WBEZ | aldermen http://www.wbez.org/tags/aldermen Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Rep. Mell appointed to father's city council seat http://www.wbez.org/news/rep-mell-appointed-fathers-city-council-seat-108162 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/debmell.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has chosen State Representative Deb Mell to succeed the 33rd ward seat held for decades by her father, Dick Mell. Mell resigned her state post early Wednesday morning, and was later confirmed by the City Council.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m just trying to take it in,&rdquo; Mell told the council. &ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t get much sleep last night, and I love my area. I don&rsquo;t think anyone who knows me [questions] that, and how much passion I have for the people of the 33rd ward and how hard I&rsquo;m gonna work on their behalf.&rdquo;</p><p>The announcement was not a surprise - Mell&rsquo;s name had been rumored to be the choice out of the 12 people vying for the spot. Mayor Emanuel had said Mell&rsquo;s last name and familial ties would neither work for her or against her in the selection process. The mayor lauded Mell Wednesday for &ldquo;breaking glass ceilings&rdquo; for being the first openly lesbian member of the City Council.</p><p>Most of the City Council joined the mayor in his praise, some of them even highlighting family ties as a blessing, instead of criticizing the choice as nepotism.</p><p>As Ald. Michael Zalewski (23rd) put it: &ldquo;it&rsquo;s just the way life is.&rdquo; Zalewski&rsquo;s son serves as a state representative in Illinois.&nbsp;</p><p>Ever the historian, Ald. Ed Burke even spouted off all the family connections in the City Council&rsquo;s history, including his own, adding that he couldn&rsquo;t think of anything that would &ldquo;make someone more proud than to succeed their parent in an office that that parent had held.&rdquo;</p><p>The lone &ldquo;no&rdquo; vote in the council came from Ald. Bob Fioretti (2).</p><p>&ldquo;I do know Deb Mell, and I like Deb Mell. And I like what she stands for. But we are not a monarchy, we are a democracy, so let&rsquo;s start acting like it,&rdquo; Fioretti said.</p><p>Fioretti later added that his vote wasn&rsquo;t cast against Deb Mell as an individual, but rather was a vote against the process.</p><p>Mell responded to the criticism as soon as she took the floor.</p><p>&ldquo;That just makes me work even harder, and I have something to prove,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;And you will not question my passion and hard work on behalf of the 33rd ward.&rdquo;</p><p>Deb Mell&rsquo;s father and sister, Patti Blagojevich, were both in attendance for the swearing-in. Dick Mell told reporters he didn&rsquo;t give his daughter any advice on her new position, and it was &ldquo;her ballgame now.&rdquo;</p><p>Mell added there were some things he would miss about being an alderman, saying there was no other position like it out there, but said time had passed him by.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t tweet, I don&rsquo;t have Facebook, I don&rsquo;t email very well, I do text a little bit,&ldquo; he said. &nbsp;&ldquo;And when I get stacks of emails from constituents and I try to call them back and I get their voicemails, that&rsquo;s what I miss. I miss that one on one conversation with the person who&rsquo;s got the problem.&rdquo;</p><p>As if a sign of the changing tide, shortly after Deb Mell had been sworn in by the City Council, the <a href="http://33rdward.org/">33rd ward website</a> was swiftly changed to showcase a picture of her face.</p><p>Dick Mell won&rsquo;t be drifting too far away from the political spectrum. He still holds the powerful Democratic Committeeman seat, a position that gives him a weighted vote for his daughter&rsquo;s successor in Springfield. Mell wouldn&rsquo;t say if he had any favorites, telling reporters only that there were &ldquo;many candidates.&rdquo;</p><p>Deb Mell said she officially resigned from her state post Wednesday morning, and would be out in the 33rd ward as soon as Wednesday evening, meeting her new constituents.</p><p><em>Lauren Chooljian is a WBEZ web producer. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">@laurenchooljian&nbsp;</a></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102454479" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Wed, 24 Jul 2013 08:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/rep-mell-appointed-fathers-city-council-seat-108162 Report on alleged misconduct rankles aldermen http://www.wbez.org/news/report-alleged-misconduct-rankles-aldermen-108148 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/IG.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The office that investigates claims of misconduct by Chicago aldermen has released a new report, prompting a round of criticism from some members of City Council. The <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/olig/Documents/LIGrpt-Jul2013.pdf">18-page report</a> is the second released by Legislative Inspector General Faisal Khan since the city council established that office by ordinance in 2010.</p><p>The report looks at 132 complaints filed between July 2012 and July 2013, of which 25 were investigated. The report elaborates on a handful of complaints in more detail, though no aldermen are named.