WBEZ | Religion http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Fish fry dinners bring food, community to Catholics during Lent http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/fish-fry-dinners-bring-food-community-catholics-during-lent-110029 <p><p>Roman Catholics are not supposed to eat meat on Fridays during Lent. They view it as a small act of penance to honor Christ&rsquo;s death.</p><p>So churches across Chicago and the nation are carrying on a time-honored way to skip the meat, and gather as a community. It&rsquo;s the Friday fish fry, and it is growing in popularity here again.</p><p>One of the biggest and longest-running fish fries in Chicago -- and, volunteers claim, the only one here with a drive-through -- is at St. Ferdinand Church on the far Northwest Side.</p><p>Father Jason Torba stood in the church basement last Friday evening among a circle of volunteers. Many wore bunny ears and orange name tags shaped like fish.</p><p>&ldquo;We ask God for his blessing tonight and especially for the people, they will come and will serve,&rdquo; Torba said, adding it is even more important to serve during Lent. Then he led the group in an &ldquo;Our Father.&rdquo;</p><p>The volunteers were about to serve nearly 600 fish dinners ... in three hours. And the crowd started lining up 45 minutes early.</p><p>St. Ferdinand&rsquo;s fish fry has been going on for something like 25 years now. Organizers said other churches are coming to them now, asking how to start fish fries of their own.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/fish%20fry%201.JPG" title="Signs point the way to St. Ferdinand’s fish fry. (WBEZ/Lynette Kalsnes)" />Professor Michael Murphy, director of Catholic Studies at Loyola University Chicago, said church dinners like this were popular in the middle of the last century. Then, the tight parish structure made the local church a central part of life, resulting in women&rsquo;s and men&rsquo;s clubs, and many other events.</p><p>&ldquo;The parish was for so many years the place to be,&rdquo; he said, adding parishes served as a social outlet.</p><p>Murphy said fish fries merged theological teachings and practicality. If Catholics could not eat meat on Fridays, they might as well have fish and get together. He said that need to gather is central to the philosophy of the faith.</p><p>Murphy said these church dinners waned in popularity in greater Chicago after &ldquo;older parish things broke down&rdquo; following Vatican II, combined with the loosening of social structures in the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s.</p><p>But he sees them coming back in style over the past few decades. Murphy said some of his students want to start at fish fry at Loyola. He credited this partly to the &ldquo;Pope Francis effect,&rdquo; which has Catholics longing for community again.</p><p>&ldquo;This is not just to come to eat fish, but it is to build community,&rdquo;&nbsp; said Rich Wenzl, who has helped run the St. Ferdinand event with his wife Pat for 19 years. Their main goal is not to raise money. They hope to attract people from the parish and the larger neighborhood.</p><p>&ldquo;Our world is very hungry for getting out of our houses and having a place to go that&rsquo;s correct, and that&rsquo;s safe, that feels good to be with each other and that we can share ourselves with one another,&rdquo; Rich Wenzl said.</p><p>Pat Wenzl, who is the lead organizer of the fish fry, said it is especially important to recruit young people to volunteer to keep them in the parish and in the faith.</p><p>&ldquo;If we groom them well and make them feel comfortable and make them feel like it&rsquo;s an important part of them, it only serves to help the church in years to come,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>The couple created the process for running the event, and it is pretty much an assembly line. Friday, four men stood over designated fryers. Four women lined up next to each other to dish out fish, coleslaw, dinner rolls and condiments.</p><p>Teens stood right outside the kitchen, ready to run out orders to two packed dining halls. The operation is so big now, it takes more than 100 volunteers a night.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/fish%20fry%202.jpg.JPG" style="float: left; height: 358px; width: 275px;" title="Volunteers run the fish fry like a factory line to make and serve about 600 meals in three hours. (WBEZ/Lynette Kalsnes)" />Mary Clemente, who headed the line of women, did not slow down for even a minute ... not until her 4-year-old grandson popped by.</div><p>&ldquo;Give me a kiss, hey, love you,&rdquo; Clemente told her grandson.</p><p>&ldquo;Grandma, why is people wearing Easter bunny ears?&rdquo; he asked.</p><p>&ldquo;For Easter,&rdquo; she said with a laugh.</p><p>Then she went right back to work. Clemente has been volunteering so long, &ldquo;My son was 3, he&rsquo;s now 21, so that&rsquo;s how long, 18 years.&rdquo;</p><p>Another woman chimed in: &ldquo;Last year was her birthday, we made her kitchen queen.&rdquo;</p><p>Many of the volunteers have stories like this. Volunteering eight, 10, even 20 years is common. Even though it is hard work, Clemente said it is fun, and volunteers become like family.</p><p>That sense of community was visible among diners, too. Anne Marie Castiglioni came with her children and her mom. She does not attend St. Ferdinand&rsquo;s, but lives nearby. She said her son could not wait to see the Easter Bunny, who appears here the last fish fry of the season.</p><p>&ldquo;(He) had the biggest smile on his face to see this guy because he&rsquo;s known him since he&rsquo;s been like 3 years old, he&rsquo;s kind of grown up knowing this Easter Bunny here,&rdquo; Castiglioni said.</p><p>Her mom, Pat Zwick, said coming here has become a family tradition.</p><p>&ldquo;And the Easter Bunny brings you more into the Easter spirit,&rdquo; she said, as her granddaughter, who was sitting in her lap, excitedly pointed out that the Easter Bunny was right across the room.</p><p>On the other side of the crowded hall, Vincent Clemente -- Mary&rsquo;s husband - ate fish dinners with their grandson. Clemente&rsquo;s been a parishioner since he was 1.</p><p>&ldquo;Some people now, they don&rsquo;t go to church as often,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Some people that live in the neighborhood don&rsquo;t attend church, but this enhances the parish community because then they see how much of a community it is, and it may bring them to the church.&rdquo;</p><p>St. Ferdinand&rsquo;s last fish fry of the season was Friday night. They cannot hold one this weekend, since Catholics are required to fast on Good Friday, depending on their age.<br />But parishioners at St. Ferdinand plan to keep building community through food. They&rsquo;ll be back with the fish fry next year.</p><p>And up next? A pancake breakfast.</p><p><em>Lynette Kalsnes is a WBEZ producer/reporter covering religion and culture. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes" target="_blank">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em><br />&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 15 Apr 2014 16:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/fish-fry-dinners-bring-food-community-catholics-during-lent-110029 New exhibit takes unique look at death, food and remembrance http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/new-exhibit-takes-unique-look-death-food-and-remembrance-109974 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/death exhibit.