoot-no-child-left-behind-111885 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Sharon%20%26%20Nikki%20McCutcheon.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/Sharon &amp; Nikki McCutcheon" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201101696&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Feds investigating CPS&rsquo; CEO</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">There&rsquo;s word that Chicago public Schools CEO is being investigation by federal authorities over a multi-million dollar no bid contract. This comes as the CPS inspector general is looking in the matter as well and that action was spurred by an investigative piece by the education publication Catalyst Chicago. Catalyst Deputy Editor Sarah Karp gets us up to speed. Read the article <a href="http://catalyst-chicago.org/2015/04/feds-investigate-20-million-supes-contract-byrd-bennett-ties/">here</a>.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/CatalystChicago">Sara Karp</a> is the Deputy Editor of Catalyst Chicago.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201101692&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Changes afoot for No Child Left Behind</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions is working on a bi-partisan bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act -- most recently known as No Child Left Behind. The law expired at the end of last year and a new version could shift how public schools operate going forward. Joining us now to talk about how the rewrite could affect schools in Illinois is Peter Cunningham, former press secretary at the U.S. Department of Education, Robin Steans, executive director of Advance Illinois, and the president of the National Education Association Lily Eskelsen-Garcia.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/pcunningham57">Peter Cunningham</a> is the former press secretary at the U.S. Department of Education.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://www.steansfamilyfoundation.org/bio_robin.shtml">Robin Steans</a> is the Executive Director of Advance Illinois.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/lily_nea">Lily Eskelsen-Garcia</a> is the President of the National Education Association.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201101689&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Indiana Dunes faces threats of private development</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">In 2012 the Indiana state legislature entered into an agreement with a company that would restore the 85-year old limestone pavilion that sits on the beach at Indiana Dunes State Park. Now plans to expand the building&rsquo;s footprint with an additional glass and steel conference center are moving forward. The state of Indiana calls it the perfect public/private partnership that will bring even more visitors and revenue to the popular park. Environmental groups are calling it a potential disaster for migrating birds and people wanting peace and quiet. WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana reporter Michael Puente tells us what we the state might gain, and lose from the project.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/MikePuenteNews">Michael Puente</a> is WBEZ&#39;s North West Indiana Bureau reporter.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201101686&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Vatican Ends Scrutiny Of U.S. Nuns</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Vatican has ended a controversial oversight of a group that represents most United States Catholic nuns. WBEZ Religion reporter Lynette Kalsnes provides details.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">Lynette Kalsnes</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201101684&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Remembering the Holocaust 70 years later</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">This year marks the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the concentration camps. This Sunday, Jews from across the region will gather to remember and honor those who died. David Levine chairs the local Holocaust Remembrance Day, held at a synagogue in Skokie. Joining him is Henry Jelen, the co-chair of Yom HaShoah ceremony. They talk about the event, and the challenges of keeping history alive as the survivors pass away.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;<strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/illinoisnut">David Levine</a> is the chair of a Holocaust Remembrance Day in Skokie.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><i>Henry Jelen is the co-chair of the <a href="https://twitter.com/yom_hashoah">Yom HaShoah</a> ceremony.</i></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201101677&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Increased record sales put strain on vinyl pressers</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Vinyl records--like cassettes and CDs--are often thought of as a thing of the past. But vinyl has been making a comeback over the last decade. Last year, more than 9.2 million vinyl records sold in the U.S., according to a Nielsen report. And, as sales and production for vinyl has increased, the number of pressing plants has stayed the same. Some of the biggest American pressing plants are &ldquo;booked up&rdquo; currently. To get an inside view on the record pressing business as we approach Record Store Day this Saturday, we&rsquo;re joined by Matt Early, VP of Sales and marketing of Gotta Groove Records out of Ohio and local musician Dave Thompson.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;<strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em>Matt Early is the VP of Sales at <a href="https://twitter.com/gottagrooverecs">Gotta Groove Records</a> in Ohio.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/bsidechicago">Dave Thompson</a> is the member of Chicago-based band Hidden Billboards.</em></p></p> Thu, 16 Apr 2015 07:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-04-16/morning-shift-changes-afoot-no-child-left-behind-111885 CPS Board president says Chicago schools under investigation http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-board-president-says-chicago-schools-under-investigation-111884 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/BoardOfEd1_0_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Officials with the nation&#39;s third-largest school district say federal authorities are &quot;investigating a matter&quot; at Chicago Public Schools.</p><p>In a statement released Wednesday, Chicago Board of Education president David Vitale says federal authorities requested interviews with several employees. He says the board was made aware of the investigation on Tuesday and is cooperating fully.</p><p>He did not offer details on the investigation. A spokesman for Chicago Public Schools didn&#39;t return a request for comment Wednesday.</p><p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel told reporters Wednesday that he didn&#39;t have further details. He says there isn&#39;t information yet on who&#39;s the target of the probe.