</p><p>In one case, an alderman allegedly took more campaign donations from a contributor than permitted. Another investigation claims an alderman instructed a police officer to write two traffic summonses to a person who had gotten into a parking dispute with the alderman&rsquo;s sister-in-law.</p><p>Members of the City Council&rsquo;s Progressive Caucus demurred from commenting on specific examples cited in the study, saying they hadn&rsquo;t yet seen the report. Still, several accused Khan of releasing the study to the media before it was available to the public &ndash; a claim that Khan denies.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s got to be coming out of his office,&rdquo; said Ald. Scott Waguespack (32nd), &ldquo;he needs to be more tight-lipped on the approach that he&rsquo;s taking.&rdquo; Several aldermen said they believe Khan&rsquo;s office should be dissolved, and that aldermanic oversight could be given to City Inspector General Joseph Ferguson, who already has jurisdiction over city employees.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s interesting that they&rsquo;re focused more on the confidentiality and the city inspector general office rather than the substantive facts of these reports,&rdquo; Khan told WBEZ Monday.</p><p>Council members specifically declined to comment on one <a href="http://www.myfoxchicago.com/story/22901456/ald-joe-moore-accused-of-ethics-violations-by-ig-inspector-general#ixzz2ZoIAqPln">alleged abuse of power</a> that <a href="http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2013/07/21/reform-ald-joe-moore-caught-ethics-probes">WTTW&rsquo;s &ldquo;Chicago Tonight&quot;</a> first reported on Sunday. In the story &lsquo;multiple sources&rsquo; named Joe Moore (49th) as the alderman who allegedly allowed campaign work to be done from his ward office, then paid off a former aide to stay silent about it.</p><p>First elected to the City Council in 1991, the reform-minded North Side alderman fired off a written statement on Monday denying any such misconduct. It said &ldquo;the issues involved were personnel matters--not political ones&rdquo; and came from a &ldquo;disgruntled former employee.&rdquo; Khan&rsquo;s office was &ldquo;run amok with a lack of professionalism...&rdquo; the statement continued, and according to Moore never interviewed him about the allegations.</p><p>Khan declined to confirm or deny the identity of any of the aldermen in the report.</p><p>The Office of the Legislative Inspector General has been criticized in the media for its expenditures, but in the newly-released report, Khan says his office has hired five part-time employees to help carry the workload. Their investigations now go to the city&rsquo;s Board of Ethics.</p><div><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="http://www.twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="http://www.twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></div></p> Mon, 22 Jul 2013 17:40:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/report-alleged-misconduct-rankles-aldermen-108148 Construction begins on Midwest’s first affordable housing for LGBTQ seniors http://www.wbez.org/news/construction-begins-midwest%E2%80%99s-first-affordable-housing-lgbtq-seniors-107501 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/photo (1)(1).JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Construction vehicles knocked down walls at a building in Lakeview Monday to prepare for what will soon become the region&rsquo;s first LGBTQ-friendly senior affordable housing development.</p><p>The $26 million dollar development will occupy a part of the old 23rd district Town Hall police station on Halsted and Addison streets, as well as the now-vacant space next to it. The building will be home to 79 studio and one-bedroom apartments, as well as a space for community programming run by <a href="http://www.centeronhalsted.org/" target="_blank">The Center on Halsted</a>.</p><p>The development has been in the works for a while. By Lakeview Ald. Tom Tunney&rsquo;s count, he&rsquo;s been working on the issue for at least 10 years. Tunney, one of the first openly gay Chicago aldermen, says the work won&rsquo;t stop once the center opens.</p><p>&ldquo;The selection process is going to be interesting because the demand is gonna be amazing,&rdquo; Tunney said. &ldquo;And getting it open and learning in general how to integrate the community center with the housing component, I think there&rsquo;s gonna be a few challenges there.&rdquo;</p><p>Some Chicagoans have already voiced interest in living in the building. Tom Genley said the senior center would be a safe zone, and thus he was eyeing one of the apartments.</p><p>&ldquo;Here, because I can be me, an out gay man. Here, because I do not have to hide my true self,&rdquo; Genley said. &ldquo;Here, because the closet is for clothes.&rdquo;</p><p>But alongside the celebration and hard-hat photo-ops was an air of disappointment over the Illinois House of Representatives&rsquo; decision not to call a vote on a bill to legalize same-sex marriage. During her remarks about the housing project, Representative Sara Feigenholtz called the last weekend of the legislative session one where a lot of &ldquo;broken dreams happened.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We just didn&rsquo;t quite get it done yet,&rdquo; Feigenholtz said. &ldquo;But we&rsquo;re gonna go back and we&rsquo;re gonna get it done.