WBEZ | CTA http://www.wbez.org/tags/cta Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: The awkward comedy of Craigslist http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-18/morning-shift-awkward-comedy-craigslist-110044 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flickr hurleygurley.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We revisit the struggles of a small Indiana town through the eyes of it&#39;s not-so-great basketball team. Also, turning Craigslist posts into comedy.</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-awkward-comedy-of-craigslist/embed?header=false&border=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-awkward-comedy-of-craigslist.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-awkward-comedy-of-craigslist" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: The awkward comedy of Craigslist" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 18 Apr 2014 08:29:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-18/morning-shift-awkward-comedy-craigslist-110044 Morning Shift: The soulful sounds of Brazil's Luisa Maita http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-04/morning-shift-soulful-sounds-brazils-luisa-maita <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Cover Flickr retorta_net.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We get a preview of the Cubs home opener from our WBEZ sports contributor Cheryl Raye-Stout. Plus, we bring you live music from Brazilian chanteuse Luisa Maita.</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-soulful-sounds-of-brazil-s-luisa/embed?header=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-soulful-sounds-of-brazil-s-luisa.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-soulful-sounds-of-brazil-s-luisa" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: The soulful sounds of Brazil's Luisa Maita" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 04 Apr 2014 08:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-04/morning-shift-soulful-sounds-brazils-luisa-maita Leaked video appears to show Blue Line train derailment http://www.wbez.org/news/leaked-video-appears-show-blue-line-train-derailment-109917 <p><p>Footage appearing to show <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/blue-line-train-derails-climbs-escalator-ohare-109909">Monday&#39;s Blue Line derailment</a> at O&#39;Hare International Airport <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elMXt00xyIU">surfaced late Tuesday on YouTube</a>.</p><p>Though the original poster is unkown and the video was taken down, copies have sprung up around the video-sharing website. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, neither the <a href="http://voices.suntimes.com/news/breaking-news/surveillance-video-appears-to-show-blue-line-ohare-derailment/">CTA or the NTSB have commented on the video yet</a>.&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 26 Mar 2014 08:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/leaked-video-appears-show-blue-line-train-derailment-109917 Blue Line train derails, climbs escalator at O'Hare http://www.wbez.org/news/blue-line-train-derails-climbs-escalator-ohare-109909 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP661422106797(1).jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Last updated March 25, 4 p.m.</em></p><p>An emergency track-side braking system activated but failed to stop a Chicago commuter train from jumping the tracks and barreling to the top of an escalator at O&#39;Hare International Airport, a federal investigator said Tuesday.</p><p>The events that led to Monday&#39;s accident, which occurred around 3 a.m. and injured more than 30 passengers, might have begun with the train operator dozing off toward the end of her shift, according the union representing transit workers. But Tuesday&#39;s announcement that a piece of emergency safety equipment might have failed was the first indication the accident could have been caused by human error and mechanical failure.</p><p>National Transportation Safety Board investigator Ted Turpin said a preliminary review showed the train was traveling at the correct speed of 25 mph as it entered the station. Investigators said they have not yet determined whether the operator ever applied the in-cab brake.</p><p>Turpin, who is in charge of the investigation, said an automatic emergency braking system located on the tracks was activated but failed to stop the train as it burst onto the platform.</p><p>&quot;It activated,&quot; Turpin said of the emergency system. &quot;That&#39;s all we know factually. Now, whether it did it in time or not, that&#39;s an analysis that we have to figure out.&quot;</p><p>A team from the NTSB was also exploring how rested the train operator was before starting her shift and whether rules governing overtime had been violated, after a union official suggested she might have dozed off.</p><p>They planned to interview the train operator Tuesday afternoon.</p><p>&quot;We&#39;re going to ask probably the operator how they felt ... because we always take into consideration the fatigue factor. It&#39;s one of the things we do investigate,&quot; Turpin said.</p><p>The operator, whom officials have not identified, was off duty for about 17 hours before starting work around 8 p.m. Sunday but had recently put in a lot of overtime, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 308 President Robert Kelly said Monday.