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When someone passes away today, it&rsquo;s pretty common for friends and family to reminisce about them over food and drink. Just think about all those casseroles and cookies that pile up or about hoisting a glass at an Irish wake.</p><p>It turns out, in some ancient cultures, that use of food went, well, further.</p><p>A new show at the University of Chicago&rsquo;s Oriental Institute opens Tuesday, and it takes an unusual look at death. The show&rsquo;s called <a href="http://oi.uchicago.edu/museum/special/remembrance/" target="_blank">&ldquo;In Remembrance of Me: Feasting with the Dead in the Ancient Middle East</a>.&rdquo;</p><p>It examines how we&rsquo;ve remembered our loved ones across cultures and time, and the ways people have tried to control how they&rsquo;ll be thought of too. It highlights some ancient Middle Eastern cultures that believed souls lived on in monuments and needed to be fed so later generations could just come and hang out with them.</p><p>&ldquo;Cultures all over world, in all different periods in all areas of the world have done this, have had some way of maintaining contact their deceased ancestors,&rdquo; said Emily Teeter, a research associate and special exhibits coordinator at the Oriental Institute.</p><p>&ldquo;In Egyptian theology, they thought they would live forever, as long as they were remembered by the living,&rdquo; she said, adding that this ancient culture believed part of the soul lived on in monuments, and keeping those souls alive required lots and lots of food.</p><p>She pointed to a stone slab with an engraving of a couple who were unmistakably Egyptian, with angular black wigs, jeweled collars.</p><p>All over the monument, there are tiny carvings of birds, oxen, bread, even beer. Teeter said those are instructions on what to bring the couple to keep them alive: They wanted a thousand each of oxen, birds, bread and beer.</p><p>&ldquo;The Egyptian dead were apparently constantly hungry,&rdquo; Teeter said. &ldquo;...To stay alive you need to eat, and their whole goal with mummification, with creating these monuments, is to live eternally.&rdquo;</p><p>Teeter said the couple - who died more than 4,000 years ago -- even planned ahead on what to do once all their descendants had passed away, and there was no one to bring them food anymore. The engraving says that if visitors don&rsquo;t happen to have 1,000 oxen on them, it&rsquo;s enough to just pray for the food.</p><p>And it&rsquo;s not just the ancient Middle East where rites like this happened. At an excavation site in Vatican City, University of Chicago Divinity School Dean Margaret Mitchell saw tubes sticking out of burial sites. She said that was so people could pour in beverages to share with their dead loved ones.</p><p>Mitchell said some Roman catacombs had tables for people to eat between rows of burial urns.</p><p>&ldquo;Whether the dead can still eat a Twinkie or can still drink a good glass of merlot, it&rsquo;s a way of tenderly caring for the dead,&rdquo; Mitchell said.</p><p>The monuments go beyond providing the living with that connection to the dead, or assuring the dead will keep getting fed. In some cases, these statues and stones let people control how they&rsquo;ll be remembered.</p><p>The exhibit&rsquo;s showpiece is a replica of an ornately carved memorial stone of a man named Katumuwa. He&rsquo;s in fancy dress, sitting at a banquet table full of food, looking relaxed and happy in the afterlife. Before he died, commissioned it himself.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not just &lsquo;Pete was here,&rsquo; but it&rsquo;s even bigger,&rdquo; Mitchell said. She likened this memorial stone to the huge monument Illinois politician Roland Burris has had built, even though he&rsquo;s still very much alive.</p><p>It&rsquo;s like saying, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not going to leave it to the winds or your children to decide how you&rsquo;re going to be remembered, but I want to steer that process myself,&rdquo; Mitchell said. &ldquo;In some ways, the monuments are like a fist to the sky that says, I refuse to be forgotten.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p><em>Lynette Kalsnes is a WBEZ producer/reporter covering religion, culture and science. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 05:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/new-exhibit-takes-unique-look-death-food-and-remembrance-109974 Secrets from the Tomb: The hunt for Chicago's mummies http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2014-03/secrets-tomb-hunt-chicagos-mummies-109934 <p><p>Who would have thought the ancient dead could actually break news? But that&rsquo;s exactly what happened when I embarked on my hunt for Chicago&rsquo;s mummies.</p><p>The Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) invited me to tag along in February as they took their two mummies, Paankhenamun and Wenuhotep, to be scanned at the University of Chicago.</p><p>The video below will give you a good idea of what that trip involved, and why everyone - from radiologists to Egyptologists to ambulance drivers, were fascinated by the process.<a name="video"></a></p><p><strong><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="349" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gopKCYXkdOg" width="620"></iframe></strong></p><p>The results of the scans are already coming in, and though the mummies are not currently on display, if they do go back to the galleries some relabeling will be in order - listen to the radio story above to find out why.</p><p>It was news to me that the AIC even had mummies. Like The Field Museum and the Oriental Institute (OI) of the University of Chicago, the AIC got theirs toward the end of the 19th century, when people on science expeditions and tourist junkets alike became captivated with ancient Egypt.</p><p>Mummies continue to&mdash;bad pun alert&mdash;walk the line between cultural object and scientific specimen. What sometimes gets lost beneath the bandages and elaborately decorated coffins is the fact that mummies were humans too.</p><p>Until a few decades ago, if someone wanted to verify that fact, they would simply unwrap it - as in this somewhat ghoulish photograph of a researcher undoing the linen wrapping on one of the Oriental Institute&rsquo;s mummies.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Unwrap%20mummy.jpg" style="height: 422px; width: 620px;" title="Date/individual unknown. Bad mummy tech: An unidentified employee unwraps one of the Oriental Institute’s mummies in approximately 1910 (archival photo courtesy of The Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago) " /></p><p>I&rsquo;m struck by how casual it all seems, this act that we now view as a desecration. The two people conversing in the background, the fact that the researcher&rsquo;s not even wearing gloves!</p><p>But many mummies were unwrapped, some by institutions and others by upper crust tourists, who thought they&rsquo;d have a little fun with the souvenir they picked up on their tour of Europe.</p><p>The mummy in this photograph is still at the Oriental, though it hasn&rsquo;t been displayed since the 1960s or &lsquo;70s. Oriental Institute Egyptologist Emily Teeter took me back to see her and despite being prepared, I was still startled.