&rdquo;</p><p>Democratic state Rep. Greg Harris of Chicago decided not to call a House floor vote on the bill that would&#39;ve made Illinois the 13th state to allow gay marriage. Harris said he didn&#39;t have the votes but also vowed to bring back the issue.</p><p>The Center on Halsted has been working with <a href="http://www.heartlandalliance.org/" target="_blank">The Heartland Alliance</a>, a local anti-poverty organization, state and city officials on the financing and construction for the affordable housing development.&nbsp; All 79 units will be subsidized, and will cost no more than 30 percent of a given resident&rsquo;s income. Construction on the building is scheduled to be completed by the fall of 2014.</p><p><em>Lauren Chooljian is WBEZ&rsquo;s Morning Producer/Reporter. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/laurenchooljian" target="_blank">@laurenchooljian</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 03 Jun 2013 16:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/construction-begins-midwest%E2%80%99s-first-affordable-housing-lgbtq-seniors-107501 Reporter’s Notebook: What are aldermen responsible for? http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/reporter%E2%80%99s-notebook-what-are-aldermen-responsible-107344 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/5303796081_ce192df642_z.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="650" src="http://embed.verite.co/timeline/?source=0Am-AbC8HDbXMdDNPdTUxMTJWM0FaakxUdUdqWlVOc3c&amp;font=PTSerif-PTSans&amp;maptype=toner&amp;lang=en&amp;width=620&amp;height=650" width="620"></iframe></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/about-curious-city-98756">Curious City</a> is a news-gathering experiment designed to satisfy the public&#39;s curiosity. People <a href="http://curiouscity.wbez.org/#!/ask">submit questions</a>, <a href="http://curiouscity.wbez.org/#!/ask">vote </a>for their favorites, and WBEZ reports out the winning questions in real time on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/curiouscityproject">Facebook</a>, <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/WBEZCuriousCity">Twitter </a>and the timeline above.</p><p dir="ltr">Curious Citizen Andrea Lee of Chicago&rsquo;s Noble Square neighborhood reached out to her alderman about two problems: a lack of a recycling bin and basement flooding. No dice with either problem. Given an alderman&rsquo;s vague job description, Lee wanted to know what aldermen actually can do.</p><p dir="ltr">Have you contacted your alderman or local politician about anything lately? If so, did City Hall help? And, what should local politicians be responsible for, anyway?</p><p dir="ltr">If you have leads or a point for us to consider, please comment below, or hit us at any of the social media outlets listed above!</p></p> Thu, 23 May 2013 16:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/reporter%E2%80%99s-notebook-what-are-aldermen-responsible-107344 Aldermen propose bed bug crackdown http://www.wbez.org/news/aldermen-propose-bed-bug-crackdown-105190 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/bed_bug_gilles san martin.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F76952852" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="image-insert-image ">Three Chicago aldermen are trying to crack down on bed bugs in the city by proposing to fine landlords who don&#39;t get rid of the pests.</div><p>The city got some tough press this month: Pest control company Orkin bestowed the title of<a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/chris-bentley/2013-01/bed-bug-reports-chicago-105080" target="_blank"> number one bed bug city</a> in the county on Chicago for 2012.&nbsp;</p><p>Alderman Ray Suarez (31), Harry Osterman (48) and Debra Silverstein (50) are behind the measure, which calls bed bugs a &quot;public nuisance.&quot; They say it&#39;s the responsibility of the landlord, co-op or condominium board to get rid of the pests once they&#39;re spotted.&nbsp;</p><p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.5208141678012908" style="font-weight: normal;">Under the ordinance, a landlord would have to bring in pest control services as many times as it takes to get the bugs out of the unit. Meanwhile condo or co-op boards would only have to prepare a &quot;pest management plan&quot; in the event that the bugs show up in their units. According to the ordinance, the tenant&#39;s only responsibility would be to report the landlord of any known infestation, and cooperate with any treatment that follows.&nbsp;</b></p><p>The ordinance also sets guidelines on how to properly throw away infested mattresses, clothing or other materials. Everything would have to be totally enclosed in a plastic bag and labeled as being infested with bed bugs.&nbsp;</p><p>If landlords don&#39;t comply, the aldermen are proposing fines from $300 to $1000 for each offense.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 29 Jan 2013 06:25:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/aldermen-propose-bed-bug-crackdown-105190 Chicago aldermen stand to get millions in pensions http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-aldermen-stand-get-millions-pensions-98707 <p><p>An analysis of pension fund documents by the Chicago <em>Tribune </em>shows retiring City Council members stand to get millions in benefits thanks to a quiet deal engineered under former Mayor Richard M. Daley.