WBEZ | Culture http://www.wbez.org/news/culture Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Emanuel says no 'three-strike rule' over parks for Riot Fest http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/emanuel-says-no-three-strike-rule-over-parks-riot-fest-112064 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/riot fest flickr.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>It looks like Riot Fest has a new home in Chicago.</p><p>Aldermen involved in the back and forth over the music festival&rsquo;s location said that after three years in Humboldt Park, the punk and rock music festival will move this year a few miles away in Douglas Park.</p><p>Many Chicagoans were unhappy with the condition of the West Side park after last summer&rsquo;s festival. Alderman Roberto Maldonado (26) said residents of Humboldt Park and the surrounding neighborhoods have been complaining to him about the state of the grounds ever since concert-goers and organizers left.</p><p>&ldquo;Four Sundays ago...two of the diamonds were unusable for the opening games of the softball league,&rdquo; Maldonado said. &ldquo;The impact to the local economy, although it was substantial the first and second year, the third year it wasn&rsquo;t there.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p><p>So for now, Riot Fest is taking its party elsewhere. In a statement, Riot Fest founder Michael Petryshyn said he met with Ald. George Cardenas (12) about using Douglas Park and was, &ldquo;ecstatic&rdquo; at the response he got from their new aldermanic partner.</p><p>&ldquo;We are so very excited to get to know our new neighbors and to work with them to hold an event that is beneficial to the community, local businesses and the resident,&rdquo; Petryshyn said. &ldquo;Essentially, everything we have brought to Humboldt Park over the last three years.&rdquo;</p><p>After Wednesday&rsquo;s City Council meeting, Mayor Rahm Emanuel said he was pleased the festival chose to stay in the city, but issued a warning to organizers: Leave Douglas Park the way you find it.</p><p>&ldquo;They now know the people of Humboldt Park don&rsquo;t want them, I don&rsquo;t think it&rsquo;s in their best interest to have a second park say &lsquo;We don&rsquo;t want you&rsquo; in Chicago,&rdquo; Emanuel told reporters. &ldquo;So they&rsquo;ve been put on notice to be a better citizen in holding this festival because if you go 0-for-2, we don&rsquo;t have a three-strike rule in the city of Chicago for you.&rdquo;</p><p>Ald. Cardenas said the Park District is set to put down a bond as insurance in the event Douglas Park sees some damage.</p><p><em>Lauren Chooljian is a WBEZ political reporter. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">@laurenchooljian</a></em>.</p></p> Wed, 20 May 2015 16:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/emanuel-says-no-three-strike-rule-over-parks-riot-fest-112064 Kim Jong Un reportedly kills defense chief with missile http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-15/kim-jong-un-reportedly-kills-defense-chief-missile-112039 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP-Ahn%20Young-oon.jpg" title="South Korean men pass by a TV news program showing images published in North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper of North Korea's ballistic missile believed to have been launched from underwater and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, at Seoul Railway station in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, May 9, 2015. (AP- Ahn Young-oon)" /></div><p><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205641964&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe>Kim Jong Un reportedly kills his defense chief with missile</span></span></p><p>North Korea has reportedly executed &nbsp;Defense Minister Hyon Yong Chol by anti-aircraft guns. Reports say he was put to death, in part, because he was disrespectful to North Korea&rsquo;s leader Kim Jong Un, doing things like falling asleep at military events. The reports come from South Korea&rsquo;s intelligence agency, but have not been verified. History professor, Bruce Cumings<em> </em>joins us to discuss the latest news out of North Korea.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p>Bruce Cumings, professor of history at the University of Chicago and author of <em>Parallax Visions: Making Sense of American-East Asian Relations at the End of the Century</em>, <em>The Korean War: A Histor</em>y and <em>North Korea: Another Country, </em>joins us to discuss the latest news out of North Korea.