WBEZ | lgbt http://www.wbez.org/tags/lgbt Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en 'We're engaged!' http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/were-engaged-112636 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150807 Ashley Gordon Beth Howard bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Ashley Gordon and Elizabeth Howard met last year on the dating app Tinder. A few days after they started chatting, they met in person for the first time. It was a Thursday evening and they went to Buena Bar, a restaurant halfway between their two homes.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Wed, 12 Aug 2015 14:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/were-engaged-112636 For same-sex marriage opponents, the fight is far from over http://www.wbez.org/news/same-sex-marriage-opponents-fight-far-over-112270 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/whitehouseap.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Supreme Court decision Friday that upheld the right of same-sex couples to marry was one for the history books.&nbsp;Obergefell v. Hodges&nbsp;was exalted by gay rights groups and their supporters, and condemned by those who believe that marriage should be reserved for one man and one woman.</p><p>Opponents of same-sex marriage say that the fight is far from over.</p><p>In fact, many of them did not wait long before raising the idea of passing a constitutional amendment to ban it. The prospect that the attempt will prove successful seems unlikely, though. Constitutional amendments are easy to talk about but rarely enacted &mdash; and polls show that a clear majority of Americans support the right of LGBT people to marry.</p><p>Still, opponents say that there are other avenues to pursue &mdash; in Congress, state legislatures and the courts.</p><p>Brian Brown, president of the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nationformarriage.org/">National Organization for Marriage</a>, compares this week&#39;s Supreme Court opinion to the landmark&nbsp;Roe v. Wade&nbsp;decision making abortion a legal right. A future court, he says, could revisit the issue.</p><p>&quot;That&#39;s why it&#39;s critical that people of faith, others who understand that marriage is the union of a man and a woman, get out and support candidates that are committed to overturning this decision,&quot; Brown says.</p><p>More immediately, advocates on both sides say that the battle will now be fought in the lower courts and will involve religious liberty cases.</p><p><a href="http://ratiochristi.org/people/jeremy-tedesco">Jeremy Tedesco</a>&nbsp;of the Alliance Defending Freedom &mdash; a group representing a Colorado bakery owner who was sued after refusing for religious reasons to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple &mdash; also represents clients in several other, similar cases. Following the&nbsp;Obergefell&nbsp;ruling, he expects that same-sex marriage advocates will step up their legal challenges.</p><p>&quot;I think their efforts, as we&#39;ve seen already, are primarily targeted at businesses that are owned by religious folks who object to creating expression or are being forced to participate in marriage ceremonies that violate their religious beliefs,&quot; he says.</p><p>Opponents of same-sex marriage say that there will be a push now in state legislatures to adopt laws protecting those business owners who argue their religious beliefs prevent them from serving same-sex couples. But that&#39;s likely to be an uphill climb.</p><p>Arizona&#39;s conservative Republican Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed a religious freedom law last year, saying that it was too divisive. A few months ago, Indiana quickly rewrote its religious freedom law and added protections for sexual orientation to head off a threatened boycott.</p><p>The battle is likely to be about more than bakeries, printers and flower shops. Marcy Hamilton, a law professor at Yeshiva University&#39;s Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, says that the Supreme Court decision clearly makes exemptions for churches and ministers who don&#39;t want to preside over marriages of same-sex couples.</p><p>&quot;But I think what we&#39;ll see is a push for religious nonprofits, not just houses of worship,&quot; she says, &quot;to be able to get exemptions from having to provide services to same-sex couples.&quot;</p><p>To that end, same-sex marriage opponents are looking to Congress and a bill called the First Amendment Defense Act, or FADA.</p><p>Brown says that the bill would protect businesses and nonprofits &mdash; so-called 501(c)(3) groups &mdash; that refuse to provide services to same sex couples.</p><p>&quot;That means they cannot be stripped of the right for federal contracts,&quot; he says. &quot;They cannot be stripped of their 501(c)(3) status. They cannot be treated as if they are the functional equivalent of racists.