</p></p> Wed, 15 Apr 2015 17:36:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-board-president-says-chicago-schools-under-investigation-111884 Emanuel likely to stay the course on education in second term http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-likely-stay-course-education-second-term-111843 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/rahmvictoryspech.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Public education was one of the reasons Mayor Rahm Emanuel faced a runoff election Tuesday.</p><p>Despite a rocky relationship with some teachers and parents in his first term, he won a second.</p><p>Emanuel now will face challenges at Chicago Public Schools that look a lot like the challenges of four years ago: declining enrollment, ballooning pension costs, and an expiring contract with the Chicago Teachers Union.</p><p>But then again, first-term Emanuel looks different than second-term Emanuel, so far.</p><p>&ldquo;I understand the challenges we face will require me to approach them differently and work in a different fashion,&rdquo; he said in his victory speech at a union hall in the West Loop.</p><p>CTU Vice President Jesse Sharkey says although union-backed candidate Jesus &lsquo;Chuy&rsquo; Garcia garnered 44 percent of the vote to the mayor&rsquo;s 56 percent, &nbsp;the new &ldquo;sweater-wearing Rahm&rdquo; is enough of a victory.</p><p>&ldquo;You saw the mayor <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjqQWB3WtCo">put on a soft shirt</a> and say he was going to do more listening, which is very different than what you saw in 2012,&rdquo; Sharkey said, referring to <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-teachers-strike-after-talks-fail-102287">the year CTU teachers went on strike</a> for the first time in 25 years.</p><p>It&rsquo;s unclear how far that rhetoric will go. Sharkey admitted while there&rsquo;s still likely to be a lot of conflict. CTU will have to work with Emanuel.</p><p>&ldquo;The union can&rsquo;t go around saying this mayor is dead to us for the next four years,&rdquo; Sharkey said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going to have to figure out how to actually solve some of the problems going on in the schools.&rdquo;</p><p>The current teachers&rsquo; contract expires in June, but could be extended for a fourth year if the board offers the union a three percent raise.</p><p>&ldquo;People would be willing to take less money in exchange for some basic protections about working conditions and some assurances that they&rsquo;re not just going to keep closing and privatizing schools,&rdquo; Sharkey said.</p><p>&ldquo;We are still under a moratorium, so no immediate plans to do anything on that front,&rdquo; said Jesse Ruiz, vice president of the Chicago Board of Education, referring to a five-year moratorium put into place after the Board <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-board-votes-close-50-schools-107294">closed 50 schools in 2013</a>.</p><p>It&rsquo;s a tough promise to keep in a city with a declining population and therefore, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/3000-fewer-students-enroll-chicago-public-schools-110869">declining school enrollment</a>.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re hoping to change that (exodus) by some of the things we&rsquo;re doing to make it attractive for Chicagoans to want to continue to live here and grow their families here,&rdquo; Ruiz said. &nbsp;</p><p>Parent Wendy Katten says she hopes that to do so the district will focus on improving existing schools, rather than opening a bunch of new ones.</p><p>&ldquo;We see 7,000 fewer students in CPS than three years ago and there&rsquo;s a reason why,&rdquo; Katten said. &ldquo;People want strong neighborhood schools. I mean, <a href="http://cps.edu/NewSchools/Pages/Process2014.aspx">we&rsquo;ve got new RFPs for charters due today</a>. We don&rsquo;t need any more schools right now.&rdquo;</p><p>But Andrew Broy, executive director of the Illinois Network of Charter Schools, said it&rsquo;s not an either-or.</p><p>&ldquo;We can both expand high-quality charters, while we work on all the schools in the city to make them better,&rdquo; Broy said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll borrow a phrase from President Obama--I think we can walk and chew gum at the same time.&rdquo;</p><p>In his victory speech, Emanuel made it sound like he will walk and chew gum at the same time &mdash; by continuing to open new schools while trying to improve existing ones.</p><p>&ldquo;I hear you on the importance of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/future-uncertain-chicagos-neighborhood-high-schools-108834">neighborhood high schools</a> and better choices,&rdquo; he shouted.</p><p>The question is: Will he still be wearing that sweater?</p></p> Wed, 08 Apr 2015 15:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-likely-stay-course-education-second-term-111843 Behind CPS graduation rates, a system of musical chairs http://www.wbez.org/news/behind-cps-graduation-rates-system-musical-chairs-111786 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/grad rate thumb.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Hidden beneath Chicago&rsquo;s record-high graduation rate is a surprising fact: High schools still have a lot of trouble holding on to students.<br /><br />A WBEZ and Catalyst Chicago analysis of graduation numbers for every high school in the city shows how many freshmen stayed through graduation day, how many dropped out and how many finished at other schools&mdash;including alternative schools.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Map: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/behind-cps-graduation-rates-system-musical-chairs-111786#map">Which schools hang onto the most freshmen?</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>Half of all CPS high schools saw at least half of the Class of 2013 transfer to other schools between freshman and senior years.</p><p>CPS officials say the school system encourages students and families to choose where they want to go to high school, and that includes transferring after freshman year.</p><p>It&rsquo;s also the first time the public has been able to compare freshman retention rates at charter schools versus district-run high schools, because in the past charters reported transfers, while other schools reported mobility. The common perception was that charters were weeding out students who weren&rsquo;t doing well, but the numbers were an apples-to-oranges comparison.&nbsp; In fact, data show wide variation across all school types.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Graduation rates vs. freshman retention</span><br /><br />The data raises an important question: How can schools lose so many students and still report high graduation rates?<br /><br />At their most basic, graduation rates look at the number of students who enroll as freshmen, and calculate the percentage who earn a diploma four years later.<br /><br />&nbsp;Chicago counts students over five years to include students who take a little longer to finish high school.