WBEZ | climate change http://www.wbez.org/tags/climate-change Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Greek financial future hangs in limbo http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-29/greek-financial-future-hangs-limbo-112279 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP%20PhotoGiannis%20Papanikos1.jpg" style="width: 602px; height: 375px;" title="(Photo: AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212538753&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Greek banks close as debt crisis continues</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Banks in Greece closed Monday. The government of Greece is trying to prevent the Greek financial system from collapsing by preventing Greeks from withdrawing all their funds in a panic. Greeks are now also limited on how much money they can withdraw from ATM machines and businesses are limited in the transactions they can do. It&rsquo;s known as capital control. Greek Prime Minister, Alexis Tsipras, has called for a referendum on July 5th to allow the Greek public to vote on whether or not it wants to remain in the European Union. Endy Zemenides, executive director of the Hellenic American Leadership Council joins us from DC, where he has been lobbying the US Congress to push for a deal that has sustainable debt levels for Greece.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em>Endy Zemenides is executive director of the&nbsp;<a href="http://hellenicleaders.com/">Hellenic American Leadership Council</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212536996&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Climate change threatens survival of Pukapuka</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Pukapuka is one of the most remote atolls in the Cook Islands. It&rsquo;s one of the world&rsquo;s oldest cultures dating back more than 2,000 years. Now, its entire existence is being threatened by climate change. The documentary, &#39;Homecoming: A film about Pukapuka,&#39; hopes to tell the island&rsquo;s story, before it&rsquo;s gone. The subjects of the film, John Frisbie and Amelia Borofsky, join us from Honolulu, along with filmmaker, Gemma Cubero del Barrio.<br /><br /><strong>Guests: </strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>John Frisbie and Amelia Borofsky are the subjects in the documentary <a href="https://www.facebook.com/HomecomingDoc">&#39;<span>Homecoming: A Film about Pukapuka.&#39; </span></a></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Gemma Cubero del Barrio is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/HomecomingDoc">&#39;<span id="docs-internal-guid-de1a98be-4115-f05b-e86b-ef0e46cbf432">Homecoming: A Film about Pukapuka.&#39;</span></a></em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212535540&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Theory of the sixth mass extinction</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Scientists maintain that in Earth&rsquo;s 4.5 billion years, there have been five &ldquo;mass extinctions.&rdquo; These events destroy life at an accelerated rate. The fifth mass extinction wiped out 96 percent of life on the planet, including the dinosaurs. A new article theorizes that we currently are witnessing Earth&rsquo;s sixth mass extinction. Professor Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University, co-authored the article, &#39;Accelerated modern human&ndash;induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction.&#39; We&rsquo;ll ask him what&rsquo;s causing our planet to lose &ldquo;species of other organisms&rdquo; at a pace &rdquo;unparalleled for 65 million years.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-9937d329-411a-8dc6-7377-5e2bf3583eb7"><a href="https://twitter.com/PaulREhrlich">Paul Ehrlich</a> is a professor at&nbsp;</span>Stanford University.</em></p></p> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 15:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-29/greek-financial-future-hangs-limbo-112279 Morning Shift: LGBT dance party heads south http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-17/morning-shift-lgbt-dance-party-heads-south-112204 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Giandomenico%20Ricci.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 382px;" title="Flickr/Giandomenico Ricci" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/210756063&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Gov. Rauner launches ad campaign&nbsp;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Earlier this month <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-01/morning-shift-gov-rauner-balancing-budget-112113">Governor Rauner was on Morning Shift</a> talking about his budget proposals. At about that time there was talk that the governor was getting set to run campaign style TV ads as part of his strategy for getting democrats to agree with items on his agenda. He said he didn&#39;t want to speculate on those ads. The ads came out yesterday and mostly take aim at democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan. So what does this latest move by the governor mean for ongoing budget negotiations? Have legislators used this tactic before to push their agenda, especially when it&rsquo;s NOT election season? We talk to Christopher Mooney, Director of the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois, for analysis.