</p><p><a href="http://trib.in/K0Nlri">The newspaper reported Tuesday</a> that documents show 21 aldermen who have retired under the plan are in line to get nearly $58 million over their expected lifetimes. But contributions and the likely investment returns are forecast to cover just $19 million — or about a third — of the sum.</p><p>The gap is contributing to the municipal pension plan's $6.7 billion in unfunded liabilities. That's adding to the strain for taxpayers and current and future city employees.</p><p>Legislation creating the plan was tucked into a larger bill signed into state law in 1991 without public vetting.</p></p> Tue, 01 May 2012 10:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-aldermen-stand-get-millions-pensions-98707 City's ward remap drawing more battle lines than boundaries http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-12-16/citys-ward-remap-drawing-more-battle-lines-boundaries-94965 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-December/2011-12-16/3683_75d13a813ebe85f.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>City Hall was tense Thursday and more political maneuvering was expected Friday. Aldermen have been fighting for electoral survival as they redraw the <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/about/wards.html" target="_blank">city’s ward boundaries</a>, which they have to do every 10 years using new census data. But demographic shifts have made this decade’s debate more difficult than in the past. WBEZ’s political reporter <a href="http://www.wbez.org/staff/sam-hudzik" target="_blank">Sam Hudzik</a> joined <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> to talk about the map-making mess.</p><p><em>Music Button: 11 Acorn Lane, "Hark The Herald Angels Sing", from the album Happy Holy Days, (self released)</em></p></p> Fri, 16 Dec 2011 14:45:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-12-16/citys-ward-remap-drawing-more-battle-lines-boundaries-94965 Majority of aldermen call for budget changes http://www.wbez.org/story/majority-aldermen-call-budget-changes-93680 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-October/2011-10-21/CPL books.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A majority of Chicago's aldermen are calling for changes to Mayor Rahm Emanuel's 2012 city budget. They say his proposed budget cuts would hurt public safety and quality of life.</p><p>Twenty-eight of the city's 50 aldermen signed the letter to Mayor Emanuel.&nbsp; They say his plan to cut library hours would cause too many layoffs and negatively effect patrons who rely on the library.</p><p>"We're hearing it loud and clear, all across the city, from the West Side to the East Side to the North Side to the South Side," said Ald. Bob Fioretti (2nd). "Everybody's complaining about the cuts."</p><p>Fioretti said cutting library hours, as mayor Emanuel has proposed, would hurt kids and people who use the internet to search for jobs.</p><p>In addition to the library cuts, the 28 aldermen voiced other concerns.</p><p>The current budget proposal also consolidates 12 mental health clinics into six, and privatizes some health services. Aldermen say public clinics are vital for Chicago's neediest and must be protected.</p><p>Other concerns include the $10 million cut from the Office of Emergency Management and Communications. That would eliminate fire and police dispatcher positions - and, aldermen say, endanger public safety.</p><p>The bloc says they also "have reservations" about the proposed near doubling of the fee for city stickers on SUVs. But aldermen recognize that the 2012 budget won't avoid cuts entirely, said Ald. Walter Burnett (27th).</p><p>"'Cause somethin' have [sic] to give. And we're rational enough to understand that. But we just wanna see if we can balance the burden out a little bit more," Burnett said.</p><p>Meanwhile, Mayor Emanuel said he remains open to changing his proposed budget, as long as alderment identify other cuts or revenue sources to offset the ones they don't like.</p><p>"I hear them. It doesn't mean I agree. But it doesn't mean I disagree," Emanuel said. "And as I always said, not all signatures on a letter are created equal."</p><p><br> &nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 02 Nov 2011 11:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/majority-aldermen-call-budget-changes-93680 Local leaders flex political power during tough times http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-27/local-leaders-flex-political-power-during-tough-times-92505 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-September/2011-09-27/Cook County Board.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Furlough days caused a stir recently at the <a href="http://www.cookcountygov.com/" target="_blank">Cook County Board</a> as some commissioners balked at giving up a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/furlough-debate-threatens-stymie-budget-negotiations-cook-county-board-92336" target="_blank">day of work</a>. The move did not impress Board President <a href="http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-19/president-preckwinkle-anticipates-tough-choices-cook-county-budget-92155" target="_blank">Toni Preckwinkle</a>. Meanwhile, aldermanic-adventures at City Hall raised some eyebrows: A few aldermen took <a href="http://www.chicagonewscoop.org/traveling-aldermen-coast-past-city-ethics-rules/" target="_blank">trips overseas recently</a> – though not on the taxpayers’ dime. Third parties served as underwriters for the trips, which city ethics guidelines deems appropriate under certain conditions. But by the book or not, were these moves appropriate during tight budget times? And what do they reveal about power at the city and county? <a href="http://www.ramsincanon.com/" target="_blank">Ramsin Canon</a>, political editor at <em><a href="http://www.gapersblock.com" target="_blank">Gaper’s Block,</a></em> joined <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> to discuss these issues and more.