WBEZ | Cuba http://www.wbez.org/tags/cuba Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en New Conservation Effort Aims to Protect Papa's Papers http://www.wbez.org/news/new-conservation-effort-aims-protect-papas-papers-114329 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-72766039_wide-4abb2b2410d206426dd304cff3f0f301ad5e7661-s700-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res460841124" previewtitle="Ernest Hemingway wrote The Old Man and the Sea here at the Finca Vigia, his home outside Havana."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Ernest Hemingway wrote The Old Man and the Sea here at the Finca Vigia, his home outside Havana." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/23/gettyimages-72766039_wide-4abb2b2410d206426dd304cff3f0f301ad5e7661-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="Ernest Hemingway wrote The Old Man and the Sea here at the Finca Vigia, his home outside Havana. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>It&#39;s been a year since the U.S. and Cuba began normalizing relations. Tourism, business and cultural exchanges are booming. And there is another curious benefactor of those warmer ties &mdash; Ernest Hemingway, or at least, his legacy. The writer lived just outside of Havana for 20 years, and that house, called the Finca Vigia, has long been a national museum.</p></div></div></div><p>But years of hot, humid Caribbean weather has taken a toll on the author&#39;s thousands of papers and books. A Boston-based foundation is helping restore those weathered treasures, and who better to lead that effort than the original dean of home repairs: Bob Vila, of public television&#39;s&nbsp;This Old House. He tells NPR&#39;s Carrie Kahn that he has a personal connection to Cuba. &quot;I&#39;m American-born Cuban,&quot; he says. &quot;My Havana-born parents emigrated during the latter part of World War II, and I was born in Miami, raised there and partially in Havana up until the revolution in 1959.&quot;</p><div><hr /></div><p><strong><span style="font-size:18px;">Interview Highlights</span></strong></p><p><strong>On the condition of the house</strong></p><p>It&#39;s restored &mdash; I mean, the restoration, the new roof, the new windows, all of the basics of the house were, the restoration was completed five or six years ago, it&#39;s now into its first major maintenance phase. The work that continues is really about the conservation of the papers, the books. Hemingway&#39;s private library of over 9,000 books were all left there. The changes that President Obama has brought forth have allowed us to actually begin fundraising so that we can help with the work of creating a paper conservation laboratory as well as an archival storage facility where many of these literary treasures will find a safe home.</p><p><strong>On the treasures in the house</strong></p><div id="res460841229" previewtitle="Hemingway left his books, papers and typewriter (seen here in 1964) in Cuba when he returned to America."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Hemingway left his books, papers and typewriter (seen here in 1964) in Cuba when he returned to America." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/23/gettyimages-141550987_sq-4d05629687bdcd88a9ad99a90ba4473ae829a705-s300-c85.jpg" style="height: 310px; width: 310px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="Hemingway left his books, papers and typewriter, seen here in 1964, in Cuba when he returned to America. (Mondadori Portfolio /Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p>The very first time I went to the Finca, I came as an expert on termite damage. And what happened was that the accessory building that Hemingway put up back in the &#39;50s, which was a wooden building, was essentially a guesthouse/garage. And this is where the Cubans had been storing a great many items, and I needed to get in to see what the structure looked like, and to just poke around at it to see how bad the damage was.</p><p>But they were very very jealous about it; they didn&#39;t want me to go in there. But I finally convinced them, and we opened these doors and turned on a spare light bulb that&#39;s in there. And I&#39;ve always compared it to what it must have been like to find Tutankhamen&#39;s tomb. Because in the dim light, I just saw a row of all his African hunting trophies, boxes upon boxes of books, and I look to the left, and there&#39;s his typewriter.</p></div></div></div><p><strong>On the house after the revolution</strong></p><p>He left the home to the Cuban people, not to the revolution, and he wanted it to become a museum. His widow eventually went and removed personal belongings, you know, her grandmother&#39;s tea set kind of things, and papers ... but generally speaking, everything that you see there, he meant to leave there, so that it could become a center for learning, a center for understanding more about his literature, and part of a cultural bridge between our United States culture and the Cuban culture.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/12/27/460822063/new-conservation-effort-aims-to-protect-papas-papers?ft=nprml&amp;f=460822063" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Sun, 27 Dec 2015 10:24:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/new-conservation-effort-aims-protect-papas-papers-114329 Working with Afghanistan's saffron farmers http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-17/working-afghanistans-saffron-farmers-114211 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/download_2.jpg" title="(Photo courtesy of Rumi Spice)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/238028486&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: Working with Afghanistan&#39;s saffron farmers</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">After their tours of duty in Afghanistan, U.S. veterans, Keith Alaniz, Emily Miller and Kimberly Jung, wanted to do more to help rebuild Afghan society. So they started Rumi Spice, a &ldquo;for-profit social enterprise&rdquo; that links Afghan farmers with global markets, through harvesting and selling the world&rsquo;s most expensive spice - saffron. For our Global Activism series, they&rsquo;ll join us to tell stories about their tours of duty in Afghanistan and how the people they encountered inspired them to create a brighter future for Afghanistan.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c9c387db-b1db-c5fd-e492-270fa721543f"><a href="http://twitter.com/@jk_alaniz">Keith Alaniz</a> is </span>co-founder and president of <a href="http://twitter.com/Rumi_Spice">Rumi Spice</a> and a &nbsp;U.S. Army veteran who worked in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2014. