WBEZ | war http://www.wbez.org/tags/war Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Turkey, Russia Promise Not To Go To War Over Downing Of Russian Fighter Jet http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-25/turkey-russia-promise-not-go-war-over-downing-russian-fighter-jet <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/1125_russia-turkey-624x416.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_96763"><img alt="Protesters hold placards and shout slogans as they take part in an anti-Turkey picket outside the Turkish embassy in Moscow on November 25, 2015. Turkey shot down a Russian war plane on the Syrian border on November 24, sending tensions spiraling as Russian President Vladimir Putin warned Ankara its &quot;stab in the back&quot; would have serious consequences. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/11/1125_russia-turkey-624x416.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Protesters hold placards and shout slogans as they take part in an anti-Turkey picket outside the Turkish embassy in Moscow on November 25, 2015. Turkey shot down a Russian war plane on the Syrian border on November 24, sending tensions spiraling as Russian President Vladimir Putin warned Ankara its “stab in the back” would have serious consequences. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)" /><p>Tensions are still running high, a day after Turkey shot down a Russian fighter jet that it says strayed into its airspace and did not respond to warnings. Russia disputes both assertions.</p></div><p>The Russian captain who survived the downing of the plane says he was flying over Syrian territory, and also says Turkey did not issue any warnings. Both Turkey and Russia promised today not to go to war the incident, but there are still many questions about what the fallout might look like.</p><p><a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/11/25/turkey-russia-promise-no-war" target="_blank"><em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s</em></a> Indira Lakshmanan gets the latest from&nbsp;Nadia Bilbassy-Charters, Washington bureau chief for Al Arabiya news channel.</p></p> Wed, 25 Nov 2015 14:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-11-25/turkey-russia-promise-not-go-war-over-downing-russian-fighter-jet What's behind the rise of TB? http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-12/whats-behind-rise-tb-113762 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Sanofi%20Pasteur.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Sanofi Pasteur)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/232797833&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The global TB epidemic</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Last month, the World Health Organization announced that tuberculosis is now the world&rsquo;s leading infectious disease killer. TB surpassed HIV in 2014. We&rsquo;ll talk with two experts: attorney Anand Grover, who once worked as UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health and is now a senior advocate on the Supreme Court of India; and Brian Citro, clinical lecturer in Law and associate director of the International Human Rights Clinic at the University of Chicago Law School. Citro was in China recently to research TB outbreaks. They&rsquo;ll tell us some of the reasons why TB has made a comeback.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/@AnandGroverRepo">Anand Grover</a> is a former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health, a senior advocate on the Supreme Court of India, and the Director and Co-Founder of the Lawyers Collective in India. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em>Brian Citro is a clinical lecturer in law and associate director for the International Human Rights Clinic at the <a href="http://twitter.com/@UChicago">University of Chicago</a> Law School.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/232798755&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">War continues in Yemen&nbsp;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Saudi Arabia has sent ground troops to Yemen and launched air strikes for the last several months. The Saudis now say publically they want a ceasefire, but Belkis Wille, a Human Rights Watch researcher based in Yemen, disagrees. She&rsquo;ll tell us why she believes Saudi actions have indicated the opposite. Wille also believes the United States is more directly involved in the Yemen civil war than it has indicated.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-fc07db94-fd93-e069-5024-29e8d287bc2e"><a href="http://twitter.com/@belkiswille">Belkis Wille</a> is a Yemen and Kuwait researcher for <a href="http://twitter.com/HRW">Human Rights Watch</a>&rsquo;s Middle East and North Africa Division.</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/232799362&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: The &quot;free gift of transfer leveraging technology&quot;&nbsp;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Today for Global Activism, we feature the &ldquo;Free Gift of Knowledge Transfer Leveraging Technology&quot; project. It utilizes Google Hangout and technology transfers to share expertise from various fields with educators, students and professionals in India and around the world. Global Activist Manu Vora will tell us how utilizing the simplest of technologies can transform lives.