WBEZ | Ireland http://www.wbez.org/tags/ireland Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Worldview: Ireland's corporate tax code, connecting kids to nature and songs to boost the birth rate http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-05-29/worldview-irelands-corporate-tax-code-connecting-kids-nature-and-songs <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/wv_scotlandyard.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F94530615&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-connecting-kids-to-nature-and-songs-to-b.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-connecting-kids-to-nature-and-songs-to-b" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Ireland's corporate tax code, connecting kids to nature and songs to boost the birth rate" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Wed, 29 May 2013 08:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-05-29/worldview-irelands-corporate-tax-code-connecting-kids-nature-and-songs Remembering Ireland's Bloody Sunday, 40 years later http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-30/remembering-irelands-bloody-sunday-40-years-later-95955 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-30/ireland1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Today is the 40th anniversary of the Bloody Sunday massacre, when British soldiers shot 26 unarmed civil-rights protesters and bystanders. More than half of those shot died.</p><p>At age 15, <a href="http://donmullan.com/" target="_blank">Don Mullan</a> witnessed the event. His book, <em>Eyewitness Bloody Sunday</em>, was one of the catalysts that pushed then Prime Minister Tony Blair to establish a second, more critical, inquiry into Bloody Sunday in 1998. The inquiry lasted until 2010 and prompted a historic apology from British Prime Minister David Cameron. He described the events of Bloody Sunday as “unjustified and unjustifiable.”</p><p>Don tells <em>Worldview</em> about what he witnessed first-hand in Ireland, 40 years ago.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>Don Mullan is giving a public talk at DePaul University's School of Public Service on February 7 at 12PM. The talk will take place at 14 East Jackson Avenue, on the 16th floor.</em></p></p> Mon, 30 Jan 2012 16:35:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-30/remembering-irelands-bloody-sunday-40-years-later-95955 Worldview 1.30.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-01-30 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/episode/images/2012-january/2012-01-30/scotland3.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Scotland recently announced plans to hold a referendum on independence from Britain. Alex Salmond, Scotland’s first minister, says this would be the country's “most important decision for 300 years.” Local Scot Euan Hague walks us through the history of Scottish-English relations and tells us why he favors an independent Scotland. Also, today marks 40 years since Ireland's Bloody Sunday massacre, where British soldiers shot 26 unarmed civil-rights protesters and bystanders. At age 15, Don Mullan witnessed the events. In 1998, his book, <em>Eyewitness Bloody Sunday</em>, helped push Prime Minister Tony Blair to establish an inquiry into "Bloody Sunday." <em>Worldview</em> talks to Don about that day and the current state of peace in Northern Ireland.</p></p> Mon, 30 Jan 2012 15:35:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-01-30 Proposed European credit rating agency set to give American “big three” competition http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-21/proposed-european-credit-rating-agency-set-give-american-%E2%80%9Cbig-three%E2%80%9D-com <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-July/2011-07-21/german.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>American credit ratings agencies recently downgraded Greece, Portugal and Ireland’s debt to junk status, making it harder for the EU to avoid an economic meltdown. In Europe, there’s growing discontent over these agencies’ unchecked power. Earlier this week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel called for the creation of a new European credit ratings agency.</p><p><a href="http://www.rolandberger.com/expertise/experts/expert_profile/rbsc-exp-Markus_Krall.html" target="_blank">Markus Krall</a>, an economist at Roland Burger in Germany who's leading the effort, tells us how it would work.