WBEZ | World Bank http://www.wbez.org/tags/world-bank Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Humanitarian aid arrives to Madaya, Syria http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-13/humanitarian-aid-arrives-madaya-syria-114460 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="447" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Syria-Soundcloud.jpg" title="(AP Photo)" width="623" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241679390&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Syrian humanitarian crisis</span><br />On Monday, the besieged Syrian town of Madaya received its first shipment of aid since October. Trucks brought in food and blankets and much needed relief for a population on the verge of starvation. Additional supplies are expected to arrive this week. The town is controlled by rebel forces but surrounded by regime forces, which has made it difficult to get relief into the area. The aid is expected to last a month. According to Oxfam, almost 400,000 Syrians are in besieged areas and 4.5 million Syrians are in hard&shy;to&shy;reach areas so what has happened in Madaya is likely to happen in other parts of the country.</p><p><strong>GUESTS:</strong> Shannon Scribner is humanitarian policy manager for Oxfam America.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="870" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Antarctica2014%20photo%20credit%20AntarcticaIceMarathon.png" title="Sarah Ames during her Marathon run in Antarctica (Courtesy of Sarah Ames)" width="580" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241680181&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">World Marathon Challenge: seven races on seven continents in seven days </span><br />Sarah Ames is a Chicago area law firm partner and an amateur runner. What makes her unique is that Ames believes she&rsquo;s the only woman ever to run a marathon on seven continents &ndash; and she&rsquo;s done it four times. She&rsquo;ll tell us how she literally became a global runner and why she runs for a group called Hamlin Fistula&shy;USA. The NGO tries to raise awareness about a condition called fistula &ldquo;an abnormal connection between the rectum and the vagina&rdquo; that can cause immense suffering and death during childbirth, especially in developing countries. This month, Ames will run in the World Marathon Challenge. She&rsquo;ll attempt to run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days.</p><p><strong>GUESTS</strong>: Sarah Ames is a, marathon runner, board member and spokesperson for the NGO, Hamlin Fistula‐USA and partner at the law firm Quarles &amp; Brady, LLP.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="403" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/humanitarian_raid.jpeg" title="Photo for the Mother Jones article ‘Humanitarian Raid: The World Bank is supposed to help the poor. So why do so many of its investments underwrite oligarchs?’, by Claire Provost and Matt Kennard (Courtesy of Mother Jones)" width="631" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241680594&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">World Bank subsidiary, the IFC, may hurt the poor </span><br />The International Finance Corporation is a World Bank subsidiary. The World Bank calls it &ldquo;the largest global development institution focused exclusively on the private sector in developing countries.&rdquo; Its motto is, &ldquo;We work with the private sector in developing countries to help create opportunity for all.&rdquo; After a nine&shy;month investigation, journalists Matt Kennard and Claire Provost, claim in a new Mother Jones report &ldquo;Humanitarian Raid,&rdquo; that the IFC may do more harm than good to the poor. We&rsquo;ll ask Provost and Kennard why they believe the IFC is more likely, as they write, &ldquo;helping the rich get richer.&rdquo; Support for their reporting came from a grant through the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.</p><p><strong>GUESTS:</strong> Matt Kennard and Claire Provost are journalists and fellows at the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and at the centre for Investigative Journalism in London.