WBEZ | climate change http://www.wbez.org/tags/climate-change Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en EcoMyths: How Botanic Gardens Fight Climate Change http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-how-botanic-gardens-fight-climate-change-114735 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/EcoMyths-Botanic Gardens.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Kate Sackman of <a href="http://www.ecomyths.org">EcoMyths Alliance</a>, believes that with increased global focus on slowing Climate Change and creating sustainable livelihoods, more people seeki to understand these problems and how to solve them. For our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths"><em>EcoMyths</em></a> segment, Sackman joins us with Dr. Paul Smith, secretary general of Botanic Gardens Conservation International <a href="http://www.bgci.org/">(BGCI)</a> and former head of the Kew Millennium Seed Bank. They&rsquo;ll tell us why they think that botanic gardens, like our own <a href="http://www.chicagobotanic.org/">Chicago Botanic Garden</a>, are the key to finding these global solutions.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/244061145&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; font-weight: 700; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Botanic Garden Basics</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Modern botanic gardens started in the 16</span><span style="font-size: 8.8px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: super; white-space: pre-wrap;">th</span><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;"> and 17</span><span style="font-size: 8.8px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: super; white-space: pre-wrap;">th</span><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;"> centuries in Europe for the purpose of growing plants with economic value, including forestry and agriculture, the &ldquo;economic botany&rdquo; era. This was followed historically by a period of data collection, and the naming and classification of plants &ndash; Paul calls this the &ldquo;taxonomic era&rdquo;. He asserts that we are now in the era of applying global solutions using all this data.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">What is a Botanic Garden: &nbsp;The internationally accepted definition of a botanic garden is &nbsp;one that scientifically documents their plant collections and is open to the public. &nbsp;Key to this is the garden&rsquo;s scientific basis for how plants are cultivated, monitored, documented, and the information that the garden shares with its public visitors and the botanic garden community at large If a garden simply displays beautiful flowers it is not considered a botanic garden, although it may be a &ldquo;public garden&rdquo;. The full definition is provided on the attached document.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; font-weight: 700; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Why Botanic Gardens Matter: International Impact</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Botanic gardens deal with all plant diversity, both in the wild and cultivated. Botanic gardens within North America and globally are generally very supportive of one another. &nbsp;Collectively we have a lot to accomplish to help save the world&rsquo;s plants, as at least one-third of known plants are believed to be at risk of extinction over the next twenty to thirty years. &nbsp;It is critical to prevent plant extinctions on this scale not only to prevent the extinction of animals that rely on threatened habitats, but in order to preserve the natural world that humans love and upon which we all rely for our everyday needs.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; font-weight: 700; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">The Adventurous Side</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Climate change, food security, and sustainable livelihoods are just a few of the critical global issues that botanic garden work impacts directly. Plant scientists work all around the world, collecting and preserving new species, studying threatened species in the wild, and restoring degraded natural areas. &nbsp;They are explorers and adventurers, often working in dangerous and remote places. Botanists and others who work with plants in the lab and in the wild are deeply devoted to their work and passionate about making an impact.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; font-weight: 700; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Crop Wild Relatives</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">All plants that are grown for food are derived from a wild source. &nbsp;These wild plants, called &ldquo;crop wild relatives&rdquo;, need to be protected in their original habitat in order to serve as a backstop in case their cultivated cousins are threatened or wiped out by disease, pests, or other calamity. Royal Botanic Gardens Kew has estimated the present value of these crop relatives in the wild to be $42 billion. &nbsp;Clearly, we need to ensure the resilience of these plants in their native habitats if we want to maintain food security into our ever more populated future.