</p><p>&quot;I know she works a lot &mdash; as a lot of our members do,&quot; he said. &quot;They gotta earn a living. ... She was extremely tired.&quot;</p><p>Kelly said the operator took standard drug and alcohol tests after the derailment and that she assured him they were not an issue.</p><p>Asked whether she may have nodded off, Kelly responded: &quot;The indication is there. Yes.&quot;</p><p>Federal investigators hoped to turn the scene over to local officials later Tuesday to begin removing the train from the escalator at the underground Chicago Transit Authority station.</p><p>The train is designed to stop if operators become incapacitated and their hand slips off the spring-loaded controls. Kelly speculated that, upon impact, inertia might have thrown the operator against the hand switch, accelerating it onto the escalator.</p><p>Transit officials refused to discuss what other safety mechanisms are in place around the transit system while the investigation was ongoing.</p><p>Federal safety regulators keep a close watch on longer distance, city-to-city passenger rail and freight operations. But federal safety oversight of transit systems within cities has been weaker, and responsibility for any technology to prevent crashes and control speeds has been left to local authorities.</p><p>There are efforts to grant a safety oversight role to the Federal Transit Administration, which has primarily been a funding agency, said Sean Jeans-Gail, vice president of the National Association of Railroad Passengers, a Washington-based advocacy group.</p><p>In the meantime, local transit agencies like Chicago&#39;s make their own choices about how to spend scarce funding, juggling the needs of safely maintaining systems that are a century old in some places with pressure to expand systems to meet demand.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s always going to be a tension, but it&#39;s a tension that becomes more pronounced when there&#39;s not a healthy level of investment in both maintenance and ... capacity expansion,&quot; Jeans-Gail said.</p><p>Investigators have also been scrutinizing the train&#39;s brakes, track signals and other potential factors while reviewing video footage from more than 40 cameras in the station and on the train, Turpin said.</p><p>The station remained closed Tuesday, and CTA buses took passengers to and from O&#39;Hare to the next station on the line. Transport officials have not said when full Blue Line service will resume at O&#39;Hare.</p></p> Mon, 24 Mar 2014 09:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/blue-line-train-derails-climbs-escalator-ohare-109909 Morning Shift: Do increased smoking restrictions mean less smokers? http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-18/morning-shift-do-increased-smoking-restrictions-mean <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flickr lanier67.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A proposed bill in the state Senate would fine smokers who light up with kids in the car. But, does a ticket really prevent people from lighting up? We hear from smokers and those looking to curb the addiction.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-do-increased-smoking-restrictions-me/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-do-increased-smoking-restrictions-me.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-do-increased-smoking-restrictions-me" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Do increased smoking restrictions mean less smokers?" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 18 Feb 2014 08:32:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-18/morning-shift-do-increased-smoking-restrictions-mean Morning Shift: Rockford getting a boost from an Esty economy http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-03/morning-shift-rockford-getting-boost-esty-economy <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flickr Charles &amp; Hudson.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We take a look at how the online craft marketplace Etsy has teamed up with Rockford, Illinois. Plus, what&#39;s the real deal with e-cigarettes? We talk with smoking cessation expert Dr. Philip McAndrew to clear through some of the confusion.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-rockford-getting-a-boost-from-an-est/embed?header=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-rockford-getting-a-boost-from-an-est.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-rockford-getting-a-boost-from-an-est" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Rockford getting a boost from an Esty economy" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 03 Feb 2014 08:35:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-03/morning-shift-rockford-getting-boost-esty-economy Will Chicago scale back its bus rapid transit plan? http://www.wbez.org/news/will-chicago-scale-back-its-bus-rapid-transit-plan-109423 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AndrewsCROPSCALE.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px; float: right; height: 315px; width: 300px;" title="Dan Andrews of Kennicott Brothers says squeezing Ashland Avenue traffic into one lane and removing most left turns would hamstring the business. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" />After wrapping up a public-comment period in an ambitious Chicago bus project, Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s administration faces tough choices about the design.