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://igpa.uillinois.edu/person/christopher-z-mooney">Christopher Mooney</a> is the&nbsp;</em><em>&nbsp;Director of the <a href="https://twitter.com/illinoisIGPA">Institute of Government and Public Affairs</a> at the University of Illinois.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/210756061&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Pope&rsquo;s encyclical takes on climate change</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Vatican is releasing a rare encyclical about the environment Thursday. A leaked draft of Pope Francis&rsquo; letter came out Monday. In the draft, the Pope reportedly calls for urgent action to fight climate change and care for the Earth, and says global warming is quote &ldquo;mostly&rdquo; due to human action. The Pope is addressing Congress and the United Nations in September. We&rsquo;ve got Sister Dawn Nothwehr, the Erica and Harry John Family Endowed Chair in Catholic Theological Ethics at the Catholic Theological Union, to help us make sense of what this means.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.ctu.edu/academics/dawn-m-nothwehr-osf">Sister Dawn Nothwehr</a> is&nbsp;</em><em>the Erica and Harry John Family Endowed Chair in Catholic Theological Ethics at the <a href="https://twitter.com/ChicagoCTU">Catholic Theological Union.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/210756058&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Affinity Community Services offers services to the LGBT community on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Africans Americans are more likely than whites, Hispanics and Asian Americans to self-identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. That data comes from a 2012 Gallup Poll. Yet, in Chicago, the Pride Parade takes place on the North Side and many of the services for the city&rsquo;s LGBT community are NOT in black neighborhoods. One organization that&rsquo;s changing that paradigm is <a href="http://affinity95.org/acscontent/">Affinity Community Services</a>, a social justice group out of Hyde Park that works with black LGBTQ people of all ages. Kim Hunt, the group&rsquo;s executive director and Deja Phillips, a high school student at Butler College Prep in Pullman on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side stop by to talk about the group&#39;s effort.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://affinity95.org/acscontent/about-us/who-we-are/">Kim Hunt</a> is&nbsp;</em><em><a href="https://twitter.com/affinitycs">Affinity Community Services</a>&#39; Executive Director. </em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Deja Phillips is a student at&nbsp;</em><em><a href="http://butlercollegeprep.noblenetwork.org/">Butler College Prep</a> in Pullman and organization volunteer.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/210756057&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">LGBT dance party heads south</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Earlier this moThis weekend caps a month of Pride-related celebrations with the Pride Festival. And next Sunday, the annual Pride Parade brings together the LGBT community, allies, politicians, and party-goers to north Halsted Street, in the Heart of Boystown. But how is Pride celebrated on south Halsted and other parts of the city&rsquo;s South Side? An event this Friday is aiming to create a safe and comfortable space in the Hyde Park to dance, congregate and share stories. <a href="http://no-small-plans.com/">Slo &lsquo;Mo dance party</a> aims to be that place. We talk with co-founders Kristen Kaza about why a space is needed outside the traditional gay friendly enclaves, and DJ Tess gives us a preview of the slow jams dancers will hear on Friday.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/kristenkaza">Kristen Kaza</a> is&nbsp;</em><em><a href="https://instagram.com/nosmallplanschi/">Slo &lsquo;Mo</a>&#39;s co-founder. </em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/tesskisner">DJ Tess Kisner</a> is</em><em>&nbsp;</em><em><a href="https://twitter.com/slomoparty">Slo &lsquo;Mo</a>&#39;s co-founder.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 08:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-17/morning-shift-lgbt-dance-party-heads-south-112204 Worldview: White House climate change proposals face criticism prior to COP 21 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-08/worldview-white-house-climate-change-proposals-face-criticism-prior <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP980301639017.jpg" style="height: 403px; width: 620px;" title="In this Jan. 22, 2015 photo, gentoo penguins stand on a rock near station Bernardo O'Higgins, Antarctica. The melting of Antarctic glaciers as a consequence of global warming is concerning scientists as this contributes to rising sea levels which will eventually reshape the planet. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199888546&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">White House pledge on climate change</span></p><p>In late March, the Obama administration rolled out its targets to combat Climate Change ahead of the Paris Climate Talks (COP21-CMP11) due to commence at the end of 2015.