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; font-weight: 700; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">One (2) Green Thing(s)</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Grow something new and unusual in your home garden or on your terrace, such as heritage vegetable varieties.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.656;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b0d9c5e0-b33a-fdb7-55cb-f26bb77dfd92"><span style="font-size: 14.6667px; font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">And visit your local botanic garden with new eyes &ndash; exploring how their scientific knowledge is helping to solve global challenges!</span></span></p></p> Tue, 26 Jan 2016 09:21:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-how-botanic-gardens-fight-climate-change-114735 Climate Change's Effect on Public Health http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-06/climate-changes-effect-public-health-114393 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_386099793449.jpg" title="(AP Photo/Michel Euler)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240695643&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong>Climate Change&rsquo;s effect on public health</strong></span><br />The World Health organization says climate change is the biggest public health threat of the 21st century. Climate Change has been linked to many public health problems - everything from increased waterborne diseases due to warmer waters and more flooding - to a rise in asthma cases. &nbsp;Illinois has its own set of public health challenges - with things like allergies on the rise. We&rsquo;ll look at the relationship between Climate Change and health with Dr. Sarah Lovinger, executive director of Chicago Physicians for Social Responsibility, Brian Urbaszewski, director of Environmental Health Program for the Respiratory Health Association and Dr. Peter Orris, director of the Occupational Health Service Institute at the University of Illinois School of Public Health.</p><p><strong>GUESTS:</strong></p><p>Dr. Sarah Lovinger is executive director of <a href="http://www.chicagopsr.org/">Chicago Physicians for Social Responsibility</a> and a practicing physician</p><p><a href="http://earthjustice.org/50states/2013/brian-urbaszewski">Brian Urbaszewski</a> is Director of Environmental Health Program for Respiratory Health Association, a Chicago-based lung health advocacy founded in 1906</p><p>Dr. <a href="http://www.cade.uic.edu/sphapps/faculty_profile/sphFacultyInd.asp?i=porris&amp;d=">Peter Orris</a> is a professor and director of Occupational Health Service Institute, located at the University of Illinois School of Public Health in Chicago. He attended the Paris talks.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240696414&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong>&ldquo;Le Doggy Bag&rdquo; hits France</strong></span></p><p>France just passed a law requiring all restaurants to provide takeaway boxes for customers who request them. Unlike Americans, the French have not traditionally used &ldquo;le doggy bag&rdquo; after finishing a meal at a restaurant. The new legislation is part of an effort to reduce food waste. Louisa Chu joins us to talk about how the new law is being received.</p><p><strong>GUEST: </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/louisachu?lang=en">Louisa Chu</a> (Co-host of Chewing, new food and health podcast with Monica Eng)<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240697070&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong>Global Notes: Singer Renata Flores reviving </strong><strong>Quechuan language</strong></span></p><p>You may not be able to pronounce this song title- Chaynatam ruwanki cuyanaita- but you&rsquo;d probably be able to hum along with its familiar melody line. &nbsp;The song is Michael Jackson&rsquo;s &ldquo;The Way You Make Me Feel&rdquo; and in this version, it&rsquo;s sung in the ancient Incan language known as Quechuan by a 14 year old Peruvian girl. On this week&rsquo;s Global Notes, Tony Sarabia brings us the story of<a href="http://renatafloresperu.com/"> Renata Flores</a>&rsquo; efforts to revive the language among Peru&rsquo;s youth through song.</p><p><strong>GUEST: </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is the host of The Morning Shift and Radio M</p></p> Wed, 06 Jan 2016 09:42:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-06/climate-changes-effect-public-health-114393 Fish Stocks are Declining Worldwide, and Climate Change is on the Hook http://www.wbez.org/news/fish-stocks-are-declining-worldwide-and-climate-change-hook-114210 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/sole_edited_custom-143d61edc5e4d102aee854bd44bf71d32ec7d612-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res459705256" previewtitle="A fisherman shovels grey sole, a type of flounder, out of the hold of a ship at the Portland Fish Pier in Maine, September 2015. New research finds the ability of fish populations to reproduce and replenish themselves is declining across the globe. The worst news comes from the North Atlantic, where most species are declining."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="A fisherman shovels grey sole, a type of flounder, out of the hold of a ship at the Portland Fish Pier in Maine, September 2015. New research finds the ability of fish populations to reproduce and replenish themselves is declining across the globe. The worst news comes from the North Atlantic, where most species are declining." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/14/sole_edited_custom-143d61edc5e4d102aee854bd44bf71d32ec7d612-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 456px; width: 620px;" title="A fisherman shovels grey sole, a type of flounder, out of the hold of a ship at the Portland Fish Pier in Maine, September 2015. New research finds the ability of fish populations to reproduce and replenish themselves is declining across the globe. The worst news comes from the North Atlantic, where most species are declining. (Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>For anyone paying attention, it&#39;s no secret there&#39;s a lot of weird stuff going on in the oceans right now. We&#39;ve got a monster El Nino looming in the Pacific. Ocean acidification is<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/02/23/388480482/acidifying-waters-are-endangering-your-oysters-and-mussels">&nbsp;prompting hand wringing</a>&nbsp;among oyster lovers. Migrating fish populations have<a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2015/03/13/iceland_abandons_eu_bid_it_s_all_about_the_mackerel.html">&nbsp;caused tensions</a>&nbsp;between countries over fishing rights. And fishermen say they&#39;re seeing<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/06/11/412943456/why-is-this-fisherman-selling-threatened-bluefin-tuna-for-2-99-a-pound">&nbsp;unusual patterns</a>&nbsp;in fish stocks they haven&#39;t seen before.</p></div></div></div><p>Researchers now have more grim news to add to the mix. An analysis published Monday in the&nbsp;<em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences&nbsp;</em>finds that the ability of fish populations to reproduce and replenish themselves is declining across the globe.</p><p>&quot;This, as far as we know, is the first global-scale study that documents the actual productivity of fish stocks is in decline,&quot; says lead author&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gregorybritten.info/home">Gregory L. Britten</a>, a doctoral student at the University of California, Irvine.</p><p>Britten and some fellow researchers looked at data from a global database of 262 commercial fish stocks in dozens of large marine ecosystems across the globe. They say they&#39;ve identified a pattern of decline in juvenile fish (young fish that have not yet reached reproductive age) that is closely tied to a decline in the amount of phytoplankton, or microalgae, in the water.</p><p>&quot;We think it is a lack of food availability for these small fish,&quot; says Britten. &quot;When fish are young, their primary food is phytoplankton and microscopic animals. If they don&#39;t find food in a matter of days, they can die.&quot;</p><p>The worst news comes from the North Atlantic, where the vast majority of species, including Atlantic cod, European and American plaice, and sole are declining. In this case, Britten says historically heavy fishing may also play a role. Large fish, able to produce the biggest, most robust eggs, are harvested from the water. At the same time, documented declines of phytoplankton made it much more difficult for those fish stocks to bounce back when they did reproduce,<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/30/science/cods-continuing-decline-traced-to-warming-gulf-of-maine-waters.html?_r=0">&nbsp;despite aggressive fishery management efforts</a>, says Britten.</p><p>When the researchers looked at plankton and fish reproduction declines in individual ecosystems, the results varied. In the North Pacific &mdash; for example, the Gulf of Alaska &mdash; there were no significant declines. But in other regions of the world, like Australia and South America, it was clear that the lack of phytoplankton was the strongest driver in diminishing fish populations.</p><p>&quot;When you averaged globally, there was a decline,&quot; says Britten. &quot;Decline in phytoplankton was a factor in all species. It was a consistent variable.&quot;</p><p>And it&#39;s directly linked to climate change: Change in ocean temperature affects the phytoplankton population, which is impacting fish stocks, he says.</p><div id="res459726645"><div id="responsive-embed-map-fisheries-20151214"><iframe frameborder="0" height="699px" marginheight="0" scrolling="no" src="http://apps.npr.org/dailygraphics/graphics/map-fisheries-20151214/child.html?initialWidth=773&amp;childId=responsive-embed-map-fisheries-20151214&amp;parentUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2Fsections%2Fthesalt%2F2015%2F12%2F14%2F459404745%2Ffish-stocks-are-declining-worldwide-and-climate-change-is-on-the-hook%3Fft%3Dnprml%26f%3D459404745" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;" width="620"></iframe></div></div><p>Food sources for fish in their larval stage were also a focus of<a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/112/30/E4065.full.pdf">&nbsp;research</a>&nbsp;published earlier this summer by&nbsp;<a href="https://www.princeton.edu/aos/people/research_staff/asch/index.xml">Rebecca Asch</a>, now a post-doctoral research associate at Princeton University. Asch studied data from 1951 to 2008 on 43 species of fish collected off the Southern California coast and found that many fish have changed the season when they spawn. When fish spawned too early or too late in the season, there can be less plankton available to them, shrinking their chance of survival. She calls it a &quot;mismatch&quot; between when the fish spawn and when seasonal plankton blooms.