WBEZ | The First 100: Rahm Emanuel's first 100 days as Chicago Mayor http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Emanuel's former opponents grade his first 100 days http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuels-former-opponents-grade-his-first-100-days-91045 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-26/AP110217115127.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Today we wrap up our coverage of Rahm Emanuel's first 100 days in office. All week we've brought you stories about the new Chicago mayor: what he's accomplished, where he's fallen short.</p><p>Now we give the microphone to people who tried to stop Emanuel from getting the job in the first place. We asked the mayor's political opponents to grade his first 100 days.</p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483665-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-august/2011-08-26/emanuel-critics-feature110826sh.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>Miguel del Valle thinks this story is stupid. Okay, so he didn't actually say that to me. He's too polite. But last week at a diner on Western Avenue, around bites of oatmeal and raisins, del Valle complained about the whole notion of 100 day assessments.</p><p>"Well, I don't think it's a benchmark that should be used at all," del Valle said. "It takes time."</p><p>Del Valle is a former city clerk, and up until February 22, a candidate for mayor. He finished a very distant third to Emanuel.</p><p>"The 100 days is more about a perception of whether or not there's movement, whether of not that movement is in the right direction," del Valle said.</p><p>One area where del Valle thinks Emanuel is moving in the wrong direction is on property taxes.</p><p>"The mayor said there would not be a property tax increase in the city of Chicago," del Valle said. "Well, we're looking at a property tax increase for CPS. Now, I think it's a bit disingenuine on the part of the administration to say, 'Well,&nbsp; we said that there wouldn't be a property tax increase for city services.' Well, the schools are a part of the city."</p><p>Generally speaking, though, del Valle said Emanuel is doing well, has energy and a no-nonsense approach to governing. But he said it's too early to judge how Emanuel will do when it comes to the city's $600 million budget deficit, or other big-ticket items.</p><p>"Well, I'd give him an A for effort," said another mayoral candidate, Patricia Van Pelt Watkins, delivering a preliminary grade for Emanuel. If the 2015 election were held today, Watkins said she'd vote for her one-time opponent.</p><p>"He has surpassed my expectations," Watkins said. "I did not expect him to get out in the neighborhoods like he has, and talk to the people, because he shied away from all the forums. And he was more like a television - he ran a campaign - a Rose Garden campaign. But I've seen him in the neighborhoods. And I've seen him talk to people, and try to figure out what people are concerned about."</p><p>One thing Watkins is concerned about that she hasn't heard Emanuel address, is the issue of ex-offenders: how to help people leaving prison stay out of prison.</p><p>"Now, I met with Rahm Emanuel right after the election, and I talked to him about the ex-offender issue," Watkins recalled. "And he told me he understood it. He said, 'I understand if we do not provide some type of re-entry support for people coming back...they're going to continue in that cycle and we're going to continue to pay. He said, 'I haven't figured out how to deal with it yet.' But he said, 'It's important to me, and I am thinking about it, and I want you to know that.'"</p><p>Watkins is still waiting.</p><p>During the campaign, she got a lot of exposure after a major candidate, former U.S. Sen. Carol Moseley Braun, ridiculed Watkins for her past - admitted - drug abuse.</p><p>The former senator declined to talk for this story, because - she told me - an interview would be like "one cocktail" for a "recovering politician." But one of her key supporters did agree to weigh in on Emanuel's first 100 days.</p><p>"Right now, it's a mixed review," said Jonathan Jackson, who is the national spokesman for Rainbow PUSH, and - though he'd rather not be known just for this - the son of the Reverend Jesse Jackson. He sharply criticized Emanuel during the campaign as a stranger to the South Side who only came around to get votes.</p><p>Sitting in his father's office last week, Jackson told me he wishes Emanuel were speaking out more on some things - like the increase in shootings by police. But he sees positive signs.</p><p>"I would congratulate him on taking a stand on increasing the school day," Jackson said. "I like to see that the new schools CEO is going to reinstitute recess back into the Chicago Public Schools. It never should have been gone. So those are important steps."</p><p>Jackson said he has not met or talked with Emanuel since the election day, though he acknowledged he has not requested a meeting.</p><p>U.S. Rep. Luis Gutierrez has met with Emanuel. Perhaps uncomfortably, though, as Gutierrez backed candidate Gery Chico in the mayoral race, and recorded a Spanish-language commercial claiming Emanuel "turned his back to us and our most vulnerable families" when it came to immigration reform.</p><p>Gutierrez's tone has changed dramatically. The congressman's spokesman said in an email that Gutierrez "is extremely impressed and encouraged by the mayor's first few months in office" especially his work "related to immigrants." And he said Gutierrez and Emanuel are "developing a good working relationship."</p><p>Gery Chico, it should be noted, has been appointed chair of the state Board of Education but is still awaiting state Senate confirmation - a limbo that could explain why he didn't answer my repeated interview requests.</p><p>Chico's biggest supporters during the campaign - and therefore, Rahm Emanuel's biggest detractors - were labor leaders. And many of them declined to comment for this story. But not Rocco Terranova.</p><p>In addition to having an awesome name, Rocco Terranova is head of the Sheet Metal Workers' Union Local 73. About a thousand of his members live in Chicago, but only 87 of them work for the city. Still, their union was - and is - concerned about Emanuel. About privatization that could cost jobs. About overtime changes that could mean smaller paychecks.</p><p>"He's probably a little better. He's better than we thought," Terranova said this week. "We haven't had a lot of changes that we thought were going to come down right away against the unions, to be honest. So, we haven't...we feel very fortunate to be working with him."</p><p>Other union leaders have criticized Emanuel's early posturing with labor. But for the sheet metal workers, the mayor is benefiting from exceptionally low expectations.</p><p>And there could be something else at play in all this nice talk. Who could blame Rocco Terranova, Luis Gutierrez and other former Emanuel critics from trying to develop "working relationships" with him? Or all those others who didn't want their comments in this story?</p><p>For at least the next three years and 265-odd days, he is the mayor.</p></p> Fri, 26 Aug 2011 17:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuels-former-opponents-grade-his-first-100-days-91045 Mayor Emanuel discusses first 100 days in office at community forum http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-26/mayor-emanuel-discusses-first-100-days-office-community-forum-91084 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-26/First 100 Days 003 by Bill Healy - August 24 2011.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483666-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/sites/default/files/First 100 seg 1 of 2 mp3.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="338" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/28207690?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;color=b30000" width="601"></iframe></p><p>On Wednesday evening, WBEZ hosted a community forum with Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and other city officials at the Chicago History Museum. The event was the culmination of WBEZ's series <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor" target="_blank"><em>The First 100</em></a>, features and conversations assessing the mayor’s performance and promises during his first few months in office.