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/same-diploma-different-school-111581">Chicago expands use of alternative schools</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>Chicago also counts students back at their home school. If a student&nbsp; transfers from School A to School B, but still graduates, School A gets credit. Researchers say it&rsquo;s best to track the same students over time.<a name="video"></a></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="465" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/i0EibDr47gc" width="620"></iframe></p><p><em>Map created&nbsp;</em><em>by Simran Khosla</em></p><p>Kenwood Academy is a good example of how students move throughout the system. In 2009, 439 freshman walked through the doors of the school. Sixty-six left the city or moved out of state, leaving 393 still enrolled. Over five years, 54 dropped out and 317 graduated. CPS divides 317 by 393 for an official graduation rate of 85 percent.<br /><br />But beneath those numbers, WBEZ and Catalyst found additional movement. Not all 317 graduated at Kenwood; 276 from the original freshman class did, while 12 finished at other CPS schools and 29 earned their diploma at alternative schools. Kenwood also helped other schools&rsquo; graduation rates by enrolling and graduating 30 students who initially enrolled as freshmen at other schools.<br /><br />Kenwood Principal Gregory Jones said the movement at his school is not atypical in an urban district with so many choices.<br /><br />&ldquo;But mostly, Kenwood kids stay at Kenwood,&rdquo; Jones said.<br /><br />John Easton, a distinguished fellow at the Spencer Foundation, said CPS has been reporting graduation rates more honestly and fairly for decades, following the same students from freshman year, rather than senior year, like many others.<br /><br />&ldquo;This whole calculating graduation rates correctly, using these cohort longitudinal methods where you follow kids over time really started here in Chicago in the mid-80s by a man named Fred Hess,&rdquo; Easton said.<br /><br />Easton worked with Hess in the 1980s and spent the decades since at the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research and the National Center for Education Statistics. The numbers are no less complicated today than they were then, he said.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/special-series/meet-companies-profit-when-cps-students-drop-out-111665">Meet the companies that profit when CPS students drop out</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>&ldquo;There are dozens of decisions and every single one of those decisions is going to have an implication for what the bottom line number is,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">&lsquo;Dark days&rsquo; to top 20</span><br /><br />In 2007, Noble Street Charter School wasn&rsquo;t doing a very good job keeping its freshmen.<br /><br />&ldquo;We certainly weren&rsquo;t actively trying to remove students from our campus, but if a student wanted to transfer or they thought maybe it wasn&rsquo;t the right fit, we were kind of like, &lsquo;OK. Godspeed,&rsquo;&rdquo; said Principal Ellen Metz, who was the dean of students at the time.<br /><br />Metz said that was clearly the wrong approach. Of that first freshman class, just 72 of 132 made it to graduation day.&nbsp;<br /><br />As is true for freshmen at all CPS high schools, freshman who leave and graduate from another school are still counted in Noble&rsquo;s graduation rate. But even so, Metz argues, the best way to make sure students don&rsquo;t drop out is to keep them in the building.<br /><br />&ldquo;If a student ever suggests they want to transfer, we call that the T-word and it&rsquo;s considered almost like &lsquo;a swear&rsquo; here at our campus,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s something that you don&rsquo;t say.&rdquo;<br /><br />Since 2007, Noble&rsquo;s flagship campus has become somewhat obsessed with holding on to its students. The numbers for the Class of 2013 show Noble&rsquo;s flagship campus kept almost 80 percent of the original freshmen. That&rsquo;s better than all but 12 other Chicago public high schools.<br /><br />Freshman Avonjae Dickson used the &ldquo;t-word&rdquo; all the time last fall.<br /><br />&ldquo;I chose a lot of schools and since I was late turning in my papers, I eventually had to come here, but I wanted to go to Lincoln Park,&rdquo; Dickson said.<br /><br />Metz said Dickson is slowly coming around.<br /><br />&ldquo;She&rsquo;s sort of acknowledging, she&rsquo;s starting to see, maybe I do like this,&rsquo;&rdquo; Metz said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a classic example why freshman year is so critical. We also could have, in the fall, when she was speaking that way, we could have said, &lsquo;You know, maybe you&rsquo;re right, maybe this isn&rsquo;t the right fit, if you don&rsquo;t like it.&rsquo;&rdquo;<br /><br />Other Noble schools struggle to keep freshmen, but only one campus, Rowe-Clark, lost more than half of the Class of 2013. Twenty of the city&rsquo;s neighborhood high schools struggle the most, holding on to fewer than 35 percent of the original freshmen. All are on the South and West sides.<br /><br />Among charters, Urban Prep&rsquo;s two campuses do the worst. Chief Academic Officer Lionel Allen said the data &ldquo;unfairly paints a very dismal picture of the work (they&rsquo;re) doing at Urban Prep.&rdquo;<br /><br />He said it&rsquo;s important to note that Urban Prep serves primarily African American males. Nationally, that subgroup has some of the lowest graduation rates. Allen said he is also concerned that there are discrepancies between the numbers they track internally and those being reported by CPS.<br /><br />Even so, he added, &ldquo;we absolutely need to do a better job.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We would love to hold on to all of our freshmen,&rdquo; Allen said.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">A (second) choice</span></p><p>In a system of choice, where students don&rsquo;t have to go to the school nearest to their house, it might seem that there would be no mobility. For the most sought after high schools, that seems to be the case.</p><p>Of the top 10 schools holding on to the largest percentage of the Class of 2013, six are selective enrollment. ChiArts, Lakeview, Prosser and Spry are the others.</p><p>But for the rest of the system, a remarkable number of students are transferring between their freshman and senior years. About 16,000 of the more than 20,000 graduates in the Class of 2013 started and finished in the same place.</p><p>Easton of the Spencer Foundation said the fact that about 4,000 students are still graduating after transferring is actually encouraging.</p><p>&ldquo;Previous research had suggested that a transfer of high school students was sort of a danger sign,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;That meant they hadn&rsquo;t done very well and were trying to find another place so they were perhaps on a path to dropping out. So I find it very encouraging that many of these transfer students are graduating. Of course, the thing that you worry about is the quality of the program they&rsquo;re going into.