</p><p>Knowing just how vulnerable our fisheries are to potential climate change is on the radar of NOAA Fisheries. The agency has put together a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/ecosystems/climate/documents/Fish_Stock_Climate_Vulnerability_Assessment.pdf">Fish Stock Climate Vulnerability Assessment</a>&nbsp;report expected to be released in early 2016. And like many things associated with climate change, there will be winners and losers.</p><p>Jon Hare is the oceanography branch chief for NOAA Fisheries&#39; Northeast Fisheries Science Center and a lead researcher on the agency&#39;s assessment. He says they looked at 82 fish and invertebrate species in the Northeast. About half of the species, including Atlantic cod, were determined to be negatively impacted by climate change in the Northeast U.S. Approximately 20 percent of the species are likely to be positively impacted&mdash;like the Atlantic croaker. The remainder species were considered neutral.</p><p>Similar assessments are underway in the California Current and the Bering Sea, and eventually in all of the nation&#39;s large marine ecosystems.</p><p>&quot;This is where the idea of ecosystem-based management comes in. It&#39;s not only fishing that is impacting these resources,&quot; says Hare. &quot;We need to take a more holistic view of these resources and include that in our management.&quot;</p><p>Britten says the fact that productivity of a fishery can change should be an eye-opener for fisheries management.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s no longer just pull back on fishing and watch the stock rebound. It&#39;s also a question of monitoring and understanding the ability of stocks to rebound, and that&#39;s what we demonstrated in this study. The rebound potential is affected as well,&quot; says Britten.</p><p><i>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/12/14/459404745/fish-stocks-are-declining-worldwide-and-climate-change-is-on-the-hook?ft=nprml&amp;f=459404745" target="_blank"> via NPR</a></i></p></p> Thu, 17 Dec 2015 15:37:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/fish-stocks-are-declining-worldwide-and-climate-change-hook-114210 Obama Runs Wild with Outdoorsman Bear Grylls http://www.wbez.org/news/obama-runs-wild-outdoorsman-bear-grylls-114209 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/obama runs wild.JPG" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DslPYTrQhO8?rel=0" width="560"></iframe></p><p>President Obama will appear Thursday night on the NBC reality show &ldquo;<a href="http://www.nbc.com/running-wild-with-bear-grylls" target="_blank">Running Wild with Bear Grylls</a>.&rdquo; The episode, which was filmed in September, follows the president on a walking tour with wilderness survival expert Bear Grylls around Alaska&rsquo;s shrinking Exit Glacier.&nbsp;It airs on NBC Dec. 17 at 10 p.m. Eastern.</p></p> Thu, 17 Dec 2015 14:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/obama-runs-wild-outdoorsman-bear-grylls-114209 Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord as a Good Start, but Just a Start http://www.wbez.org/news/scientists-see-un-climate-accord-good-start-just-start-114174 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/scientist-world_custom-bafdc96856408e56e032268b0ed9ae3a39f27d2b-s400-c85.jpg" style="height: 381px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" title="Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. (Simone Golob/Corbis)" />The United Nations climate summit is over, the weary diplomats have gone home, and now the historic&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/12/12/459464621/final-draft-of-world-climate-agreement-goes-to-a-vote-in-paris-saturday">deal</a>&nbsp;is being dissected by scientists.</p><p>Climate researchers&#39; dire&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2014/04/13/302541260/climate-change-adjustments-must-be-fast-and-large-u-n-panel-says">warnings</a>&nbsp;about global warming helped spur negotiators to draft this unprecedented international agreement, which commits both rich and poor countries to rein in greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades.</p><p>Some scientists now say they feel relief that the world is finally taking climate change seriously.</p><p>&quot;The accord signals that the world really gets it,&quot; says<a href="http://www.mbl.edu/ecosystems/melillo/">Jerry Melillo</a>, who studies the impact of climate change with the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. &quot;The world understands that climate change is a serious issue and, if left unchecked will have catastrophic consequences for society.&quot;</p><p>Melillo was particularly struck by the debate over whether to aim for a cap of 2 degrees Celsius in the average increase in global temperature, or to try to keep global warming lower &mdash; below 1.5 degrees Celsius. &quot;This says to me that the world understands that we have to do as much as possible, as soon as possible,&quot; he says.