&quot;</p><p>In his majority opinion,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/14-556_3204.pdf">Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote&nbsp;</a>that religious groups have a constitutionally protected right to advocate against same-sex marriage:</p><blockquote><div><p>&quot;It must be emphasized that religions, and those who adhere to religious doctrines, may continue to advocate with utmost, sincere conviction that, by divine precepts, same-sex marriage should not be condoned.</p><p>&quot;The First Amendment ensures that religious organizations and persons are given proper protection as they seek to teach the principles that are so fulfilling and so central to their lives and faiths, and to their own deep aspirations to continue the family structure they have long revered.&quot;</p></div></blockquote><p>Tedesco says that&#39;s a message from the court that the dispute over same-sex marriage is not like earlier battles over racial discrimination.</p><p>&quot;Culturally, we have to make the case that these things are completely different,&quot; Tedesco says. &quot;And I think the Supreme Court rightly recognized that, by recognizing that people who believe this do so in good faith.&quot;</p><p>For those who oppose this week&#39;s Supreme Court decision, that may be the most important battle.</p><p><em>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/06/27/418038177/for-same-sex-marriage-opponents-the-fight-is-far-from-over">via NPR</a></em></p></p> Sun, 28 Jun 2015 20:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/same-sex-marriage-opponents-fight-far-over-112270 After marriage equality, what's next for the LGBT movement? http://www.wbez.org/news/after-marriage-equality-whats-next-lgbt-movement-112269 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/prideap.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Amid celebrations about the Supreme Court&#39;s decision legalizing gay marriage, some within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community are also raising concerns about what may lie ahead for them.</p><p>J. Bryan Lowder, an editor at&nbsp;Slate,&nbsp;outlined his own concerns earlier this week in a piece that he published before the Supreme Court decision, titled&nbsp;<a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2015/06/25/some_unintended_consequences_of_marriage_equality_worth_taking_seriously.html">&quot;The Real Dangers of Same-Sex Marriage</a>.&quot; In the article, he writes the he is &quot;worrying ... about what the solidly established right to marriage might do to queer people and to the unique community we&#39;ve created over the past century or so.&quot;</p><p>Aside from marriage, &quot;there are many other issues in the community that are more important to certain individuals,&quot; Lowder tells NPR&#39;s Arun Rath. Marriage &quot;is a very happy kind of cause,&quot; he says, and &quot;I do worry that once marriage equality is done, we&#39;re going to lose some of the allies that we&#39;ve had in the past because it&#39;s just not as fun to be involved in it.&quot;</p><div><hr /></div><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Interview Highlights</span></p><p><strong>On why marriage may not be right for everyone</strong></p><p>In some cases, couples don&#39;t want to get married, they would prefer to have the domestic partnership. And that can be for ideological reasons, they may not, sort of, like the institution of marriage.</p><p>But also, in certain states where there are no discrimination protections for LGBT people, you know, there&#39;s the line that says, &quot;If you get married on Sunday, you could get fired on Monday.&quot; So forcing people, in a sense, to get married by getting rid of these domestic partnership agreements could make them have to come out to their communities ... [putting them] in danger of being discriminated against.</p><p><strong>On implications for future support for other LGBT causes</strong></p><p>The interesting thing about marriage as a social cause over the past few decades or so has been that it is a very happy kind of cause. It&#39;s easy to brand it as a beautiful thing because we all love to see pictures of people being happy and in love. It&#39;s very easy to share on social media, which ... incidentally [has] arisen alongside the marriage equality movement. And so marriage in some ways has been an easy sell. I don&#39;t want to overstate that, because obviously there&#39;s been a lot of intense activism to get to the point we got to.</p><p>But the things that are coming up for the LGBT community next &mdash; such as discrimination or trans-phobia &mdash; all the things we&#39;re coming to next in our movement are just not as easily shareable and happy. So I do worry that once marriage equality is done, we&#39;re going to lose some of the allies that we&#39;ve had in the past because it&#39;s just not as fun to be involved in it. And I hope that&#39;s not true, but I think it could happen.