&nbsp;</p><p>Members of the community, both local leaders and engaged local residents, gathered to facilitate a dialogue around change within the city of Chicago--how its implemented and plans for the future of the city and its residents.</p><p>A number of audience members asked questions and made comments about priorities at City Hall.</p><p><em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> presented an edited version of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-08-24/first-100-mayor-emanuel%E2%80%99s-early-impact-chicago" target="_blank"><em>The First 100 – Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s Early Impact on Chicago</em></a> event on Friday.<br> &nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 26 Aug 2011 14:40:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-26/mayor-emanuel-discusses-first-100-days-office-community-forum-91084 Luring Chicago dropouts back to school, one doorstep at a time http://www.wbez.org/story/luring-chicago-dropouts-back-school-one-doorstep-time-91009 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-25/lsanders_harper.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>To get an idea of how many dropouts are in Chicago, imagine for a minute you&rsquo;re at Soldier Field. The stadium is packed. There are 60,000 people here. That&rsquo;s how many dropouts this city has.</p><p>The dropouts range from 13 to 21 years old, kids who have no high school diploma and are not in school&mdash;they would fill up this stadium. Every seat.</p><p>Now, for the first time, Chicago is pledging to go after them.</p><p>Leonetta Sanders is not actually looking for dropouts. The district doesn&rsquo;t do that yet. But it could learn a lot from the way the Harper High School principal goes after her truant students.</p><p>&ldquo;Where are you supposed to be at right now? (At school). Why aren&rsquo;t you in school? (I don&rsquo;t know.),&rdquo; Sanders said.</p><p>Sanders works off a list of names and addresses&mdash;today it&rsquo;s freshmen. But out on the streets, she&rsquo;ll go after anybody&mdash;forget the list.</p><p>When she sees one of her students pushing a lawn mower down Damen Avenue at 11 a.m., she&rsquo;s on it.</p><p>Sanders: What you pushing this lawn mower for? (&lsquo;Cause I&rsquo;m finna go home and cut my grass.) OK, and then what you gonna do tomorrow at 7:45? (Be at school.) You gonna be at school, Baber? (Yes.)&nbsp; Are you sure you&rsquo;re gonna be at school? (Positive.) You gonna have on your uniform? (Yes). You ready to learn? OK. Now don&rsquo;t lie to me, if you say you&#39;re gonna be there I expect you to be there, OK? (OK) All right. (OK).</p><p>Sanders crosses the street at a furious pace. She heads straight for the gas station where Baber had been hanging out&mdash;and ducks inside.</p><p>&ldquo;I understand some of my kids are hanging out here during the day&mdash;they&rsquo;re supposed to be in school. And I just caught one of them leaving here. So I need you to let them know, that they need to be in school, starting tomorrow&mdash;full uniform.&rdquo;</p><p>From behind thick, bulletproof glass, the gas station attendant promises not to sell anything to kids during school hours.</p><p>And that&rsquo;s how the morning goes. Sanders knocks on doors, talks on porches.&nbsp; &ldquo;A lot of people are like, &lsquo;You the principal? Coming out to the house?&rsquo; Yeah!&rdquo;</p><p>Some believe it&rsquo;s going to take that sort of attitude and outreach to get thousands of dropouts back to school. Without trying to, Sanders finds two dropouts after visiting half dozen homes. One agrees to enroll in Harper. He&rsquo;s 16, on house arrest on a gun charge, with a fat ankle bracelet around his leg.</p><p>&ldquo;Hey darlin&rsquo;, step on out. What are you doing?&rdquo; she asks one former student. &ldquo;Sleeping? What&rsquo;s your name? So you went to Marshall? What happened?&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;There you go. When you get out in the community--see? He wasn&rsquo;t even expecting to be on our roster. But we&rsquo;re gonna take him in, we&rsquo;re gonna welcome him, and see what we can do to make sure that he&rsquo;s successful and that he graduates,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Now it&rsquo;s 49,999!&rdquo;</p><p>Some dropouts do find their way back to school&mdash;but that&rsquo;s often because of community groups or family, not the schools. Jennifer Vidis oversees alternative schools for Chicago Public Schools.</p><p>&ldquo;What we have never had is a systemic effort to identify and recover these students and get them back in school,&rdquo; Vidis said.</p><p>It&rsquo;s a big deal, this new commitment the district is making. But all the details--how they&rsquo;ll find dropouts, what the campaign will look like, how many kids will re-enroll, how they&#39;ll pay for it&hellip; nobody has any of that figured out yet.</p><p>&ldquo;We will have a very highly visible, youth-friendly system for reaching these kids, figuring out what the best fit is for them, and counseling them into those seats,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Think Facebook, Twitter, websites, an ad campaign. In Houston, one politician said this: &ldquo;We&rsquo;re coming to get you to bring you back. And we may not get you today, but we&rsquo;re going to eventually get you back in the system.&rdquo;</p><p>Cities like Houston have run campaigns to re-enroll dropouts. Houston is gearing up right now for an annual one-day dropout walk. Politicians join a thousand volunteers and go door to door to encourage kids to go back to school. Last year, the district says 735 re-enrolled.</p><p>Houston&rsquo;s campaign is flashy, but many point to Philadelphia as a model. Laura Shubilla helped lead a massive citywide effort there to bring back dropouts.</p><p>&ldquo;When we started this process there was a lot of interest in doing a big &lsquo;We want you back&rsquo; campaign, and we spent a lot of time talking about &hellip; well, if we&rsquo;re gonna ask kids to come back we actually have to have someplace for them to come back to, and sending them back to the place they left in the first place because it wasn&rsquo;t the right school for them isn&rsquo;t the answer,&rdquo; Shubilla said.</p><p>Chicago knows this, too. The district is adding nearly 10,000 alternative seats at tiny schools around the city, with the first of them projected to open a year from now.</p><p>Authorizing those schools was one of the mayor&rsquo;s goals for his first 100 days in office.</p><p>District officials want to copy another idea from Philadelphia: re-enrollment centers, where kids can talk with counselors about why they left school in the first place. Did they need childcare? Do they have trouble reading? Answers to those questions can help direct kids to a school that zeroes in on their needs.</p><p>Shubilla says it&rsquo;s a victory when a city decides to take responsibility for the young people it&rsquo;s lost. &ldquo;If you can do this right and pull this off, not only is it an economic imperative locally and nationally, but just the moral imperative of it becomes very powerful for a city.&rdquo;</p><p>The clock is ticking on the stadium full of dropouts, though. CPS admits a quarter of the 60,000 are already too old&mdash;even on a fast track, they won&rsquo;t be able to earn enough credits before they age out of school.</p><p>Another 45,000 kids have a shot&mdash;if the city&rsquo;s campaign to bring them back gets underway.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 25 Aug 2011 23:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/luring-chicago-dropouts-back-school-one-doorstep-time-91009 A sample from 'The First 100' live event http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-25/sample-first-100-live-event-91022 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-25/first100 bez sign.