</p><p>But not everyone was so impressed by that debate over temperature targets.</p><p>&quot;There was a tremendous amount of discussion about [whether to have] a target of 1.5 degrees as opposed to 2 degrees,&#39;&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/staff/trenbert/">Kevin Trenberth</a>, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. &quot;Without saying how you&#39;re going to achieve things, I think we will actually blow right through both of those things.&quot;</p><p>Trenberth suspects warming will exceed 2 degrees Celsius probably around 2060. &quot;And so the discussion actually becomes somewhat irrelevant,&quot; he says.</p><p>&quot;There are a lot of commitments, there are goals,&quot; Trenberth continues. &quot;But the things which are not addressed are how to achieve those goals. There is no mention of a carbon tax, there&#39;s no mention of any penalties if countries don&#39;t come through.&quot;</p><p><a href="https://www.princeton.edu/step/people/faculty/michael-oppenheimer/">Michael Oppenheimer</a>, an expert on climate change impacts at Princeton University, says this deal has the promise of moving the world forward, but that governments need to be watched.</p><p>&quot;There are no enforcement and compliance provisions in this agreement which would cause a government to quake at the fear of not meeting the commitments they made,&quot; Oppenheimer says. &quot;And furthermore, the so-called transparency provisions, which allow different governments to understand what other governments have done, are not yet themselves worked out enough so we can be sure we&#39;ll be able to see what road we&#39;re actually going down.&quot;</p><p>Now that the international deal is done, he says, whether it makes a difference will depend on thousands of decisions made in individual countries and inside corporations.</p><p>&quot;Even more important than the transparency provisions is that people who are concerned about climate change &mdash; leaders and average citizens in each country &mdash; focus like a laser beam on what their country is doing,&quot; says Oppenheimer.</p><p><a href="http://globalecology.stanford.edu/labs/caldeiralab/">Ken Caldeira</a>, at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, Calif., says the deal has great aspirations. But he thinks the real test will come five years from now, when countries have to report back on what they&#39;ve achieved and ramp up their ambitions.</p><p>&quot;If countries really do what they say they&#39;re going to do, it could make a real difference,&quot; Caldeira says. &quot;However, we have the experience of the Kyoto protocol, some 20-odd years ago, where countries promised to do a lot; and it was great words but nothing got done. I&#39;m a little cynical that countries will really do what they said they were going to do.&quot;</p><p>Still, he says, this is a landmark agreement. And others point out there&#39;s just no way one meeting could solve the entire climate problem.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t think it&#39;s fair to look at Paris and say, &#39;You should have done everything today,&#39; &quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.geosc.psu.edu/academic-faculty/alley-richard">Richard Alley</a>, a geoscientist at Pennsylvania State University. &quot;And so the question is: Are we moving in the right direction? Is this a step on the journey that more steps can be taken and will get us there? And I think that it&nbsp;is&nbsp;that.&quot;</p><p>&quot;We now have a plan for moving forward, which I can tell you for sure is better than no plan at all,&quot; agrees&nbsp;<a href="http://campusdirectory.ucsc.edu/detail.php?type=people&amp;uid=kkroeker">Kristy Kroeker</a>, at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who studies the effect of climate change on the oceans.</p><p>&quot;Based on the science, I would say that we still have substantial risks ahead for large-scale impacts to our oceans,&quot; Kroeker adds. &quot;I think there is considerable work to be done to actually meet some of the targets. But I would say I am really tentatively hopeful that we&#39;re at a turning point for our planet.&quot;</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/12/15/459693015/scientists-see-u-n-climate-accord-as-a-good-start-but-just-a-start?ft=nprml&amp;f=459693015" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 15 Dec 2015 15:31:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/scientists-see-un-climate-accord-good-start-just-start-114174 Worldview at Notebaert Nature Museum to talk Climate Change http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-10/worldview-notebaert-nature-museum-talk-climate-change-114134 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/web%20climate%202%20620.jpeg" title="WBEZ’s “Worldview” broadcasts at Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 10 December, 2015. from left – Jerome McDonnell, Adele Simmons, Joel Brammeier, Kathleen Dean Moore, Kate Sackman of EcoMyths Alliance &amp; Brooke Hecht of Center for Humans and Nature" /></div></div></div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/237022372&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-1fe3d367-8e97-6a8f-383e-f8884c09e811">Worldview is LIVE at Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum to talk COP21, Climate Change and Conservation</span></strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span>Negotiators are expected to work into the weekend at the climate change talks in Paris.