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/@emily_emiller">Emily Miller</a> is Co-Founder and CMO. She previously served as a U.S. Army Engineer Officer in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. &nbsp;</em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/@kimboleek">Kimberly Jung </a>is co-founder and CEO and a U.S. Army Engineer Officer. Led a platoon in Wardak and Ghazni Provinces in 2010-2011 and served with provincial reconstruction teams as a female engagement supplement.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/238028939&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: The Wright brothers&#39; first successful flight</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>On December 17, 1903, the first airplane took flight. Historian John Schmidt reminds what happened that day.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Professor John Schmidt is the author of &#39;On This Day in Chicago&#39;.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/238029169&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Canada seeks to reconcile with First Nations</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised that his government will work for &ldquo;full reconciliation&rdquo; with the country&rsquo;s indigenous peoples. His promise followed the release earlier this week of a report by the country&rsquo;s Truth and Reconciliation Commission that found the country&rsquo;s early policies towards the indigenous had amounted to genocide. Canada is also currently conducting a national investigation into about 1200 cases of indigenous women and girls who&rsquo;ve gone missing over the last several decades. We&rsquo;ll talk about that investigation and the Prime Minister&rsquo;s pledge with Liesl Gerntholtz, Executive Director of the Women&rsquo;s Rights Division&nbsp;at Human Rights Watch.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-c9c387db-b1e4-ee65-54d7-478d2963ed87"><a href="http://twitter.com/@LieslHRW">Liesl Gerntholtz</a> is the Executive Director of the Women&rsquo;s Rights Division </span>at <a href="http://twitter.com/@HRW">Human Rights Watch</a>.</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/238029729&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">A look at Cuba through the lenses of three photographers</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">It&rsquo;s been exactly one year since the United States and Cuba agreed to restore diplomatic relations. Since then, U.S. travel to the island has grown by 50 percent. Photographers Mario Algaze and Kathy Yates discovered the country decades ago. Their photographs of the islands are featured in new photographic exhibit, &#39;90 Miles Away: Three Views of Cuba&#39;. Algaze and Yates join us to discuss their work and the changing relationship between the US and Cuba.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:</strong>&nbsp;</p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c9c387db-b1e7-c4a4-d186-80a31f11aeb6">Kathy Yates is a photographer. </span></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em>Mario Algaze is a photographer. He was born in Cuba</em>.</li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 Dec 2015 15:26:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-17/working-afghanistans-saffron-farmers-114211 This Isn't The First Time Americans Have Shown Fear Of Refugees http://www.wbez.org/news/isnt-first-time-americans-have-shown-fear-refugees-113888 <p><div id="res456922619" previewtitle="The Statue of Liberty, as seen through windows on the south side of the Great Hall at Ellis Island."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="The Statue of Liberty, as seen through windows on the south side of the Great Hall at Ellis Island." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/21/ap_341703699854_wide-69453f4b153ef88326af0668a54bb88f2f31ef0f-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="The Statue of Liberty, as seen through windows on the south side of the Great Hall at Ellis Island. (Julie Jacobson/AP)" /></div><div><div><p>Political leaders in the national and state capitals this week began raising barriers against refugees coming to the U.S. from Syria and Iraq. They were responding to a sense of fear in the land that refugees might bring with them some of the dangers they were fleeing.</p><p>Such fears escalated sharply after the deadly terror attacks in Paris on Friday, the 13th&mdash; a November night of random slaughter that took at least 130 lives and wounded hundreds.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2015-11-18/bloomberg-poll-most-americans-oppose-syrian-refugee-resettlement">Polls</a>&nbsp;throughout the week showed&nbsp;<a href="http://www.langerresearch.com/wp-content/uploads/1173a1AfterParis.pdf">clear majorities</a>&nbsp;of Americans supporting at least &quot;a pause&quot; in the resettlement of refugees from the region being roiled by the self-proclaimed Islamic State.</p></div></div></div><div id="res456915278" previewtitle="The Bloomberg/Selzer poll asked about the best approach to dealing with the Syrian refugee crisis — proceeding with a plan to resettle 10,000 in the U.S., to filter by religion or accept none."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2015-11-18/bloomberg-poll-most-americans-oppose-syrian-refugee-resettlement" target="_blank"><img alt="The Bloomberg/Selzer poll asked about the best approach to dealing with the Syrian refugee crisis — proceeding with a plan to resettle 10,000 in the U.S., to filter by religion or accept none." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/21/take-in-syrian-refugees-_chartbuilder_custom-b76bae834062bab36cded85e3cd7059368b5a42d-s400-c85.png" style="height: 294px; width: 500px;" title="The Bloomberg/Selzer poll asked about the best approach to dealing with the Syrian refugee crisis — proceeding with a plan to resettle 10,000 in the U.S., to filter by religion or accept none. Domenico Montanaro/NPR/Bloomberg/Selzer poll, conducted Nov. 16-17, margin of error of +/- 3.9 percent" /></a></div><div><p>&nbsp;</p></div></div><p>For all that America prides itself on being &quot;a nation of immigrants&quot; symbolized by the Statue of Liberty with her lamp beside a golden door, the U.S. is also a nation of people &mdash; subject to human insecurity and fears for safety heightened over the past decade.</p><p>Within 48 hours of the attack,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/20/456713306/governor-who-started-stampede-on-refugees-says-he-only-wants-answers">Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder&nbsp;</a>had called for a pause in refugee resettlements. The Republican&#39;s state is home to a significant Muslim population and might have been a logical destination for many new arrivals. Within a day, a majority of the nation&#39;s governors had joined Snyder or gone even further. In Tennessee, a GOP legislative leader called for Syrians already resettled in Nashville to be&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/19/456502693/tennessee-lawmaker-calls-for-national-guard-to-round-up-syrian-refugees">rounded up</a>&nbsp;and turned over to federal authorities.