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:<em>&nbsp;</em></strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-fc07db94-fd95-e2f7-7ee4-bfaf235a1a0b"><a href="http://twitter.com/manuvora">Manu K. Vora</a> is the president of Blind Foundation for India (BFI). &nbsp;</span></em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 12 Nov 2015 15:15:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-12/whats-behind-rise-tb-113762 Censorship looms amid rise of Hindu nationalism in India http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-22/censorship-looms-amid-rise-hindu-nationalism-india-113473 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/3291759617_b85d5263f9_z.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Pratham Books) " /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229615702&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">India&#39;s writers face censorship</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">In the last few weeks, at least 40 Indian writers have returned top literary prizes in protest of what they call a &ldquo;climate of intolerance&rdquo;. Novelists, poets and playwrights say that since the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) party came to power with the election of Prime Minister Modi, the country has seen a rise in Hindu nationalism that has led to less freedom of speech and respect for secular rights. Writer Sonia Faleiro, and Wendy Doniger, whose book on Hindus was withdrawn from publication in India, join us to discuss the current climate in India.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-0ae63cb2-9106-e9e3-0b3e-a38dd7d7ad56">Wendy Doniger</span> is professor of the history of religions at the <a href="http://twitter.com/uchicago">University of Chicago</a>. </em></li><li><em><a href="http://twitter.com/@soniafaleiro">Sonia Faleiro</a> is a writer and author, most recently of<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0802170927/ref=tsm_1_fb_lk">&nbsp;&#39;Beautiful Thing: Inside the Secret World of Bombay&#39;s Dance Bars</a>&#39;.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229616164&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Is an &#39;energy war&#39; still possible?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">Low energy prices can have enormous geopolitical ramifications. Low oil prices played a large role in Canadian voter dissatisfaction and the eventual election defeat of former Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. Russia&rsquo;s economy has been in tailspin from lower gas prices. Many experts feel it&rsquo;s why President Vladimir Putin became aggressive towards his neighbors, especially Ukraine. Low oil prices may have also been a big factor in bringing Iran to the table for the recently agreed on P5 +1 nuclear deal. We&rsquo;ll talk about some of the security issues surrounding energy with Michael Klare, professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and defense correspondent for The Nation. He&rsquo;s written numerous books on international energy and security affairs, most recently, &#39;The Race for What&#39;s Left: The Global Scramble for the World&#39;s Last Resources&#39;.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-0ae63cb2-9109-a272-53d8-eed9270e4e0e"><a href="http://twitter.com/mklare">Michael Klare</a> is professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and defense correspondent at </span><a href="http://twitter.com/thenation">The Nation</a>. His most recent book is, &#39;The Race for What&#39;s Left: The Global Scramble for the World&#39;s Last Resources&#39; .&nbsp;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229616854&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: &#39;Right To Be Free&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">After hearing Ghanaian Eric Peasah&rsquo;s story about his efforts to buyback child slaves who have been trafficked into Ghana&rsquo;s fishing industry, Chicagoan and Global Activist Lori Dillon, created a local branch of Peasah&rsquo;s NGO, Right To Be Free. For Global Activism, Dillon is back with Peasah, who now regularly visits Chicago to spread awareness and educate schoolchildren about enslaved children in Ghana.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-0ae63cb2-910b-d93a-bb3a-52dbe5af9ca8">Eric Peasah is the founder of <a href="http://twitter.com/rightobefree">Right To Be Free</a> (Ghana).</span></em></li><li><em>Lori Dillon is the founder of <a href="http://twitter.com/rightobefree">Right To Be Free</a> (U.S.).&nbsp;</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 22 Oct 2015 14:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-22/censorship-looms-amid-rise-hindu-nationalism-india-113473 This generation of military families faces the prospect of 20 years of deployments http://www.wbez.org/programs/takeaway/2015-10-20/generation-military-families-faces-prospect-20-years-deployments-113421 <p><p><img alt="" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/story_main/public/story/images/mil-families.jpg?itok=c0ETzYt7" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="Friends and family watch as paratroopers with the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, return home from Afghanistan at Pope Army Airfield in Fort Bragg, North Carolina November 5, 2014. (Chris Keane/Reuters)" /></p><div><p>Mason&nbsp;Bontrager&nbsp;joined the military right before 9/11. Since then, he has deployed five times &mdash; twice to Iraq and three times to Afghanistan.