<br /><br />The city can stick to its plans and push for federal funds to build what would be the nation&rsquo;s most advanced &ldquo;bus rapid transit&rdquo; line. The project would transform Ashland Avenue, beginning with a 5.4-mile leg that would connect several passenger rail lines before they reach the Loop and, planners say, spur economic development that benefits the entire Chicago region.<br /><br />But there could be significant collateral damage, especially to the trucking operations of companies in an historic industrial corridor along the route.<br /><br />The Chicago Transit Authority says the BRT line, which could eventually lengthen to 16 miles, would cut the average Ashland bus ride time roughly in half. But some companies in the Kinzie Industrial Corridor and a few large retailers nearby say they would struggle too much to make and receive deliveries and keep customers flowing in. The companies are pushing hard for the Emanuel administration to eliminate some of the project&rsquo;s key features for speeding up bus service.<br /><br />Along the route&rsquo;s initial leg, which would stretch from Cortland Avenue to 31st Street, the competing interests are obvious.<br /><br />Just outside Rush University Medical Center, one of four major hospitals in the Illinois Medical District, a half-dozen patients and staffers huddled in the cold one evening this week at a bus stop. They included Larry Coldiron, a Rush computer consultant who lives near Midway International Airport and gets to ride the CTA&rsquo;s Orange Line train for most of his commute. But his trip home starts with the Number 9 bus down Ashland &mdash; the city&rsquo;s most heavily used bus route. He said the 2.5-mile journey between the hospital and train usually takes 45 minutes.<br /><br />&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been doing this for 16 and a half years and it just keeps getting worse,&rdquo; Coldiron said.<br /><br />The BRT project would bring big changes. The buses would have a lane to themselves on both sides of a landscaped median. To keep the buses moving through intersections, most opportunities to turn left from Ashland would be eliminated and many traffic signals would favor the buses. Passengers would board from platforms averaging a half mile apart. The CTA is also aiming for pre-paid boarding to eliminate lines in bus doorways. The project&rsquo;s environmental assessment says the BRT buses would move up to 83 percent faster than today&rsquo;s buses.<br /><br />&ldquo;I&rsquo;d like to see it,&rdquo; Coldiron said.&nbsp;Service that fast could attract some of his coworkers who now drive and pay for parking around the hospital, he said.<br /><br />That&rsquo;s exactly the idea, said Benet Haller, a top planner at the Chicago Department of Housing and Economic Development. &ldquo;They would have more money to spend on other things &mdash; like food, retail goods and housing.&rdquo;<br /><br />Haller said the BRT line would promote development in the medical district, where employment already totals 29,000, and in industrial areas along the route. He said it would also give a shot in the arm to many restaurants and retailers, especially ones that lack their own parking lots. Haller said the economic impact could extend throughout the Chicago region.<br /><br />&ldquo;All of our expressways are, pretty much, at capacity,&rdquo; Haller said. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s no real easy possibility to improve any of them. So, if we want to thrive, it&rsquo;s really going to come to reinvestment back in the central part of Chicago because it&rsquo;s the one part of the region in which there&rsquo;s a really robust transit network.&rdquo;<br /><br /><strong>THE CTA IS GUNNING TO BUILD</strong> the initial leg by 2017. Agency officials say they will apply for Federal Transportation Administration grants to cover an estimated $60 million in costs for detailed design and construction. Later phases would extend the BRT to Irving Park Road and 95th Street and cost another $100 million, the agency says.<br /><br />But there would be other costs, particularly to local businesses whose lifeblood is truck delivery. Those include Kennicott Brothers, an employee-owned flower wholesaler centered at 452 N. Ashland Ave., about a mile north of the medical district.<br /><br />Dan Andrews, a Kennicott manager, says the company runs 13 vans from that location for deliveries to neighborhood florists, grocery stories and companies that help throw events such as weddings and parties. &ldquo;Normally our customers will order in the morning,&rdquo; Andrews said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ll load up the van with orders for that day and then send them out.&rdquo;<br /><br />Andrews is worried because the BRT design would leave just one lane on each side of Ashland for cars, trucks and regular buses, slowing down the Kennicott vans. &ldquo;It would probably be like rush hour all day,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />The CTA acknowledges that the Ashland traffic would move slower. A spokeswoman says a peak-hour car trip that now takes 30 minutes would take 36 minutes with BRT in place.<br /><br />Another concern for Andrews is the loss of intersections for turning left off Ashland. &ldquo;With the BRT line, I&rsquo;d have to take three right turns and then I would have to go through a residential area.