</p></p> Thu, 21 Jul 2011 15:06:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-07-21/proposed-european-credit-rating-agency-set-give-american-%E2%80%9Cbig-three%E2%80%9D-com Can Irish survive beyond sláinte? http://www.wbez.org/story/brian-o%E2%80%99conchubhair/can-irish-survive-beyond-sl%C3%A1inte-83888 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-17/O&#039;Conchubhair-Brian.jpg" alt="" /><p><h1 id="internal-source-marker_0.052819848386948975"><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">There&rsquo;s no doubt &ldquo;sláinte&rdquo; will be heard in Irish pubs throughout Chicago on St. Patrick&rsquo;s Day. It&rsquo;s the favorite Irish-language (Irish Gaelic) toast for those who hoist pints of Guinness. But beyond St. Patrick&rsquo;s Day, a linguist worries about the language&rsquo;s long-term survival. </span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">&ldquo;The challenge is to have Irish survive more as just a few calcified phrases like &lsquo;sláinte,&rsquo; speckling our English language and have it as a living, modern language,&rdquo; says Brian O&rsquo;Conchubhair, a native of Ireland who is now a professor at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. </span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Irish isn&rsquo;t the dominant language in Ireland: English is now king. O&rsquo;Conchubhair says Irish may not even be the second-most spoken language in Ireland. Depending on how you count speakers, that distinction could go to Chinese.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">This is despite the fact that Irish is the island nation&rsquo;s official language, and documents from the European Union still must be translated from English into Irish.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">O&rsquo;Conchubhair, who was in Chicago for St. Patrick&rsquo;s Day, says the Irish language took a big hit following the Great Potato Famine of the 1800s. People left Ireland in droves for the U.S. Those who remained began to speak English--primarily because it was viewed, O&rsquo;Conchubhair says, as the language of prosperity. The language was seen as the tongue of rural people or the elderly.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">O&rsquo;Conchubhair says it&rsquo;s unclear why Ireland didn&rsquo;t become a bilingual society, embracing both Irish and English. He says it&rsquo;s not uncommon to have English-speaking young people unable to communicate with older relatives, who may only speak Irish. </span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">&ldquo;It would be much easier to be a monoglot English speaker in Dublin who knows no Irish than someone who is willing to say they are bilingual,&rdquo; O&rsquo;Conchubhair says.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">However, Irish saw a resurgence in the 1990s, especially among young people. O&rsquo;Conchubhair says they viewed it as hip.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">&ldquo;There are more Irish speakers now in the urban based areas in Dublin, Cork and Limerick who speak Irish socially, who use the Internet, who listen to the radio and the TV stations through the Irish language,&rdquo; O&rsquo;Conchubhair says.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">As that resurgence continues, the debate over whether Irish should be preserved sometimes gets heated.</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">&ldquo;If you want to start an argument in an Irish pub, raise the issue of the Irish language: Is it a waste of time? Is it the unique culture gem that needs to be protected and nourished?,&rdquo; O&rsquo;Conchubhair says. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a hot-button issue. Always has been, always will be.&rdquo;</span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">O&rsquo;Conchubhair planned on celebrating St. Patrick&rsquo;s Day at a Chicago pub, where he hoped to also catch a championship game of Gaelic football, a sport that shares similarities with soccer and rugby. <br /></span></h1><h1><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: Arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;">Here, WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente asks O&rsquo;Conchubhair more about the Irish language, how it fared during the days of the &ldquo;Celtic Tiger&rdquo; economic boom, and why an Irishman decided to study his own language and heritage from the confines of Notre Dame.</span></h1><p>&nbsp;<span href="/sites/default/files/story/insert-image/2011-march/2011-03-17/irish-language-2-way.mp3" id="filefield_audio_insert_player-91188" class="filefield_audio_insert_player" player="null">irish-language-2-way.mp3</span></p></p> Thu, 17 Mar 2011 23:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/brian-o%E2%80%99conchubhair/can-irish-survive-beyond-sl%C3%A1inte-83888 The novel 'Galway Bay' explores Irish history, from Ireland to Chicago http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-03-16/novel-galway-bay-explores-irish-history-ireland-chicago-83798 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-March/2011-03-16/st patrick&#039;s day parade_getty.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Thursday, many Chicago lads and lasses will honor the Emerald Isle and St. Patrick in their own particular way, but there was a time when practically anyone you kissed in this city was Irish. Immigrants flooded Chicago during the great potato famine, but few ever really left behind their island home. Take Honora Kelly. Her family came to Chicago to escape starvation. Two generations later Honora&rsquo;s grandson Edward Kelly became mayor of this city.