</p><p dir="ltr">With President Barack Obama recently announcing that he would suspend the drawdown of troops from the US, that means he may deploy once again.</p></div><p dir="ltr">His wife,&nbsp;Amy, says her family is part of a new generation of military families facing unprecedented circumstances. For many young military couples like the Bontragers, their entire marriage has come with the threat of war, and there appears to be no end in sight.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We&rsquo;re definitely facing this reality of what it looks like to raise children in this lifestyle,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;We could be the first generation that&rsquo;s going to experience 20 years of deployment. What that&rsquo;s like to raise a family &mdash; we have nothing to compare it to. We&rsquo;re learning as we go, but we also rely heavily on the support of our country so that we can continue to serve this mission.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">And that&rsquo;s just a hard reality of America&rsquo;s longest war: After more than a decade, servicemembers are being called to battle &mdash; again and again and again.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Deployments are challenging and it&rsquo;s hard, and each time he goes there are uncertainties,&rdquo; Amy says. &ldquo;We have to accept that mission because that&rsquo;s the mission that&rsquo;s been given to us by our commander-in-chief. This is new to millennials. In 2001, did we think we&rsquo;d still be at war? That probably wasn&rsquo;t even a thought. But this is our reality. We realize that the mission is much greater than us, and we stand ready to serve. That&rsquo;s what it means to be in the military today.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Over the course of nearly 10 years of marriage, the Bontragers have lived in five different locations. Though her husband has completed five tours of duty, he&rsquo;s not ready to quit &mdash; Amy says her husband is part of a group that feels it is their obligation to put in an end to the conflict, because they were the ones fighting in the beginning.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;That&rsquo;s a conversation that happens in a lot of homes, and day-to-day it changes &mdash; do you stay in or do you get out?&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;But it goes back to that commitment, and you realize that, for some of these guys, they feel they&rsquo;re called to do this and this is what they&rsquo;re built for and they&rsquo;re trained for. It&rsquo;s hard &mdash; you look at these children and think this is a very different lifestyle that they are being brought up in when compared to other children in our country. But then you realize that it&rsquo;s something that&rsquo;s much greater than us.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/bluestar.JPG" style="height: 194px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="(Via BlueStarFam.org)" />Amy, who has a master&rsquo;s degree in philanthropy, has had to change jobs to meet the needs of her family. Now she&rsquo;s the program manager with<a href="https://www.bluestarfam.org/"> Blue Star Families</a>, an organization formed in April 2009 by a group of military spouses. The group works &ldquo;to create a platform where military family members can join with civilian communities and leaders to address the challenges of military life,&rdquo;&nbsp;<a href="http://bluestarfam.org/about">according to</a>&nbsp;a statement on the Blue Star website.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m really excited that I&rsquo;ve been able to give back through the organization that I work with,&rdquo; Amy says. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s a lot of work to be done, and we do have support, but we&rsquo;re going to continue to need that support.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">&mdash;<a href="http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-10-20/generation-military-families-faces-prospects-20-years-deployments"><em> via The Takeaway</em></a></p></p> Tue, 20 Oct 2015 10:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/takeaway/2015-10-20/generation-military-families-faces-prospect-20-years-deployments-113421 New photo exhibit examines consequences of war http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-09-25/new-photo-exhibit-examines-consequences-war-113070 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/marines_014.jpg" title="(Photo courtesy of Beloit College)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/225575814&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Weekend Passport: Conflict and Consequence&nbsp;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll tell us about an exhibit that documents the conditions of war. It&rsquo;s called &#39;Conflict and Consequence: Photographing War and Its Aftermath&#39;.