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Wednesday night, WBEZ<a href="http://www.wbez.org/event/2011-08-24/first-100-mayor-emanuel%E2%80%99s-early-impact-chicago" target="_blank"> hosted a public forum</a> to discuss and assess the progress of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s first 100 days in office as part of WBEZ's series, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor" target="_blank"><em>The First 100</em></a>.<em> Eight Forty-Eight</em>’s Alison Cuddy posed questions to the mayor and some members of his administration in front of an audience at the Chicago History Museum. The topics ranged from education and safety to parking meters and privatization. Cuddy presented listeners’ questions as well. Listeners had other opportunities to comment the progress of city government and are invited to <a href="http://wbez.org/thefirst100." target="_blank">continue sharing their opinions</a>, comments and questions.</p><p><em>Music Button: Calibro 35, "Hired To Kill", from the CD Ritornando Quellido Di...", (Nublu)</em><br> &nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 25 Aug 2011 14:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-25/sample-first-100-live-event-91022 Emanuel checks bike paths off the list http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-checks-bike-paths-list-90943 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/IMG_2918.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>In his transition plan for the city, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said he wanted to plot out two miles of protected bike lanes by his 100<sup>th</sup> day in office. It&rsquo;s part of his larger goal of making Chicago part of a &quot;world-class&quot; bike network--a goal he announced before he stepped into his City Hall Office.<br /><br />&quot;I announced in the campaign that we&#39;re going to do 25 miles of bike lanes a year,&quot; Emanuel said. The Mayor said he wants 100 miles of these lanes before his first term ends.</p><p>The new lanes put bikers directly between the curb and a parking lane divided by plastic barriers. The Mayor promised the city would select a pilot location--emphasis on the select--for the first two miles of the project. The transition plan outlines that locations would be selected based on &quot;high community demand and cycling activity combined with sufficient physical room to create protected lanes.&quot;<br /><br />WBEZ Producer Susie An and News Desk Intern Lauren Chooljian decided to take a ride down Kinzie to see the project for themselves. They started on Navy Pier, and headed down Grand Avenue toward Kinzie and Milwaukee--the start of the protected bike lane. The contrast between Grand and Kinzie was quite stark. Grand only has painted bike lanes, and cars and buses are able to get pretty close, while the protective barriers on Kinzie keep bikers at a safe distance from motorists.</p><p>According to the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, there were more than <a href="http://www.cmap.illinois.gov/bike-ped">1400 reported bike accidents in 2009</a> in the city, with only a fraction of them happening on Kinzie. There were also few accidents on Jackson, between Damen and Halsted--the site of the next stretch of protected bike lanes. The Mayor&#39;s office announced this summer that the city would soon install 1.5 miles of protected lanes by the United Center.</p><p>According to CMAP the intersection of Milwaukee, Ogden and Chicago had the most bike accidents in the city between 2005 and 2009. (The Chicago Department of Transportation doesn&rsquo;t have it&#39;s own bike accident data.) The city says there aren&#39;t plans for a protected bike lane there yet.</p><p>&quot;Kinzie was chosen as the first project--there was ample available right of way, we quickly developed a plan to put in an installation that would have maximum benefit for a minimal financial cost,&quot; said Brian Steele, spokesman for the Chicago Department of Transportation.</p><p>The half-mile stretch in the River North neighborhood cost $140,000 to install, according to the city. Taxpayers paid for all but $10,000 of the construction costs, as cycling company SRAM made a donation to the project. The path runs from Milwaukee to Wells and includes a fiber glass cover over the Kinzie Bridge.</p><p>Joe Schwieterman, transportation expert from DePaul University, says the costs of these projects aren&#39;t trivial.</p><p>&quot;It adds up when you start talking about dozens or even 100 miles of bike lanes,&quot; he said.</p><p>According to Schwieterman, the projects are relatively cheap when compared to other infrastructure investments, but the cost of a bike lane isn&#39;t just about the installation.<br /><br />&quot;Unfortunately, though, it does mean for every lane of bike you put up, you eliminate something for another program&mdash;that&rsquo;s where Rahm&rsquo;s going to have to play his hand here pretty soon,&quot; Schwieterman said.</p><p>Steele says CDOT plans to build the Jackson bike lane during an upcoming resurfacing project in September. He says his office doesn&rsquo;t have a cost estimate for the project, because the design hasn&#39;t been finalized, and each individual location will have its &quot;own associated cost.&quot;</p><p>So, technically, the mayor met his 100 day goal.</p><p>But the selection doesn&rsquo;t satisfy all Chicago cyclists. Steven Vance, writer for the bike blog <a href="http://gridchicago.com/">Grid Chicago</a>, is pleased that the city is getting protected bike lanes. However, if he could do the 100 days over again, he said he &quot;would keep the Kinzie bike lane, but I&rsquo;m not sure I would keep the Jackson bike lane.&quot;</p><p>Vance said he wants to know more about the selection process&mdash;he thinks there are other city streets that need a protected lane more than Jackson. For Vance, it&#39;s not just about throwing bike lanes in when the street is already being worked on--there are a lot of factors to be considered. He recently put together a <a href="http://www.stevevance.net/crashportal/?page=bikecrash">map of accident data</a> from the Illinois Department of Transportation. His records show only three accidents occurred in 2009 where the Kinzie lanes are now, and where the Jackson lanes will be.</p><p>Brian Steele says CDOT does look at a myriad of factors: he mentioned bike traffic and available right of way (or width of the road) as major considerations.</p><p>Schwieterman calls the bike lanes on Kinzie and Jackson easy victories&mdash;projects that residents can actually see but ones that may have the least transportation significance.</p><p>&quot;Kinzie is a little like that, it runs laterally across downtown--to get the real bang for the buck so to speak you may have to go to busy arterials and that&rsquo;s where traffic moves a little faster, you have more pressured intersections, people making turns, and that&rsquo;s where not having a history of bike culture is going to make us move up a real learning curve,&quot; Schwieterman said.</p><p>There&#39;s already been evidence of this learning curve just a month after the Kinzie lanes opened. Some drivers have complained about added traffic congestion on Kinzie. Postal trucks have been spotted driving down the bike lane, and during Susie and Lauren&#39;s ride, they also saw a few confused drivers --one car was even parked in the lane.</p><p>And remember, the Mayor wants 100 miles of these lanes by the end of his first term--Schwieterman says that&rsquo;s pretty ambitious.<br /><br />&quot;Well, 100 miles is a lot. I mean let&rsquo;s not kid ourselves, for a city that&rsquo;s having trouble fixing pot holes to do 100 miles of streets. When you have new ideas like this you need to lay out the plan so people can understand what the end game is. And I think our city has been accused often of setting the bar too high then we accomplish nothing,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />Schwieterman says the city&rsquo;s budget is squeezed as it is so it&rsquo;s going to be hard to make the case for bike lanes. But Steele says CDOT will be looking for funding from the state and the federal government to help with these projects.</p><p>Although Mayor Emanuel can check another thing off his 100 day check list, the real challenge lies ahead in the next 98 miles.