&nbsp; The White House&rsquo;s goals have met with harsh criticism for either going too far or not far enough. We&rsquo;ll talk about the announcement and other climate related news with Jack Cushman. He&rsquo;s an environmental journalist and contributing editor to&nbsp;<em>Inside Climate News</em>. Cushman will critique the U.S. climate pledge and compare it to what other countries are promising. He&rsquo;s author of the book,&nbsp;<em>Keystone and Beyond: Tar Sands and the National Interest in the Era of Climate Change</em>.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cda60aca-9ab2-8403-10d3-2665e5220770"><a href="https://twitter.com/jackcushmanjr">Jack Cushman</a> is an</span> environmental journalist and contributing editor with <a href="https://twitter.com/insideclimate">Inside Climate News</a>.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199888814&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Yemen intervention</span></font></p><p>Saudi fighter jets have been hitting Houthi rebel positions around Yemen. The intervention comes as Iran is accused of giving military support to the Houthis.&nbsp; And the continued fighting between the rebels and government is creating a security gap that militants are trying to fill, according to military observers. U.S. Defense&nbsp; Secretary, Ashton Carter, says that Al-Qaeda has &quot;seized the opportunity&quot; in Yemen as the terrorist group reportedly &nbsp;attacked a border post close to Saudi Arabia.&nbsp; Sheila Carapico, political science professor at the University of Richmond, will give us her thoughts on the violence and the roles of the various players.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-325a04d4-9ab4-e5d5-1cb3-0b39f4706341"><a href="https://twitter.com/SCarapico">Sheila Carapico</a> is a </span>professor of Political Science and International Studies at the <a href="https://twitter.com/urichmond">University of Richmond</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199889541&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Notes: Babel Med Music Festival</span></font></p><p>Catalina Maria Johnson, host and producer of&nbsp;<em>Beat Latino</em>&nbsp;on Vocalo, is just back from the annual Babel Med Music festival in Marseille, France. This year&rsquo;s festival brought together artists from 30 different countries.&nbsp; On this week&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Global Notes</em>, Catalina joins Jerome and Tony Sarabia to talk about some of the highlights.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ae72e756-9ab7-960d-526d-4a8e91f3b192"><a href="https://twitter.com/catalinamariaj">Catalina Maria Johnson</a> is host and producer of Beat Latino on Vocalo. She&rsquo;s also a regular contributor to Wall Street Journal International Magazine, Afro Pop World Wide Blog and other publications.</span></em></p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is the host of <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZmorning">WBEZ Morning Shift</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 Apr 2015 15:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-08/worldview-white-house-climate-change-proposals-face-criticism-prior Last day of Lima climate talks http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-12-12/last-day-lima-climate-talks-111227 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP288975775932.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The second round of climate talks are wrapping up in Lima, Peru. We talk to Jack Cushman of Inside Climate News about what still needs to be accomplished before the final round of talks in Paris next year.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-lima-climate-talks/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-lima-climate-talks.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-lima-climate-talks" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Last day of Lima climate talks" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 12 Dec 2014 11:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-12-12/last-day-lima-climate-talks-111227 Morning Shift: Some religious groups divided on climate change http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2014-12-04/morning-shift-some-religious-groups-divided-climate-change-111188 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Soonlee20091.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We get a recap of the Illinois General Assembly&#39;s veto session, and discuss different faiths&#39; points of view on climate change. Plus, the music of Porgy and Bess.</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-110/embed?header=false&border=false" width="100%" height="750" frameborder="no" allowtransparency="true"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-110.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-110" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Some religious groups divided on climate change" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 04 Dec 2014 07:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2014-12-04/morning-shift-some-religious-groups-divided-climate-change-111188 As Keystone XL stalls, another pipeline network moves quietly forward http://www.wbez.org/series/front-and-center-work/keystone-xl-stalls-another-pipeline-network-moves-quietly-forward <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flanagan 1.jpeg" alt="" /><p><p>The Keystone XL has been in the news a lot lately. The controversial pipeline would carry tar sands oil, a form of crude that is booming in North America. The southern section of the pipeline is already built, but protests have raged over the northern section and the State Department has been hesitant to approve it.