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li>Nari Safavi is one of the co-founders of the <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/default.aspx">PASFARDA Arts &amp; Cultural Exchange</a>.&nbsp;</li><li>James Pearson is the Collections Manager/Exhibition Coordinator at the Wright Museum of Art.&nbsp;</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/225576281&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: Balboa reaches the Pacific</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>On September 25, 1513, Balboa sighted the Pacific Ocean. Historian John Schmidt tells how the discovery changed history.</p><p><strong>Guest: </strong><em><a href="http://twitter.com/JRSchmidtPhD">Prof. John Schmidt</a> is the author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago&#39;.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/225576985&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Foreign films to watch: &#39;Sicario&#39; and &#39;The New Girlfriend&#39;&nbsp;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Film contributor Milos Stehlik gives us his take on two new films- Sicario- which looks at the drug wars and stars Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro. He&rsquo;ll also tell us whether the latest film by French director Francois Ozon, The New Girlfriend is worth seeing.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/milosstehlik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/facetschicago">Facets Multimedia</a> and WBEZ&rsquo;s film contributor.</em></p><p><em>&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 25 Sep 2015 15:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-09-25/new-photo-exhibit-examines-consequences-war-113070 Once a Catholic priest, now a father of two http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/once-catholic-priest-now-father-two-112313 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps Francis Alicia Riley bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Francis Riley was a Catholic priest during the late 1960s. Riley later left the priesthood and became a husband and father. He came to the Chicago StoryCorps booth in May with his wife Margaret and their daughter Alicia. Alicia asked her dad about the ways his time in the priesthood changed him.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/once-catholic-priest-now-father-two-112313 White House asks Congress for war powers to fight ISIS http://www.wbez.org/news/white-house-asks-congress-war-powers-fight-isis-111537 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP439279241343.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In a move that is sure to set off a new round of debate over how the U.S. should fight ISIS, the Obama administration has sent Congress a request for formal authorization to use military force against the extremist group.</p><p>A <a href="http://www.foreign.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/02-11-15_White_House_AUMF_Text.pdf">copy of the new Authorization for the Use of Military Force, or AUMF</a>, has been posted by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; it says ISIS &quot;poses a grave threat to the people and territorial integrity of Iraq and Syria, regional stability, and the national security interests of the United States and its allies and partners.&quot;</p><p>We&#39;ve updated this post to reflect the news. <em>Post continues:</em></p><p>Discussing draft versions of the request earlier this morning, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., <a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/02/11/385396486/sen-kaine-pushes-for-vote-on-military-strikes-against-isis">told NPR&#39;s Morning Edition</a> that President Obama will ask Congress to authorize ground troops, with a prohibition on their use in &quot;enduring offensive combat missions.&quot;</p><p>A similar provision is in the request for war powers; it also sets a three-year limit on the powers and repeals the 2002 authorization for using force in Iraq.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s not good to have these previous war authorizations kind of floating out there&quot; to be used years later, he said.</p><p>White House officials framed the request for war powers after meeting with members of both parties in Congress, where it will come under close scrutiny.</p><p>The effort has been a balancing act, with a key issue being the possible role of ground troops: Republicans say they don&#39;t want to limit the Pentagon&#39;s approach, while Democrats are wary of giving the OK to an open-ended conflict.</p><p>&quot;On Capitol Hill, there is going to be an extended debate, discussion, and argument over exactly what the Authorization for the Use of Military Force should say, what the limits should be,&quot; NPR&#39;s Tamara Keith reports.</p><p>The new AUMF would replace the authorization that was provided to President Bush in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the U.S. It would set new parameters for the U.S. to follow as it tries to combat ISIS, the violent group that has claimed territory in Iraq and Syria.</p><p>&quot;There&#39;s high skepticism on Capitol Hill that the earlier authorizations cover&quot; the military operations the U.S. has already conducted against ISIS, Kaine said.