</p></p> Tue, 12 Jan 2016 10:50:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-13/humanitarian-aid-arrives-madaya-syria-114460 Humanitarian aid arrives in Madaya, Syria http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-13/humanitarian-aid-arrives-madaya-syria-114459 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Syria%20CMS%20smail.jpg" title="In this Monday, Jan. 11, 2016 photo, a young boy waits to be evacuated from the besieged town of Madaya, northwest of Damascus, Syria. Aid convoys reached three besieged villages on Monday — Madaya, near Damascus. Reports of starvation and images of emaciated children have raised global concerns and underscored the urgency for new peace talks that the U.N. is hoping to host in Geneva on Jan. 25. (AP Photo)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241679874&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Humanitarian aid arrives to Madaya, Syria</strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">On Monday, the besieged Syrian town of Madaya received its first shipment of aid since October. Trucks brought in food and blankets and much needed relief for a population on the verge of starvation. Additional supplies are expected to arrive this week. The town is controlled by rebel forces but surrounded by regime forces, which has made it difficult to get relief into the area. The aid is expected to last a month. According to Oxfam, almost 400,000 Syrians are in besieged areas and 4.5 million Syrians are in hard-to-reach areas so what has happened in Madaya is likely to happen in other parts of the country. We&rsquo;ll discuss the situation in Madaya and other areas in the region with Shannon Scribner, humanitarian policy manager for Oxfam America.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">GUESTS:</span></strong> Shannon Scribner is humanitarian policy manager for Oxfam America.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241680594&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">Report claims the World Bank&#39;s International Finance Corporation may hurt the poor</span></strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">The International Finance Corporation is a World Bank subsidiary. The World Bank calls it &ldquo;the largest global development institution focused exclusively on the private sector in developing countries.&rdquo; Its motto is, &ldquo;We work with the private sector in developing countries to help create opportunity for all.&rdquo; After a nine-month investigation, journalists Matt Kennard and Claire Provost, claim in a new Mother Jones report &ldquo;Humanitarian Raid,&rdquo; that the IFC may do more harm than good to the poor. We&rsquo;ll ask Provost and Kennard why they believe the IFC is more likely, as they write, &ldquo;helping the rich get richer.&rdquo; Support for their reporting came from a grant through the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">GUESTS:</span></strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;Matt Kennard and Claire Provost are journalists and fellows at the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and at the centre for Investigative Journalism in London.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241680181&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong><span>World Marathon Challenge: Seven races on seven continents in seven days</span></strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">Sarah Ames is a Chicago area law firm partner and an amateur runner. What makes her unique is that Ames believes she&rsquo;s the only woman ever to run a marathon on seven continents &ndash; and she&rsquo;s done it four times. &nbsp;She&rsquo;ll tell us how she literally became a global runner and why she runs for a group called Hamlin Fistula-USA. The NGO tries to raise awareness about a condition called fistula &ldquo;an abnormal connection between the rectum and the vagina&rdquo; that can cause immense suffering and death during childbirth, especially in developing countries. This month, Ames will run in the World Marathon Challenge. She&rsquo;ll attempt to run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2311fca6-3be3-757d-88be-a4bfa129b094">GUESTS: </span></strong>Sarah Ames is a, marathon runner, board member and spokesperson for the NGO, Hamlin Fistula-USA and partner at the law firm Quarles &amp; Brady, LLP.</p><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 12 Jan 2016 09:44:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-13/humanitarian-aid-arrives-madaya-syria-114459 Financial burden of Ebola falls to African diaspora http://www.wbez.org/news/financial-burden-ebola-falls-african-diaspora-111031 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Ebola shipping.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Members of Chicago&rsquo;s West African diaspora say they are struggling under the pressure of supporting large extended families in Ebola-stricken countries, where the public health crisis has taken a <a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2014/10/08/ebola-new-world-bank-group-study-forecasts-billions-in-economic-loss-if-epidemic-lasts-longer-spreads-in-west-africa">serious economic toll</a>. Some have turned to neighbors, government assistance programs and faith organizations for help -- not just to send back to their motherland, but to sustain their families in the U.S. during this period.</p><p>&ldquo;You know, to take care of five persons in America, at the same time to take care of more than 25 persons (in Africa), it&rsquo;s not easy,&rdquo; said David Young, &ldquo;and on a low income, it&rsquo;s terrible.