</p><p><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205642483&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe>Milos Stehlik on opening night of Cannes film festival</span></span></p><p>Film Contributor, Milos Stehlik, reports from the Cannes International Film Festival. He&rsquo;ll tell us about the latest happenings, &nbsp;including a festival ban on celebrity selfies, the Auschwitz-themed movie <em>Son of Saul</em> by first-time director Laszlo Nemes and of course, he&rsquo;ll tell us why he hated the <em>Mad Max</em> reboot.</p><p><strong>Guest: </strong></p><p>Milos Stehlik, WBEZ film contributor and director of Facets Multimedia</p><p><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205642992&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe>Weekend Passport: &#39;Tasso&#39;s Journey&#39; A Greek love story</span></span></p><p>Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. &nbsp;This week he&rsquo;ll tell us about a book reading at the National Hellenic Museum that takes us back to Greece during World War II.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p>Nari Safavi, WBEZ contributor and co-founder of Pasfarda Arts and Cultural Exchange</p><p><a href="http://seasonsofsun.com/">Paula Burzawa</a>, author of the book, <em>Tasso&#39;s Journey, A Novel</em>.</p></p> Fri, 15 May 2015 13:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-15/kim-jong-un-reportedly-kills-defense-chief-missile-112039 Why are thousands of Chicago's Chinese buried out in Stickney? http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/why-are-thousands-chicagos-chinese-buried-out-stickney-112017 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/stickneychinesechrinemeng.jpg" title="At Mount Auburn Cemetery in Stickney, visitors can burn gifts for their dead ancestors at this altar created for the purpose. (Monica Eng/WBEZ)" /></div><p>For nearly a century Chicago&rsquo;s Chinese have been making spring pilgrimages to southwest suburban Stickney.</p><p>It&rsquo;s not for the food &mdash; in fact they usually bring their own. And it&rsquo;s not for their culture &mdash; the suburb is historically Bohemian. But there are more than 8,000 other reasons to visit: the graves of their ancestors that reside way in the back of Mount Auburn Memorial Park.</p><p>On a recent early spring morning, Vivian and Kevin Mei were there with three generations of their family. And they were having a picnic on their grandfather&rsquo;s grave.</p><p>&ldquo;We brought a whole roasted pork, some of our granddad&rsquo;s favorite shrimp dumplings, we brought bread, we brought beverages, chicken and duck,&rdquo; Mei said while an uncle took a cleaver to the pig.</p><p>&ldquo;You bring what they liked to eat when they were alive,&rdquo; Kevin added.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Sharing foods that ancestors loved is an important part of this annual tradition called Qing Ming. Families are also encouraged to visit on special dates in the fall to make sure dead relatives are well-prepared for the cold days ahead.&nbsp;</p><p>During these times each year, thousands of Chicagoans like the Meis flock to Mount Auburn carrying plastic bags and bakery boxes bulging with pastries, pork buns and meat.&nbsp;</p><p>Long rows of cars snake down the narrow road leading back to the Chinese section where an altar provides a safe place for burning paper money and gifts for the dead.</p><p>&ldquo;My understanding is that you first light the incense to open the path,&rdquo; Grace Fong said, &ldquo;and then you can burn the rest of the gifts.&rdquo;</p><p>Jim Yong was carrying bags heavy with food when he arrived with his wife and small children.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;Every year, we come out and visit them and feed them, just do the normal thing,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;And pretty much just bringing the two little ones to show them what the Chinese tradition is about.&rdquo;<br /><br /><span style="font-size:22px;">Why Stickney?</span></p><p>Yong&rsquo;s been trekking to this blue collar suburb since he was a kid, but like a lot of visitors, he was never quite sure why this location was chosen.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;My understanding when Chinatown started &mdash; and this is from my great- grandparents &mdash; was that they were selling donations,&rdquo; he explained. &ldquo;And each person who donated some money would get a spot here.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>There are a lot of family stories like that, trying to make sense of why people who lived in the city &mdash; one with plenty of cemeteries &mdash; would make Stickney their final resting place.</p><p>Source after source suggested asking the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association in Chinatown. After all, this social service agency has been setting up Chinese burials at Mount Auburn for almost 100 years. But the CCBA wasn&rsquo;t all that helpful. In fact, they said they couldn&rsquo;t find any original documents related to those early years.