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mummy%20unwrapped.PNG" style="height: 282px; width: 620px;" title="Unwrapped mummified remains. (WBEZ/Alison Cuddy)" /></div><p>But now we can see inside mummies, thanks to images generated by CT scans. Scanning is the cutting edge of mummy research and exhibition, and it&rsquo;s driving a new interest in the ancient dead, among the public and at institutions.</p><p>Here you see the incredibly detailed views these machines allow, from a recent scan of the Field&rsquo;s mummy known only as the Gilded Lady (a woman who died in her early 40s and was entombed in the early Ptolemaic period).</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mummy_sidebyside.jpg" title="(images courtesy of the Field Museum)" /></div><p>Given Chicago&rsquo;s rather large mummy population, local hospital scanners are sure to be kept busy over the coming years.</p><p>The chart and map below gives you a sense of how many we have, and what the main collections include, from Peruvian mummy &ldquo;bundles&rdquo; at the Field, to mummy parts, including a monkey&rsquo;s paw and other bits of animals at the Oriental.</p><p>I haven&rsquo;t verified this, but Chicago might just be the mummy capital of America.</p><p><strong>What sort of mummies are in the Field Museum&#39;s collection?</strong></p><p><iframe height="360" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-assets/WBEZ-Graphics/mummy_graphs/field.html" width="620"></iframe></p><p><strong>What sort of mummies are in the Oriental Institute collection?</strong></p><p><iframe height="460" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-assets/WBEZ-Graphics/mummy_graphs/oriential.html" width="620"></iframe></p><p>Bob Martin, emeritus curator at the Field, said they are planning to re-do their permanent Egyptian collection, and include more digital elements (like a touch-screen table top display that allows you to virtually unwrap one of their mummies).</p><p>The Art Institute&rsquo;s mummies aren&rsquo;t currently on display, though curator Mary Greuel hopes any information gleaned from the University of Chicago scans will eventually be part of an exhibition..</p><p>I also found some stray mummies. There is one in the Social Studies department at Naperville Central High School.</p><p>And if you pay a visit to the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary library you can view the mummy of a young girl, known as Hawara Portrait Mummy #4.</p><p><strong>Map: Where are Chicago&#39;s mummies?<a name="map"></a></strong></p><p><strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://www.google.com/fusiontables/embedviz?q=select+col1+from+1O8JcaqBRIzHJbqYxbjLyLBBTiZXqw7z4Pg9T6oV6&amp;viz=MAP&amp;h=false&amp;lat=41.88994363687098&amp;lng=-87.93986547851563&amp;t=1&amp;z=9&amp;l=col1&amp;y=2&amp;tmplt=2&amp;hml=ONE_COL_LAT_LNG" width="620"></iframe></strong><br /><br />Do you know of any local mummies we may have missed? Let us know - we&rsquo;d love to add them to our inventory!</p></p> Fri, 28 Mar 2014 11:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2014-03/secrets-tomb-hunt-chicagos-mummies-109934 Chicago-area nuns weigh in on Pope's first anniversary http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/chicago-area-nuns-weigh-popes-first-anniversary-109852 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/pope nuns.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been a tough couple of years for nuns in the U.S.<br /><br />In 2012 the Vatican essentially ordered three male bishops to oversee the group representing 80 percent of American nuns, the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, saying the LCWR promoted &ldquo;radical feminist themes incompatible with the Catholic faith.&rdquo;</p><p>So when a new pope came in exactly a year ago, many in this group wondered what it might mean for them and a range of women&rsquo;s issues from the Vatican investigation of nuns, to birth control, to women&rsquo;s ordination.</p><p>&ldquo;All I had was some hope, not a great deal for anything new or different,&rdquo; said Sister Suzanne Zuercher, a Benedictine at St. Scholastica Monastery on Chicago&rsquo;s North Side.</p><p>&ldquo;Now that a year has passed, I can&rsquo;t believe who it is that that conclave elected,&rdquo; Sister Suzanne said, adding that she was surprised and even amazed by how much Pope Francis has accomplished in a year. She pointed to how he had begun reforming the Curia (essentially the Vatican&rsquo;s top dogs) and cleaning house at the scandal-ridden Vatican bank.</p><p>Sister Suzanne said she appreciated how the Pope had changed the focus of the church from doctrinal to pastoral.<br /><br />&ldquo;The church has so often appeared, and been, grim. That is so different with this man,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s not grim at all, he is relaxed, he&rsquo;s joyous, and he says without being joyful, what do we have to offer people?&rdquo;<br /><br />Sister Suzanne and her Prioress, Sister Patricia Crowley, both said the Pope&rsquo;s popularity and symbolic acts like openly refusing to judge gay priests are creating a new image of the papacy and the church.</p><p>And while they acknowledge he&rsquo;s had a busy first year, they are waiting for him to take on women&rsquo;s issues in the church.</p><p>The Pope previously said he has a &ldquo;vivid hope&rdquo; women will play a &ldquo;more capillary and incisive&rdquo; role in the church. In an interview with Latin American nuns, he told them if they got a letter announcing an investigation similar to U.S. nuns, not to worry.</p><p>Sister Patricia is cautiously optimistic this could translate to action. Someday, she&nbsp; said, she even hopes to see women&rsquo;s ordination. But she admits the church moves slowly.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s gradual,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;But basically, I&rsquo;d like to see that women are equal to men within the church because the first witness to the resurrection was a woman, and I think that&rsquo;s a pretty clear gospel message that indeed women are equal to men.&rdquo;</p><p>In the meantime, Pope Frances still hasn&rsquo;t lifted oversight from many U.S. nuns. That doesn&rsquo;t surprise Charles Reid, a Catholic blogger and professor of law at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota.<br /><br />&ldquo;When he renewed that investigation, he was brand new on the job. He wasn&rsquo;t going to upset apple carts that quickly,&rdquo; Reid said. &ldquo;I do not think he will do what (Pope) Benedict was doing, and that is relentlessly pursue nuns.&rdquo;<br /><br />Reid explained that Pope Francis &ndash; who&rsquo;s a Jesuit &ndash; comes from a tradition that values spirited academic debate.<br /><br />&ldquo;Will he open doors to the ordination of women? No,&rdquo; Reid said. &ldquo;Will he open the doors to scholarship that could lead there in 20 years? Maybe, maybe.&rdquo;<br /><br />That day can&rsquo;t come soon enough for Sister Donna Quinn, a local activist nun. She wants women to have an equal voice and vote in the church.<br /><br />&ldquo;I really don&rsquo;t see any action,&rdquo; Sister Donna said. &ldquo;I see this nice wonderfulness of words and the media. Why doesn&rsquo;t the media pick up on the fact that the church is all men? All men are in power.