&rdquo;</p><p>Of the roughly 4,000 students who transferred and still graduated, 1,200 actually finished at <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/same-diploma-different-school-111581">alternative schools</a>, while just 59 transferred into the city&rsquo;s sought after selective enrollment high schools.</p><p dir="ltr"><em>Becky Vevea is an education reporter for WBEZ. Follow her&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/WBEZeducation">@WBEZeducation</a>. Additional reporting by Chris Hagan, WBEZ web producer.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">Support for this story was provided by Front and Center, funded by The Joyce Foundation: Improving the quality of life in the Great Lakes region and across the country.&nbsp;</em></p><p><a name="map"></a><iframe frameborder="0" height="820" scrolling="no" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-assets/MAPS/graduationratemap/GraduationRateMap.html" style="float: right; clear: right;" width="620"></iframe></p></p> Tue, 31 Mar 2015 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/behind-cps-graduation-rates-system-musical-chairs-111786 Unions and Garcia push for $15-an-hour minimum wage http://www.wbez.org/news/unions-and-garcia-push-15-hour-minimum-wage-111768 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/chuy15.PNG" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Mayoral candidate Jesus &quot;Chuy&quot; Garcia and the Chicago Teachers Union are pushing for a $15 per hour minimum wage.</p><p dir="ltr">Garcia, members of the CTU, and activists with the national movement &ldquo;Fight for 15&rdquo; rallied outside the Chicago Board of Education Wednesday. They want all companies who do business with Chicago Public Schools to agree to a wage increase.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Parents who cannot get regular hours at their job, who cannot make a living wage, have a difficult time providing their children, who are our students, with the kind of environment necessary for real learning,&rdquo; said CTU Vice President Jesse Sharkey.</p><p dir="ltr">All CTU-represented employees and most others at CPS are already above the minimum wage, but Sharkey said subcontracted employees, like Safe Passage workers and recess monitors, are not.</p><p dir="ltr">Mayor Rahm Emanuel has already <a href="http://www.wbez.org/mayor-emanuel-backs-chicago-minimum-wage-hike-13-110462">promised to increase the minimum wage</a> to $13 an hour by 2018. The wage hike applies to all companies who do business with the city and its sister agencies, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-chief-backs-mayors-13-hour-minimum-wage-111138">including CPS</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">Garcia said he&rsquo;d find the money for a wage hike by closing tax loopholes for wealthy corporations and rerouting money given to &ldquo;cronies of the mayor.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;If there&rsquo;s enough money to make them happy, there ought to be enough money to pay for frontline workers within Chicago Public Schools,&rdquo; Garcia said. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">School janitors also rallied outside the Board Wednesday to argue against the layoffs that took place after <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/custodial-contract-causing-problems-start-school-year-110767">CPS outsourced custodial management</a> to Aramark and SodexoMAGIC.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Since Aramark has taken over, I currently have to clean 72,000 square feet of hallway,&rdquo; said Ina Davis, a janitor at University of Chicago - Donoghue Charter School. &nbsp;&ldquo;I have 17 classrooms, 23 bathrooms and I&rsquo;m the only janitor that has to clean this at night. I&rsquo;m just asking for CPS to help us.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Last week, principals asked CPS to <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/principals-cps-end-custodial-contract-now-111735">end the contracts</a> with Aramark and SodexoMAGIC, saying the schools were still dirty. District officials say after hiccups early in the year, a recent audit of school cleanliness showed most schools are cleaner.</p><p dir="ltr">Tom Balanoff, president of the Service Employees International United - Local 1, said even though Aramark <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/aramark-cps-change-plan-cut-school-janitors-110870">compromised by not following through</a> with about half of the planned layoffs, the company still made more than 200 janitors part-time, which is a problem.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;There&rsquo;s just not enough hours in the day for the janitors to do all the work,&rdquo; Balanoff said.</p><p dir="ltr"><em>Becky Vevea is an education reporter for WBEZ. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/WBEZeducation">@WBEZeducation</a>.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 25 Mar 2015 17:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/unions-and-garcia-push-15-hour-minimum-wage-111768 Principals to CPS: End custodial contract now http://www.wbez.org/news/principals-cps-end-custodial-contract-now-111735 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/2979169728_730927ae16_z_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago Public Schools principals have had it.</p><p>A survey conducted by the Chicago Principals and Administrators Association found nearly 90 percent of principals say their schools are dirtier than they were a year ago, just before the Chicago Board of Education gave control of all school cleaning services to two private companies -- Aramark and SodexoMagic.</p><p>The move led to hundreds of janitors being laid off, which in turn led to disorganization and dirty conditions. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/custodial-contract-causing-problems-start-school-year-110767">WBEZ first reported issues</a> with cleanliness in schools last September.</p><p>Aramark and CPS scrambled to remedy the issue by <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/aramark-cps-change-plan-cut-school-janitors-110870">not following through with some of the planned layoffs</a>. In October, they announced plans to only cut 290 custodians, not 468.</p><p>But it wasn&rsquo;t enough of a compromise for principals, said Clarice Berry, head of the principals&rsquo; group.</p><p>&ldquo;There is no negotiating with us anymore,&rdquo; Berry said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re not listening to any more promises. We&rsquo;re not waiting anymore. You can not staff a school with 1,200 kids with two custodian workers and think it&rsquo;s going to work. Ever.&rdquo;</p><p>The contracts were collectively worth $340 million, $260 million for Aramark to oversee all 2,400-plus janitors, and $80 million to SodexoMAGIC to oversee cleaning at 33 schools.