</p><p><em>Music Button: Tommy Smith, "Karma", from the CD Karma, (Spartacus)</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 27 Sep 2011 15:20:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-27/local-leaders-flex-political-power-during-tough-times-92505 Big ideas, small tasks: a new alderman's balancing act http://www.wbez.org/story/big-ideas-small-tasks-new-aldermans-balancing-act-86535 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-May/2011-05-13/forweb.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Today’s swearing-in ceremony will usher thirteen new faces on to Chicago city council. Many of them won on the promise of change, including Ameya Pawar of the far north side’s 47th Ward.</p><div><div>Pawar wants to help make government smarter, faster, and more inclusive. His idealism won over constituents... but many are watching to see how it will align with the practicalities of being a Chicago alderman.<br> <br> Ameya Pawar’s first real political battle is shaping up to be quite different from what he may have hoped.<br> <br> PAWAR: We issued a letter to the City of Chicago and to the budget office and the Treasurer’s office asking them how I can reduce my salary.<br> <br> Yes. REDUCE his salary.<br> <br> PAWAR: The answer that I got back was no. That I would have to amend the ordinance which sets the salary for aldermen...<br> <br> It’s set at 108 thousand dollars... but Pawar promised to take only 60 thousand, and put the rest back into the ward.<br> <br> PAWAR: So that would require spending almost all my political capital in getting 25 other aldermen to vote to amend the ordinance so that I could just simply reduce my salary. So that kind of puts me in a jam right now. I made a promise, but nonetheless we’re going to keep it.<br> <br> Pawar wants to use the money to hire extra staff, or to help a non-profit that works in the 47th.<br> <br> With Chicago’s budget mess, you wouldn’t think it would be so hard to give a pay cut to an employee that ASKS for one.<br> <br> Welcome to Chicago city government. But Pawar isn’t fazed by setbacks.<br> <br> If he were, he would never have run for the office and scored his improbable win. Just a few months ago, the thirty year old Indian-American was a political unknown. He was working in Northwestern University’s emergency preparedness office. Pawar says he wanted to see if someone could run a positive campaign about issues, and win.<br> <br> At first, Pawar struggled.<br> <br> PAWAR: I can’t tell you how many times I was told not to do this, that I would be damaging my career, that I would make enemies, or that I was simply crazy.<br> <br> Incumbent Eugene Schulter was a shoo-in and, for months, Pawar couldn’t raise more than five thousand dollars. But Schulter dropped out at the eleventh hour on the hopes of another job. … suddenly, it was an open seat... and Pawar gained momentum after ward residents heard him at debates. Pawar trounced Schulter’s hand-picked successor... a member of the ward’s Democratic establishment. So now... ward residents will have a new alderman for the first time in 36 years... and the question is... how will ward life change?<br> <br> FITZGERALD: It’s nothing on him, it’s simply the number of staff he’s going to have.<br> <br> This is Garrett Fitzgerald. He’s executive director of the Northcenter Chamber of Commerce. Before that, Fitzgerald worked in Schulter’s office, helping respond to calls for services.<br> <br> FITZGERALD: Tree trims, graffiti, missing garbage carts. We even got a call -- a woman’s husband had gone to the hardware store and gotten the wrong kind of paint, and called us to see if we could help her get it refunded.<br> <br> Fitzgerald says it was a full workload for Schulter’s staff of nine. Pawar will have only three... because he’s new on council and won’t chair any committees. Fitzgerald thinks Pawar has the energy to keep up with constituent services.<br> <br> But it might be tough for Pawar to also find time to keep his big-picture promises. For one, Pawar wants to create ward councils that advise him on budgeting and legislative priorities. Fitzgerald says the ideas are exciting... but Pawar will have to be prepared to see some flounder:<br> <br> FITZGERALD: some point down road some of these ideas aren’t going to work out, some of them are not going to work the way he thought they would. And his abilty to identify those areas that aren’t working and change and either go back to an older way of doing it, or completely look at it new again, is going to be essential to his success.<br> <br> In the end, it may be the details that Pawar doesn’t wallow in that determine his success... making sure the potholes are filled, and garbage is collected.<br> <br> Odette Yousef, WBEZ.</div></div></p> Mon, 16 May 2011 23:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/big-ideas-small-tasks-new-aldermans-balancing-act-86535