&rdquo;</p><p>Young, a Liberian who came to the U.S. two years ago and was recently joined by his wife and three children, worries that his family might perish -- of starvation -- in Chicago&rsquo;s Chatham neighborhood on the South Side. The family receives free housing from the Chatham Fields Evangelical Lutheran Church, where Young is Music Director. Young says his take-home pay, about $1000 a month, is already low for a family that size. But lately, they&rsquo;ve had to make do with less, as he&rsquo;s been wiring about $600 montly back to his family in Liberia.</p><p>&ldquo;Because there&rsquo;s no work now in Liberia -- everything is shut down economically,&rdquo; Young explained, &ldquo;So, they tell me that they are not working.&rdquo;</p><p>The <a href="http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2014/09/17/000470435_20140917071539/Rendered/PDF/907480REVISED.pdf">World Bank </a>and <a href="http://documents.wfp.org/stellent/groups/public/documents/ena/wfp268458.pdf">other international aid groups</a> confirm those reports. People in Ebola-stricken countries, afraid of catching the often-fatal virus, are staying home to avoid human-to-human interaction. This has left many households without income.</p><p>&ldquo;I am telling you that almost everyday they make a call,&rdquo; Young said about his family in Liberia. &ldquo;They have to call and tell us no food, no this one, no this, no that. They are not working. There&rsquo;s no jobs.&rdquo;</p><p>The amount that Young feels obligated to wire abroad has left him desperate for help feeding his family here. Trying to get help, Young said he has attempted twice to qualify for food stamps in Illinois. He was denied because he&rsquo;s lived in the U.S. fewer than five years. Because of the nature of his work visa in the U.S., an R-1 temporary visa for religious workers, Young also faces restrictions on what type of additional work he may seek to augment his income.</p><p>Still, Young feels compelled to continue to reach into his household&rsquo;s meager resources to scrounge whatever they can for his network in Liberia. In a front room of his house, a large blue barrel sits, half-full with items like hand sanitizer, soap, toothpaste, disinfectants, shampoo, and rice. All are items one can find in Liberia, but Young says his sons there tell him that pantry staples and basic household cleaning products have shot up in price since the outbreak began.</p><p>&ldquo;If you ask for a bottle of Clorox right now, it&rsquo;s very expensive,&rdquo; said Young.</p><p>Just across the street from Young&rsquo;s house, at the Chatham Fields Evangelical Lutheran Church, Pastor Kenety Gee helps lead a congregation with many Liberians. He said the financial toll of supporting family back home has hit them all.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s really hard to look at the pictures, look at the stories, and ignore your family members,&rdquo; Gee said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s really, really hard, so you got to stretch yourself.&rdquo;</p><p>Gee said he&rsquo;s no exception: one of his sisters in Liberia has a successful wholesale business, and never required Gee&rsquo;s support. But with Liberia&rsquo;s economy on hold, things have changed.</p><p>&ldquo;I send them $300 every week. That&rsquo;s $1200 a month,&rdquo; said Gee. &ldquo;But that&rsquo;s the kind of strain that is put on us here in the U.S.&rdquo;</p><p>The World Bank hasn&rsquo;t yet analyzed recent remittances to Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. Wiring services Western Union and Moneygram weren&rsquo;t able to share data. But people from all three communities share similar stories: that they&rsquo;re constantly transferring money, and that many have shifted away from shipping goods.</p><p>Artemus Gaye used to collect goods monthly to ship to Liberia. But his last 40-foot long container was sent in March. Since then, the business has dried up.</p><p>&ldquo;Who will you send it to now everyone has been quarantined, people are not moving around,&rdquo; said Gaye. &ldquo;The markets are very empty.&rdquo;</p><p>Today, Gaye&rsquo;s collecting protective medical gear and hospital supplies, which he hopes to ship in November. This isn&rsquo;t the usual stuff for this time of year. Normally, Gaye would be shipping Christmas presents. Still, he&rsquo;s optimistic that the market will be back to normal by the holiday</p><p>Gaye&rsquo;s encouraged by recent reports that Ebola is leveling off in Liberia.</p><p>&ldquo;We might be having a good Christmas season,&rdquo; said Gaye. &ldquo;You know, it&rsquo;ll be reflective, but at least people will be out there to do what they do best - interact with each other.&rdquo;</p><p>Many hope their family members in Africa will also be able to return, safely, to work. That could help ease finances for the diaspora in Chicago to celebrate the holidays, too.