</p><p>Still, one official who calls himself &ldquo;GK&rdquo; offered a couple of theories.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /><br />&ldquo;Could be the reason they went to Mount Auburn was because it was not really a Catholic cemetery or any particular religious denomination cemetery, just a regular cemetery on the Southwest side,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;And to get down there was an easy route down Ogden [Avenue] before 55 was ever built.&rdquo;</p><p>But 91-year-old Eunice Wong thinks there&rsquo;s a more sinister angle. She&rsquo;s the daughter of the late, powerful Chicago businessman Tom Chan Sr. Chan&rsquo;s first wife was buried at Rosehill Cemetery on the North Side around 1920. But when it came time to bury Chan himself in 1944, &ldquo;They refused to have him buried,&rdquo; she said.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Incense and misunderstanding</span></p><p>&ldquo;They said their other clients did not like the Chinese burning incense and stuff like that,&rdquo; Wong recalled. &ldquo;They said they dirtied up the cemetery because they bring food and all that kind of stuff.&rdquo;</p><p>Indeed, stories from the <a href="http://undereverystone.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-chinamen-who-were-asked-to-leave.html">Chicago Daily Tribune in 1944</a> pretty much confirm Wong&rsquo;s version of Caucasian-only policy and her father&rsquo;s exclusion.</p><p>But they also indicate Rosehill&rsquo;s main objection was the Chinese practice of digging up bones and sending them back to China. Back then, many Chinese believed a person&rsquo;s final resting place should be in his native soil. Rosehill&rsquo;s management told the Tribune in 1944 its other clients were freaked out by &ldquo;the scenes and the stench.&quot;</p><p>Wong&rsquo;s family, however, didn&rsquo;t want to dig up any bones. They were here to stay, so they couldn&rsquo;t understand the exclusion.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;We were angry because it would have been so much simpler if he could have been buried there,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;And that&rsquo;s how we ended up at Mount Auburn.&rdquo;</p><p>In recent years the Chinese community has been welcomed back to Rosehill, which came under new ownership in 1991.&nbsp;<br /><br />Still, the majority have stuck with Stickney &mdash; Jim Yong among them.&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/chinesegraves.jpg" title="Many Chinese families bring gifts of food when they visit their ancestors at Mount Auburn Memorial Park in Stickney. (WBEZ/MONICA ENG) " /></p><p>On the windy Qing Ming weekend, his kids were cheerfully spreading rainbow-colored towels on their great-grandparents graves, as their dad explained the day.</p><p>&ldquo;We burn incense,&rdquo; Yong said. &ldquo;We also burn money so they can have have their spending and clothes and everything like that. Then we just pretty much stay with them for the rest of the day.&rdquo;</p><p>For now, Qing Ming traditions remain strong at Mount Auburn. On certain spring weekends it can feel like many of the Chicago area&rsquo;s 100,000 Chinese (many foreign-born) are throwing a big family reunion in a single spot. Many have even started to schedule their visits before or after the holiday to avoid the crowds.</p><p>But, it&rsquo;s unclear just how long the younger generations will keep up the practice. Twenty-something barista Kevin Mei says he&rsquo;s not even sure which days he&rsquo;s supposed to visit. So how does he know when to go?</p><p>&ldquo;Grandma just tells me, &lsquo;It&rsquo;s time to go!&rdquo;</p><p><em>Monica Eng is a WBEZ producer and co-host of the Chewing The Fat podcast. Follow her at</em><a href="https://twitter.com/monicaeng"> <em>@monicaeng</em></a> <em>or write to her at meng@wbez.org</em></p></p> Tue, 12 May 2015 08:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/why-are-thousands-chicagos-chinese-buried-out-stickney-112017 Little Bison on the Prairie http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/little-bison-prairie-112013 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/bison.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Prairie conservationists are celebrating the births of more than 10 baby bison at Nachusa Wildlands in Northern Illinois. They are counting on this thriving herd of bison to bring back the growing prairie.