</p><p>&ldquo;This contract should be voidable, because they have not met the terms of the contract,&rdquo; Berry said, calling on the district to cut ties with Aramark.&nbsp;</p><p>At an unrelated press conference, Mayor Rahm Emanuel said he is in contact with Aramark and will hold the company accountable.</p><p>&ldquo;They better fix this,&rdquo; Emanuel said. &ldquo;If it&rsquo;s not (fixed), it&rsquo;s going to be a very short contract.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">CPS chief Barbara Byrd-Bennett sent an e-mailed statement admitting the two companies faced a bumpy transition.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;They met with principals, worked collaboratively to address their concerns and adjusted staffing to meet the needs of our schools,&rdquo; the statement read. &ldquo;These efforts have ​paid off.&rdquo;</p><p>CPS spokesman Bill McCaffrey also included the results of an audit conducted at 308 schools showing just 17 schools falling under the cleanliness standards set forth in the contract.</p><p><em>Becky Vevea is an education reporter for WBEZ. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZeducation">@WBEZeducation</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 19 Mar 2015 16:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/principals-cps-end-custodial-contract-now-111735 Morning Shift: New U of C report dissects discipline practices in Chicago schools http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-19/morning-shift-new-u-c-report-dissects-discipline-practices-chicago <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ShuttrKingKT.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/ShuttrKingKT" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196673365&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">New U of C report dissects discipline practices in Chicago schools</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">After criticism that suspensions were being used far too frequently, Chicago Public Schools shifted its discipline practices. A <a href="https://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/Discipline%20Report.pdf">report</a> out of the University of Chicago this week shows that while suspensions are down, some of the most vulnerable students are still being suspended. We discuss the report with U of C&#39;s Lauren Sartain.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://uei.uchicago.edu/about/staff/lauren-sartain">Lauren Sartain</a> is a research analyst at the University of Chicago.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196673358&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></div><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">New book digs into impact of Presidential legacy</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Presidential watchers and historians are in a holding pattern waiting to learn about the location of the Obama library. The Barack Obama Foundation is waiting for the results of the April 7 Mayoral run-off to announce whether Chicago, where the President has deep political and personal roots, will land the deal. And while some Chicagoans say it seems impossible to imagine it anywhere else, some experts say a presidential library is not the economic or cultural prize that cities claim it is. Anthony Clark is a former legislative aide and speechwriter and author of The Last Campaign: How Presidents Rewrite History, Run for Posterity &amp; Enshrine Their Legacies. He says that it&rsquo;s not about the flashy exhibits, but the approval rating when he leaves office. Clark walks us through some of the more popular presidential libraries.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/anthonyjclark">Anthony Clark</a> is author of the book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Last-Campaign-Presidents-Posterity/dp/1508409749">&quot;</a></em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Last-Campaign-Presidents-Posterity/dp/1508409749"><em>The Last Campaign: How Presidents Rewrite History, Run for Posterity &amp; Enshrine Their Legacies.&quot;</em></a></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196673354&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Report touts benefits of alternative energy in Illinois</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">In early March, the Environmental Law and Policy Center released a report titled, Illinois Clean Energy Supply Chain: Good for Manufacturing Jobs, Good for Economic Growth and Good for Our Environment. Howard Learner, the founder and Executive Director of the ELPC, joins us to explain where he sees major progress in Illinois&#39; energy policies.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/HowardELPC">Howard Learner</a> is the Exectuive Director for the&nbsp;</em><em>Environmental Law and Policy Center.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196673348&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Religion:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 24px;">Spiritual leaders come together to discuss end of life issues</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">When we&rsquo;re healthy, it&rsquo;s out of mind. When we&rsquo;re sick, we strategize with our doctor about how to get better. Few of us, including physicians, are equipped to talk about end of life issues. While the average person and the medical establishment slowly wakes up to the importance of this topic, the void is often filled by religion. We delve into the role of faith and religion in end-of-life care with panelists from the upcoming forum &ldquo;What We Hold Central: An Inter-Faith Discussion of Religious and Moral Perspectives at the End of Life.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em>Rev. Stanley Davis is the&nbsp;</em><em>Co-Executive Director of the <a href="https://twitter.com/CRLMC1">Council of Religious Leaders of Metropolitan Chicago.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><i><a href="https://pmr.uchicago.edu/padela">Dr. Aasim Padela</a> is the Director of Initiative on Islam and Medicine and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago.</i></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><i><a href="http://hsd.luc.edu/bioethics/people/john-j-hardt">John Hardt</a> is the Vice President and Assocaite Provost of Mission Integration at Loyola University Health System.</i></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196673344&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">South by Southwest still rocks</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Once upon a time, South By Southwest was a small festival where unsigned indie bands could get noticed by a major label. Now, it&rsquo;s grown to something of epic proportions featuring music, film, and technology. But if you head to the right bar at the right time, you might just see an artist you&rsquo;ve never heard of blow your mind. That&rsquo;s why Sound Opinions host and WBEZ blogger Jim DeRogatis is there. He tells us if he&rsquo;s had one of those &ldquo;magic moments&rdquo; so far at the festival&rsquo;s 2015 edition.