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/10/385215395/white-house-seeking-support-of-congress-in-fight-against-isis">As Tamara reported for the Two-Way yesterday</a>, the effort to shape the legislation has included a wide range of administration officials, from White House Counsel Neil Eggleston to National Security Advisor Susan Rice.</p><p>&mdash; <em><a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/11/385411567/white-house-will-request-war-powers-from-congress-today-senator-says" target="_blank">NPR&#39;s The Two-Way</a></em></p></p> Wed, 11 Feb 2015 13:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/white-house-asks-congress-war-powers-fight-isis-111537 Vietnam veteran's combat experiences left him disillusioned with the war http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/vietnam-veterans-combat-experiences-left-him-disillusioned-war-110888 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps-141001-Barry-Romo-bh.png" alt="" /><p><p>&ldquo;One-third of the casualties in Vietnam were because of IEDs (improvised explosive devices), because of bombs and booby traps,&rdquo; Barry Romo, 67, said while recording this week&rsquo;s StoryCorps.</p><p><a href="http://www.history.com/topics/vietnam-war/vietnam-war-history/videos/barry-romo">Romo is a Vietnam veteran</a> who lives in Chicago and is associated with the group, <a href="http://www.vvaw.org/veteran/article/?id=189">Vietnam Veterans Against the War.</a> Earlier this week, Romo spoke about how his wartime experiences changed him.</p><p>&ldquo;Part of my job was to pay money to people who would bring back unexploded rounds,&rdquo; Romo said. &ldquo;The U.S. dropped more explosives on Vietnam than in the Second World War and 11 percent of those bombs were duds. And the Vietcong and the North Vietnamese would literally saw them in half, get that explosive and make mines to blow up Americans.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;One day, there was an explosion on the other side of the base, and what had happened was two or three or four Vietnamese children were bringing back a white phosphorous artillery round to get paid a buck and something happened to it just as they were reaching the base and two or three of the children literally ceased to exist. And one little girl was left, somewhere between the ages of 10 and 14. And she was bleeding, and in pain, and her clothes had been burned onto her. And I took off my poncho, wrapped her in that, and put her on the floor of the helicopter.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;And we flew to where there was a giant military hospital. I jumped out with the little girl in my arms. And I ran to an attendant. He was a white Caucasian male. And he took one look and said, &ldquo;We don&rsquo;t treat Vietnamese nationals here. You&rsquo;re going to have to take her to the Catholic orphanage.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;And we got into the helicopter and I put the girl on the floor again. And she whimpered like a little kitten in pain. The pilot landed and there was a Caucasian woman. And I jumped out, put the little girl in her arms and we flew off&hellip;I don&rsquo;t know whether she lived or she died.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We had been told, &lsquo;You&rsquo;re going to Vietnam to fight for the future, for freedom and democracy.&rsquo; And here was a little girl whose friends had all died. And it didn&rsquo;t matter. The only thing that mattered was the color of her skin and the shape of her eyes.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;But the way you deal with combat is: You get through the night and then you get through the day and then you get through the night and then you get through the day. You put those things away, not to revisit them until you get back to the United States.&rdquo;</p><p>Romo lost a nephew, with whom he was close, fighting in Vietnam as well. And the experience of bringing his body back to the United States from Vietnam shook him to the core.</p><p>&ldquo;I couldn&rsquo;t admit the war was wrong to begin with. It took me a year of doing drugs and drinking and not sleeping.&rdquo;</p><p>Romo survived and became an active member of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. But for some veterans, the memories of their combat prove too much to bear.</p><p><a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/21/us/22-veteran-suicides-a-day/">According to the VA,</a> an average of 22 U.S. veterans kill themselves each day. <a href="http://veteranscrisisline.net/About/AboutVeteransCrisisLine.aspx">A crisis line created specifically for veterans has fielded more than a million calls </a>since it began in 2007.</p><p>Since Romo finished his military service, the VA has made an effort to address the issue, as evidenced by a <a href="http://www.va.gov/opa/docs/Suicide-Data-Report-2012-final.pdf">2012 report from the Veterans Administration</a> compiling veteran suicide data.</p><p>But Romo is convinced the issue is far from over. &quot;Twenty-two vets a day are killing themselves,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Twenty two vets. And it&rsquo;s important because when the war ends, it doesn&rsquo;t really end for the people who fought it or who are victims of it.