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/financial-burden-ebola-falls-african-diaspora-111031 Mass grave discovered in Mexico http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-09/mass-grave-discovered-mexico-110918 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP338073131151.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A mass grave discovered in Iguala, Mexico is believed to contain the remains of a group of student protesters who went missing in September. The students were reportedly attacked by police before disappearing. We&#39;ll get an update from journalist Adam Raney, who joins us from Mexico.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-mass-grave-discovered-in-mexico/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-mass-grave-discovered-in-mexico.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-mass-grave-discovered-in-mexico" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Mass grave discovered in Mexico" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 09 Oct 2014 11:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-09/mass-grave-discovered-mexico-110918 U.S. faces serious global challenge over World Bank president nomination http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-02/segment/us-faces-serious-global-challenge-over-world-bank-president-nomination <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//AP120323110631_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>President Obama’s recent nomination for World Bank president has pleasantly surprised many observers, given the fact he’s not an economist. Instead, president of Dartmouth College <a href="http://www.dartmouth.edu/presidentelect/bio-kim.html" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Dr. Jim Yong Kim</a> is an expert in global health and the former director of the <a href="http://www.who.int" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">World Health Organization’s</a> Department of HIV/AIDS. But Dr. Kim has competition from two strong nominees: &nbsp;Latin American economist <a href="http://www.sipa.columbia.edu/academics/directory/jao2128-fac.html" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Jose Antonio Ocampo</a> and Nigeria’s finance minister, <a href="http://www.fmf.gov.ng/the-ministry/management-team/honourable-minister.html" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala</a>. Ocampo and Okonjo-Iweala’s nominations signal that there might be a crack in the United States’ 70-year domination of the World Bank. &nbsp;</p><p><em>Worldview </em>talks with <a href="http://www.genderaction.org/who.html" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Elaine Zuckerman</a> about the potential for big changes in the World Bank. She’s the founder of Gender Action, a Washington DC-based watchdog group for global financial institutions.</p></p> Mon, 02 Apr 2012 10:49:51 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-04-02/segment/us-faces-serious-global-challenge-over-world-bank-president-nomination Alfredo Sfeir Younis visits 'Occupy' movement and calls for societal change http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-12-20/alfredo-sfeir-younis-visits-occupy-movement-and-calls-societal-change-95 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-December/2011-12-19/alfredo.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chilean economist <a href="http://silentpeacemeditation.com/about-alfredo/">Alfredo Sfeir Younis</a> spent more than 30 years at the World Bank. There he focused on the rights of indigenous peoples, poverty eradication and international trade. &nbsp;</p><p>Along the way he’s also became a Mayan priest.</p><p>These days Alfredo uses his &nbsp;<a href="http://silentpeacemeditation.com/">Zambuling Institute for Human Transformation</a> to combine spirituality and public policy issues.</p><p>Currently he’s on a tour of the U.S. After talking with a range of the “Occupy” movement protestors, Alfredo thinks we must challenge some fundamental values.</p><p>There's no doubt that after our current global economic strife, movements like <a href="http://occupywallst.org/">Occupy Wall Street</a>, the anti-austerity protests in Europe and the Arab Spring present a form of a pushback.</p><p>On this edition of Worldview, we spend the hour with Alfredo to talk about our changing times.</p></p> Tue, 20 Dec 2011 18:01:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-12-20/alfredo-sfeir-younis-visits-occupy-movement-and-calls-societal-change-95 Worldview 12.20.11 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-122011 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//episode/images/2011-december/2011-12-16/alfredo1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chilean economist Alfredo Sfeir Younis spent more than 30 years at the World Bank tackling the rights of indigenous peoples, poverty eradication and international trade. Today, Alfredo leads a slightly different life: He's a Mayan priest and president of the <a href="http://silentpeacemeditation.com/" target="_blank">Zambuling Institute for Human Transformation</a>, an organization that works on the connections between spirituality and public policy. On his current tour of the U.S., he's meeting with "Occupy" protesters. Alfredo argues, in order for humanity to thrive, the world must challenge some fundamental ideas of how we order, value and measure our society.