WBEZ | Panama http://www.wbez.org/tags/panama Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Earthquakes in China, Berlusconi's final appeal and extraodinary rendition http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-23/earthquakes-china-berlusconis-final-appeal-and-extraodinary-rendition <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/China earthquake.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Author Wenguang Huang weighs in on how the Chinese government is responding to Monday&#39;s earthquakes and also takes the pulse of the Chinese economy. Italian former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi could be banned from politics, and Panama releases an ex-CIA agent.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102303841&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/china-s-economy-berlusconi-s-final-appeal-and-extr.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/china-s-economy-berlusconi-s-final-appeal-and-extr" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Earthquakes in China, Berlusconi's final appeal and extraodinary rendition" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Tue, 23 Jul 2013 11:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-23/earthquakes-china-berlusconis-final-appeal-and-extraodinary-rendition Global Activism: Organization works to safeguard cultural heritage of Panama’s Naso people http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-03-15/global-activism-organization-works-safeguard-cultural-heritage-panama%E2%80%99s- <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-March/2012-03-15/Dona Lupita y bebe.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Each Thursday on our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/globalactivism" target="_blank"><em>Global Activism</em></a> segment we hear about an individual who’s decided to work to make the world a better place. Sarah Antrim Cambium is the founder of the <a href="http://tjerdi.wordpress.com/about/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">My Grandmother’s River Project</a>, which aims to help the Naso, an indiginous community in Panama. The Naso are a community of 3800 and are struggling hold on to their culture and ancestral lands.</p></p> Thu, 15 Mar 2012 17:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-03-15/global-activism-organization-works-safeguard-cultural-heritage-panama%E2%80%99s- Worldview 3.15.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-03-15 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/episode/images/2012-march/2012-03-15/copy-safetyhousegaytrans2luongojpgcropdisplay0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In the last two weeks, at least 14 young Iraqis who were perceived to be gay or part of the emo culture have been killed in Baghdad. Scott Long, a <a href="http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/hrp/visitingfellows/current_fellows.html" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">human rights fellow</a> at Harvard Law School, tells <em>Worldview </em>why these kids have recently become the target of increased violence. And on <a href="http://www.wbez.org/globalactivism" target="_blank"><em>Global Activism</em></a>, Sarah Antrim-Cambium, the founder of <a href="http://tjerdi.wordpress.com/about/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">My Grandmother’s River Project</a>, discusses her organization's efforts to safeguard the culture of the Naso, an indigenous group in Panama.</p></p> Thu, 15 Mar 2012 13:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-03-15 A critical look at pending free trade agreements http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-01/critical-look-pending-free-trade-agreements-91401 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-September/2011-09-01/FTA3.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>In 1994, the United States, Canada and Mexico implemented the <a href="http://www.ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/north-american-free-trade-agreement-nafta" target="_blank">North American Free Trade Agreement</a> (NAFTA). At the time, proponents of the landmark agreement said NAFTA would create hundreds of thousands of high-wage jobs in the U.S. It was also supposed to pull Mexico’s economy into the First World and transform it into a robust market for American goods.</p><p>After seventeen years, it’s clear that NAFTA hasn't lived up to expectations. Yet after the August recess, Congress plans to vote on three more free trade agreements -- this time with South Korea, Panama and Colombia. With President Obama and politicians on both sides of the aisle under tremendous pressure to create jobs, the likelihood is high that they'll pass.</p><p>We sift through the facts and myths of free trade agreements with Laura Carlsen, director of the <a href="http://www.cipamericas.org/" target="_blank">Americas Program of the Center for International Policy</a> and a columnist for <a href="http://www.fpif.org/" target="_blank"><em>Foreign Policy in Focus</em></a>.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 01 Sep 2011 15:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-09-01/critical-look-pending-free-trade-agreements-91401 “Congo Princess” works to preserve Afro-Panamanian identity http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/%E2%80%9Ccongo-princess%E2%80%9D-works-preserve-afro-panamanian-identity <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/congo-princess-panama_306x199.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>An ethnic group known as the Congos have lived in Panama for centuries. They&rsquo;re the descendants of slaves, many of whom fled to isolated islands to escape Spanish rule. Throughout the years, Congos have managed to preserve their unique Afro-Panamanian identity. But as they integrate into mainstream Panamanian life, their traditions are increasingly at risk. The World Vision Report&rsquo;s Marlon Bishop brings us the story of one woman in Panama City&nbsp; working to keep the Congo culture alive. <br />&nbsp;</p><p><em>This piece originally aired on the <a href="http://www.Prx.org" target="_blank">World Vision Report</a> and was provided by the <a href="http://www.prx.org" target="_blank">Public Radio Exchange.</a></em></p></p> Thu, 18 Nov 2010 17:07:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/%E2%80%9Ccongo-princess%E2%80%9D-works-preserve-afro-panamanian-identity