</p><p>On Thursday, the U.S. House voted overwhelmingly to suspend the resettlement of Syrian and Iraqi refugees until each and everyone could be certified as safe by the heads of the FBI, the CIA and the Department of Homeland Security.</p><p>&quot;From a law enforcement perspective, the bill presents us with an impracticality,&quot; Attorney General Loretta Lynch said. And FBI Director James Comey, one of the three officials charged with certifying the refugees as safe, noted, &quot;It would be very, very difficult to say of anyone coming into the country that there is zero risk.&quot;</p><p>Despite the big bipartisan majority vote, perhaps no one expects this House bill to become law. It will be altered in the Senate, and it has drawn a veto threat from the White House. Nonetheless, it had to happen &mdash; if only to defuse the explosive atmosphere of anxiety even on Capitol Hill in the wake of the horrors in Paris. All these politicians were giving voice to the powerful popular impression &mdash; visible in much of the media &mdash; that lax policies and porous borders could expose Americans to the same sort of violence visited on the French.</p><p>Prosecutors said Friday they determined that&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/11/20/world/europe/ap-eu-paris-attacks-the-latest.html">two of the suicide bombers</a>&nbsp;at France&#39;s national stadium had passed through Greece last month. Greece is a common European entry point for many refugees because of its proximity to Syria. It scarcely seems to matter, however, that the core of the Paris problem is that principal players were European nationals &mdash; or that the supposed mastermind was&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/19/456683674/suspected-planner-of-paris-attacks-took-conventional-journey-to-radicalization">radicalized in a French prison</a>.</p><p>This is not, of course, the first time Americans have confronted a sudden influx of refugees. And it is not the first time the impulse has been to raise the drawbridge:</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_100112020274.jpg" style="height: 213px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Rescuers work to free trapped survivors and find dead victims in a four story building that collapsed in the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)" /><strong>2010 &mdash; Haitians:&nbsp;</strong>The earthquake in Haiti in 2010 increased the already strong incentives for Haitians to attempt the hazardous seaborne transit to the U.S., whether legally or illegally. Given the new devastation in the island nation, the U.S. relaxed its usual policy of deportation for undocumented Haitians already in the U.S. illegally, granting them Temporary Protected Status. Similar status had been granted to arrivals of other Latin American countries after earthquakes and hurricanes. But the idea of accepting new Haitian immigration because of this disaster was strongly resisted both in Florida and beyond.</p><p><strong>1980 &mdash; Cubans:</strong>&nbsp;In the summer of 1980, an economic crisis in Cuba led the Communist regime of Fidel Castro to allow thousands of Cubans to leave the country. Over the course of months, perhaps 125,000 Cubans made the trip from Cuba to the U.S. in a massive, but haphazard, flotilla known as the &quot;Mariel boatlift.&quot; Public opinion was positive at first, but soured at reports that Castro had salted the exodus with an admixture of inmates from prisons and hospitals. Partly as a result, relocation was slowed while the &quot;Marielitos&quot; arrivals were vetted and processed at military reservations in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Puerto Rico and Arkansas, as well as South Florida. In Arkansas, there were riots at the camp and escapes. The political fallout caused the defeat that fall of the state&#39;s young first-term Democratic governor, Bill Clinton.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_7501250109.jpg" style="height: 203px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="A little girl in a pedicab, and her driver stare as they pass a demonstration of nine anti-war activists before the United States embassy in Saigon, Friday, Jan. 25, 1975. The activists, led by David Harris, left, of Menlo Park, Calif. former husband of folk singer Joan Baez, passed out leaflets demanding the end of U.S. intervention in South Vietnam. (AP Photo)" /><strong>1975 &mdash; Vietnamese:</strong>&nbsp;The fall of Saigon sent hundreds of thousands of South Vietnamese fleeing from the triumphant new Communist regime. Some had the means to travel, while others were forced onto flimsy vessels that were barely seaworthy. They came to be known as &quot;boat people.&quot; Many had the U.S. as their ultimate destination, and a young Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown of California resisted their relocation. He even tried to prevent planeloads of refugees from landing in his state at Travis Air Force Base. Brown eventually relented, and Vietnamese have assimilated successfully in California and elsewhere since. Returning to the governorship in 2011, Brown has been a vocal supporter of accepting Syrian refugees.</p><p><strong>Mid-1950s </strong>&mdash;<strong> Post-WWII Europeans, including Jews who survived the Holocaust:</strong>&nbsp;When the Soviet Union was tightening its grip on Eastern Europe through proxy governments run by the Communist Party, President Dwight D. Eisenhower released a plan to bring a quarter-of-a-million asylum-seekers to the U.S. But the end of World War II in 1945 sent waves of refugees in multiple directions. Here again, the popular reaction was resistance. A Gallup poll in 1946 found 59 percent of Americans disapproved of a plan to accept those displaced by the war &mdash; including Jews, who had survived the Holocaust. President Harry Truman directed that 40,000 refugees be admitted in December of that year, a number that barely registered against the magnitude of human movement at the time.