&rdquo;<br /><br />Andrews has more than deliveries to worry about. Many of Kennicott&rsquo;s customers pick up their flowers. &ldquo;If they can&rsquo;t get to our location, they&rsquo;re going to choose either another vender or they might choose to be delivered to,&rdquo; he said, pointing out expenses associated with deliveries.<br /><br />If Chicago sticks with its BRT plan, Andrews says his company might have to find a location away from Ashland Avenue. &ldquo;It costs you a lot of money to move your company,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />Economic-development groups in the Kinzie corridor are speaking up for businesses like Kennicott. &ldquo;These companies need every advantage they can to compete in our city,&rdquo; said Roger Romanelli, executive director of the Randolph/Fulton Market Association.<br /><br />&ldquo;Nealey Foods has about 40 trucks every morning,&rdquo; Romanelli said, reeling off names of businesses potentially hamstrung by the BRT project. &ldquo;These companies are critical to our economy.&rdquo;<br /><br />Romanelli says slowing the traffic down and banning the turns would also be unfair to big retailers like Costco, which employs more than 100 people in a new facility at Ashland and 14th Street. He points out that diverting traffic to other congested arteries would not much help much.<br /><br />The Emanuel administration, Romanelli says,&nbsp;ought to scrap the Ashland project and focus on existing buses.&nbsp;Romanelli&nbsp;suggests speeding up service by simply eliminating some stops and using transponders to give buses longer green lights. &ldquo;BRT is not the only solution for Ashland Avenue,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br /><strong>A FEDERALLY REQUIRED 30-DAY PERIOD</strong> for public comment about the environmental assessment ended Friday. Now Mayor Emanuel&rsquo;s administration has to decide whether to make adjustments that might please the plan&rsquo;s business critics but slow the bus service.<br /><br />Randy Blankenhorn, executive director of the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, describes the clashing interests. &ldquo;Planners always want the 100-percent solution,&rdquo; he said, pointing to the goal of regional economic growth over the long term. &ldquo;And local businesses are worried about the bottom line today and tomorrow.&rdquo;<br /><br />Blankenhorn says the city should help companies find ways to bypass Ashland and maybe even allow a few more left turns across BRT lanes. &ldquo;But you have to protect the integrity of the transportation investment you&rsquo;re making,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />On Ashland, that means a bus system fast enough to attract thousands of new riders.<br />&nbsp;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 20 Dec 2013 16:05:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/will-chicago-scale-back-its-bus-rapid-transit-plan-109423 Final phase of Ventra rollout suspended, developer apologizes http://www.wbez.org/news/final-phase-ventra-rollout-suspended-developer-apologizes-109094 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Ventra.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Chicago commuters will be able to hold on to those old Chicago Cards and magnetic strip cards for a little while longer. Chicago Transit Authority officials announced the the final phase of the new <a href="http://ventrachicago.com/">Ventra </a>system&rsquo;s rollout will be suspended until a few of its problems are fixed. Chicago Cards and Chicago Card Plus were supposed to be phased out by November 15.</p><p dir="ltr">CTA President Forrest Claypool also said the agency won&rsquo;t pay the developer, Cubic Transportation Systems, any of the $454 million, 12-year contract, until the company meets three criterion: customer service wait times must be five minutes or less, processing times for the tap-and-go function of a Ventra card must be under two and a half seconds--99 percent of the time--and all readers and vending machines must be operational 99 percent of the time.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The bottom line is that too many of our customers are confused and frustrated and that&rsquo;s our fault,&rdquo; Claypool told members of the City Club at a luncheon Tuesday.</p><p dir="ltr">Cubic&rsquo;s head of North American operations, Richard Wunderle, was on hand to answer some questions as well.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;This transition period wasn&rsquo;t our shining light, and for that I want to apologize to the riders of CTA,&rdquo; said Wunderle. &ldquo;It wasn&rsquo;t our best effort but it will get better, so I apologize for that.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Cubic isn&rsquo;t new to the public transit game: They&rsquo;ve got 400 fare-collection projects in operation across the world, including systems in Sydney, London and Washington, D.C. But the Ventra system marks the first time the company&rsquo;s tackled an open-fare, contactless card system; and officials say it&rsquo;s the first of its kind in North America.</p><p dir="ltr">Wunderle said Cubic engineers are already at work on a number of fixes to get things up to speed.