</p><p><iframe scrolling="no" src="//www.storehouse.co/stories/48x2d-little-bison-on-the-prairie/embed" style="width:100%;max-width:600px;height:300px;border:none;"></iframe></p></p> Mon, 11 May 2015 15:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/little-bison-prairie-112013 Thousands try for role in 'Chiraq' http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/thousands-try-role-chiraq-112009 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2015-05-10 at 10.30.55 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p>Auditions for a Spike Lee movie about violence on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side inspired thousands of people to stand in line in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood on a chilly, gray Saturday.<br /><br />Spike Lee&rsquo;s film, called &lsquo;Chiraq,&rsquo; has garnered criticism from politicians and others who think the term reflects poorly on the city.<br /><br />But as aspiring cast members stood for hours in line outside St. Sabina Academy, most said they didn&rsquo;t see a problem with the name of the film.<br /><br />The problem, they say, is that the South and West sides of Chicago really are like war zones.<br /><br />Many expressed hope that the movie and its title would bring much-needed attention to the less affluent parts of the city.<br /><br />More than 2,500 people had gone through the audition process by about 2 p.m., standing for pictures and leaving their contact information.<br /><br />&ldquo;I knew there&rsquo;d be a lot,&rdquo; said Rev. Michael Pfleger, the pastor at St. Sabina. &ldquo;But I didn&rsquo;t know there&rsquo;d be this many.&rdquo;<br /><br />Pfleger said by the end of the day, he expected to see more than 4,000 people.<br /><br />The casting call had asked for people of all ethnicities from age 7 to 75.<br /><br />&ldquo;Grandmas and gang members, all the same, in line,&rdquo; Pfleger said.<br /><br />&ldquo;It&rsquo;s been great. It&rsquo;s been a very powerful, very positive thing here at 78th and Racine. I mean, when&rsquo;s the last time we ever heard a casting call for a movie being held in the<br />heart of the black community?&rdquo;<br /><br />Pfleger says he personally doesn&rsquo;t see a problem with Spike Lee calling the movie &lsquo;Chiraq.&rsquo;<br /><br />&ldquo;I think Spike is a good brother, I think he&rsquo;s a conscientious brother, and I think people that are here say they want to be connected with Spike Lee.&rdquo;<br /><br />Filming is expected to begin later this month.</p></p> Sun, 10 May 2015 10:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/thousands-try-role-chiraq-112009 StoryCorps: Students need to 'know that they are seen' http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-students-need-know-they-are-seen-112007 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Capture_17.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Sonia Wang&#39;s parents wanted her to become a lawyer or doctor, but instead she became a teacher.</p><p>Wang&rsquo;s parents are Korean immigrants and had a hard time accepting their daughter&#39;s decision.</p><p>This past January, Sonia Wang stopped by the StoryCorps booth with Ji Yoon Noh, a young woman she mentors.</p><p>Wang told Noh that her passion for education grew out of an experience she had when she was nine years old.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p></p> Fri, 08 May 2015 12:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-students-need-know-they-are-seen-112007 Orson Welles Centennial Festival http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-08/orson-welles-centennial-festival-112006 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" centenary="" class="image-original_image" orson="" span="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Orson%20Wells%20Color%20Old%20620.jpg" title="Portrait of actor and movie director Orson Welles during a press conference in Paris, Feb. 22, 1982. M. Welles is in France to receive the “Legion of Honor”, highest French distinction. (AP Photo/Jacques Langevin)" welles="" /><p><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204555716&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe>Orson Welles Centennial Celebration</strong></span></span></p><p><span>A Chicago-area celebration of the centenary of Orson Welles takes place throughout the month of May in Woodstock, Illinois, where Welles spent his formative years. The Orson Welles Centennial Festival begins tonight, Friday May 8</span>th, with a screening of a new documentary by Chuck Workman, Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles. Film contributor, Milos Stehlik, spoke with film critic and Welles scholar, Jonathan Rosenbaum, about Orson Welles and his legacy.</p><p><strong>Guest Host: </strong></p><p>Milos Stehlik is WBEZ film contributor and director of <a href="http://www.facets.org/">Facets MultiMedia</a></p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-c34349ba-3459-b500-26f7-c379bee73768"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c34349ba-3459-22a0-72de-434fc78282e5">Jonathan Rosenbaum</span> is a film critic, <a href="http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net/">blogger</a> and scholar on Orson Welles. He&#39;s the author of the book <em>Discovering Orson Welles</em> and&nbsp; co-author of the edited volume <em>This is Orson Welles</em>.