<br /><br />And now, her great-great-granddaughter <a href="http://www.marypatkelly.com/content/index.asp" target="_blank">Mary Pat Kelly</a> shares her ancestor&rsquo;s story in the historical novel, <em>Galway Bay.</em> Kelly&rsquo;s writing and filmmaking careers have drawn heavily on her Irish roots. The Chicago native joined&nbsp;<em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> to discuss her own personal Irish lore. The novel is based on her family&rsquo;s journey to Chicago from Ireland. It's also currently being developed into a miniseries, which will be shot in Ireland and Chicago.</p></p> Wed, 16 Mar 2011 14:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-03-16/novel-galway-bay-explores-irish-history-ireland-chicago-83798 Water Will Be Off Or Restricted Across Ireland Into Next Week http://www.wbez.org/story/europe/water-will-be-or-restricted-across-ireland-next-week <p><p>"Water restrictions are likely to continue into the new year for hundreds of thousands of householders on both sides of the Border as local authorities struggle to maintain supplies," <a href="http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2010/1230/breaking4.html" target="_blank">the<em> Irish Times</em> writes</a>.</p><p>As <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-12093504" target="_blank">the BBC reports</a>, the problem is particularly acute in Northern Ireland, where many are without water altogether:</p><p><blockquote></p><p>"Eighty villages and towns have been affected as pipes burst in the [recent] thaw.</p><p>"Around 18,000 customers are still affected in the Belfast area, 5,000 in the eastern part of Northern Ireland and 8,000-9,000 in the western area."</p><p></blockquote></p><p>The <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=132465378" target="_blank">Associated Press adds that</a>:</p><p><blockquote></p><p>"Long lines formed Thursday at emergency water points and Scotland [sent] thousands of liters of bottled water for distribution to help families."</p><p></blockquote> Copyright 2010 National Public Radio. To see more, visit <a href="http://www.npr.org/">http://www.npr.org/</a>.<img src="http://metrics.npr.org/b/ss/nprapidev/5/1293724646?&gn=Water+Will+Be+Off+Or+Restricted+Across+Ireland+Into+Next+Week&ev=event2&ch=103943429&h1=Ireland,Foreign+News,The+Two-Way,Europe,World,Home+Page+Top+Stories,News&c3=D%3Dgn&v3=D%3Dgn&c4=132473840&c7=1001&v7=D%3Dc7&c18=1001&v18=D%3Dc18&c19=20101230&v19=D%3Dc19&c20=1&v20=D%3Dc20&c45=MDA0OTc2MjAwMDEyNjk0NDE4OTI2NmUwNQ001"/></p></p> Thu, 30 Dec 2010 08:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/europe/water-will-be-or-restricted-across-ireland-next-week Does Portugal really need a bailout? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/does-portugal-really-need-bailout <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/socrates.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Now that Ireland&rsquo;s agreed to a bailout, analysts worry that Portugal may be next. Notre Dame professor <a href="http://www.nd.edu/~kellogg/faculty/fellows/fishman.shtml" target="_blank">Robert Fishman</a> is a co-editor of the book, &ldquo;The Year of the Euro.&rdquo; He argues that fears about the Iberian nation's economy are overblown.</p><p>He says Portugal went from a being a dictatorship and European backwater in the 1960s to a modern country by the end of the century. The transformation is especially surprising, since it also had to deal with the collapse of its empire in 1974.</p></p> Fri, 03 Dec 2010 17:44:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/does-portugal-really-need-bailout BBC Documentary: The Irish are angry about the country’s financial crisis http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/bbc-documentary-irish-are-angry-about-country%E2%80%99s-financial-crisis <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/56935442.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Celtic Tiger seems to have lost its roar. After months of resistance, this past weekend Ireland agreed to accept an EU/IMF bailout of some $100 billion to help shore up its crippled banking system.</p><p>As Ireland faces one of Europe&rsquo;s most punishing financial crises, the anger amongst its citizens has grown. After coping with two years of recession and major cuts, many Irish taxpayers have had enough. Some have decided to leave the country in order to find employment.</p><p>For the program <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00bgtqd">Assignment</a>, the BBC&rsquo;s Ed Butler went to Ireland to meet some of the casualties of the country&rsquo;s economic collapse.<br />&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 23 Nov 2010 17:42:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/bbc-documentary-irish-are-angry-about-country%E2%80%99s-financial-crisis