</p><p dir="ltr">One issue that&rsquo;s drawn many complaints from CTA riders is being charged for multiple taps of their Ventra card at the turnstile. Officials say customers would tap their card, and after not immediately seeing a green &ldquo;Go&rdquo; signal, they&rsquo;d tap multiple times or move to a different lane. As of Tuesday, Cubic said they added a new &ldquo;processing&rdquo; screen to show riders the system is working before it lets them through. Engineers will also be upgrading the Ventra software over the weekend to try and bring processing times down on card readers to two-and-a-half seconds or less. CTA officials said that&rsquo;s happening 95 percent of the time--but the other 5 percent of the time, processing times varied from three to 10 seconds, sometimes more.</p><p dir="ltr">Claypool said the issue that&rsquo;s upset him the most is the long wait times for callers trying to reach a customer service agent, calling it a &ldquo;self-inflicted wound.&rdquo; The CTA chief said on one day last month, the center was overwhelmed with 20,000 calls. Some customers couldn&rsquo;t get through to an agent at all, while others waited, and waited - in some cases, for more than 30 minutes. Cubic has hired more customer service agents since then, and plans to expand further.</p><p dir="ltr">No timeline has been set for when the Ventra rollout will continue. Wunderle said he can&rsquo;t really give a &ldquo;best guess&rdquo; how long it will take the company to address the CTA&rsquo;s three benchmarks, only estimating &ldquo;weeks&rdquo; when pressed by a reporter.</p><p dir="ltr">Other interesting Ventra facts:</p><ul><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">The entire Ventra contract lasts 12 years: The two years allotted for engineering the system are almost up. The next 10 years of the contract will be for the service.</p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">Cubic paid $92 million up front toward the transition: installing card readers, vending machines, call center operations, etc.</p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">CTA lawyers will be looking into how many fares they&rsquo;ve missed because of bus drivers waving people through when there seemed to be problems with the Ventra card</p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">50 percent of CTA riders are now using Ventra cards</p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">Card readers will now display a &ldquo;low balance&rdquo; screen that lets customers know their Ventra card balance is under $10</p></li></ul><p dir="ltr"><em>Lauren Chooljian is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">@laurenchooljian</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 06 Nov 2013 13:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/final-phase-ventra-rollout-suspended-developer-apologizes-109094 I trust your truth http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-10/i-trust-your-truth-108972 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/4283808167_d6b4d204a7_z.jpg" style="height: 414px; width: 620px;" title="(Flickr/Bart Heird)" /></div></div><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m not moving this bus until you stop playing that music,&quot; the bus driver said to a young Hispanic man last Saturday night. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">I was riding the #50 Damen bus up to a performance at Martyrs. In the city, you are used to someone&rsquo;s cell phone speakers becoming a post-Millennium boom box. Loud music on public transportation is a familiar annoyance, one that I have gotten used to having grown up here. At first, you are startled by the intrusion, but quickly you forget it is even there. Still, it does not change the fact that it is an unnecessary nuisance akin to eating on public transportation. To live in a city is to assault the senses. If it is not the noise, it is the sights. If it is not the sights, it is the smells. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">&quot;I&rsquo;m so sick of punks like </span>you playing <em>that</em> music,&rdquo; the bus driver said. By that point, he had stalled the bus and stepped out of his driving area.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">But the Hispanic man was not listening to music on his cell phone. He was texting or browsing or something else. He was looking down, going about his evening. He was like any other passenger on the bus, minding his own business. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">No, the music came from two young white men. They were holding the phone up, looking at videos while their music blared, oblivious too of their surroundings. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">And as the bus driver left his seat and faced the passengers, the two men quietly slipped their phones away and said nothing. It was a sly move and I do not begrudge them for doing so. If someone complains about the noise, the courteous thing to do is to put your phone away. If a situation escalates, it makes sense to defuse the tension. And when faced with potential confrontation, I understand their lack of nerve to name themselves as the culprit. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">But should they have stepped in? Would you? </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">The driver began to yell at the Hispanic man first accused, who said, &ldquo;Yo man, that wasn&rsquo;t me.&rdquo; </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">And I chimed in. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span>&ldquo;It wasn&rsquo;t. It was them,&rdquo; I pointed to the two men. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">And another black woman nodded her head and said, &ldquo;Yep,&rdquo; but the bus driver seemingly did not care.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">He looked back at the Hispanic man, glanced quickly at the two men and got back into his seat, as if nothing happened at all, as if he could not be bothered to know the truth. Or maybe he understood the truth, but could not be bothered to stomach an alternative to what he normally faces on the bus. The next time, he probably thought, the next time I will be right because I am always right, because this is how I see the world.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">Situations like this are difficult to parse. Did I actually see what I thought I just saw? Did I insert race into a situation that was not about race? My gut says no. My gut says a young man was accused of being the source of a public noise nuisance on the bus because he was a man of color.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">I first posted about this incident <a href="http://britticisms.tumblr.com/post/64600329328/im-not-moving-this-bus-until-you-stop-playing#captiontop" target="_blank">on my blog</a> and while most people were upset, one Tumblr user wrote, &ldquo;It was probably just a mistake and since the music had stopped he went back to drive the bus. I don&rsquo;t think it had anything to do with race.&rdquo;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">He was not a witness to what I saw, so his opinion is only based on what I said. But also, I was not inside the head of the bus driver. I do not know if he accused the man because he made an assumption based on the first cell phone he saw or the first man of color he saw.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">I have told friends and acquaintances about numerous racially-charged incidents in my own life. I&rsquo;ve told them about the mother forcing her two children out of the pool, the only other two children there, when my sister and I jumped in as little girls. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want you in there now,&rdquo; she said. </span></p><p dir="ltr"><span>Was I jumping to conclusions? Was my own mother as she later recalled what happened? I&rsquo;ve talked about being called the n-word in Wicker Park as recently as 2009. I&rsquo;ve talked about being called &ldquo;hostile&rdquo; and &ldquo;angry&rdquo; for asking questions at jobs, even though other people who have actually yelled to others in the same setting were not accused of anything.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">Most people understand where I am coming from and perhaps can offer their own stories as well. But I have also been accused of causing trouble. I have been accused of seeing what is not there. It does not matter that these incidents have occurred only a handful of times, that I don&rsquo;t spend my life &ldquo;looking for racism&rdquo; in every interaction. It is difficult for others, particularly those with privilege, to see wrongs when they have occurred. If it does not affect them, how can it be real? If they do not see it every day, does it even happen at all?</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid--eb8a0a8-dc18-9a48-37f2-8589b298c2ca">I can speak to my own experiences as a woman. I can speak to my experiences as a black American. But there are lives I will never truly know or understand. There are experiences that I will never face because of my age or my sexuality or my class. But the privilege I have does not mean that I can not try to empathize. It does not mean that I can not listen to the things people tell me and observe the world around me and know that some things are more real than my scope of understanding. It does not mean that I can not trust others&#39; feelings or trust their truth. That is the least that I can do.&nbsp;</span></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Britt Julious writes about race and culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow Britt&#39;s essays for&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr</a>&nbsp;or on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 21 Oct 2013 13:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-10/i-trust-your-truth-108972 Morning Shift: Ready for the Ventra switch? http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-10-08/morning-shift-ready-ventra-switch-108867 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Ventra flickr-cta web.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We talk about the ups and downs of the CTA&#39;s transition to Ventra, hear from Michael Puente about the proposed Illiana expressway, and talk with a breast cancer advocacy group on how we can be smart contributors this October for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. (Photo: Flickr/Steven Vance)</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-ventra-cards-are-here-to-stay/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-ventra-cards-are-here-to-stay.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-ventra-cards-are-here-to-stay" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Ready for the Ventra switch?" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 08 Oct 2013 08:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-10-08/morning-shift-ready-ventra-switch-108867