</p><p><strong>On other LGBT issues that deserve attention</strong></p><p>A lot of, for instance, trans[gender] individuals would much rather have more protections for their particular issues than for marriage equality. Also, LGBT homelessness among youth is a huge problem in this country, in cases where parents kick people out for identifying as queer. So fixing that problem might be a more immediate concern for those individuals than, you know, getting married. ... There are many other issues in the community that are more important to certain individuals.</p><p><strong>What marriage may mean for gay culture</strong></p><p>Because gay people and lesbian people and the entire community did not have the ability to get married, that was not a goal within the community. So you didn&#39;t grow up as a gay kid hoping for your wedding, because it just wasn&#39;t a possibility. Some people may have wanted it, but most of us, you know, just didn&#39;t think about it because it wasn&#39;t on the table.</p><p>And so, I think that that allowed us to imagine different ways of being in romantic relationships and loving. So for some of us, that meant monogamous relationships that looked exactly like a married couple, and just didn&#39;t have the legal imprimatur of the state. But for other people, they had many different kinds of arrangements.</p><p>And so what I do worry about is, with this opportunity being offered to everyone now &mdash; which is clearly a great thing &mdash; maybe we will lose some of that imagination that the gay community has had in the past to think about how to live in different ways and, you know, really offer a critique to straight culture of how we can arrange our romantic lives.</p><p><em>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/06/28/418327652/after-marriage-equality-whats-next-for-the-lgbt-movement">via NPR</a></em></p></p> Sun, 28 Jun 2015 19:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/after-marriage-equality-whats-next-lgbt-movement-112269 Indiana pastor doesn’t want changes to 'religious freedom' law http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/indiana-pastor-doesn%E2%80%99t-want-changes-religious-freedom-law-111798 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Pence Reax_1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">As Indiana Gov. Mike Pence asks lawmakers to send him a clarification of the state&#39;s new religious-freedom law later this week, at least one Northwest Indiana pastor is speaking out against the prospect of changes.</p><p dir="ltr">On Tuesday, Pence defended the Indiana law as a vehicle to protect religious liberty but said he has been meeting with lawmakers &quot;around the clock&quot; to address concerns that it would allow businesses to deny services to gay customers.</p><p>The governor said he does not believe &quot;for a minute&quot; that lawmakers intended &quot;to create a license to discriminate.&quot;</p><p>&quot;It certainly wasn&#39;t my intent,&quot; said Pence, who <a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/indiana-gov-pence-signs-religious-objections-bill-111772">signed the law last week</a>.</p><p>But, he said, he &quot;can appreciate that that&#39;s become the perception, not just here in Indiana but all across the country. We need to confront that.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;It would make the bill null and void,&rdquo; Rev. Ron Johnson, senior pastor of Living Stones Church in Crown Point, Indiana, told WBEZ. &ldquo;Because it&rsquo;s not going to protect religious liberty.&rdquo;</p><p>The Indiana law prohibits any laws that &quot;substantially burden&quot; a person&#39;s ability to follow his or her religious beliefs. The definition of &quot;person&quot; includes religious institutions, businesses and associations.</p><p>Although the legal language does not specifically mention gays and lesbians, critics say the law is designed to shield businesses and individuals who do not want to serve gays and lesbians, such as florists or caterers who might be hired for a same-sex wedding.</p><p>Johnson says from his understanding, the law could allow something more troubling.</p><p>&ldquo;Nobody is saying that if you come into get a hamburger you say, &lsquo;Hey, are you a homosexual? I&rsquo;m not going to serve you a hamburger.&rsquo; That is not even the issue,&rdquo; Johnson said. &ldquo;The issue has been specifically related to forcing someone to celebrate a same-sex wedding ceremony that they believe violates their religious beliefs. That&rsquo;s where the rub has come.&rdquo;</p><p>Johnson feels the religious community is being forced to accept something they do not believe in.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re talking about the Left and the gay lobby forcing us not to tolerate their behavior but to celebrate their behavior and that&rsquo;s fundamentally wrong,&rdquo; Johnson said. &ldquo;Whatever group is pushing for their right to express themselves sexually however they want to do it, if you don&rsquo;t jump on the bandwagon and support that then you&rsquo;re a bigot, or you&rsquo;re a hater.