</p></p> Tue, 20 Dec 2011 15:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-122011 Gender Action tracks how the World Bank and IMF affect women and children http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-01/gender-action-tracks-how-world-bank-and-imf-affect-women-and-children-93 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-November/2011-11-01/genderaction1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Over the last sixty years, international financial institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund have doled out more than one trillion dollars in loans. Much of this money has gone to poor countries to fund large-scale infrastructure projects, from transportation to access to electricity and water.</p><p>But these ambitious projects can have unforeseen consequences. By burdening poor countries with gargantuan debt, they sometimes do more harm than good. And, critics say, the human dimension to these projects is often miscalculated. For example, World Bank-funded pipelines have displaced tens of thousands of impoverished people in places like West Africa and Central Asia.</p><p>While working as an economist at the World Bank, <a href="http://www.genderaction.org/who.html" target="_blank">Elaine Zuckerman</a> started to think that the needs of women and children were being overlooked by these massive, taxpayer-backed financial institutions. In 2002, she founded <a href="http://www.genderaction.org/who.html" target="_blank">Gender Action</a>, a watchdog group that monitors how the practices of the World Bank, IMF and other organizations affect women. It's one of the only organizations of its kind in the world.</p><p>On today's show, we talk to Elaine about how international financial institutions may be contributing to gender inequality.</p></p> Tue, 01 Nov 2011 15:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-01/gender-action-tracks-how-world-bank-and-imf-affect-women-and-children-93 Worldview 11.1.11 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-11111 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//episode/images/2011-november/2011-11-01/syria1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In Syria, some observers are worried that an all-out civil war could erupt. The Assad regime has heightened its crackdown on protesters. The U.S. ambassador recently left the country. And, with Turkey’s support, deserted soldiers are taking up arms against the regime. We discuss the latest in Syria with <a href="http://www.hampshire.edu/faculty/odahi.htm" target="_blank">Omar Dahi</a>, a professor at Hampshire College. Also, while many of the infrastructure projects funded by the World Bank and the IMF are ostensibly designed to help the world’s poorest nations, they often end up benefiting big business and the bottom line at the expense of local populations, especially women and children. We discuss this trend with <a href="http://www.genderaction.org/who.html" target="_blank">Elaine Zuckerman</a>, founder and executive director of <a href="http://www.genderaction.org/" target="_blank">Gender Action</a>, a watchdog group for international financial institutions.</p></p> Tue, 01 Nov 2011 14:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-11111 Alfredo Sfeir Younis on sustainability through community and human transformation http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/alfredo-sfeir-younis-sustainability-through-community-and-human-transformation <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//106616473.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The rescue of 33 Chilean miners last month has sparked a discussion about how we harvest, utilize and sustain our resources. Chilean economist <a target="_blank" href="http://silentpeacemeditation.com/about-alfredo/">Alfredo Sfeir Younis</a> is president of the <a target="_blank" href="http://silentpeacemeditation.com/">Zambuling Institute for Human Transformation.</a> He spent more than 30 years at the World Bank, where he focused on the rights of indigenous peoples, poverty eradication and international trade.&nbsp; He tells us about the rescue effort&rsquo;s impact on Chilean society and shares his views on the proper moral course for global sustainability and development.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div></p> Tue, 09 Nov 2010 16:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/alfredo-sfeir-younis-sustainability-through-community-and-human-transformation