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_781671446777.jpg" style="height: 224px; width: 310px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="In this Aug. 22, 1939 file photo, the S.S. Parita, with 700 European Jewish refugees on board, lists after it was beached near the Ritz Hotel in Tel Aviv, an all-Jewish town in Palestine, under British mandate. The state of Israel declared independence in 1948. (AP Photo)" /><strong>Late 1930s</strong><strong> &mdash; European Jews before the Holocaust:</strong>&nbsp;Those seeking political asylum from the rise of Nazism in central Europe often wanted to come to the U.S., and some with the necessary means or connections managed to do so. Still, others were turned away. A Fortune magazine poll in 1938 found 67 percent opposed to allowing &quot;German, Austrian and other political refugees&quot; to come to the U.S. That same year, a troubled President Franklin D. Roosevelt convened a 29-nation conference to discuss the Jewish refugees in particular, who were fleeing Hitler&#39;s rise.</p><p>As one account put it, &quot;If each nation [present] had agreed on that day to take in 17,000 Jews at once, every Jew in the [German] Reich could have been saved.&quot; But the conference, which was held in France, accomplished little. The U.S. and Great Britain were not willing to lead the way in accepting substantially higher numbers of Jewish refugees. In one especially notorious case, the ocean liner&nbsp;St. Louis&nbsp;arrived at Miami in 1939, but was not allowed to disembark more than 900 passengers &mdash; nearly all of them Jewish refugees. The ship returned to Europe, where many of the 900 would die in the Holocaust. That same year, a Gallup Poll found 61 percent of Americans opposed to taking in 10,000 refugee children, most of them German Jews.</p><p><strong>1918 &mdash; Post-WWI Europeans:&nbsp;</strong>Hundreds of thousands of people tried to come to the U.S. after the end of World War I in 1918. Their efforts merged with the surging immigration that had characterized the decades before the war, bringing waves of Italians, Greeks, Eastern Europeans and Russians to America. These populations found assimilation more difficult than Northern Europeans had before them.</p><p>This same convergence of concerns is evident in the current panic over Syrians, which bleeds into a more general public unease over immigration in general. For Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and others, the threat of terrorists arriving among refugees is an extension of a larger resistance to immigration. And that story is nearly as deeply woven into American history as the idea of immigration itself.</p><p><strong>In the </strong><strong>1850s</strong><strong> it was the Irish, </strong>driven onto the sea by famine, dispersing to the New World and the Australia. America also greeted many Germans in those same years before the Civil War, fleeing turmoil at home and arriving in force in New York, the Midwest and even frontier Texas.</p><p><strong>The late 1800s and early 1900s brought the first big waves of Italians, </strong><strong>Greeks</strong><strong> <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/poland-elsewhere-why-so-many-poles-came-chicago-113578" target="_blank">and Poles</a>,</strong> as well as many Jews from Russia and from eastern and central Europe. Chinese, many of them refugees from political unrest in Asia, came in great numbers in this era as well.</p><p>The U.S. set up a processing camp on Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay that operated from 1910 to 1940. Arriving immigrants from Asia stayed there for vetting and processing that could take many months. The rates of exclusion for arrivals here was far greater than for Ellis Island, the processing site in New York Harbor, hard by the Statue of Liberty.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/11/21/456857350/this-isnt-the-first-time-americans-have-shown-fear-of-refugees" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Mon, 23 Nov 2015 11:09:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/isnt-first-time-americans-have-shown-fear-refugees-113888 U.S. and Cuba to collaborate on marine life protection http://www.wbez.org/news/us-and-cuba-collaborate-marine-life-protection-113456 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/A diver makes an immersion at the International diving Center Maria la Gorda on the Guanahacabibes peninsula.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_94664"><img alt="A diver makes an immersion at the International diving Center Maria la Gorda on the Guanahacabibes peninsula in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on June 10, 2015. (Chris Gillette/AP)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/1021_cuba-diving-624x468.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="A diver makes an immersion at the International diving Center Maria la Gorda on the Guanahacabibes peninsula in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on June 10, 2015. (Chris Gillette/AP)" /><p>The United States and Cuba are teaming up to safeguard marine life in protected areas in the Florida Straits and the Gulf of Mexico. The two governments &ndash; and scientists from each country &ndash; will share resources and best management practices to help protect habitats and fish populations.</p></div><p>The Florida Keys <a href="http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/" target="_blank">National Marine Sanctuary</a> will establish a sister sanctuary relationship with Cuba&rsquo;s Guanahacabibes National Park, and the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Texas will be paired with Banco de San Antonio, off the western tip of Cuba.</p><p>Billy Causey&nbsp;of NOAA helped broker the U.S.-Cuba deal. He tells&nbsp;<em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s</em> Jeremy Hobson why the collaboration will benefit both the U.S. and Cuba.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/10/21/us-cuba-marine-life-partnership" target="_blank"><em>via Here &amp; Now</em></a></p></p> Wed, 21 Oct 2015 16:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/us-and-cuba-collaborate-marine-life-protection-113456 Internet access expands in Cuba - for those who can afford it http://www.wbez.org/news/internet-access-expands-cuba-those-who-can-afford-it-113194 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/kahncuba--5--edit_custom-d28b46ce7c1fa4f28843f0b8da141f0a050631d2-s600-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res446012363" previewtitle="Havana residents huddle in front of the Habana Libre hotel, trying to log onto the Internet."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Havana residents huddle in front of the Habana Libre hotel, trying to log onto the Internet." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/kahncuba--5--edit_custom-d28b46ce7c1fa4f28843f0b8da141f0a050631d2-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 442px; width: 600px;" title="Havana residents huddle in front of the Habana Libre hotel, trying to log onto the Internet. (Carrie Kahn/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>The best place to see Cuba&#39;s Internet explosion is along the busy Havana thoroughfare known as La Rampa, or the Ramp.