&rdquo;<br /><br />But Sister Donna sees one hopeful sign in the Pope&rsquo;s more humble lifestyle, including his decision to ditch those fancy red shoes.<br /><br />&ldquo;If he has taken off those expensive shoes and the garb and walked with the people, he is taking that first wonderful step,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s a lot more to follow, hopefully.&rdquo;<br /><br /><em>Lynette Kalsnes is a producer/reporter covering religion, culture and science for WBEZ. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes" target="_blank">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 13 Mar 2014 17:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/chicago-area-nuns-weigh-popes-first-anniversary-109852 Crisis in Crimea and schools globally under violent attack http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-03-10/crisis-crimea-and-schools-globally-under-violent-attack-109828 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/(AP PhotoAlexander Zemlianichenko).jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The U.S. Ambassador to Russia says the U.S. will not recognize an upcoming Crimean referendum to join Russia. We&#39;ll get an update from Jeffrey Mankoff, senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Plus, a new report by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack says there were hundreds of violent attacks on teachers, students and school buildings in the last five years alone. Diya Nijhowne, the group&rsquo;s director, will detail some of the attacks.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-crisis-in-crimea/embed" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-crisis-in-crimea.js"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-crisis-in-crimea" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The Crisis in Crimea" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 10 Mar 2014 12:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-03-10/crisis-crimea-and-schools-globally-under-violent-attack-109828 Packing in the paczkis http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/packing-paczkis-109792 <p><p>Happy Paczki Day, Chicago!</p><p>This occasion marks a time of feasting before the Lenten fast &mdash; specifically on the jelly doughnuts&nbsp; known as paczki that are a tradition in Poland. But unlike cultures that celebrate Fat Tuesday, aka Mardi Gras, paczki have their heyday on two distinct days in Chicago&rsquo;s Polish community.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Photos: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisachu/sets/72157641622072985/" target="_blank">Paczki Day in Chicago</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>&ldquo;By being of Polish extraction and living in Chicago, you get the best of both worlds,&rdquo; explained Jan Lorys, managing director of the Polish Museum of America, which is located in the West Town neighborhood on Milwaukee Ave., the longtime &ldquo;Main Street&rdquo; of Polish Chicago.</p><p>Lorys continued, &ldquo;In Poland, the tradition is that you are getting ready for Lent, which is a period of fasting. So you get rid of all of your animal fats...and make paczki, which are deep fried in fat.&rdquo;</p><p>That happens on the Thursday before Ash Wednesday -- both in Poland and in Chicago&rsquo;s bakery-filled Polish-American neighborhoods.</p><p>&ldquo;But when you come to the United States, the big thing is Mardi Gras, the Shrove Tuesday before Ash Wednesday,&rdquo; Lorys said. &ldquo;So the idea came for having Paczki Day on Shrove Tuesday, combining an existing American holiday with something from Poland.&rdquo;</p><p>That is how most U.S. Polish communities do it, but in Chicago we respectfully observe both traditions, meaning, Lorys said, &ldquo;that you have them on Thursday, and then starve yourself over the weekend and then have them on Tuesday again.&rdquo;</p><p>So now that you understand the double-doughnut-day directive, we should say a word about the spelling and pronunciation of this deep-fried treat.</p><p>Paczek (POANCH-ek) is the word for a single doughnut. But, as Lorys said, &ldquo;You never [just] eat one.&rdquo; So the really important word to learn is the the plural paczki (POANCH--kee) -- as in, &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t believe I just ate 17 paczki.&rdquo;</p><p>To make matters more confusing, the word paczki, meaning filled doughnut, looks exactly like the word paczki, meaning package. So if you have ever passed one of Chicago&rsquo;s many Polish shipping services and wondered if the sign saying &ldquo;Paczki do Polski&rdquo; means they specialize in mailing doughnuts to Poland, the answer is &ldquo;no.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/paczki%20powder.jpg" style="float: right; height: 197px; width: 350px;" title="" />You may also be wondering if paczki are really that much different from other jelly doughnuts, Bismarcks, Berliners, bombolini, Boston cremes, or sufganiyot. From the looks of them you might think they&rsquo;re all the same. But Dobra Bielinski of Delightful Pastries explains that they are a denser, eggier affair.</div><p><br />&ldquo;People really eat jelly-filled doughnuts for the filling, not the doughnut itself,&rdquo; the baker said. &ldquo;And with a paczki, what happens is that people eat it for the dough and not the filling. Relatively, there is less filling and and more dough. Once this cools off, when you bite it, it springs back, it doesn&rsquo;t collapse like pancake.&rdquo;</p><p>On Wednesday morning, Bielinski presided over a bustling kitchen that would crank out more than 20,000 paczki over the next week, including 10,000 pre-ordered doughnuts and several thousand for the City of Chicago&rsquo;s birthday celebration in Daley Plaza Tuesday.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;And those are just the orders we know about. We still have to make them for orders [by] people who are coming into the store,&rdquo; Bielinski said.</p><p>Giant bowls of butter, flour, rum, eggs, yeast, and sugar were spinning under the mixer. Workers rolled finished mounds of dough into lime-sized balls for proofing. Once risen, whole trays of paczki buns would be gently lowered into vats of oil. Traditionally, that oil would have been lard, but today Bielinski uses a blend of canola and soy to reflect changing customer demands .</p><p>&ldquo;If I had to do it at home, I would do it in lard,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>&ldquo;Me too,&rdquo; piped in Stasia Hawryszczuk, her mom, &ldquo;because it tastes much better.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;If you were living in a small town in Poland,&rdquo; Bielinski said, &ldquo;everyone would have their own pig in the backyard and the pig was fed scraps, and the lard was fairly healthy because they didn&rsquo;t add anything to it. You would melt it down and you&rsquo;d have all this fat to fry in. &ldquo;</p><p>Midway through frying, the bobbing buns were expertly flipped using what look like two mahogany chopsticks.</p><p>And when the hot walnut-colored pastries emerged from the fryer, they bore nary a drop of grease -- thanks, Bielinski said, to the rum in the dough that prevents excessive absorption of oil.</p><p>Next up, is the sugar glaze, which was traditionally studded with candied orange peels, a delicacy in Poland during this time of year when fresh fruit was scarce.</p><p>When I was a young kid in Poland you would get oranges under the Christmas tree,&rdquo; Bielinski said.