&quot;</p><p>Johnson added that the national backlash Indiana has endured following Pence&rsquo;s signing of SB 101 into law has been shameful.</p><p>&ldquo;This is a witch hunt if I ever saw one. Frankly, I think it&rsquo;s an insult to Hoosiers. It&rsquo;s an insult to our great governor who is an incredibly good man,&rdquo; Johnson said.</p><p>The federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act arose from a case related to the use of peyote in a Native American ritual.</p><p>But in 1997, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the federal law did not apply to the states. So states began enacting their own laws. Twenty now have them on the books, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/legal-expert-says-illinois-got-it-right-regarding-its-religious-freedom-law-111783">including Illinois</a>.</p><p>Businesses and organizations including Apple and the NCAA have voiced concern over Indiana&#39;s law, and some states have barred government-funded travel to the state.</p><p>Democratic legislative leaders said a clarification would not be enough.</p><p>&quot;To say anything less than a repeal is going to fix it is incorrect,&quot; House Minority Leader Scott Pelath, a Democrat from Michigan City, said.</p><p>Republican Senate President Pro Tem David Long said lawmakers were negotiating a clarification proposal that he hoped would be ready for public release on Wednesday, followed by a vote Thursday before sending the package to the governor.</p><p>&quot;We have a sense that we need to move quickly out here and be pretty nimble,&quot; Long said. &quot;But right now, we don&#39;t have consensus on the language.&quot;</p><p>Also Tuesday, the Indianapolis Star urged state lawmakers in a <a href="http://www.indystar.com/story/opinion/2015/03/30/editorial-gov-pence-fix-religious-freedom-law-now/70698802/">front-page editorial</a> to respond to widespread criticism of the law by protecting the rights of gays and lesbians.</p><p>The Star&#39;s editorial, headlined &quot;FIX THIS NOW,&quot; covered the newspaper&#39;s entire front page. It called for lawmakers to enact a law that would prohibit discrimination on the basis of a person&#39;s sexual orientation or gender identity.</p><p>The newspaper says the uproar sparked by the law has &quot;done enormous harm&quot; to the state and potentially to its economic future.</p><p>The state of Arkansas is now considering passing it&rsquo;s own Religious Freedom Restoration Act.</p><p><em>The Associated Press contributed to this story.</em></p><p><em>Michael Puente is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau Reporter. Following him on Twitter @MikePuenteNews.</em></p></p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 07:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/indiana-pastor-doesn%E2%80%99t-want-changes-religious-freedom-law-111798 Transgender teenager named Prom Queen http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/transgender-teenager-named-prom-queen-111411 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150116 Reyna Ortiz A bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When he was 12, Ray Ortiz packed a blue duffel bag and prepared to leave home forever.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s just no way in hell that I&rsquo;m going to live a life that I&rsquo;m not happy with,&rdquo; Ortiz remembers thinking.</p><p>&ldquo;At the time I didn&rsquo;t know what transgender was,&rdquo; Ortiz says in this week&rsquo;s StoryCorps. Kids at school called him &ldquo;Gay Ray,&rdquo; so he assumed that he was gay.</p><p>He wrote his mom a letter saying &ldquo;not only was I gay, but that I wanted to be a girl.&rdquo;<br />She was supportive and gradually Ray transitioned to living life as a female, going by the name Reyna and using female pronouns. &ldquo;I just made a mental decision like: I&rsquo;m going to do what I want. And I don&rsquo;t care what anybody else has to say.&rdquo;</p><p>Ortiz has three brothers, one older and two younger. And they provided a lot of support when it came time for her to attend Morton East High School in Cicero.</p><p>Other students were &ldquo;horrendous,&rdquo; Reyna said. She told her older brother and she says he went to her high school, into her classroom and confronted her bully. She says kids never bothered her again.</p><p>Ortiz became friends with the most beautiful girls in school. &ldquo;And they were willing to fight and slap somebody if they disrespected me,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;But eventually people just got used to me. By my junior year, I can honestly say, I ruled that school.