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/JimDeRogatis">Jim DeRogatis</a> is the co-host of WBEZ&#39;s Sound Opinions.</em></p></p> Thu, 19 Mar 2015 07:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-19/morning-shift-new-u-c-report-dissects-discipline-practices-chicago Meet the companies that profit when CPS students drop out http://www.wbez.org/sections/special-series/meet-companies-profit-when-cps-students-drop-out-111665 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/IMG_1128_0.JPG" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">One year ago, a small contingent of some of Chicago&rsquo;s most powerful education officials flew to Arizona for a conference of education investors, hosted by Chicago Board of Education member Deborah Quazzo&#39;s investment firm Global Silicon Valley Advisors.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">The keynote speaker: Earvin &lsquo;Magic&rsquo; Johnson.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Fellow board member Mahalia Hines introduced the NBA-star-turned-businessman whose name is now branded across five of Chicago&rsquo;s newest for-profit alternative schools, called the Magic Johnson Bridgescape Academies. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;One thing I was really great at was math, so I know my money,&rdquo; Johnson told the crowd. &ldquo;I know a great deal, a good deal and a bad deal.&rdquo;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Johnson&rsquo;s entire speech focused on making money in urban areas, returning bigger profits than expected in each case. He didn&rsquo;t mention the schools for dropouts in Chicago Public Schools until asked a question by someone in the audience.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">One month after Quazzo, Hines, another CPS board member Andrea Zopp, CPS chief Barbara Byrd-Bennett and Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s then-education deputy Beth Swanson attended the conference, the Chicago Board of Education </span><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/new-alternative-schools-some-run-profit-companies-come-hefty-price-tag-110239">approved another $6 million in startup money</a> for for-profit alternative schools. It was the second round of a multi-year expansion. (Quazzo has also&nbsp;<a href="http://chicago.suntimes.com/news-chicago/7/71/223620/cps-profitable-investment-board-ed-member">come under fire in recent months after a Chicago Sun-Times investigation</a> found that companies she invests in have tripled the amount of money made through contracts held with CPS schools.)</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">A WBEZ and&nbsp;</span><a href="http://catalyst-chicago.org/2015/03/mixing-profits-and-performance-at-alternative-schools/">Catalyst Chicago</a> investigation found most of the new for-profit alternative schools are running half-day programs where students earn credits in a matter of weeks, through mostly online coursework. Yet, students are getting </span><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/same-diploma-different-school-111581">regular high school diplomas</a>, with the name of the school they left. Many students <a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/special-series/safety-net-dropouts-catches-others-111598">never officially dropped out</a> and some are not at all off-track.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">WBEZ and&nbsp;</span>Catalyst Chicago also found that many of the for-profit companies running alternative schools stand to make millions off the deals. Other findings:&nbsp;</p><ul><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">On average, some of the companies spend more than half of their budget on consultants, advertising, technology and fees to affiliated companies.</span></p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Companies can maximize profit by running two or even three sessions a day, serving double the number of kids, yet only hiring the same or fewer staff as a normal school. (One of the for-profit companies, Camelot, is an exception. It operates an eight-hour school day with little online work.)</span></p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Since the companies are privately owned, the public has no way of knowing who is making money from investing in them or whether they have any connections to district or city officials.</span></p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">In at least one case, CPS contracted with a company that was, at the time, under investigation in California.</span></p></li></ul><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">John &lsquo;Jack&rsquo; Donahue, a leading expert on privatization in the public sector and faculty chair of the Masters in Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, said he isn&rsquo;t against companies making a profit, but he cautions against outsourcing when it&rsquo;s not clear what outcome you want. He was also troubled by CPS giving students diplomas from the school they left, not the alternative school.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;The problem is, when you have people with the incentive and the ability to fool us about what&rsquo;s happening,&rdquo; Donahue said, noting that because Illinois does not have a high school exit exam, it&rsquo;s hard to measure if the diploma is meaningful. &ldquo;When you can&rsquo;t specify, in clear terms, what you want...because the undertaking is complex, as education is&hellip;then it won&rsquo;t work.&rdquo;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Because Chicago&rsquo;s graduation numbers are going up, there&rsquo;s no incentive for district officials to make clear that many more diplomas are coming from alternative schools. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">A money-making model</span></strong></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">When Emanuel promised to double the number of seats in alternative schools in 2011, there were 60,000 dropouts under 21 in the city. The people running a small army of alternative schools rejoiced. They thought this meant they would have room and resources to serve the thousands of kids on their waiting lists.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">No one guessed it meant the mayor would look past existing alternative schools to out-of-town, for-profit companies to help fix the dropout crisis.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Nationally, for-profit education companies see opportunity in alternative schools.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">There are four companies now operating in Chicago: Camelot Education, Pathways, EdisonLearning, and Ombudsman. These four companies alone run more than 100 schools in at least 30 states. When Camelot was acquired in 2011 by the private equity firm Riverside Company, managing partner Suzy Kriscunas noted in a press release: </span>&ldquo;Alternative and special education has significant growth.