&rdquo;</p></p> Fri, 03 Oct 2014 10:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/vietnam-veterans-combat-experiences-left-him-disillusioned-war-110888 StoryCorps: Veteran encourages his kids to be proud of the United States http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-veteran-encourages-his-kids-be-proud-united-states-110484 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Capture_13.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Sam Guard graduated from high school on D-Day, when General Dwight D. Eisenhower launched troops onto the beaches of Normandy. Within two weeks of graduation, he turned himself in to an army post and began his military service. He was sent to the Pacific, earning his first battle star in the Philippines.<br /><br />When Sam visited the Chicago StoryCorps booth with his neighbor and friend Ruth Knack, he described his time in the military as being like a marriage. &ldquo;You think to yourself. &lsquo;This is it. Let&rsquo;s make the best of it.&rsquo; It is a continuous challenge and you need to rise to the occasion.&rdquo;<br /><br />He used the GI bill to go to college, but was soon recalled for the Korean conflict. He earned four more battle stars by being in 270 days of continuous combat. He recalls sleeping in a hole in the ground, without changing his clothes or washing himself. &ldquo;Our sink was our steel helmet turned upside down,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />In the trenches, he was reminded of something his mother would say when he was a kid. &ldquo;No son of mine will ever serve in a war,&rdquo; she would tell her friends. Her husband had served in the military and she believed that it was supposed to be the &ldquo;war to end all wars.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;<br />Sam remembers a time in the 1970s when his kids came home from school in tears.<br /><br />&ldquo;What&rsquo;s the matter?&rdquo; he asked. They said they were ashamed.<br /><br />&ldquo;Ashamed of what?&rdquo; he asked. Ashamed to be Americans, they responded.<br /><br />Kids at school were reacting to news of the Watergate scandal. &quot;And I thought about this,&quot; Sam said. &quot;I spent four years and two wars fighting for my country and my children are ashamed to be Americans?&quot;<br /><br />But Sam felt that the Watergate scandal was a net positive because the country corrected itself, without a revolution. &ldquo;What seems like a great defeat is possibly the highest moment,&rdquo; Sam said. &ldquo;Our greatest insight into the ultimate truth. It&rsquo;s that taking apart that may reveal its true nature.&rdquo;</p><p>He looked into his children&rsquo;s tiny faces and told them &ldquo;that they are witnessing not the disgrace of America but the triumph of our system that works.&rdquo;</p><p>And so, throughout his life there has always been a mixture of pride in his military service and shame in having to explain things to his family.<br /><br />&ldquo;We call them heroes? But what the hell is heroic about dropping bombs on people?&rdquo; To soldiers today he would say: I have some understanding of the price they paid and I wish them well. It is appreciated.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/6250422&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 11 Jul 2014 13:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-veteran-encourages-his-kids-be-proud-united-states-110484 Hosting the enemy: Our WWII POW camps http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/hosting-enemy-our-wwii-pow-camps-109344 <p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/16853521&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Orland Park resident and curious CPA Bill Healy describes himself as a World War II history buff, but he recalls a moment not long ago when his enthusiasm for the subject outstripped his knowledge of it. He was out with some friends after a game of golf, he says, and one of them brought up German prisoner of war camps in the suburbs. Bill was shocked! He&#39;d never heard of these before, so he hit up Curious City with this question:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>Where were German POW camps located around Chicago during World War II?</em></p><p>Bill&rsquo;s question screamed for a visual treatment, so we put together <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/life-chicagos-german-pow-camps-109344#POWmap">this annotated map</a> that shows the camps&rsquo; locations and a bit more about them. Below, we also provide some context to make sense of it.</p><p>But with Bill&rsquo;s enthusiasm as our guide, we kept a lookout for interesting stories about life in and around the camps. We turned up several: A few were sad, a few were uplifting and a few had even grabbed headlines in decades past. Each is a reminder that Chicago&rsquo;s connection to World War II didn&rsquo;t just involve sending young men and women abroad; political and personal dramas unfolded at home, too.</p><p><strong>German POW camp locations</strong></p><p>The main camp was Fort Sheridan, with 1,300 POWs housed there from 1944 to 1945. Fort Sheridan also served as a sort of processing center and distributor of some 15,000 POWs, with prisoners being sent to smaller &ldquo;branch camps&rdquo; throughout the Midwest, a handful dotting Chicagoland.