&nbsp;</span>And we&rsquo;re at the <a href="http://www.naturemuseum.org/">Peggy Notebart Nature Museum</a> with a panel of conservationists to discuss how climate change will transform our natural world. Thanks to the <a href="http://www.humansandnature.org/">Center for Humans and Nature</a> and <a href="http://ecomyths.org/">EcoMyths Alliance</a> for assembling the gathering.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>GUESTS:&nbsp;</strong></p><p><a href="http://www.metropolisstrategies.org/AdeleSimmons.html">Adele Simmons</a> is vice chair and senior executive for Metropolis Strategies; president of the Global Philanthropy Partnership. Previously, she has served as co-chair on the Task Force that developed the Climate Action Plan for the City of Chicago</p><p><a href="http://www.riverwalking.com/">Kathleen Dean Moore</a> is distinguished professor of philosophy at Oregon State University; founder, Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word.</p><p><a href="http://www.greatlakes.org/document.doc?id=610">Joel Brammeier</a> is president and CEO of the Alliance for the Great Lakes. He also advises state governors and provincial premiers on clean water policy.</p><p><a href="http://www.humansandnature.org/curt-meine">Curt Meine</a> is senior fellow at the Center for Humans and Nature and the Aldo Leopold Foundation; associate adjunct professor at UW&ndash;Madison. A conservation biologist, historian, and writer.</p><p><a href="http://www.jameswhitlowdelano.com/">James Whitlow Delano</a> is a photographer and curator of the exhibit, &ldquo;BODY OF WATER &ndash; Climate Change, Water, &amp; Human Rights&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 10 Dec 2015 10:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-10/worldview-notebaert-nature-museum-talk-climate-change-114134 World leaders enter second week of climate talks in Paris http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-12-08/world-leaders-enter-second-week-climate-talks-paris-114094 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/cop21 obama ap Eric Feferberg web.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Global leaders are halfway through a two-week gathering in Paris to address concerns of and come up with strategies to combat climate change. As they begin the second week of the climate summit, COP21, we check with local conservation ecologist <a href="https://twitter.com/aderby4">Abigail Derby Lewis</a> to see what has been discussed at the talks, how likely it is to achieve prolonged international cooperation and what&rsquo;s being done here in Chicago to combat climate change.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 08 Dec 2015 12:12:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-12-08/world-leaders-enter-second-week-climate-talks-paris-114094 They Need Millions — Make That Billions — To Cope With Climate Change http://www.wbez.org/news/they-need-millions-%E2%80%94-make-billions-%E2%80%94-cope-climate-change-114091 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-456037164_custom-b775a036de6e323bf6565688612446d92506057f-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res458355975" previewtitle="Bangladesh is facing drought, cyclones and floods. This expanse of water, photographed in September 2014, was a field the month before. It's in the Kalashuna village in Gaibandha district."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Bangladesh is facing drought, cyclones and floods. This expanse of water, photographed in September 2014, was a field the month before. It's in the Kalashuna village in Gaibandha district." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/03/gettyimages-456037164_custom-b775a036de6e323bf6565688612446d92506057f-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Bangladesh is facing drought, cyclones and floods. This expanse of water, photographed in September 2014, was a field the month before. It's in the Kalashuna village in Gaibandha district. (Allison Joyce/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>For the developing countries at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Paris, it&#39;s more than a chance to talk. It&#39;s a chance to be heard &mdash; and their representatives are taking advantage of the world stage by airing their grievances and proposing potential fixes.</p></div></div></div><p>How these specific demands will be addressed is still up in the air (along with way too much carbon dioxide). &quot;Nobody is going to get everything they want,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.unfoundation.org/who-we-are/leaders/vice-presidents/reid-detchon.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/">Reid Detchon</a>, vice president for energy and climate strategy at the United Nations Foundation. And as these nations are in locations that are most acutely feeling the effects of climate change, he adds, the most critical item on the agenda is simply achieving any agreement at all.