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>EVENT:</strong></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-c34349ba-3468-22f9-b51d-fe6955b815f0">Jonathan Rosenbaum will appear the <a href="http://www.welleswoodstock.com">Orson Welles Centennial Festival</a></p><p dir="ltr">May 8 - May 23</p><p>Woodstock, IL at various locations</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204556960&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe>65th Anniversary of the Schuman Declaration</span></span></strong></p><p>The greatest peacemaking institution of the last century is arguably the European Union. May 9th marks the 65<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the <a href="http://europa.eu/about-eu/basic-information/symbols/europe-day/schuman-declaration/index_en.htm">Schuman Declaration</a>. At the time, Robert Schuman was France&rsquo;s foreign minister. His declaration&rsquo;s aim was to make war between European states impossible as stated in the declaration&rsquo;s opening line, &ldquo;World peace cannot be safeguarded without the making of creative efforts proportionate to the dangers which threaten it.&rdquo; We&rsquo;ll celebrate the peacemaking power of the EU and discuss threats to its future.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-83b38682-345b-b0a1-894f-52219bd70430"><a href="https://sites.google.com/site/aaronfreemansite/Home?previewAsViewer=1">Aaron Freeman</a> is a WBEZ contributor, artist-in-residence at the Chicago Council on Science &amp; Technology&nbsp;and self-declared Schuman declaration enthusiast</p><p dir="ltr">John McCormick is the Jean Monnet Professor of European Union Politics at Indiana University and author of the book <em><a href="http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=581141">Why Europe Matters: The Case for the European Union</a></em></p><p><strong><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 24px;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-fb16e14c-3457-1a94-0e03-9a178a014368"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204558557&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe>Weekend Passport:</span> Russian Music and Ballet, Middle East Poetry and Travel the globe frugally</span></span></strong></p><p><span>Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll recommend a concert that blends Russian folk music with classical and electronic music, a poetry festival featuring Iraqi and other Middle Eastern poets and we&rsquo;ll find out how to travel the globe, on $50 a day.</span></p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p>Narimon Safavi, WBEZ contributor and co-founder of <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/">Pasfarda Arts and Cultural Exchange</a></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-fb16e14c-3460-45e5-9d3a-b74da4fb4be2">Matt Kepnes is author of </span>the book <em>How to Travel the World on $50 a Day </em>and editor of the &#39;<a href="http://www.nomadicmatt.com/">Nomadic Matt</a>&#39;, travel blog</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 08 May 2015 11:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-08/orson-welles-centennial-festival-112006 As Whole Foods breaks ground, Englewood residents make their pitch http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/whole-foods-breaks-ground-englewood-residents-make-their-pitch-111995 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/wf.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been more than a year-and-a-half since Whole Foods announced it was setting up shop in Chicago&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood, and the store&rsquo;s opening is still more than a year away.</p><p>But that doesn&rsquo;t mean the community is sitting idly by. Residents are actively engaging with Whole Foods about the role of an organic grocery store chain in a food desert at the corner of 63rd and Halsted.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s been wonderful. I think that Whole Foods has been very committed to everything going on here,&rdquo; said Glen Fulton, executive director of the Greater Englewood Community Development Corporation, whose office is across the street in a U.S. Bank branch overlooking the construction site.</p><p>When the high-end grocer first announced it was moving to this high-poverty community some Chicagoans were shocked. But the company is trying to shed its elite label &mdash; it says part of its mission is bringing healthy options to areas riddled with junk food.