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">A WBEZ and </span>Catalyst Chicago investigation into Chicago&rsquo;s new for-profit alternative schools found that CPS has paid for-profit companies more than $70 million in just two years to start up new alternative schools. Most often, the companies are able to make money by cutting spending at the school level.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">CPS pays the new half-day alternative schools the same amount per child that it pays normal schools. The companies can save by hiring one teacher to teach two students each day. An analysis of budget documents shows many of the new schools spend less than half their budget on school staff. Usually, schools spend between 70 and 80 percent on staff salaries.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Budgets show the for-profit schools spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on consultants, technology, and fees to their parent companies for back-office costs. In some cases, they are purchasing materials from themselves or other parent companies, too.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Last school year, CPS paid Pathways in Illinois $5.1 million to operate two schools with about 500 students. The company then paid its affiliates $1.8 million for a variety of services and curriculum. The company is also run by the daughter of a couple who started a similar for-profit chain of alternative schools in California, called Options for Learning and Options for Youth. That company fell under an investigation by the State of California for improper spending. That same couple is on the board of directors for Pathways in Illinois, while their daughter is the executive director.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Magic Johnson Bridgescape, operated by </span>EdisonLearning in partnership with the former NBA-star, budgets $400,000 for each school to buy educational materials. Much of that is used to buy eCourses, an EdisonLearning product. Spokesman Mike Serpe said the company also buys other online programs, such as Think Through Math, which is part of Chicago Board of Education member Quazzo&rsquo;s investment portfolio.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">No one from </span>EdisonLearning or Magic Johnson Enterprises would agree to an interview.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">But at a press conference in Chicago in February, Johnson said he was approached by </span>EdisonLearning because the company wanted to draw inner-city students into its schools. &ldquo;What they needed was a guy like myself to come in to more or less brand it,&rdquo; he said. When asked how much he makes per school, he told WBEZ and Catalyst: &ldquo;That is all you need to know.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Budget documents obtained through multiple Freedom of Information Act requests indicate how much Johnson stands to make off the alternative schools. One proposal listed a half- million-dollar fee to &ldquo;Magic Johnson Enterprises,&rdquo; but the assumption was based on opening many more schools.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Jack Elsey, Chicago Public Schools&#39; chief of innovation and incubation, said there&rsquo;s no way CPS could have delivered on Emanuel&rsquo;s promise to double the number of dropouts being served without outside help.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;The point is not the bottom line,&rdquo; Elsey said. &ldquo;The point is having an impact on students. So the benefit of getting the student in and graduated within a month or two months, means that&rsquo;s one more student who&rsquo;s graduated who wouldn&rsquo;t have graduated before.&rdquo;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&lsquo;Who cares if they make money?&rsquo;</span></strong></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Illinois does not allow for-profit companies to run schools. State law requires public charter schools to be non-profits incorporated in Illinois. However, districts like CPS and non-profits can contract with for-profit companies to provide services.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">It&rsquo;s why district officials are careful to call the new alternative schools &ldquo;programs&rdquo; instead of schools. The for-profit companies technically hold contracts to provide what&rsquo;s called an &ldquo;Alternative Learning Opportunities Program.&quot;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Bridgescape, Camelot and Ombudsman are run by for-profit, out-of-state companies. Pathways is a non-profit certified in Illinois, although its executives own for-profit companies that do business with the non-profit.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Todd Bock runs Camelot Education, one of the for-profit companies to open alternative schools in Chicago in the last few years.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;People hear the word &#39;for-profit&#39; and they think these companies are making hundreds of thousands of dollars on these schools and that&rsquo;s really, really not the case,&rdquo; he said.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">The schools Bock&rsquo;s company runs are an outlier. Students at Camelot&rsquo;s EXCEL Academies have to go to school for almost nine hours and there is little work done on computers.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">He says Chicago should hold companies like his accountable for quality.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;We have an obligation to the taxpayers to do it better and more efficiently than what&rsquo;s been done in the past and if we can&rsquo;t do that, then we don&rsquo;t deserve to be there,&rdquo; Bock said.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Gary Miron, professor of evaluation, measurement, and research at Western Michigan University,</span> studies for-profit and not-for-profit education companies. He said education companies see alternative schools as appealing because demand is so high and the companies have an excuse for poor performance, since dropouts are less likely to score well on standardized tests.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">CPS is funding the new schools as if they were charter schools, but then not having them grant their own diplomas. &nbsp;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;Some people say, &lsquo;Who cares if it&rsquo;s for-profit? If they can deliver a better product at a lower cost, who cares if they make a little money?&rsquo;&rdquo; Miron said. &ldquo;And then I&rsquo;d say, &lsquo;Yeah! Why not?&rsquo; But it&rsquo;s not happening. It&rsquo;s just not happening. When we look at the outcomes, they&rsquo;re not as good.&rdquo;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">CPS is trying to hold the new schools accountable for performance, though it isn&#39;t using the same measures it applies to the rest of the high schools in Chicago. Instead, it looks at improvement in reading and math, attendance and how many kids actually earn diplomas.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Early numbers show of the five performance levels CPS gives schools, not ONE of the new for-profit schools made it into the top two.