</p><p><em>Susie An contributed to this report</em></p><p><em>Music Button: Genji Siraisi, &quot;Monkey Proof&quot; from the CD Censorsh!t (Expansion Team Records)</em></p></p> Wed, 24 Aug 2011 10:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-checks-bike-paths-list-90943 A bird's-eye view of airports in Emanuel's Chicago http://www.wbez.org/story/birds-eye-view-airports-emanuels-chicago-90942 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/airplane.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We’re taking stock of what’s new in Rahm Emanuel's administration as well as what's been moving along as usual. Since Chicago’s election, news about city airports has been a mixed bag of old problems and new opportunities. We give a birds-eye view of what’s happening with airports in Rahm Emanuel’s Chicago.</p><p>Let’s start at O’Hare, Chicago's flagship airport and one the world’s busiest. How’s Rahm Emanuel dealt with that in the past 100 days?</p><p>SCHWIETERMAN: He’s really come in with, everything gets looked at again.</p><p>This is Joseph Schwieterman, a transportation professor at DePaul University. Schwieterman says Emanuel looked at the smaller stuff at O’Hare - like a politically-charged concessions contract, as well as the biggest: the 15-billion dollar expansion. Schwieterman says when it came to O’Hare expansion, the new mayor got on board quickly.</p><p>SCHWIETERMAN: The O’Hare project has progressed so far now that I think there’s a general sense that there’s no turning back.</p><p>Having said we thought even three months ago that this was going to be the big summer for airline travel. &nbsp;That’s not happening.</p><p>ANDOLINO: We need to not live in just today but we need to be prepared for the future.</p><p>That’s Rosemarie Andolino, Commissioner of the city’s Department of Aviation.</p><p>ANDOLINO: We want to continue to be an airport, a global airport, bringing commerce here to our state. And it is our economic engine. I think everybody realizes that.</p><p>Commissioner Andolino’s one of the few holdovers from Mayor Daley’s administration.&nbsp;She says Rahm Emanuel is not slowing things down.</p><p>ANDOLINO: In terms of aviation, I think the commitment continues to be just as great. Again, creating jobs, bettering the customers’ experience, enhancing the customers’ experience is a leading desire for Mayor Emanuel that we continue to do here.</p><p>It’s not clear, though, whether all the airlines at O’Hare can stay on board with the project without fighting City Hall over costs and benefits.</p><p>Now, to the Southwest Side of Chicago.&nbsp;That’s where Midway Airport is nestled among bungalow houses and rail yards.&nbsp;Chicago’s been trying to hold onto and expand O’Hare, but Midway?&nbsp;The city’s trying to lease it out. In fact, it almost did lease out Midway two years ago, but the $2.5 billion deal fell through.&nbsp;Rosemarie Andolino says Rahm Emanuel is still thinking about it.</p><p>ANDOLINO: Right now, the administration is keeping all of its options open. There are pros and cons to everything. And so, we’ll just have to see with a little more time to see how things play out and what’s best for Chicago.</p><p>Now, Midway and O’Hare are technically in the city, but you may not know there’s a third Chicago airport.&nbsp;It's called Gary-Chicago International Airport and it’s right across the Indiana state line in Gary.&nbsp;It’s small, and it doesn’t have a passenger airline yet.&nbsp;So, it’s little wonder that Mayor Richard Daley didn’t talk much about Gary-Chicago, and Rahm Emanuel hasn’t, either.&nbsp;That’s had people in Indiana worry that Rahm Emanuel would pull Chicago out. Here’s Gary-Chicago airport board member Ross Amundson.</p><p>AMUNDSON: Certainly that’s a question you ask any time somebody new comes to the table. We’ve seen nothing that would indicate that continued relationship and trust isn’t going to continue.</p><p>Chicago aviation chief Rosemarie Andolino says no one needs to worry.&nbsp;When it comes to airports, Chicago’s got Gary’s back.</p><p>ANDOLINO: It’s almost like a big brother, little brother kind of relationship. Or, big sister I should say.</p><p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel hasn’t talked all that much about airports during his administration.&nbsp;But Andolino says he’ll change that soon.&nbsp;He plans to host an aviation summit with industry leaders this fall.</p></p> Wed, 24 Aug 2011 10:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/birds-eye-view-airports-emanuels-chicago-90942 The downside of hiring more cops in Chicago http://www.wbez.org/story/downside-hiring-more-cops-chicago-90944 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-24/RS2638_AP110502035527.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When Rahm Emanuel was running for mayor of Chicago, he outlined his crime strategy at a press conference. "As mayor I will put a thousand additional police on the streets working closely with Chicago residents to fight the guns, to fight the gangs and the fight the drugs that now pervade," he said.</p><p>That seems like a pretty straightforward promise, but it hasn't played out that way. Shortly after taking office Emanuel claimed he was making good on half of the promise to put a thousand more cops on Chicago's streets.<br> <br> "While this is just the eighth day of being mayor, we are presenting today of putting 500 more police on our streets in the role of being beat officers," he said.</p><p>But here's the thing: These additional officers were already officers. They had been out on the streets, though not as beat cops.&nbsp; Reporters immediately challenged Emanuel's assertion. Fran Spielman of the <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em> told the mayor he had promised a thousand new officers and she asked if he was going to deliver on that. The mayor responded, "Fran, I'm well aware of what I said, but I do appreciate being reminded, but thank you. But within the first seven days here, we're putting 500 officers on the street as a down payment."</p><p>Pat Camden with the Fraternal Order of Police, the union that represents cops, says those 500 officers were already agressively working the streets. "All they did is reassign them overnight. So, with all due respect to mayor, it's smoke and mirrors," Camden said.</p><p>The union is pushing for the city to hire more to keep up with the pace of cops who quit or retire. Camden estimates the department is down about 2,000 officers from a couple years ago, though he doesn't know the exact numbers. "You know the staffing of the police department is one of the best-kept secrets going. Why? I don't know. If you're going to turn around and say you know we've hired, we have a thousand additional officers, what was the number a hundred days ago, and what is it today? That's the question you should be asking somebody."</p><p>I did ask for those numbers several times over four days. A police spokeswoman said she didn't have exact numbers, however, she put the current workforce at more than 12,000 officers. That's a lot more than Los Angeles, for example, where they have a larger population, fewer than 10,000 cops and a much lower homicide rate. So if we already have more cops than they do, should we be adding more? Emanuel's campaign promise to do so may have been politically expedient, but is it a good idea?</p><p>"I think the idea of putting one thousand more cops on the street is unambiguously a good thing," said Jens Ludwig, an economist and co-director of the University of Chicago's crime lab. A few years ago he co-wrote a research paper that found that for every dollar spent on police, society sees a benefit of $4 to $8.&nbsp;</p><p>"What that means is society has an opportunity to turn a $1 bill into a $4 bill, and if you had a machine at home, do not try this at home but if you had a machine that would spit out a $4 bill whenever you put a $1 bill into it, everyone would go to the bank and get as many $1 bills as they could get their hands on and feed it into that machine," he said.