</p><p>Although nearly 425,000 POWs came to the United States during World War II, 370,000 of them were German. Many were captured while fighting in German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel&#39;s Afrika Corps.</p><p>We brought them to the U.S. for several reasons: First, it was too expensive provide food for prisoners held overseas. Also, camps were overcrowded in Europe, and our ally Great Britain asked for our help. Lastly, POWs could help fill the labor shortage in vital industries such as farming.</p><p>In the Chicago area, another few hundred were based in the Sweet Woods Forest Preserve near south suburban Thornton. They stayed in military-style barracks constructed during the Great Depression by the Civilian Conservation Corps. The Thornton site later housed a Girl Scout camp and even a high school.</p><p>Estimates suggest that between 75 and 250 POWs worked at Arlington Fields, south of Arlington Heights. Prisoners there were assigned to work at the United States Naval Air Station at Glenview. Also in Glenview, nearly 400 POWs were based at U.S. Camp Skokie in 1943. They worked in nearby orchards and farms, as well as the Naval Air Station. The facility was built by the Civil Conservation Corps and became a military police post before housing the German POWs. After the war ended, most of the facility was demolished, but one was preserved and housed a Girl Scout camp in the 1960s.<a name="POWmap"></a></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="620" mozallowfullscreen="" scrolling="no" src="//www.thinglink.com/card/467079498500669440" type="text/html" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="620"></iframe></p><p>About 200 POWs were based in Camp Pine in Des Plaines at the corner of Euclid and River Road. Some of those POWS worked in the greenhouse of Pesche&rsquo;s Flowers, which is still open today. <a name="stories"></a></p><p><strong>The stories: Why Rudolf Velte returned 50 years later</strong><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Rudolf_Velte_German_POW_circa_19451946 for WEB.jpg" style="height: 221px; width: 170px; float: right;" title="This photo of Rudolf Velte in uniform was taken by a photographer sent by a church group that visited the POWs. Velte worked at Pesche’s Flowers. (Photo courtesy of the Des Plaines History Center)" /></p><p>Rudolf Velte was a German POW who was held at Camp Pine during the end of World War II, from 1945 to 1946.&nbsp;He had fought in German Field Marshal General Erwin Rommel&rsquo;s Afrika Corps before he was taken prisoner by the French. He escaped. Conditions were abysmal, he said: &ldquo;There was not much to eat and drink and very bad medical care, leading to bad illnesses.&rdquo; Velte ended up turning himself in to English soldiers. From there the American army took over and brought him to the states.</p><p>Curious City&rsquo;s Edie Rubinowitz went to Des Plaines learn more about this POW who picked carnations and made a special delivery more than fifty years later. She also discovered tapes that caught Velte recounting his story to (and being translated by) an American cousin, Art Bodenbender.</p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/16855476&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong>The stories: Reinhold Pabel&rsquo;s escape to Uptown</strong></p><p><embed flashvars="host=picasaweb.google.com&amp;noautoplay=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;feat=flashalbum&amp;RGB=0x000000&amp;feed=https%3A%2F%2Fpicasaweb.google.com%2Fdata%2Ffeed%2Fapi%2Fuser%2F103395493521839527756%2Falbumid%2F5955883370124599073%3Falt%3Drss%26kind%3Dphoto%26authkey%3DGv1sRgCKfO2Imck8PCDQ%26hl%3Den_US" height="400" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" src="https://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/picasaweb.googleusercontent.com/slideshow.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="600"></embed></p><p><em>(Press play for slideshow. Press paper icon to see captions)&nbsp;</em></p><p>Not all German POWs had fond memories of their imprisonment in America. Reinhold Pabel&rsquo;s experience was not as idyllic as Velte&rsquo;s. Yes, Pabel did get to take courses he wanted to &mdash; he learned Persian, for example &mdash; but he said the Nazi and anti-Nazi tensions ran high in Camp Grant in Rockford, Ill. Prisoners were forced to pick sides and those who were anti-Nazi could face beatings by the Nazis.</p><p>Pabel was also not enamored with the U.S. government&rsquo;s efforts to &ldquo;de-Nazify&rdquo; prisoners. The audio piece below tells the surprising story of how Pabel learned about the American way of life on his own. (Vocal reenactments courtesy of Peter Spies)</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/124240519&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em>Edie Rubinowitz is a professor of journalism at Northeastern Illinois University and a former WBEZ news reporter. You can follow her on Twitter @<a href="https://twitter.com/edester" target="_blank">edester</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 10 Dec 2013 16:36:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/hosting-enemy-our-wwii-pow-camps-109344