&rdquo;</p><p>Emmanuel&nbsp;Garcia was a sophomore at Morton East when Ortiz was a senior. Garcia was struggling to come to terms with his identity as a gay Latino man. &ldquo;Seeing someone who was so open and out with their gender identity, it was intimidating,&rdquo; Garcia said in an interview recently. &ldquo;She carried herself so fearlessly.&rdquo;</p><p>During Reyna&rsquo;s senior year, she was nominated for Prom Queen. She went without a date, and sat by herself when the court was announced.</p><p>Then, they announced the winner: &ldquo;&rsquo;And the winner of Prom Queen of 1998 - Ray Ortiz.&rsquo; And I just remember everybody coming to the stage. When I turned around it was just flashing lights and paparazzi. Pictures everywhere and people applauding.&ldquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We always hear that the Latino community is full of machismo and we never hear about a community embracing their own,&rdquo; Garcia said. &ldquo;To have this person kind of pioneer sexuality and gender identity in 1998 was unheard of.&rdquo;</p></p> Fri, 16 Jan 2015 08:07:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/transgender-teenager-named-prom-queen-111411 US announces protections for transgender workers http://www.wbez.org/news/us-announces-protections-transgender-workers-111265 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/flag.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>WASHINGTON &nbsp;&mdash; The Justice Department is now interpreting federal law to explicitly prohibit workplace discrimination against transgender people, according to a memo released Thursday by Attorney General Eric Holder.</p><p>That means the Justice Department will be able to bring legal claims on behalf of people who say they&#39;ve been discriminated against by state and local public employers based on sex identity. In defending lawsuits, the federal government also will no longer take the position that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which bans sex discrimination, does not protect against workplace discrimination on the basis of gender status.</p><p>The memo released Thursday is part of a broader Obama administration effort to afford workplace protection for transgender employees. In July, President Barack Obama ordered employment protection for gay and transgender employees who work for the U.S. government or for companies holding federal contracts.</p><p>The new position is a reversal in position for the Justice Department, which in 2006 stated that Title VII did not cover discrimination based on transgender status.</p><p>&quot;The federal government&#39;s approach to this issue has also evolved over time,&quot; Holder wrote in the memo, saying his position was based on the &quot;most straightforward reading&quot; of the law.</p><p>The memo covers all components of the Justice Department as well as all U.S. Attorneys&#39; offices. The Justice Department does not have authority to sue private employers, and the new memo does not affect that.</p></p> Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/us-announces-protections-transgender-workers-111265 HIV diagnosis leads two friends down different paths http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/hiv-diagnosis-leads-two-friends-down-different-paths-110823 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps-140919-Mark-Rick-bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>&ldquo;Drug addiction is really exhausting,&rdquo; Mark S. King says in this week&rsquo;s StoryCorps, recorded at the Palmer House Hilton Hotel in Chicago&rsquo;s Loop, in conjunction with the National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association&rsquo;s annual convention. &ldquo;I was here in this very hotel maybe eight years ago, and was in a room upstairs for five days and never left my room.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Why&rsquo;s that?&rdquo; his friend Rick Guasco asks him.</p><p>&ldquo;Because I had a crystal meth pipe in my mouth and was smoking and injecting crystal meth for five days.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s kind of surprising to hear you say that,&rdquo; Guasco says. &ldquo;So how did you fall into it?&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;What happened to me&hellip;It was about 1996 and we had just gone through 15 years of pure hell in the gay community, with AIDS. And I had certainly seen that. I had lived through the &lsquo;80s as an HIV-positive person in West Hollywood. And in 1996, at long last, we had these medications that came out&hellip;and for the first time almost since the crisis began the dying seemed to almost stop in its tracks.</p><p>&ldquo;And It was kind of at that nexus of new medications beginning and gay men looking for a reason to celebrate. And it wasn&rsquo;t long until crystal meth started creeping into that equation, creeping into our community.</p><p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s where drug addiction takes you: It makes your world very, very small. You keep shutting out everything else and you&rsquo;re left in a small room, in a hotel room, with you and the drugs and nothing else.