</p></div></div></div><p>Named for its sloping descent toward the sea, it is congested and loud. Still, crowds pack the sidewalks, office alcoves and driveways here to log on. They huddle within a few blocks of huge cell towers atop the Havana Libre luxury hotel. All eyes are glued to smartphones, tablets and laptops.</p><p>Raul Cuba, 41, types a lengthy Internet access code and password into his phone. He only learned how to log on a month ago.</p><p>&quot;I&#39;d never been on Facebook before and the first time I did, I got so excited. I started chatting with my family in Miami, in Italy and Spain,&quot; he says.</p><p>Until this summer, Internet access only was available to tourists and officials, but since then the Castro government has set up dozens of pay-as-you-go public Wi-Fi hotspots around the country. And last month, President Obama allowed U.S. companies to invest in the island&#39;s telecommunication industry.</p><div id="res446000716" previewtitle="Huge cell towers top Havana's Habana Libre luxury hotel, and locals gather nearby to take advantage of the Internet access."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Huge cell towers top Havana's Habana Libre luxury hotel, and locals gather nearby to take advantage of the Internet access." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/habana-libre-landov_custom-734f93c41b8f404043f1ebdfa6e7231c85b37e21-s600-c85.jpg" style="margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; height: 373px; width: 600px;" title="Huge cell towers top Havana's Habana Libre luxury hotel, and locals gather nearby to take advantage of the Internet access. (Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters/Landov)" /></div><div><p>But Cuba&#39;s public Wi-Fi remains out of most people&#39;s reach. An access card sold by the state phone company, ETECSA, costs about $2 for an hour of Internet use, while the average state salary in Cuba is about $20 a month. The lucky ones have relatives abroad sending money and devices back home &mdash; or they work in Cuba&#39;s tourist industry, earning tips in dollars.</p></div></div><p>Out on the Ramp, you can buy one of the Internet access cards for about $3 on Cuba&#39;s ubiquitous black market &mdash; more expensive, but it comes with technical assistance courtesy of Manuel Garcias, who&#39;s got a stack of cards for sale.</p><p>Asked where he gets the cards, he says, &quot;they come here and sell them to me &mdash; the husband or cousin of someone who works at ETECSA.&quot;</p><p><strong>&#39;The Rest Of Us With Nothing&#39;</strong></p><p>So far, only about 5 percent of Cubans can get online &mdash; one of the lowest Internet penetration rates in the world. And you don&#39;t have to go far to see those left off Cuba&#39;s Internet highway.</p><p>Just a few blocks down the Rampa, where the street dead-ends at Havana&#39;s picturesque Malecon seawall, is old-school Cuba &mdash; the original nighttime gathering spot for roving musicians, necking couples and revelers of all ages. There&#39;s barely a cell phone or laptop in sight.</p><p><img alt="Mari Jimenez, 53, uses an Internet access card sold by the state phone company." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/kahncuba--17--edit_custom-ea64ff4581ff321443e31bc733aecbf79ed74167-s300-c85.jpg" style="height: 206px; width: 320px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Mari Jimenez, 53, uses an Internet access card sold by the state phone company. (Carrie Kahn/NPR)" /></p><p>Franc Bernal Gonzalez, 17, and some friends have the night off from their mandatory military service. Only two of them have cell phones &mdash; old, little ones, where the only thing they do is make a call.</p><div id="res446012093" previewtitle="Mari Jimenez, 53, uses an Internet access card sold by the state phone company."><div><p>&quot;In Cuba, we didn&#39;t used to see so many people with all this stuff and the rest of us with nothing,&quot; Bernal says. &quot;These differences started showing up a few years back, but have really grown bigger lately.&quot;</p></div></div><p>The government says it will boost the country&#39;s extremely low Internet access rate to 50 percent in the next five years, finances permitting &mdash; but hardline politics may cut into that goal. The No. 2 official in Cuba&#39;s Communist Party recently accused outsiders of taking advantage of greater Internet freedom to &quot;penetrate us and do ideological work for a new conquest.&quot;</p><p><strong>Video Chats And Beauty Tips</strong></p><p>Back on La Rampa, there&#39;s no evidence of political penetration or subversive web surfing. Nearly everyone here is video-chatting with relatives abroad.</p><p>&quot;My love! How are you, my love!&quot; exclaims Mari Jimenez, 53, reaching her son, who&#39;s driving in Miami.</p><div id="res446208657"><div>Jimenez just learned a month ago how to use her new iPhone 5, sent by her son. She has long, acrylic white nails &mdash; except on her index finger. &quot;It&#39;s much faster to use the phone without the nail,&quot; she says. &quot;I don&#39;t want to waste time or money.&quot; She&#39;ll just glue it back on when she gets home.</div></div><p>Meanwhile, 18-year-old Daniella Hidalgo is checking out makeup tips from a YouTube beauty guru named Yuya in Mexico City. Unfortunately, the signal isn&#39;t that good and she only gets to see a few of the tips before the video cuts out.</p><p>I ask Hidalgo if she visits news sites or anything political. No way, she says: &quot;I&#39;m paying for this, I&#39;m not going to waste my money on politics.&quot;</p><p>Jorge Bativia&#39;s been trying unsuccessfully for the past hour to video-chat with his girlfriend in Australia &mdash; whom he first met via an online chat &mdash; and is ready to give up.</p><p>Even so, he says, he&#39;s glad the Internet finally came to Cuba.</p><p>&quot;Even if [the government] wanted to take it back, they can&#39;t,&quot; he says. &quot;You can&#39;t keep people&#39;s eyes covered forever.&quot;</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/10/06/445998527/internet-access-expands-in-cuba-for-those-who-can-afford-it?ft=nprml&amp;f=445998527" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Tue, 06 Oct 2015 10:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/internet-access-expands-cuba-those-who-can-afford-it-113194 LGBTQ policy in Cuba http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-31/lgbtq-policy-cuba-112781 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Emmanuel%20Huybrechts.