</p><div id="res458350133">But here are a few things that would sweeten a deal:</div><p><strong>Financial support for adaptation</strong></p><p>To respond to climate change, countries need to, well, change. That can be a pricey proposition, says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wri.org/profile/jennifer-morgan">Jennifer Morgan</a>, global director of the climate program of the World Resources Institute. &quot;Tanzania, for instance, I&#39;ve heard them talk a lot about coffee crops being their main export,&quot; she explains. To keep the plants thriving in the years ahead will require technology, equipment and human capacity they just don&#39;t have. So one of the first successes of the talks was the&nbsp;<a href="http://m.state.gov/md250132.htm">announcement</a>&nbsp;Monday that the U.S., Canada and several EU countries had pledged $248 million to the Least Developed Countries Fund to deal with adaptation issues.</p><p><strong>More financial support for adaptation</strong></p><p>Bad news: A mere quarter-billion dollars isn&#39;t going to cut it. The world&#39;s wealthiest nations had promised in 2009 to secure&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/cwire/2009/12/17/17climatewire-hillary-clinton-pledges-100b-for-developing-96794.html?pagewanted=all">$100 billion of adaptation assistance</a>&nbsp;each year, starting in 2020. Now, a bloc of 134 countries are asking for the well-off countries to make good on that offer &mdash; and bump it up even higher. Indian prime minister Narendra Modi made this issue a key part of his speech at the opening session, asking that developed nations &quot;fulfill their commitment in a credible, transparent and meaningful manner.&quot; But that&#39;s a tough one given the state of the world economy, says Detchon, who notes that &quot;anything involving money is so difficult right now.&quot;</p><p><strong>A 1.5-degree warming limit (instead of 2 degrees)</strong></p><p>Everyone seems to agree that a rise of the planet&#39;s temperature by 2 degrees Celsius would have disastrous effects. (They also agree that this seems inevitable at the moment.) But countries in the Climate Vulnerable Forum and the Alliance of Small Island States are lobbying for a lower limit through the &quot;1.5 to Stay Alive&quot; campaign.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.economist.com/mediadirectory/joel-budd">Joel Budd</a>, social policy editor of&nbsp;The Economist&nbsp;&mdash; which just released a special report on climate change &mdash; offers Bangladesh as an example. &quot;Any bad effects you can imagine from climate change are happening there,&quot; he says, rattling off a list of cyclones, flooding and drought. &quot;The more warming, the worse it gets.&quot; Although Budd doubts that even the 2-degree target is realistic, &quot;it raises the impression that 1.9 degrees is fine, when it&#39;s not fine.&quot;</p><p><strong>Set up a global reporting system</strong></p><p>It&#39;s great when countries say they&#39;re cutting greenhouse emissions. What&#39;s more important is that they prove they&#39;re actually doing it. That&#39;s why there&#39;s been momentum to create a treaty that would set legally binding targets and international monitoring. But for developing countries, keeping up with these rules is an additional burden. &quot;They don&#39;t feel they can do it,&quot; Morgan explains. So she says their response is a simple one: &quot;If you want a common system, you need to help us.&quot;</p><p><strong>Establish a procedure for &quot;loss and damage&quot;</strong></p><p>When sea levels rise, homes flood. Violent storms leave destruction in their wake. How are developing nations supposed to handle these sorts of problems? The&nbsp;<a href="http://unfccc.int/adaptation/workstreams/loss_and_damage/items/8134.php">Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage</a>&nbsp;was developed in 2013 for just this purpose, but several developed countries have resisted it, fearing they will be on the hook for climate reparations. What is clear is that many of the people hardest hit by climate change are disadvantaged in many ways. &quot;They are already leading lives of extreme precariousness,&quot; Budd says. And providing solar panels can&#39;t fix that.</p><p><strong>Find a new home for displaced populations</strong></p><p>For some island nations, climate change is a threat to their very existence. &quot;It&#39;s not about building higher dikes but relocating entire populations,&quot; Morgan says. &quot;It&#39;s like a refugee crisis.&quot; Given how the world is handling the current mass migrations from Syria, there are serious questions about what would happen to people forced out of their homes due to environmental conditions. One solution: offer environmental refugee status and clarify what rights a person with that status would have.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/12/04/458349068/they-need-millions-make-that-billions-to-cope-with-climate-change?ft=nprml&amp;f=458349068" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 08 Dec 2015 09:47:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/they-need-millions-%E2%80%94-make-billions-%E2%80%94-cope-climate-change-114091 Ominous signs for climate change in the Arctic http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-01/ominous-signs-climate-change-arctic-114017 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/U.S.