&nbsp; &ldquo;There was a lot of rationing of food. So if you would spend your money on oranges, you would use up entire orange and you&rsquo;d put the bits of candied orange peel on top of your pazckis and make a luxury item, so to speak.&rdquo;</p><p>And lastly comes the injection of filling. Traditional fillings including prune and rose petal jam, but in recent years Bielinski has gotten more creative.</p><p>&ldquo;We we do vanilla bean custard and vodka, Jameson&rsquo;s whiskey and chocolate custard, and then we did moonshine with lemon curd,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;So those were the adult ones.&rdquo;</p><p>Bielinski is especially proud of the tart and tropical passion fruit, which she makes from real fruit puree.</p><p>If you ask a dozen paczki lovers about their favorite flavors, you could easily get a dozen different answers back.&nbsp;</p><p>Responses we got included rose hip jelly, cherry, strawberry, apricot, prune, custard, chocolate, raspberry.</p><p>But regardless of which flavor you choose,&nbsp; we can all agree that these round poofs of sweetness can offer some much needed comfort during this long punishing winter.</p><p><em>Monica Eng is a WBEZ producer and co-host of the&nbsp;</em><em><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/chewing-fat-podcast-louisa-chu-and-monica-eng">Chewing the Fat</a></strong></em><em>&nbsp;podcast. Follow her at&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/monicaeng">@monicaeng</a> or write to her at&nbsp;</em><em><a href="mailto:meng@wbez.org">meng@wbez.org</a></em></p></p> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 12:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/packing-paczkis-109792 American Muslim consumer market worth billions http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/american-muslim-consumer-market-worth-billions-109587 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/HauteHijab.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Melanie Elturk launched a modest fashion clothing line a few years ago out of her apartment in Chicago&mdash;joining the populous ranks of business entrepreneurs.</p><p>What makes El-Turk stand out is that she is in the vanguard of a movement to better reach a growing but not yet widely recognized market niche: consumers who, like Elturk, are American Muslims.</p><p>She started Haute Hijab because she did not feel that mainstream fashion catered to the modern young American Muslim.</p><p>Haute Hijab is what you might characterize as a mix of haute couture and the hijab, the religious dress code to which many Muslim women adhere.</p><p>Elturk now runs her online Chicago business from Dubai. She says she specifically designed her brand as a means to support young Muslim women growing up in the United States.</p><p>She says she found, while talking to young girls, that they struggled a lot with their identity.</p><p>&ldquo;One issue that always used to come up was hijab. Just as someone who always embraced hijab, it pained me to see people struggle with whether to wear it or keep it on,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>On her website, Elturk promotes modest fashion as something modern and classy. And she says she discovered an underserved market while developing and promoting her brand.</p><p>A 2010 study by the marketing firm Ogilvy Noor reported that the American Muslim consumer market was worth $170 billion.</p><p>The U.S. has an estimated 8 million Muslims, according to Lisa Mabe, founder of multicultural marketing firm Hewar Communications.</p><p>She says that makes for a lot of purchasing power: &ldquo;There are millions of consumers just waiting to see which brands will be smart enough to engage with them, and those who do will see first-hand not only their spending power but their brand loyalty and brand advocacy.&rdquo;</p><p>Mabe said missing the Muslim market today would be like missing the Latino market in the 1990&rsquo;s.</p><p>But big American companies have yet to latch on to this demographic -- leaving an opening that is being filled by Muslim entrepreneurs.</p><p>Simply Zeena is another modest fashion company whose designs are commonly worn by fashion-conscious Muslim women in the city.</p><p>Amany Jondy, a former Chicago resident, said her company was founded because she felt there was something missing.</p><p>&ldquo;It was the typical frustrated, not being able to find the sort of everyday American-inspired looks that were modest,&rdquo; she said, describing the issue that prompted her to start her own company.</p><p>Jondy said she experienced 30 percent growth in her first year of business,&nbsp; and is projecting 40 percent growth through the end of the year.</p><p>Jondy says she is now making enough money to continue producing new clothing collections for every season. &ldquo;Our goal is to be making much more than what we&rsquo;re making now, but we&rsquo;re self-sustaining and we&rsquo;re profitable,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Fashion is certainly not the only field in which Muslim entrepreneurs are involved. The halal food scene, for instance, has really taken off in the past few years.</p><p>Sameer Sarmast lives in New Jersey, where he blogs and films a Web series about halal restaurants around the country. His popularity in the Muslim community prompted demand for a halal food tour.</p><p>&ldquo;You mention food to anybody, food is a common denominator it will bring people together,&rdquo; Sarmast said.</p><p>Sarmast, who brought his tour to Chicago, this past August, said, &ldquo;The whole idea of halal is growing even beyond the Muslim realm. I feel like it&rsquo;s just going to get bigger and bigger.&rdquo;</p><p>And it does seem to be growing.</p><p>Saffron Road, one particular halal food brand, is now taking the Whole Foods Market chain by storm.<br /><br />Adnan Durrani is CEO of Saffron Road, which produces frozen foods, packaged broths and dry goods. The selling point? His products are halal, organic, and non-GMO.</p><p>Durrani says the initial idea for his company came after the events of 9/11, when he wanted to find a way to focus on the positive aspects of Islam.</p><p>&ldquo;I started thinking of ways to create a business model that was socially responsible, that could reflect the values that I felt were important to me in my faith, and not what I was seeing in the media,&rdquo; Durrani said.</p><p>Just five years ago, he noticed an uptick in the halal food market in Europe.</p><p>&ldquo;Unlike England or France, where the majority of Muslims are below average education level &hellip; in America, the American Muslim demographic was the complete opposite. And that was kind of my wow moment,&rdquo; Durrani explained.</p><p>He said was fascinated by studies that delved into the demographics of the American Muslim market, and what he found amazed him: &ldquo;What I saw was that they were much more educated than the average American. According to Gallup, 67 percent more educated; 80 percent of them are below the age of 40. And so I looked at these statistics and said, &lsquo;Wow, this is really a marketer&rsquo;s dream.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Durrani said his company saw $18 million in retail sales in 2013, and is projecting 100 percent growth this year&mdash;the kind of numbers that are unlikely to go unnoticed by traditional big manufacturers and retailers.