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Emmanuel Huybrechts)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/221745560&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The struggle for LGBTQ rights in Cuba</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Cuba has a conflicted history with its gay and transgender population. The country imprisoned people with AIDS in the early years of the epidemic. During the Mariel boatlift in 1980, thousands of homosexuals were &ldquo;encouraged&rdquo; to leave the country. Yet Cuba is one of a the few countries that offers free gender assignment surgery to transgenders. We&rsquo;ll talk with Cuban physician and LGBT activist, Dr. Alberto Roque Guerra. He&rsquo;ll tell us about his years of advocacy to better the lives of Cuba&rsquo;s LGBT Citizens.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-af4e9124-8560-72b9-5404-52b6a86551e2">Alberto Roque Guerra is a medical doctor, specialist and professor at General Hospital in Cuba, and LGBTQ activist.</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/221746542&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Critic calls Obama&#39;s climate change policy &#39;baffling&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>President Barack Obama is visiting the Alaskan Arctic. It&rsquo;s the first such visit by a sitting U.S. president. Meanwhile, his political critics as well as his allies, continue to criticize his climate policy over decisions like the Keystone XL pipeline, offshore energy drilling and carbon emission standards. We&rsquo;ll talk about Obama&rsquo;s climate policy with Mark Hertsgaard, environment correspondent for The Nation magazine. We&rsquo;ll ask Hertsgaard about what he calls Mr. Obama&rsquo;s &#39;bafflingly two-faced climate policy&#39;.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-af4e9124-8565-4c48-aff7-1f36bb5d9de1"><a href="http://twitter.com/markhertsgaard">Mark Hertsgaard</a> is an environment correspondent for </span><a href="http://twitter.com/TheNation">The Nation</a>. His new article is &#39;Three Weeks After Obama Announced His Clean-Power Plan, He Greenlit New Oil Drilling in the Arctic&#39;. His most recent book is HOT: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 31 Aug 2015 14:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-31/lgbtq-policy-cuba-112781 White House explores ways to do business with Cuba http://www.wbez.org/news/white-house-explores-ways-do-business-cuba-112755 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-483711172_wide-dab18d4d4e6ce1cfa38f290f818727773a1fa941-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div>The Obama administration is considering ways to further ease travel and restrictions on Cuba. There is still an embargo in place and it would take an act of Congress to lift that.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The president, however, does have ways to make it easier for Americans to go to Havana or to sell goods there. A lot has changed already since the White House announced its new approach last year.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Washington, D.C. lawyer Robert Muse managed to get a U.S. government license to start ferry services to Cuba. He describes the process this way:</div><div>&quot;As Ernest Hemingway wrote about going bankrupt, it happened both slowly and then suddenly. I had applied for the license several years ago and it just sat there in a kind of policy void.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Once President Obama announced an opening with Cuba late last year, everything changed. &quot;Out of the blue,&quot; Muse says, &quot;suddenly the license was granted.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>That doesn&#39;t mean this is a done deal. Cuba still has to agree to allow ferries to bring people and goods from Miami. But at least on the U.S. side, he says, it is getting easier to get licenses, especially for sales to Cuba&#39;s small, but emerging private sector.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;That could be anything from a pizza oven to restaurant lighting to napkins and chairs. Anything you could think of. So the authority exists,&quot; Muse says.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>He&#39;d like to see the Obama administration go further to boost trade. So would Sarah Stephens of the Center for Democracy in the Americas, who has taken U.S. lawmakers and others to Cuba for many years.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;One thing that we are seeing is that many of these companies, U.S. companies that are going down to learn what they can about the market and Cuban priorities are coming back and applying for licenses and getting them,&quot; Stephens says.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>She&#39;s asked the Treasury Department to change the regulations for travel too to make it easier for individuals to go &mdash; as long as they are on educational, cultural, religious or family visits, as required by U.S. law.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;If individuals are going to Cuba, the money they are spending is going directly into the hands of individual Cubans and that&#39;s really the goal,&quot; Stephens says.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Not so says Frank Calzon of the Center for a Free Cuba.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;The folks who travel to Cuba today are subsidizing the Cuban military and the security forces because the Cuban travel industry is completely controlled by the Cuban military. That&#39;s a fact,&quot; he says.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Despite warmer relations with the U.S., he says Cuban authorities still routinely round up and beat up dissidents. He argues that having more Americans going to Cuba or doing business there won&#39;t improve things for average Cubans.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;The contrary happens,&quot; Calzon says. American corporations that are in Cuba become lobbyists of the Cuban dictatorship because they are afraid of what the Cuban government can do to their investment.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Calzon argues that President Obama has already gone too far to undermine an embargo that was put in place by Congress.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But Muse, the D.C. lawyer, says the president can still carve out exceptions, and should before he leaves office.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;The president can leave the U.S. embargo on Cuba like a piece of cheese that&#39;s far more holes than cheese,&quot; he adds.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The White House will only say that it &quot;continues to explore regulatory changes to provide new opportunities for American citizens and U.S. businesses.