</p><p>Store officials say prices will be competitive and affordable here. They also say Whole Foods is committed to being more than just an anchor tenant on a vacant lot.</p><p>The company first tested this food desert experiment a couple years ago in Detroit. It was the first national grocer to come into the city and so far it&rsquo;s been mostly a success.</p><p>In Englewood, Whole Foods has held community meetings and listened to residents who want classes on nutrition and shopping on a budget.</p><p>Fulton said he went straight to Whole Foods&rsquo; CEO with one request.</p><p>&ldquo;The first thing I wanted was for small businesses to be a part of this whole initiative for this Englewood community. Meaning that I need your support in trying to help them do business with Whole Food,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Fulton is a former director of supplier diversity at Albertsons, another major grocery chain.</p><p>&ldquo;And the second part is that we include diversity as far as diverse suppliers are concerned. So if you&rsquo;re a person of color or a woman, let&rsquo;s break down the barriers&nbsp;of trying to do business with Whole Foods,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Rachel Bernier-Green, a black South Sider, attended a free small business workshop series and learned about proper licensing and packaging. She owns &lsquo;Laine&rsquo;s Bake Shop and met a Whole Foods district manager.</p><p>&ldquo;He came out to our table and took the rest of the cookies of his favorite flavor, everything I had on display that day. So I think they enjoyed the texture of the cookies,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>So much so that Whole Foods worked with Bernier-Green to find a distributor.</p><p>Soon her mocha raspberry, citrus spritz and butter pecan bites will be in three Chicago Whole Foods. Next year the desserts will be in the store at 63rd and Halsted.</p><p>&ldquo;I think they were also impressed with the story of our company, why we exist and what we plan to do,&rdquo; Bernier-Green added.</p><p>Her small family-owned business has a social mission: hiring those who have struggled with homelessness as well as the formerly incarcerated. Each year hundreds of parolees with criminal records return to Englewood and can&rsquo;t find work.</p><p>&ldquo;We wanted to know, Whole Foods, are you going to hire people with records? We had been previously told that hands-down no, they aren&rsquo;t going to hire anybody with records,&rdquo; said Sonya Harper, executive director of Grow Greater Englewood, a food justice group. &ldquo;Whole Foods really heard our concerns as a community and they are now coming up with a program to hire people with records at that store.&rdquo;</p><p>Whole Foods says it wants to partner with social service agencies to increase opportunities for those facing employment barriers.</p><p>Meanwhile, &lsquo;Laine&rsquo;s Bake Shop is the only new confirmed supplier for the Englewood Whole Foods.</p><p>Store officials say more shelf space is available and they hope to develop some brand new businesses in the process.</p><p>There&rsquo;s still time. The next small business workshop series will be this fall.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a></em></p><p><em>Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Thu, 07 May 2015 04:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/whole-foods-breaks-ground-englewood-residents-make-their-pitch-111995 Worldview: War in Ukraine Could Escalate http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-01/worldview-war-ukraine-could-escalate-111976 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ukraine%20cms_0.JPG" title="Ukrainian tank at frontline near Mariupol in Feb 2015 (Photo by Askold Krushelnycky)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image "><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/203476188&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="font-size:24px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Ukraine/Russia Hostilities Could Soon Escalate</span></span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">Journalist Askold Krushelnycky has covered Russia and Ukraine for decades - from accompanying mujahedin groups as they fought in the Soviet-Afghan war to watching Russian troops land in Crimea. Krushelnycky was recently embedded with Ukraine&rsquo;s 37th Mechanized Infantry Battalion fighting in the port city of Mariupol. He&rsquo;s in Chicago to talk about what he&rsquo;s witnessed in the current standoff between Ukraine and Russia. And Krushelnycky will tell us what he believes are the chances of more major military action in Ukraine in the coming months.