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Not all of the new for-profit alternative schools have been open long enough to get a rating. But of those that have been, most landed at the bottom of the district&rsquo;s rankings. None earned a 1 or 1+ rating.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Miron said low-performing schools should spend more, not less, directly on students. Plus, with alternative schools, the students enrolling are some of the most at-risk and vulnerable in the city.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;</span>If these are such a good idea, why aren&rsquo;t we doing it with some suburban schools serving middle-class families?&rdquo; he asks. &ldquo;Yet we see this experimentation with private companies with pretty drastically new ideas that end up being more beneficial for profit margin than actual performance.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">Harvard&rsquo;s Jack Donahue echoed Miron&rsquo;s concerns about quality.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">&ldquo;The real thing to worry about here is the weaknesses of the measures of value, rather than the fact that somebody might be making a buck,&rdquo; he said.</span></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cac2dd7b-ef91-40c8-d60b-356db7fdb9a6">This story was co-reported with Sarah Karp of <a href="http://catalyst-chicago.org">Catalyst Chicago</a>. Becky Vevea is an education reporter for WBEZ. Follow her </span><a href="http://twitter.com/WBEZeducation">@WBEZeducation</a>.&nbsp;</em></p><p><em>A previous version of this article incorrectly identified the school at which John &#39;Jack&#39; Donahue works. It is Harvard University&#39;s John F. Kennedy School of Government.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 08:50:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/special-series/meet-companies-profit-when-cps-students-drop-out-111665 Morning Shift: Maine East War Bonds and Townships http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-06/morning-shift-maine-east-war-bonds-and-townships-111664 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jamie%20McCaffrey.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/Jamie McCaffrey" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194557103&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">CPS launches Latino Studies program</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">December of 2013, Chicago Public Schools unveiled a curriculum guide on African-American studies that allowed teachers to incorporate African-American studies into core subjects all year round. Now, CPS is targeting its largest group of minority students- Latinos. Chicago Board of Education Vice President Jesse Ruiz joins Morning Shift to talk about the new Interdisciplinary Latino and Latin American Studies curriculum.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/JesseRuizEsq">Jesse Ruiz</a> is the Vice President of the Chicago Board of Education.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556666&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Smart Bar Chicago launches New Women in Music Series</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The music festival season is not too far off and according to one Chicago venue talent buyer, when you look at the line-ups of festivals, women comprise about 10 percent of the talent. So Smart Bar Chicago talent buyer and DJ Marea Samper (aka The Black Madonna) has decided to hold a mini festival during Women&rsquo;s History Month showcasing established and up and coming female electronica and DJ talent from around the globe. Stamper tells us about the idea behind the DAPHNE: A Women&#39;s Movement in Dance Music Festival.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.last.fm/music/The+Black+Madonna">DJ Marea Samper</a> is the talent buyer for Smart Bar Chicago.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556660&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Maine East/South students craft documentary</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Ever heard the expression &quot;Faster, higher, that&#39;s Maine&#39;s Flyer?&quot; We hadn&#39;t - until a group of 20 students at Maine South and Maine East High Schools produced a documentary of the same name. The doc commemorates a World War II plane funded by a student-led war bond sales effort and named in honor of what were then Maine Township High School students. We talk with Maine East student Rachel Stan, and supervising teacher Phillip Ash about the film.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://east.maine207.org/pash/?DepartmentId=-1">Phillip Ash</a> is a teacher at Maine East High School.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Rachel Stan is a student at <a href="https://twitter.com/maine_east">Maine East High School.</a>&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556656&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">A look at Illinois townships&nbsp;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">While High School District 207 is an entirely separate governmental entity from Maine Township, it got us thinking about the history behind townships in Illinois. How do they operate and how have they evolved? Maine Township is the largest in Cook County and oldest unit of local government in the area. Joining us from the Township&#39;s Park Ridge office is Supervisor Carol Teschky.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.mainetownship.com/government/electedofficials.shtml">Carol Teschky</a>&nbsp;is the Maine Township Supervisor.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/194556649&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">New book of poetry and photography provides hope for the recently incarcerated</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Coming out of prison can often be more difficult than going in. Even though they&rsquo;ve paid their debt to society, they&rsquo;re faced with the stigma of being ex-cons, and often lack the needed resources-in society and in themselves-to move on and rebuild their lives. For years, Brandon Crockett has taught poetry to folks living at St. Leonard&rsquo;s, a facility dedicated to moving people from prison to a positive, productive life on the outside. Now Crockett has teamed up with world-famous photographer Sandro Miller to produce a book of poetry and portraits by and of the people in his class. Brandon and members of his class join Morning Shift to talk about the experience.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Brandon Crockett teaches poetry at <a href="https://twitter.com/StLeonardsMinis">St. Leonard&#39;s Ministires</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Jesse Anderson and Marketta Sims are in the poetry program at St. Leonard&#39;s Ministires and contributors of the book <a href="https://twitter.com/findfreedombook">&quot;Finding Freedom.&quot;</a></em></p></p> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 07:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-06/morning-shift-maine-east-war-bonds-and-townships-111664