&quot;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/08/28/435416074/white-house-explores-ways-to-do-business-with-cuba?ft=nprml&amp;f=435416074" target="_blank"><em>Parallels</em></a></div></p> Fri, 28 Aug 2015 10:36:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/white-house-explores-ways-do-business-cuba-112755 Oak Park Library explores sister library with Cuba http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-10/oak-park-library-explores-sister-library-cuba-112608 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ernest Hemingway in cuba Florida Keys--Public Libraries_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Oak Park is the birthplace of Ernest Hemingway. Ernest Hemingway loved Cuba. Cuba has libraries. That all adds up to an idea hatched by the head of the Oak Park Library: a sister library with Cuba. It seems more possible now that Cuba and the US have established diplomatic ties. The person behind the idea, Oak Park Library Executive Director David Seleb, joins us.</p></p> Mon, 10 Aug 2015 12:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-10/oak-park-library-explores-sister-library-cuba-112608 Afternoon Shift: Spotlight on suburban living http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-12/afternoon-shift-spotlight-suburban-living-112019 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Flickr%20spakattacks.jpg" style="height: 517px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/spakattacks)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205191862&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Are &#39;Best Places to Live&#39; lists accurate?</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">With the &ldquo;top 10&rdquo; and &ldquo;best places to live&rdquo; lists popping up all over the web, we&rsquo;ve been wondering which suburbs are the best to buy a house and raise a family. Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business real estate reporter, Dennis Rodkin, tells us what to believe and why we should be skeptical of those lists. Marty Winefield, an Evanston-based real estate broker with Coldwell Banker, also gives his insights.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a31-72d3-df2f-fdbdadf29c51"><strong>Guests: </strong></span></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Dennis_Rodkin?lang=en">Dennis Rodkin</a> is a Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business reporter.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a31-72d3-df2f-fdbdadf29c51"><a href="https://twitter.com/MartyWinefield">Marty Winefield</a></span> is a Coldwell Banker real estate broker.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205191457&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Photography collection depicts Cuba&#39;s Special Period</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a33-e80b-15c3-b96053ed3c2b">Madeleine Plonsker visited Cuba for the first time in 2002 and it changed her life. She saw examples of modern photography that haunted her and she has returned more than a dozen times since. Her visits in those years have resulted in a striking collection of photography that has been gathered in the new book &ldquo;The Light In Cuban Eyes&rdquo; from Lake Forest College Press. She joins us to talk about the book</span> and her experiences in Cuba.</p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a33-e80b-15c3-b96053ed3c2b"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Madeleine Plonsker is an art collector, philanthropist and author of </em></span><em><a href="https://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/programs/english/press/books/cubaneyes.php">&ldquo;The Light in Cuban Eyes.&rdquo;</a></em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192082&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Ogden Dunes Democrat enters Indiana governor&#39;s race</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">A Northwest Indiana woman hopes to become the state&rsquo;s first female governor. Democrat Karen Tallian officially kicked off her campaign on May 12 to seek her party&rsquo;s nomination for governor. The veteran lawmaker wants to increase Indiana&rsquo;s minimum wage and push for civil rights protections for the LGBT community. Tallian says current governor Mike Pence, a Republican, is beatable due to a series of missteps, but she&rsquo;s not the only Democrat seeking the nomination. WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter Michael Puente joins us to talk about Tallian&rsquo;s candidacy and the overall race for Indiana governor.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a35-00fd-4887-50be4cb9982d">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.twitter.com/mikepuentenews">Michael Puente</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192092&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Illinois High School Association launches initiative to make high school sports safer</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The group that represents Illinois high schools has a new campaign aimed at making high school sports safer. &ldquo;Play Smart. Play Hard.&rdquo; is an educational resource for coaches, parents and student-athletes. And there&rsquo;s another piece to the initiative: A new advisory council that will suggest changes to policies at the Illinois High School Association. Kurt Gibson, assistant executive director of the IHSA, joins us with more.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a36-a657-4337-2f6aea6e0af2">Plus Dr. Cynthia LaBella joins us to talk about the initiative. She&rsquo;s the medical director for the Institute of Sports Medicine at Lurie Children&rsquo;s Hospital and head of the concussion program. She&rsquo;s also a member of IHSA&rsquo;s Sports Medicine Advisory Committee. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guests: </strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="http://www.ihsa.org/AbouttheIHSA/AdministrativeSupportStaff/KurtGibson.aspx">Kurt Gibson</a> is associate executive director of the IHSA.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a36-a657-4337-2f6aea6e0af2"><a href="https://www.luriechildrens.org/en-us/care-services/find-a-doctor/Pages/LaBella_Cynthia_2236.aspx">Dr. Cynthia LaBella</a></span> is the medical director of the Institute of Sports Medicine at Lurie Children&rsquo;s Hospital.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192294&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Tech Shift: UI Labs opens its hub for advanced manufacturing</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">After much fanfare, &nbsp;Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute is open. After winning a $70 million federal grant back in 2014 for advanced manufacturing, the UI Labs tech hub is up and running. UI Labs chairman Warren Holtsberg &nbsp;gives us the details.