</p><p>Durrani said he is confident that as the Muslim population in the U.S. grows, more companies will start to go after their business.</p><p><br /><em>Mariam Sobh is a news anchor and reporter at WBEZ. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/mariamsobh" target="_blank">@mariamsobh</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 28 Jan 2014 11:58:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/american-muslim-consumer-market-worth-billions-109587 Survivors, lawyers say documents prove priest sex abuse cover-up http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/survivors-lawyers-say-documents-prove-priest-sex-abuse-cover-109557 <p><p>Newly released documents offer the most sweeping look yet at how the Archdiocese of Chicago has handled cases of sexual abuse by priests. Attorneys and victims contend they provide clear evidence of a cover-up that started in the 1950s and continues today.</p><p>Victims&rsquo; attorneys put 6,000 pages online Tuesday. They detail alleged abuse by 30 priests against about 50 victims.</p><p>Kathy Laarveld&rsquo;s son was one of those molested by a priest. For years, she was a staunch supporter of her parish. She was the secretary, the cook, even did the laundry for the priests, who were regular dinner guests.</p><p>She had no idea that Vincent McCaffrey, one of these priests she trusted, was abusing her son.</p><p>&ldquo;McCaffrey actually took advantage of my son on his First Communion in my home, in front of my family,&rdquo; Laarveld said.</p><p>It was not until her son told her about 10 years ago -- 20 years later -- that she learned the truth. McCaffrey admitted during court hearings to molesting so many children that he lost count. The documents show he offended at every parish where he served, including that of Laarveld and her son.</p><p>&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t forgive myself, I&rsquo;m his mother. I would have jumped in front of a bus or a train before I would ever have let anybody touch him,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Laarveld and her husband, Jim, are among survivors of priest sex abuse and their families who worked to get these papers released. Their attorneys say they refused to settle their cases unless the files went public.</p><p>The 30 priests described in the documents are about half the number the Archdiocese lists as credibly accused.</p><p>Attorney Jeff Anderson, who represented victims in these cases, spell out the accusation of a cover-up. He said, &ldquo;Priests were offending children, and they made intentional and conscious choices to conceal that, protect the priests, protect the reputation of the Archdiocese, and in effect conceal the crime and give safe harbor to the offender.&rdquo;</p><p>The documents show that offending priests moved in and out of treatment and from parish to parish, over and over, without the old parish or new one knowing what had happened.<br /><br />They show monitoring failed repeatedly. Priests and nuns who were selected to keep abusive priests from re-offending told the highest church officials they were not clear what their jobs were. They told officials the priests were breaking restrictions and hanging around kids again. And often, the records show, nothing was done.</p><p>&ldquo;It shows a pattern of repeated abuse, repeated allegations, the Archdiocese working hard to keep that all bottled up in secret and then transferring these gentleman from one parish to another so they can abuse again,&rdquo; said Chicago Marc Pearlman, who has represented nearly 100 victims along with Anderson.</p><p>&ldquo;What is striking to me is every file is very similar,&rdquo; Pearlman added. &ldquo;Each file tells the same story. The only difference is the perpetrator&rsquo;s name and the victims&rsquo; names.&rdquo;</p><p>Consider the case of Daniel Holihan. In 1986, a mom wrote to Cardinal Joseph Bernardin to tell him that the kids called Holihan &ldquo;Father Happy Hands.&rdquo;</p><p>Holihan was reportedly touching and fondling many boys and bringing them to his cottage. When the police showed an abuse-prevention movie on &ldquo;good touch, bad touch,&rdquo; a bunch of boys told their teacher it had happened to them.</p><p>The State&rsquo;s Attorney&rsquo;s Office found at least 12 cases with credible evidence, but did not charge Holihan.&nbsp; A letter thanks the office for its efforts to &ldquo;minimize the negative impact on the parish.&rdquo;</p><p>The documents show the Archdiocese moved Holihan to senior ministry, but let him serve in a parish on weekends for a number of years.</p><p>The Archdiocese has apologized for its handling of cases such as this. In a statement, it&nbsp; acknowledged that leaders &ldquo;made some decisions decades ago that are now difficult to justify.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;The pain and the suffering of victims and their families is just something that continues to haunt me, and I think it is also a terrible thing for the church,&rdquo; said Bishop Francis Kane, who oversees pastoral care for the Archdiocese.</p><p>But Kane denied there was an orchestrated cover-up. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t believe there was ever an intention to hide what has happened,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;What happened, I believe, is we&rsquo;ve had a change in understanding. Forty years ago when many of these incidents took place, we treated sex abuse in a very different way.&rdquo;</p><p>The Archdiocese points out that nearly all these cases happened before 1988. None of the 30 priests remain in active ministry. Half are dead.</p><p>The attorneys for the victims do acknowledge some things are better, including a program to help victims and training to recognize abusers.</p><p>But they say they see signs of similar patterns still occurring.</p><p>In the past decade, Father Joseph Bennett was accused of multiple allegations, including penetrating a girl&rsquo;s rectum with the handle of a communion server. In a letter to the Gary (Ind.) Diocese, asking for help monitoring Bennett, the Archdiocese said it only knew of one allegation.</p><p>Attorney Jeff Anderson points out review board reporting to Cardinal Francis George -- Bernadin&rsquo;s successor -- recommended Bennett&rsquo;s removal from priesthood.</p><p>&ldquo;Cardinal George, instead of following that recommendation, took the Bennett file and made his own determination, notwithstanding the fact one of the witnesses in that file described Bennett&rsquo;s scrotum,&rdquo; Anderson said.</p><p>The Cardinal said in documents that he interceded to make sure Bennett -- who, like many of the priests, has maintained his innocence -- had a canon lawyer.</p><p>Here&rsquo;s an excerpt from a letter the Cardinal wrote to a Bennett supporter:</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/letter.PNG" style="height: 370px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div><p>It is this kind of response that angers Kathy and Jim Laarveld. They say their family has&nbsp; paid a high cost for priest sexual abuse, and how the Archdiocese handled it.</p><p>Jim no longer goes to Mass. Kathy tries, but she sometimes starts to sob when she begins to walk into church.</p><p>She says their son, as a boy, was carefree, a firecracker. Now he is a compassionate man who has struggled because of the abuse.