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Those of us who have lived with HIV for a longtime&hellip;We came out of it one or two ways: Either we came out of it with a strong sense of empathy and sadness and wanting to do our best to help and understand. Or you come out of it with a real sense of judgment and bitterness, as if this is a new phenomenon amongst young people.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I do feel a little sad and scared for younger gay men. I&rsquo;m not judgmental. I worry for them,&rdquo; Guasco says. &ldquo;I had developed Kaposi&rsquo;s Sarcoma&hellip;the spots. And there were more of them on my legs, and I started to get nervous, worried. And I fell into the sense of denial. The first spot came in May. I didn&rsquo;t get tested until December. And a week before Christmas that year, I found out that yes, indeed, I was HIV-positive.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We have two HIV warhorses here,&rdquo; King says. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re learning as we go along. And that&rsquo;s what I try to keep in mind when we are speaking to other gay men, young or old, about how best to get a handle on this epidemic.&rdquo;</p></p> Fri, 19 Sep 2014 08:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/hiv-diagnosis-leads-two-friends-down-different-paths-110823 Morning Shift: LGBT blue collar workers still face adversity http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-20/morning-shift-lgbt-blue-collar-workers-still-face <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ex.png" alt="" /><p><p>We take a closer look at an Illinois exoneree and how he&#39;s trying to put his life back together. And, we talk about the risks some LGBT blue collar workers still face. Then, the sounds of pianist Kuang-Hao Huang, who previews Make Music Chicago.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-lgbt-blue-collar-workers-still-face/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-lgbt-blue-collar-workers-still-face.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-lgbt-blue-collar-workers-still-face" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: LGBT blue collar workers still face adversity" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 20 Jun 2014 07:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-20/morning-shift-lgbt-blue-collar-workers-still-face The music of Brazil's favelas http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-11/music-brazils-favelas-110320 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP392232449892.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The 2014 World Cup begins in Brazil tomorrow. There&#39;s an official World Cup song, but it doesn&#39;t necessarily include any of the homegrown sounds coming out of Rio&#39;s favelas. &nbsp;We&#39;ll explore the roots of favela funk with Morning Shift and Radio M host Tony Sarabia.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-music-of-brazil-s-favelas/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-music-of-brazil-s-favelas.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-music-of-brazil-s-favelas" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The music of Brazil's favelas" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 11 Jun 2014 11:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-11/music-brazils-favelas-110320 Life in Northwest Indiana's steel closet http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/life-northwest-indianas-steel-closet-110264 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/steel.PNG" style="height: 470px; width: 325px; float: left;" title="" />As Illinois gears up for its first legal same-sex marriages, across the border in Indiana gay marriage is still officially banned.</p><p>Hoosiers say attitudes there are starting to soften, but some workplaces are still more closeted than others.</p><p>A new book reveals a little-known community of LGBT steelworkers who punch in every day at Northwest Indiana&rsquo;s huge steel mills.</p><p>&ldquo;Steel Closets&rdquo; by the author <a href="http://www.annebalay.com/" target="_blank">Anne Balay</a>, documents life in the macho environment of the steel mills where LGBT workers face discrimination and are often afraid to report it to the union.</p><p>Balay, a former English professor at Indiana University Northwest in Gary and the University of Illinois at Chicago, spent five years interviewing some 40 current and former steelworkers for her book.</p><p>She and retired lesbian steelworker Jan Gentry joined WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente at our Crown Point bureau.&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 02 Jun 2014 10:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/life-northwest-indianas-steel-closet-110264