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a3b-5cad-285b-f5d9f0045722">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.uilabs.org/board/">Warren Holtsberg</a> is the chairman at UI Labs.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192096&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Chicago gets Obama Library but exact site still undecided</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">After months of speculation and rumors surrounding where the Obama Presidential Library would break ground, Chicago is the place for that space. It&rsquo;ll be called the Barack Obama Presidential Center. According to the Obama Foundation, it&rsquo;ll include a library, museum, and archives. What&rsquo;s not clear is where it&rsquo;ll be. WBEZ&rsquo;s Yolanda Perdomo attended Tuesday&rsquo;s event and joins us in studio.</p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a3c-b161-1876-eb27efbb7cf1"><strong>Guest:</strong><em> </em></span><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/yperdomo">Yolanda Perdomo</a> is a WBEZ reporter.&nbsp;</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192098&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">What will the Obama Presidential Library look like?&nbsp;</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">AThe Obama Presidential Library is officially coming to Chicago. As for the design: obviously Chicago&rsquo;s a city known for its architecture. How much more pressure does that put on the Obamas and the Obama Foundation for their decisions regarding architecture, design and urban planning? Blair Kamin is architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune and has been busy writing about these aspects of the Library. He joins us with his thoughts and some tips for the First Family. &nbsp;</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a3e-0775-7839-2154016b2b8c">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/BlairKamin?lang=en">Blair Kamin</a> is tChicago Tribune&rsquo;s architecture critic.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 12 May 2015 17:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-12/afternoon-shift-spotlight-suburban-living-112019 Worldview: Summit of the Americas to host historic meeting between Cuba and the US http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-10/worldview-summit-americas-host-historic-meeting-between-cuba-and-us <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP406371945566.jpg" style="height: 404px; width: 620px;" title="A demonstrator holds up a Panamanian flag during a protest march by the participants of the Cumbre de los Pueblos or People's Summit, against U.S. policies in Latin America, in Panama City, Thursday, April 9, 2015. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/200213427&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></div><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Obama and Castro to meet at the Summit of the Americas</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">President Obama is at the Summit of the Americas in Panama. Cuba is also attending the meetings. US-Cuban relations are on the agenda and President Obama says he is looking at whether to remove Cuba from the list of nations that sponsor terrorism. &nbsp;This would be another major step in US-Cuban relations and help pave the way for the reopening of embassies in each country. We&rsquo;ll discuss the summit and the state of US-Cuban relations with Alberto Coll, director of the Latin American Studies program at DePaul University.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-b6e3d00b-a502-eac5-ee1d-3d85540ea8df">Alberto Coll is a professor of law at <a href="https://twitter.com/DePaulU">DePaul University</a> and director of the Latin American Studies program. At the age of 6 he witnessed his father&rsquo;s arrest for opposing the Cuban government.&nbsp;</span></em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/200214869&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The Bolivian film &quot;Olvidados looks at Operation Condor in South America</span></font></p><p>The film is set during the military dictatorships of the 1970&rsquo;s in Latin America. It tells the story of Operation Condor, a collaboration between the military regimes of Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina. The CIA-sponsored Operation Condor led to the disappearance of thousands of opponents to South America&rsquo;s military dictatorships. &nbsp;The film is screening as part of the Chicago Latino Film Festival. &nbsp;Director Carlos Bolado, writer and producer and actress Carla Ortiz and film contributor Milos Stehlik join us to discuss the film and this period in Latin American history.</p><p><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><p><em><span style="font-size: 16px; white-space: pre-wrap; line-height: 1.38;"><a href="https://twitter.com/Cbolex">Carlos Bolado</a> is the director of <a href="http://olvidadosfilm.com/home-en.html">Olvidados</a>.</span></em></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.38;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c7ad2390-a504-d9f0-e978-fd58512c0af2"><span style="font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;"><a href="https://twitter.com/CarlaOrtizO">Carla Ortiz</a> is an actress and co-writer and co-producer of <a href="http://olvidadosfilm.com/home-en.html">Olvidados</a>.</span></span></em></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.38;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.38;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/milosstehlik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/facetschicago">Facets Chicago</a> and the WBEZ film contributor.&nbsp;</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/200216646&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Weekend Passport: Enrica&nbsp;</span></font><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Rocca shares her secrets to successful cicchetti</span></p><p>Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll tell us where to learn to cook like a Venetian. Chef Enrica Rocca joins us in the studio to share some of her favorite dishes.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em>Nari Safavi is one of the co-founders of the <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/default.aspx">PASFARDA Arts &amp; Cultural Exchange</a>.</em></p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/enricarocca">Enrica Rocca</a> is a world renowned chef. Her cooking school was named one of the world&rsquo;s top ten by Gourmet Magazine.</em></p></p> Fri, 10 Apr 2015 15:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-10/worldview-summit-americas-host-historic-meeting-between-cuba-and-us