</p><p>The Keystone XL&rsquo;s fans say tar sands oil can make us a more energy independent country. But environmentalists oppose it, saying tar sands oil is especially dirty and will <a href="http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tar-sands-and-keystone-xl-pipeline-impact-on-global-warming/" target="_blank">accelerate climate change</a>.</p><p>But while Keystone XL has stalled, another tar sands project are happening under the radar.</p><p>&ldquo;While all the focus has been on Keystone XL, Enbridge has used existing pipelines and new pipelines next to existing pipelines to create the same system,&rdquo; says Carl Weimer, Executive Director of the <a href="http://pstrust.org/" target="_blank">Pipeline Safety Trust</a>.</p><p>One piece in that pipeline network expects to begin full operations soon. It is called Flanagan South and it starts about two hours south of Chicago at the Flanagan South pump station.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Flanagan South</span><br />The pump station is by a road in the middle of a big field. A few pipes come up above ground and there is a building about the size of a small warehouse. It is all pretty simple-looking for how much will happen here.</p><p>In early December, the oil transport company Enbridge plans to start full operations on the Flanagan South pipeline, pumping 600,000 barrels of oil a day through a pipe about as wide as a hula hoop. The pipeline goes from Illinois to Oklahoma, but is part of a network that stretches up to the Canadian tar sands and down to the Gulf Coast (just like the Keystone.)</p><p>The number of pipelines is the United States is growing because of a booming oil industry in the tar sands of Canada and North Dakota.&nbsp; Enbridge spokesperson Jennifer Smith says that is not only good news for Enbridge&rsquo;s business, it is also good news for states like Illinois. &ldquo;Once Flanagan South [and a number of other Illinois pipelines] are in service for a full year, it will be over an additional 4 million in taxes that Enbridge will contribute to the Illinois economy,&rdquo; said Smith.</p><p>Enbridge hired around 1,000 people during construction of the Illinois section of the pipeline (it estimates about half of those jobs went to Illinois residents). And crude oil imports to the midwest recently hit an all-time high.</p><p>&ldquo;Outside of just the gasoline, jet fuel and diesel, by-products of crude oil are made for plastics, and are made in manufacturing. Our true quality of life depends on crude oil,&rdquo; said Smith.</p><p>In total, Enbridge expects to hire only five permanent position because of the Flanagan pipeline. And Doug Hayes with the Sierra Club say those jobs are just not worth it.</p><p>&ldquo;The 600,000 barrels a day is equal to about 130 million tons of carbon emissions, which is the same as putting 27 million more cars on the road each year,&rdquo; said Hayes.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Escaping public attention</span></p><p>Enbridge used existing pipes to build its new network, reversing some lines and expanding others. One of those existing lines already crossed a Canadian border, so unlike Keystone XL, it did not need state department approval (<a href="http://www.newsweek.com/2014/12/05/all-eyes-keystone-another-tar-sands-pipeline-just-crossed-border-286685.html" target="_blank">though this process has also been controversial</a>).</p><p>The Sierra club&rsquo;s Doug Hayes says the company also used something called a Nationwide 12 permit to build the new Flanagan section. It basically fast-tracks the permitting process. The southern section of the Keystone XL (which is already complete) also used one.</p><p>The permit allowed Enbridge to skip long public comment periods and avoid an environmental review of the Flanagan pipeline in its entirety.</p><p>&ldquo;So the problem is, there was no opportunity for the communities along the pipeline to learn about the dangers of oil spills, the climate impacts, and so forth,&rdquo; said Hayes.</p><p>Hayes represented the Sierra Club in a lawsuit over this permit. The Sierra Club lost, but is appealing.</p><p>Hayes says the case is a big deal because he expects more companies to follow a similar strategy. &ldquo;The tar sands industry is looking at what is happening with Keystone XL and they understand that the more the public learns about these projects, the more opposition grows. So, there has been a concerted effort to permit these pipelines behind closed doors,&rdquo; said Hayes.</p><p>Smith, the Enbridge spokesperson says the company never tried to keep the pipeline quiet and that she helped host open houses and presentations. &ldquo;Everyone is welcome to come and learn about the projects and get their questions answered,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>But when pressed on if Enbridge escaped the more comprehensive environmental review, she is more elusive. She responded to multiple rephrased variations of the question by repeating that the company followed the permitting route that the government laid out for them.