</p><p>&ldquo;I look at him and I see the day he was born, all the hope, all the love, the sparkle in his eye, and his face,&rdquo; Kathy said. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s a very playful individual, but he&rsquo;ll catch himself, and I say, &lsquo;Go for it. Be that little boy you could never be. You always had that over your head.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Her husband, Jim, plans to look at the documents. Their parish had two abusive priests at the same time.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to hurt, although we know a lot of what&rsquo;s in there, I&rsquo;m sure there&rsquo;s stuff we don&rsquo;t know,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to hurt my son. Hopefully we can be with him when he looks at it, because I don&rsquo;t want him to be alone.&rdquo;</p><p>Kathy Laarveld expects that pain will be short-lived. She thinks seeing the documents -- and the acknowledgement this all happened -- will help her son, and her entire family, to heal.</p><p>And she hopes it brings healing to others as well.</p></p> Wed, 22 Jan 2014 12:31:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/survivors-lawyers-say-documents-prove-priest-sex-abuse-cover-109557 Chicago archdiocese hid decades of child sex abuse http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/chicago-archdiocese-hid-decades-child-sex-abuse-109550 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP341903637932_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>After a 13-year-old boy reported in 1979 that a priest raped him and threatened him at gunpoint to keep quiet, the Archdiocese of Chicago assured the boy&#39;s parents that although the cleric avoided prosecution, he would receive treatment and have no further contact with minors.</p><p>But the Rev. William Cloutier, who already had been accused of molesting other children, was returned to ministry a year later and was accused of more abuse before he resigned in 1993, two years after the boy&#39;s parents filed a lawsuit. Officials took no action against Cloutier over his earliest transgressions because he &quot;sounded repentant,&quot; according to internal archdiocese documents released Tuesday that show how the archdiocese tried to contain a mounting scandal over child sexual abuse.</p><p>For decades, those at the highest levels of the nation&#39;s third-largest archdiocese moved accused priests from parish to parish while hiding the clerics&#39; histories from the public. The documents, released through settlements between attorneys for the archdiocese and victims, describe how the late Cardinals John Cody and Cardinal Joseph Bernardin often approved the reassignments. The archdiocese removed some priests from ministry, but often years or decades after the clergy were known to have molested children.</p><p>While disturbing stories of clergy sexual abuse have wrenched the Roman Catholic Church across the globe, the newly released documents offer the broadest look yet into how one of its largest and most prominent American dioceses responded to the scandal.</p><p>The documents, posted online Tuesday, cover only 30 of the at least 65 clergy for whom the archdiocese says it has substantiated claims of child abuse. Vatican documents related to the 30 cases were not included, under the negotiated terms of the disclosure.</p><p>The records also didn&#39;t include the files of former priest Daniel McCormack, who pleaded guilty in 2007 to abusing five children and whose case prompted an apology from Cardinal Francis George and an internal investigation of how the archdiocese responds to abuse claims.</p><p>But the more than 6,000 pages include internal communications between church officials, disturbing testimony about specific abuses, meeting schedules where allegations were discussed, and letters from anguished parishioners. The names of victims, and details considered private under mental health laws were redacted.</p><p>In a letter distributed to parishes last week, Cardinal George apologized to victims and Catholics, and said the archdiocese agreed to turn over the records in an attempt to help the victims heal.</p><p>The archdiocese released a statement Tuesday saying it knows it &quot;made some decisions decades ago that are now difficult to justify&quot; and that society has evolved in how it deals with abuse.</p><p>&quot;The Church and its leaders have acknowledged repeatedly that they wished they had done more and done it sooner, but now are working hard to regain trust, to reach out to victims and their families, and to make certain that all children and youth are protected,&quot; the statement read.</p><p>Officials in the archdiocese said most of the abuse detailed in the files released Tuesday occurred before 1988, none after 1996, and that all these cases ultimately were reported to authorities.</p><p>But victims&#39; lawyers argue many of the allegations surfaced after George assumed control of the archdiocese in 1997, and some of the documents relate to how the church handled the cases more recently.</p><p>&quot;The issue is not when the abuse happened; the issue is what they did once it was reported,&quot; said Chicago attorney Marc Pearlman, who has represented about 200 victims of clergy abuse in the Chicago area.</p><p>When a young woman reported in 1970 that she&#39;d been abused as a teen, for example, Cody assured the priest that the &quot;whole matter has been forgotten&quot; because &quot;no good can come of trying to prove or disprove the allegations.&quot;</p><p>Accused priests often were quietly sent away for a time for treatment or training programs, the documents show. When the accused clerics returned, officials often assigned them to new parishes and asked other priests to monitor them around children.</p><p>In one 1989 letter to Bernardin, the vicar for priests worries about parishioners discovering the record of the Rev. Vincent E. McCaffrey, who was moved four times because of abuse allegations.</p><p>&quot;Unfortunately, one of the key parishioners ... received an anonymous phone call which made reference by name to Vince and alleged misconduct on his part with young boys,&quot; wrote vicar for priests, the Rev. Raymond Goedert. &quot;We all agreed that the best thing would be for Vince to move. We don&#39;t know if the anonymous caller will strike again.&quot;</p><p>When the archdiocese tried to force accused clergy into treatment or isolate them at church retreats, some of the priests refused, or ignored orders by church administrators to stay away from children.</p><p>Church officials worried about losing parishioners and &quot;potential priests&quot; over abuse scandals. &quot;This question I believe is going to get stickier and stickier,&quot; Patrick O&#39;Malley, then-vicar for priests, wrote in a 1992 letter.</p><p>Then, in 2002, a national scandal about dioceses&#39; failures to stop abusers consumed the American church. U.S. bishops nationwide adopted a toughened disciplinary policy and pledged to remove all guilty priests from church jobs in their dioceses.</p><p>But for many victims, it was too little and too late.</p><p>&quot;Where was the church for the victims of this sick, demented, twisted pedophile?&quot; one man wrote in a 2002 letter to George about abuse at the hands of the Rev. Norbert Maday, who was imprisoned in Wisconsin after a 1994 conviction for molesting two boys. &quot;Why wasn&#39;t the church looking out for us? We were children, for God&#39;s sake.