</p><p>But there are also costs with increasing the number of police on the street and those costs can be tough to measure. "The good intentions of actually creating the uniformed presence to lower the immediate problems of crime may have an unintended result when you're looking further down the line," according to George Gascon. He's the district attorney for the city of San Francisco, and before that he was the chief of police. He says low-income, often minority communities, are flooded with police, and residents are over-criminalized. Lots of people are arrested, sometimes for small infractions.</p><p>Kids get criminal records, they're cut off from educational and employment opportunities, and all of that ultimately makes the crime problems worse. "I'm not saying that we should look the other way to crime, to the contrary. What I'm saying is that the strategies that we used in the past have not worked well, and we need to evolve away from that. In many neighborhoods basically we have been at war with our people," Gascon said.</p><p>In Chicago, one of the most heavily policed neighborhoods is Englewood. It's not hard to find people in the neighborhood who think Emanuel's plan to add more cops is just going to make their lives harder. But there are also plenty of residents who do want more police on these violent blocks.</p><p>Mario, who doesn't want me to use his last name, he falls somewhere in the middle of the debate. I sometimes swing by his Englewood home to see how things are going in the neighborhood.&nbsp; Just two days before we talked he was walking back from a nearby liquor store with his brother and a friend. Two officers pulled up in a police car. Mario says they yelled, "Freeze. Put your hands up. Don't move!" He says they had their guns out.</p><p>Mario says they had just been walking. The liquor bottle was still closed, they didn't have drugs. They didn't know why the cops were bothering them, pointing guns at them, something Mario says is scary no matter who's got the gun because accidents happen.</p><p>"So I asked. I asked why, what did we do? All I had was liquor and the explanation I got was shut up, let me do my job.&nbsp; So I proceeded to ask again after maybe five minutes of being searched, what did we do? And he stated again, shut up, let me do my job, but it was a little more aggressive so I just decided to shut up and let him do his job," says Mario.</p><p>Mario says the three of them were searched and the cops looked around in the grass, presumably to see if they'd&nbsp; thrown down any drugs.&nbsp; All told, it took about a half an hour and then the three of them were let go. Mario's grandmother witnessed the whole thing from her front porch and wanted to file a complaint, but Mario says the cops didn't really do anything wrong, though he says the guns were unnecessary.</p><p>We talked for about a half an hour on his front porch and in that time I saw squad cars probably a dozen times, though he doesn't live on a main street. Cops cars drove down his street several times, several went through the intersection at the end of his block. One stopped a block over and I could see it through some vacant lots. Such a heavy police presence is not always welcome given the interactions residents have, like Mario's recent experience.</p><p>But then a cop drives slowly up the street, window open, his elbow hanging out. The white driver stopped halfway up the street and a young black man walked over to the car. They chatted for a few seconds and then the cruiser rolled on past Mario's house.</p><p>Mario points the car out. "Those the nice guys. They come through, talk a little bit, sports, asking us what's going on, I mean, all police are not bad you know?"</p><p>So with that in mind, does Mario think it's a good idea to put a thousand additional officers on the street?&nbsp; He's less than enthusiastic, but he says, "I been watching the news. There's a lotta shit going on. A lot of people getting killed, kids, everything so me personally, I think it would be a good idea if it was used right." He stresses the word "right."</p><p>Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy says he's still reviewing what the Chicago police department has and what they need, so he's not calling for more cops at this point.&nbsp; He admits more cops would mean more police contact for residents in poor communities. But McCarthy says that contact doesn't always have to be negative or end with arrests.</p></p> Wed, 24 Aug 2011 10:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/downside-hiring-more-cops-chicago-90944 Report Card: Mayor Rahm Emanuel's First 100 Days http://www.wbez.org/content/report-card-mayor-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/first100reportcard.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>During his election campaign and throughout his first months in office, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has invited Chicagoans to hold him accountable as the city’s leader.</p><p>Well, here goes.&nbsp;</p><table style="width: 500px;" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3"><p><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/rahm-chart topper2.jpg" title="" width="600" height="125"></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>The 72-page Transition Report is not the only way to measure progress on the part of the Emanuel administration, but it’s a checklist of sorts on what the new folks in charge think is critical - and what they say they can accomplish.&nbsp;</p><p>"It will be a scorecard for the public to keep my administration accountable," Emanuel said when releasing his plan on May 10th. "It will be a scorecard for myself and my administration to keep us accountable."</p><p>Some of its points—indeed, a lot of them—are vague or hard to assess.&nbsp; An example:</p><p>#26: “<em>The City will accelerate the development of the multi-year plan, which will look at water meter installation and overhaul of water mains, in addition to incentives for permeable pavement, green infrastructure, rainwater re-use, among other options.”</em></p><p>It doesn’t say the plan is to be completed, or released, within 100 days. It merely states that the administration will "accelerate the development" of a plan. It’s a take-our-word-for-it goal —&nbsp;and one that's hard to grade.</p><p>What follows is a selection of key initiatives and our editorial team’s assessment of the progress made to date. In assessing the progress, we made every effort to be fair and precise — and made repeated calls to Emanuel’s office to verify specific points.&nbsp;</p><p>In keeping with the mayor’s own statements, we placed a high premium on transparency.&nbsp; Therefore, if the administration says it's completed a goal below, but hasn't provided evidence of it or it hasn’t been made public, we’ve judged the measure incomplete.</p><p>You can see the whole report <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/mayor/supp_info/chicago_2011_transition_report.pdf">here</a>&nbsp;and make your own scorecard.&nbsp; Let us know if you agree or what you’d add.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>And you can follow our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor">entire series of reports on Mayor Emanuel’s first 100 days here</a>.&nbsp;</p></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td><td>Fully achieved initiative</td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></td><td>Partially achieved or on track</td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-August/2011-08-21/empty star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td><td>Incomplete or unconfirmed</td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>&nbsp;</h2><h2>Our Government</h2><p>Selected and graded six items out of 12 indexed initiatives.</p><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong># 1 Cut $75 million immediately</strong></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2"><p>Structural changes totaling $75 million will be made to the current 2011 budget.</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2">Emanuel signed executive order on first full day of his term, cutting $75 million from the 2011 budget.