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">The risk of oil spills</span></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="20" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/179517057&amp;color=ff5500&amp;inverse=false&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_user=true" width="100%"></iframe>The new Flanagan South pipeline passes through roughly 2,000 waterways or wetlands. The Environmental Protection Agency says tar sands oil presents a different spill risk than conventional oil, because it can sink to the bottom of waterways and does not appreciably biodegrade.</p><p>About four years ago, an Enbridge pipeline carrying tar sands oil ruptured in Michigan.<br />The accident cost just over a billion dollars and still is not cleaned up. A report from National Wildlife Federation says the spill contaminated 30 miles of the Kalamazoo River and provoked evacuations.</p><p>Smith concedes there will always be a risk of spills. But she says if oil is going to move, the safest way to do it is through pipelines. &ldquo;Even according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, pipelines are the safest way to transport oil,&rdquo; said Smith.</p><p>Enbridge says the Michigan spill was quote, &ldquo;The company&rsquo;s darkest time.&rdquo; It says it&rsquo;s updated safety procedures and equipment since then. But pipeline activists say it is difficult to evaluate if that is true. Because of lax government oversight, they say they are left to take the company at its word.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Government Oversight</span></p><p>The National Wildlife Federation&rsquo;s report on the Michigan spill holds Enbridge accountable. But it also blames government agencies.</p><p>&ldquo;The first responders were very ill-prepared to deal with the spill. And a lot of that was the fact that they simply didn&rsquo;t have the information and tools that they needed. That is largely the fault of a federal regulatory agency that did not prepare them properly,&rdquo; said Jim Murphy, lawyer for The National Wildlife Federation.</p><p>Carl Weimer, Executive Director of the Pipeline Safety Trust, says the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) does not have the resources to deal with all the new pipelines.</p><p>&ldquo;So, if there are problems, the regulators may be missing it. So, to a grand degree we are trusting that the pipeline industry is going to do things correctly,&rdquo; said Weimer.</p><p>In a testimony before congress, PHMSA officials said the agency must grow to meet added demands and evolving changes. They also requested additional funding and said the &ldquo;potential to do more remains.&rdquo;</p><p>But Weimer says we can not lay all the blame on the federal government. States can apply to do their own additional monitoring. &ldquo;They can really provide better and more inspections of the pipeline,&rdquo; said Weimer.</p><p>Only a few states have done that, and Illinois is not one of them. But with the growing number of new pipelines in the state, Weimer says maybe it is time to consider it.</p><p><em>Shannon Heffernan is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her @<a href="http://twitter.com/shannon_h" target="_blank">shannon_h</a></em></p><p><em>Front and Center is funded by The Joyce Foundation: Improving the quality of life in the Great Lakes region and across the country.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 01 Dec 2014 12:32:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/front-and-center-work/keystone-xl-stalls-another-pipeline-network-moves-quietly-forward Capitalism and Climate Change http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-29/capitalism-and-climate-change-111008 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP10042118660_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Journalist, activist and author, Naomi Klein, says climate change could be an opportunity to demand a better world. We talk to her about her new book, &#39;This Changes Everything: Capitalism Vs. the Climate.&#39;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-capitalism-and-climate-change/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-capitalism-and-climate-change.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-capitalism-and-climate-change" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Capitalism and Climate Change" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-29/capitalism-and-climate-change-111008 After the march, what's next for climate change? http://www.wbez.org/news/after-march-whats-next-climate-change-110837 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/global warming.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">In the days leading up the 2014 <a href="http://www.un.org/climatechange/summit/" target="_blank">UN Climate Summit</a>, thousands of people marched through New York to bring attention to climate change. Millions around the world joined in the effort, but will the movement last?</p><p>One expert says most of that hinges on whether people think climate change is real. A <a href="http://environment.yale.edu/climate-communication/files/Climate-Beliefs-April-2013.pdf" target="_blank">2013 study</a> by Yale and George Mason universities found nearly two out of three people in the U.S. believe global warming is occurring, but a small percentage of Americans say climate change is all hype.</p><p>Tim Calkins, a marketing professor in the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, says the campaign faces a unique challenge because it has to prove there&rsquo;s a problem. Calkins&nbsp;says the movement is getting it right by providing solid evidence that temperatures are rising.