%20Geological%20Survey%20%282%29.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/U.S. Geological Survey)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235631392&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Climate change in the Arctic</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">As leaders from 180 countries gather in Paris to try and finalize a binding climate change agreement, overwhelmingly scientists have reached consensus that Arctic temperatures are rising at twice the rate of the world average. Dave Aplin is director of the World Wildlife Fund&rsquo;s Arctic Program. He&rsquo;ll tell us why he believes, along with most scientists, that if the trend isn&rsquo;t reversed or slowed, the results will be catastrophic not only to wildlife in the region, but to humans across the planet.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-bda4bcc2-5f72-3bd4-cb46-51d87e72bc1a">Dave Aplin is director of the </span><a href="http://twitter.com/WWFUS">World Wildlife Fund&rsquo;s (WWF-US)</a> Arctic Program.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235634132&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Chicago doctors help Syrian refugees in Jordan</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Chicago physicians Aisha Sethi, Jihad Shoshara and Sofia Shoshara were recently in Jordan. They were there to give aid and comfort to Syrian refugees throughout the country, including the UNHCR camp in Al Zaatari. Their work was part of a mission trip on behalf of the Syrian American Medical Society. They&rsquo;ll tell us about life and the challenges of Syrian refugees in Jordan and they&rsquo;ll also give their personal opinions on the current political climate in the U.S. towards refugees and migrants.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-bda4bcc2-5f79-9b4c-cb4c-4238bffbfe81"><a href="http://twitter.com/@sethiaisha">Aisha Sethi</a>, physician and associate professor of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases and assistant director for Outreach at the<a href="http://twitter.com/uchicago"> University of Chicago</a>&rsquo;s Center for Global Health. </span></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/@DrShoshara">Jihad Shoshara</a> is a Chicago area pediatrician.</em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/sofiashakir">Sofia Shakir</a> is a Chicago-area pediatrician.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235633194&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Pope Francis in Africa</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Pope Francis just wrapped up a visit to Africa, which included a stop in Uganda and the Central African Republic. While he was in the CAR he appealed for the country&#39;s Christian and Muslim factions to stop the fighting, saying &ldquo;&quot;We are all brothers. We are all brothers.&quot; The Pope even visited a mosque in the country&rsquo;s capital that had been besieged by Christian fighters. A religious and sectarian war has been waging in the CAR for the last two years and the Pope was accompanied by unprecedented security. We&rsquo;ll take a look at what the Pope did and didn&rsquo;t say on his Africa trip with Michael Murphy, director of Catholic Studies at Loyola University.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-bda4bcc2-5f83-2c6b-c081-1f2a21150267">Michael Murphy is director of Catholic Studies at Loyola University.</span></em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 01 Dec 2015 15:21:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-01/ominous-signs-climate-change-arctic-114017 Obama Leaves Paris Climate Talks Confident Of Deal http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-12-01/obama-leaves-paris-climate-talks-confident-deal-114010 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/1201_obama-paris-624x415.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_96952"><img alt="U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference in Paris, France, on December 1, 2015. (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/12/1201_obama-paris-624x415.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title="U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference in Paris, France, on December 1, 2015. (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)" /><p>Wrapping up his two-day trip to Paris for the UN global summit on climate change, President Obama said he&rsquo;s &ldquo;convinced that we&rsquo;re going to get big things done here.&rdquo;</p></div><p>The president, who said the deal is critical to the U.S. economy and national security, also spent time pledging financial support to low-lying island nations vulnerable to rising sea levels.</p><p>NPR White House correspondent<a href="https://twitter.com/tamarakeithnpr" target="_blank">&nbsp;Tamara Keith</a>&nbsp;joins&nbsp;<a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/12/01/obama-paris-climate-talks" target="_blank"><em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s </em></a>Jeremy Hobson with details.</p></p> Tue, 01 Dec 2015 12:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-12-01/obama-leaves-paris-climate-talks-confident-deal-114010