</td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>#3 Reform TIF</strong></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">TIF panel will launch. Within 100 days, the group will develop guidelines and processes to ensure TIF transparency, set standards for future TIF investments and develop measurable performance criteria.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>The panel launched, and a public meeting has been held.</p><p>An Emanuel spokesperson says&nbsp;the guidelines the administration pledged to develop&nbsp;have been completed. They&nbsp;have not been released publicly.&nbsp;</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" style="" title="" width="18" height="42"><br> &nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>#4 Initiate Ethics Reform</strong></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">With an executive order, the "revolving door" between government service and lobbying will close.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2">Hours after his inauguration, Emanuel signed an executive order banning all mayoral appointees from lobbying their former colleagues for two years.</td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>#5 Set high standards for open participatory government to involve all Chicagoans</strong></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2"><p>A searchable version of the city budget will be posted online, after a full review to ensure that its presentation is clear and easy to understand.</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>A searchable version of the city budget has been posted online, along with additional documents and previous fiscal budgets. According to a press release, "the administration has released more than 200 data sets on various city services and functions at the City’s Data Portal including city contract data from as far back as 1993, city employee salaries, and crime data for 2011. In addition, for increased accountability, the public can monitor the progress and performance of various city departments online at <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/performance">www.cityofchicago.org/performance</a>."&nbsp;</p><p>However, the information available is fragmented and not presented in a way that’s clear and easy for budget amateurs to process or digest.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>#8 Centralize, professionalize and reform procurement</strong></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The city will quantify and commit to procurement savings for the 2012 budget, based on an evaluation of everything it buys and a plan for process improvements and savings. Purchasing will be consolidated within the City.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>A website, <a href="http://www.chicagoprocurement.org">www.chicagoprocurement.org</a>, is under construction and the administration has announced the implementation of reverse auctions and transparency in non-competitive contracting (press release 7/21/11).&nbsp;</p><p>On Thursday, August 18, the administration announced that it has hired Accenture to review the procurement process and identify $25 million in savings for the upcoming budget year. However, results of the evaluation have not been announced. &nbsp;</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><b><strong>#9 Integrate public performance targets with service delivery and cost effectiveness</strong></b></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">Performance benchmarks will be established to develop reasonable standards for city services, such as garbage collection, construction activities, maintenance, repairs and infrastructure services. Performance will be posted online for the public to view.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>Many benchmarks have been posted on the city’s website, <a href="http://cityofchicago.org/performance">http://cityofchicago.org/performance</a>, including response times for tree removal, rodent baiting and retail food license approvals.&nbsp;</p><p>However, garbage collection information is missing, despite the fact that it’s the only item specifically outlined above.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><p>&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></p><p>&nbsp;</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>Our Communities</h2><p>Selected and graded 4 items out of 16 indexed initiatives.</p><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><b><strong>#13 Take action to address gun violence</strong></b></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The administration will develop a comprehensive data collection plan regarding gun usage and crimes. Working with the community and local and federal law enforcement, the city will develop a plan for the use and dissemination of data.&nbsp; The mayor will join Mayors Against Illegal Guns and work with them to develop and advance a state gun policy agenda.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>On day 99, the Emanuel administration announced the completion of a gun report that “includes aggregate data on gun make, state of origin, and involvement in crime for guns recovered by CPD.”</p><p>The report also outlines a plan for the gathering, release and utilization of future data. However, the administration hasn't provided a copy of the report. A day earlier, Emanuel announced he joined the organization Mayors Against Illegal Guns.&nbsp;</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#17 Eliminate food deserts in Chicago</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The city will convene a food desert summit that brings together all the players in the food distribution chain, from grocery store CEOs to food depositories and community groups, to create a strategy. Coupled with a public nutrition awareness campaign, the strategy will identify specific partnerships with businesses and nonprofits.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>The summit has been convened, <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/cdph/CDPH/PHFINALAGENDAAug162011.pdf">and the Healthy Chicago strategy document</a> has been completed and released, which targets key public health benchmarks. In addition, the administration says millions of dollars in funding have been secured for a Chicago Tobacco Prevention Project and the obesity-focused "Healthy Places" public nutrition awareness program.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#25 Create a world-class bike network and increase cycling</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">Pilot location for first two miles of protected bike lanes.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>The first half-mile of protected bike lanes has been established along Kinzie Avenue between Milwaukee Avenue&nbsp;and Wells Street. Although additional mileage is targeted (including along Jackson Avenue), it’s not yet complete. The administration says the Kinzie route "will be examined for safety, efficiency, and economic development outcomes."</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#28 Increase access to public space</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The task force will deliver its recommendations. A Web-based map of existing public spaces will demonstrate and inventory Chicago’s parks and open space.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>On Thursday, August 18, the administration announced the creation of the Web-based map of existing public spaces. Thus far, we’ve yet to locate the map – and the administration has yet to respond directly to our specific requests for the information.&nbsp; <em>EDITOR'S NOTE: On Wednesday, Emanuel's office provided <a href="http://webapps.cityofchicago.org/openspaces/openspaces.html">a link to the map</a> and we raised our grade from a half star to a full star.</em></p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>Our Children</h2><p>Selected and graded 4 items out of 12 indexed initiatives.</p><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#29 Increase instructional time for all students</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The mayor will continue to champion the state legislation.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2">The mayor heavily championed – and the legislation passed. He’s since continued his calls for a longer school day in Chicago Public Schools.