</p><p>In August, scientists at the National Climatic Data Center reported the highest global average of land and ocean temperatures since the center began keeping records in 1880.</p><p>&ldquo;By doing that, all of a sudden it takes that raw data and makes it more personal for people,&rdquo; Calkins&nbsp;said. &ldquo;And when you can really see a picture of it, you say &lsquo;my goodness, look at that it is a problem,&rsquo; and it keeps the belief going.&rdquo;</p><p>Calkins&nbsp;says the effort should be prepared to lose momentum post-march.</p><p>&ldquo;The real issue is how do you keep it going, year after year, because this isn&rsquo;t a problem that you solve one time and then you&rsquo;re done,&rdquo; Calkins&nbsp;said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s sort of an ongoing challenge for all of us.&rdquo;</p><p>Calkins&nbsp;says interest in climate change peaked in the mid-2000s, but lost steam in the last few years. Pointing to the success of public health campaigns for <a href="http://komen.org/" target="_blank">breast cancer</a> and the <a href="http://www.alsa.org/" target="_blank">ALS ice bucket challenge</a>, he says climate change falters because advocates struggle to explain why it matters on a deeper level.</p><p>&ldquo;When you have a disease, and there&rsquo;s some diseases that sort of lend themselves perfectly to engagement, there people see it,&rdquo;&nbsp;Calkins&nbsp;said. &ldquo;They say &lsquo;I know somebody who has this and so it matters a ton. Unless they consistently make it relevant for people, it&rsquo;s going to be tough to keep people fired up over time.&rdquo;</p><p>Confusion over what people can actually do to combat climate change is another issue. Most people agree with the primary point that climate change is a problem and and needs to be addressed, but Calkins says it&rsquo;s the secondary point of what action individuals can take that remains unclear.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s this goal to get a lot of action going, and the challenge is that progress is likely to come in little steps,&rdquo; Calkins said. &ldquo;The risk in that is you don&rsquo;t want people to get discouraged.&rdquo;</p><p>Beyond the <a href="http://peoplesclimate.org/" target="_blank">Climate March</a>, Calkins predicts the movement will be around for years. But for those involved, he says the biggest challenge will be keeping the issues at the front of peoples&rsquo; minds.</p><p>&ldquo;The problem today that people get all excited about something, but then they very quickly move on,&rdquo; Calkins said. &ldquo;The digital world we are in encourages that, because there&rsquo;s so many things that pop up that distract everybody.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Updated Sept. 24, 2014: This story was changed to correct the spelling of the name of professor Tim Calkins.</em></p><p><em>Mallory Black covers water, energy and the environment as WBEZ&rsquo;s Front and Center reporting intern. Follow her<a href="http://twitter.com/triciabobeda"> </a><a href="https://twitter.com/mblack47" target="_blank">@mblack47</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 23 Sep 2014 15:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/after-march-whats-next-climate-change-110837 The problems with Obama's ISIS strategy http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-22/problems-obamas-isis-strategy-110830 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP763262163049.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Last week, congress approved President Obama&#39;s strategy for combating ISIS in Syria and Iraq. We&#39;ll take a critical look at the policy.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-problems-with-obama-s-isis-strategy/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-problems-with-obama-s-isis-strategy.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-problems-with-obama-s-isis-strategy" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The problems with Obama's ISIS strategy" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 22 Sep 2014 10:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-09-22/problems-obamas-isis-strategy-110830 Morning Shift: Who's responsible for our global warming crisis? http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-09-17/morning-shift-whos-responsible-our-global-warming <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/NASA Goddard Photo and Video.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We talk to the author of a new book that unpacks climate change and why there&#39;s still some denying the concept. And, we look at Chicago&#39;s boundary lines. Plus, the Soul Diva stops by for another installment of Reclaimed Soul.</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-who-s-responsible-for-our-global-war/embed?header=false&border=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-who-s-responsible-for-our-global-war.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-who-s-responsible-for-our-global-war" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Who's responsible for our global warming crisis? " on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:45:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-09-17/morning-shift-whos-responsible-our-global-warming