&quot;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jan 2014 11:21:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/chicago-archdiocese-hid-decades-child-sex-abuse-109550 Church releasing sex abuse files on Chicago clergy http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/church-releasing-sex-abuse-files-chicago-clergy-109525 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP341903637932.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>UPDATED 8 p.m.</em></p><p>The Archdiocese of Chicago Wednesday released about 6,000 pages of documents detailing what it knows about decades of clergy sex abuse allegations and how it handled them, calling it an effort to &quot;bring healing to the victims and their families.&quot;</p><p>Victims&#39; attorneys, who have fought for years to hold the Catholic Church accountable for concealing crimes and sometimes reassigning priests to positions where they continued to molest children, said they got the documents Wednesday and plan to make them public next week.</p><p>The nation&#39;s third-largest archdiocese agreed to release complaints, personnel documents and other files for about 30 priests with substantiated abuse allegations as part of settlements with&nbsp; victims.</p><p>&ldquo;I think that the files will show a systemic plan over decades in this diocese, along with many other dioceses, to conceal sexual abuse, to conceal who the predators were, and to put the interests of the predators and the institution above the interests of innocent young children,&rdquo; said attorney Marc Pearlman, who has helped represent about 200 victims of clergy abuse in the Chicago area.</p><p>&ldquo;Until there is public disclosure and transparency ... there is no way people can learn about it and make sure it does not happen again,&quot; Pearlman said.</p><p>Bishop Francis Kane, who oversees pastoral care at the archdiocese, began a news conference by apologizing for the abuse. He said church officials at first failed to recognize that child sex abuse was a serious crime.</p><p>But the bishop said there were no cover-ups, even in cases where accused priests may have been reassigned.</p><p>&quot;It was just they didn&#39;t realize that it was such a terrible thing, and so I think they did relocate people, but it was not intended as a way of covering up things,&quot; he said.</p><p>He acknowledged the archdiocese made other &ldquo;terrible mistakes.&rdquo; He said they sent abusive priests off for evaluation and treatment, and then put them back into ministry after they got back reports saying it was safe to do so, something they wouldn&rsquo;t do now.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve also found out that we have to be so sensitive to the victims,&rdquo; Bishop Kane said. &ldquo;They&rsquo;ve endured some great pain. And so it&rsquo;s important for us to be sensitive and try to help them in ways that will bring healing &hellip;That&rsquo;s one of the great mistakes that I think we made, we didn&rsquo;t realize the depth of this terrible, terrible sin and crime of child sex abuse.&rdquo;</p><p>Archdiocese attorney John O&#39;Malley warned that the documents will be &quot;upsetting.&quot;</p><p>&quot;The information is painful; it&#39;s difficult to read,&quot; said O&#39;Malley, adding he himself was &ldquo;humbled&rdquo; by the issue.</p><p>The documents are expected to be similar to recent disclosures by other dioceses in the U.S. that showed how the church shielded priests and failed to report child sex abuse to authorities. Chicago church officials said 95 percent of the abuse in these cases occurred before 1988 and none occurred after 1996. They said nearly half of the priests involved are dead.</p><p>The documents will include only 30 of 65 priests against whom the archdiocese says it has credible allegations of abuse. That is because settlements that required the disclosures involved just those 30 priests, attorney Marc Pearlman said.</p><p>The release of files also won&rsquo;t include those against Father Daniel McCormack, who was sentenced to five years in prison after pleading guilty in 2007 to abusing five children while he was a parish priest and a teacher at a Catholic school. Those files have been sealed by a judge because of pending court cases, Pearlman said. But he and St. Paul, Minn., attorney Jeff Anderson will re-release the McCormack files they have.</p><p>The documents also won&rsquo;t include information about credibly accused priests who are part of religious orders, even though they may have worked in institutions associated with the archdiocese.</p><p>Attorney O&rsquo;Malley said the archdiocese will review and develop a process to release documents on archdiocesan priests. He said they can&rsquo;t release information about priests from religious orders because those priests aren&rsquo;t in their jurisdiction.</p><p>Victims and their lawyers said publicizing the documents will help victims and the Catholic Church heal and move forward, but they also criticized the archdiocese, saying officials aren&rsquo;t being transparent enough.</p><p>Joe Iacono hopes records related to the priest who abused him more than 50 years ago are among those released.</p><p>&quot;For me, it&#39;s going to empower me again, ... and hopefully it will help others out there struggling to come forward and get help,&quot; said Iacono, 62, a Springfield resident who was abused in the early 1960s while he was a student at a Catholic school in Northlake, Ill., west of Chicago.</p><p>He said Father Thomas Kelly, who is dead but whom the church has acknowledged abused children, took an active interest in a group of boys, lifting weights with them and inviting them to spend the night at the rectory.</p><p>&quot;It was his way of weeding us out and separating us from the rest of the class and making us feel special (so he could) take liberties with us,&quot; said Iacono, who said he tried to forget about the abuse until his daughter was born years later.</p><p>David Rudofski is hoping the victims will find the same healing he did, after he helped win the release of similar documents from the Joliet Diocese. Rudofski was allegedly abused by a priest when he was a child, during his First Confession.</p><p>&ldquo;The more that&rsquo;s out there, the better off everybody will be in the end, the safer children will be and the healing process for many can really start,&rdquo; Rudofski said.</p><p>He sharply disagreed with archdiocesan officials, who Wednesday asked people to view the incidents and the church&rsquo;s handling of them through the filter of a previous era, when much of the abuse happened.</p><p>&ldquo;How is that the standard of the time? Abuse is abuse no matter what decade it is. It&rsquo;s wrong and it always has been wrong,&rdquo; Rudofski said.</p><p>Cardinal Francis George, who has led the archdiocese since 1997, did not attend the news conference. But on Sunday he released a letter of apology to parishioners that said all of these incidents were reported to civil authorities and resulted in settlements.</p><p>In fact, the archdiocese has paid about $100 million to settle sex abuse claims, documents that they have. Officials said the money has come from the sale of land and a bond issue, not donations.</p><p><br />&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 15 Jan 2014 15:43:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/church-releasing-sex-abuse-files-chicago-clergy-109525