</td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#30 Recruit, support and retain high performing school leaders and principals</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">CPS will develop a strategic plan for the Chicago Leadership Academy and partners will be announced.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2">In August, Mayor Emanuel announced the creation of a strategic plan, as well as the establishment of a pool of money for merit raises, and report cards for CPS principals.</td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#33 Increase the number of non-selective, world-class schools in every neighborhood</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">CPS will complete a facilities plan to understand how its schools facilities are currently used and to plan for the 2012-13 school year.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>On Monday, August 22, Emanuel said a person had been hired to begin work on the plan. However, administration officials later said the plan has been completed. Thus far, no such facilities plan has been publicly released.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago half star.gif" title="" width="18" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><b><strong>#38 Ensure that Chicago’s immigrant community can access available support and services and that we deliver to Chicago’s youth the promise of the Dream Act.</strong></b></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The city will define the Office of New Americans infrastructure, including strategy, outcome and funding goals, accountability for execution, and a pathway – a website, office and dedicated personnel for immigrants to navigate the processes and access the resources they deserve and to which they are entitled.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>City Hall has come up with an "internal infrastructure" that outlines the points above. However, the administration is waiting to finalize the hiring of an ONA director. That person will sign off on those plans before making them public.</p><p>Currently, there is no website, no office and no dedicated personnel.&nbsp; The administration says it’s waiting to hire the ONA director so s/he could have input and prerogative on all those points as well.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-August/2011-08-21/empty star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>Our Growth</h2><p>Selected and graded 6 items out of 16 indexed initiatives.</p><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#44 Develop job growth strategies for targeted industries</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The city will support analysis and review of the growth potential, including jobs, of targeting industries. The review will also lead to recommendations for a structure to best support implementation of the strategies. Business leaders will convene to develop short-and-long term job growth strategies within their industries.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>The administration claims the analysis and review was completed on August 9<sup>&nbsp;</sup>and focused attention on the "need for a renewed and rejuvenated World Business Chicago," the organization already charged with boosting Chicago’s economic and business fortunes.</p><p>According to the administration, the newly expanded board of the organization has convened to "begin the development of short and long-term job creation strategies." Targeted industries include technology, advanced materials, manufacturing, financial trading and tourism.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#46 Develop bus rapid transit</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2"><p>The city will initiate an "alternatives analysis" – to be completed during year one – on Western and Ashland avenues to determine which corridor can most benefit from piloting the expanded service of bus rapid transit.</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>The CTA initiated the "<a href="http://www.transitchicago.com/news_initiatives/planning/altanalysis.aspx">alternatives analysis process</a>”" by placing a notice on its <a href="http://www.transitchicago.com/westernbrt/">website</a>.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-15/chicago star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#47 Support transit-oriented development</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The mayor will issue an executive order that establishes clear and consistent principals for transit-oriented development, including options such as expedited permitting, set-asides of city-owned property to expand car sharing and bike parking, expanded use of tax credits and load guarantees and opportunities for the city and the private sector to jointly invest with CTA on transit upgrades.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>On Friday, August 19, Emanuel issued a policy directive for transit-oriented development that encourages the use of incentives such as expedited permitting, set asides of city-owned property and expanded use of tax credits and loan guarantees. &nbsp;</p><p>Thus far, the administration hasn't provided the directive or responded to our requests for it.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><p>&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-August/2011-08-21/empty star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></p></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#50 Develop a strategy for a new cultural plan for Chicago</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">The administration will conduct a full audit of current programs, solicit feedback on performance and identify improvements.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>On August 15, the administration announced the completion of its audit of city-organized festivals and cultural programs.</p><p>Thus far, the administration hasn't provided a copy of the audit or responded to our requests for it.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><p>&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-August/2011-08-21/empty star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></p></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#52 Refocus the Chicago Climate Action Plan on economic impact and jobs</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">Economic impact goals for the revised plan will be released. City leadership will challenge and work with the broader community to meet the goals of the plan.&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2">According to the administration, on August 12&nbsp;it updated the Chicago Climate Action plan, with an emphasis on tying energy efficiency and sustainability to job creation, economic development and cost savings.&nbsp;</td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-August/2011-08-21/empty star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><table style="width: 600px;" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="3" style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><p><strong>#55 Build vibrant communities through development of local assets and institutional anchors</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>100 Days Goal</strong></td><td colspan="2">In developing a community anchors strategy, the city will identify one to three communities in which to pilot.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2" style="background-color: rgb(221, 218, 218);"><strong>Progress</strong></td><td rowspan="2"><p>The city conducted two weekend working sessions with the University of Chicago and Loyola University Chicago, which resulted in the creation of long-term development plans.&nbsp;</p><p>The administration has provided no evidence that one to three pilot communities have been identified.