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Guest:</strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Askold Krushelnycky is an independent journalist, formerly correspondent for the Sunday Times and editor of the Kyiv Post</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong><em>EVENT: </em></strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em><a href="http://uima-chicago.org/on-the-battlefields-of-ukraine-life-with-a-volunteer-battalion/">On the battlefields of Ukraine: life with a volunteer battalion Journalist - Askold Krushelnycky</a></em></div><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-a28baadf-10fc-3ac8-10ce-d062c95abb90">Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, Saturday, May 2nd at 6pm, </span></em><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-a28baadf-10fc-3ac8-10ce-d062c95abb90">2320 W Chicago Ave.</span></em><em style="line-height: 1.2;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-a28baadf-10fc-3ac8-10ce-d062c95abb90"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Cambria; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/203476977&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></span></span></em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Milos Stehlik Talks with Ivo Felt about the Estonian film &#39;Tangerines&#39;</span></span></p><p><em>Tangerines(Mandariinid)</em> is set in 1992, just as the Soviet Union was breaking apart and tensions flared between Georgia and Abkhazian separatists. The film tells of two soldiers, from opposing sides. Film contributor Milos Stehlik and the film&#39;s producer, Ivo Felt, discuss the film.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em>Milos Stehlik, WBEZ film contributor and director of Facets Multimedia</em></p><p><em>Ivo Felt, producer of the film Tangerines (Mandariinid) </em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/203478829&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Weekend Passport: Poesia en Abril and Chicago Asian-American Author Readings</span></span></p><p>Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. On this literary edition of weekend passport we&rsquo;ll tell you about a Spanish language poetry festival and a celebration of Asian American writers.</p><p><strong><span>Guests:</span></strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1b9f2abe-1126-987e-77c5-3e0a97853fbf">Noah Cruikshank (Crook-shank) is the Marketing Manager at Open Books and the Board President of the Chicago Writers Conference</span></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1b9f2abe-1126-987e-77c5-3e0a97853fbf">Vu Tran (Voo Tran) is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Arts at the University of Chicago and author of the upcoming novel </span>Dragonfish.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1b9f2abe-1126-987e-77c5-3e0a97853fbf">Irizelma Robles Alvarez is a Puerto Rican poet, essayist and anthropologist. </span></em></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><em><span>EVENTS:</span></em></strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1b9f2abe-1128-4c24-8c24-edb2b0f5092b">1) Vu Tran will participate in r</span>eadings with Chicago-based Asian American authors Nami Mun, and Alec Nevala-Lee.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1b9f2abe-1129-3412-0143-d9c60db76c05">Friday, May 1st, 6 pm, Open Books River North, 213 W. Institute Place, </span>Event co-organized by Open Books and the Chicago Writers Conference</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>2) Irizelma Robles Alvarez will perform as part of the Poetry Foundation&rsquo;s Poesia en Abril event.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Friday, May 1st at Comfort Station in Logan Square (there are also readings and events on Saturday)</em></p></p> Fri, 01 May 2015 14:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-01/worldview-war-ukraine-could-escalate-111976 'Aren't you going to have a hard time giving the baby up?' http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/arent-you-going-have-hard-time-giving-baby-111974 <p><p>Carrie Moon loved being pregnant.</p><p>When she gave birth to a son a few years ago, she says it felt natural, even fun.</p><p>Their one child was plenty for Carrie and her husband Charlie to take care of.</p><p>But Carrie wanted to help someone who wasn&rsquo;t able to give birth.</p><hr /><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS7285_StoryCorps%20booth%20%282%29-scr_13.JPG" style="height: 120px; width: 180px; float: left;" title="" /><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><a href="http://storycorps.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">StoryCorps</a>&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. This excerpt was edited by WBEZ.</em></p></p> Fri, 01 May 2015 10:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/arent-you-going-have-hard-time-giving-baby-111974