</p></td><td style="background-color: rgb(102, 204, 255);"><strong>Grade</strong></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-August/2011-08-21/empty star.gif" title="" width="37" height="42"></td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>Transition Report</h2><p><a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/62917601/Chicago-2011-Transition-Plan" style="margin: 12px auto 6px; font: 14px Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View Chicago 2011 Transition Plan on Scribd">Chicago 2011 Transition Plan</a><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" data-aspect-ratio="0.772727272727273" data-auto-height="false" id="doc_56800" src="http://www.scribd.com/embeds/62917601/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=list&amp;access_key=key-1tefst6uixlg3ogikqqt" width="600" frameborder="0" height="836" scrolling="no"></iframe></p></p> Tue, 23 Aug 2011 17:43:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/content/report-card-mayor-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days Rahm vows bus rapid transit, but can he deliver? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-23/rahm-promises-brt-can-he-deliver-90926 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/Transmilenio.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>All this week, WBEZ is looking at <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/first-100-rahm-emanuels-first-100-days-chicago-mayor" target="_blank">Rahm Emanuel’s first 100 days as Chicago mayor</a>.</p><p>One of Emanuel’s pledges is to push for the creation of the city’s first bus-rapid-transit line. The idea behind BRT is to deliver the benefits of rail at a fraction of the cost. BRT shortens travel times through dedicated bus lanes, pre-paid boarding that’s level with station platforms, and traffic signals that favor the buses.</p><p>WBEZ’s West Side bureau reporter <a href="http://www.wbez.org/staff/chip-mitchell" target="_blank">Chip Mitchell</a> gives us a progress report on Emanuel’s ambitious plan.<br> &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 23 Aug 2011 16:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-23/rahm-promises-brt-can-he-deliver-90926 Emanuel takes on Chicago's food deserts http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-takes-chicagos-food-deserts-90776 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-23/City Farm 2_Flickr_Piush Dahal.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Today marks Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s 100th day in office, and we’re taking stock of his progress.&nbsp;One problem he’s taken on is "food deserts," areas that don’t have much fresh food for sale.</p><p>Experts say the number of Chicagoans living in food deserts stands at approximately 400,000. Emanuel says he wants to cut that number in half by the end of his first term.&nbsp;The food desert is a complex, un-sexy policy problem, but Emanuel says he’ll spend political capital on it.</p><p>When he was barnstorming for mayor, Rahm Emanuel met a young African-American couple who live near 89th Street. The wife a doctor. The husband in information technology. Two kids. The couple told Emanuel they traveled eight miles to grocery shop.&nbsp;Emanuel assumed they endured the trek for cheaper prices.</p><p>EMANUEL: Maybe this is a vulnerability for a politician but I don’t mind because you always have to learn.</p><p>He learned the couple traveled because they didn’t have good grocery stores in their neighborhood.</p><p>EMANUEL: Here was something that kind of materialized it in an existential way. It was a way that just drove home, and &nbsp;I remember saying to the staff that was with me at the time – I want to speak to this.</p><p>MOORE: Would you say before you met that couple food deserts were even on your radar?</p><p>EMANUEL: Let’s go through my professional life. I’m a congressman on the North Side of the city of Chicago. What I do for office hours? Congress on your corner at grocery stores. I’m going to be honest – it’s not a material thing for people I represented. As chief of staff to the president of the United States, obviously I don’t want to say I had other issues, but I did have other issues.</p><p>Emanuel read up on food deserts and made their elimination part of his transition plan. And, during his first 100 days in office – he followed up.&nbsp;Back in June the mayor convened CEOs from major food chains and he received commitments from them to open stores in Chicago. Then, in July, he introduced an ordinance to city council that would make urban agriculture a new zoning designation in Chicago. The idea’s to kick-start large-scale production of vegetables close to where people need them.</p><p>EMANUEL: I see this as an opportunity to address a number of issues with one hit.</p><p>Jobs, economic development and…</p><p>EMANUEL: We’ll begin to make a dent on the public health piece of this, which is people having the opportunity to have access to fresh fruits, vegetables and meats in their area.</p><p>It’s one thing to want to make a dent in a problem like food deserts, but it’s another thing to actually make it happen.</p><p>GALLAGHER:&nbsp; It’s a complicated situation in neighborhoods like the ones we see in food deserts … it’s not just a problem that happened overnight; it’s been going on for a while.</p><p>This is national food desert expert, Mari Gallagher.&nbsp;She says Mayor Emanuel could have his work cut out for him. She's not aware of any city that’s eradicated food deserts.</p><p>GALLAGHER:&nbsp; These neighborhoods have suffered from disinvestment and other kinds of challenges, but they also have a number of assets, too. And given that everyone does eats as part of the human condition, we think there’s a real opportunity around healthy food in terms of, certainly, public health and better diet.</p><p>I meet Gallagher at the kind of spot she says could be one of these assets: the farmers market.</p><p>MARKET VENDOR: Thank you, have a nice day!</p><div class="slideshow-photo-credit" id="slideshow"><div class="slideshow-photo photo1"><span class="story-photo"><img alt="Food desert expert Mari Gallagher." class="imagecache imagecache-story_image_medium imagecache-default imagecache-story_image_medium_default" src="http://www.wbez.org/sites/default/files/imagecache/story_image_medium/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-18/004.JPG" title="(WBEZ/Natalie Moore)" width="280" height="195"></span><p class="slideshow-photo-credit">(WBEZ/Natalie Moore)</p><p class="slideshow-photo-description">Food desert expert Mari Gallagher tours a farmers market in Chicago's Pullman neighborhood.</p><span style="display: none;"><img alt="" class="imagecache imagecache-665x500" src="http://www.wbez.org/sites/default/files/imagecache/665x500/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-18/004.JPG" title="" width="665" height="500"></span></div></div><p>This market’s on 111th street, in the Pullman neighborhood’s Arcade Park.&nbsp;It’s got stalks of corn piled up like hay, and it’s got less common vegetables around, too, like&nbsp;kohlrabi.</p><p>MARKET VENDOR: It's in the cabbage family. You boil them like potatoes and serve with a cream sauce.</p><p>Gallagher says neighborhoods in the center of food deserts benefit from farmers markets. But they have another asset, too: small, corner stores.&nbsp;Food deserts have plenty of them.</p><p>GALLAGHER: These smaller stores that specialize in products that can sit on the shelves like potato chips and boxes of cereal and so on. Those are lower-risk items. If they’re going to start getting into produce, there’s a whole skill set around buying produce, displaying produce. But I think that these are challenges we can help stores address.&nbsp;</p><p>Gallagher says food deserts could stand to get help attracting bigger, mainstream grocery stores, too.&nbsp;Mayor Emanuel has already hit this.&nbsp;Again, he gathered grocery chain CEOS for a food desert summit in June.&nbsp;Emanuel walked in with data about neighborhood population density, and&nbsp;he handed over a list of 11 sites that need a big-box store and are commercially zoned (see below).</p><p>The talk was frank.</p><p>EMANUEL: Although it’s morally motivating for me, they’re not in the moral business. As one CEO said to me and I won’t say who, says ‘look, if you want to grandstand I’ll write you a check and I’ll be done with it.’ I said that’s not what I want. I want you to open stores that serve people, create jobs and make money. I want you to make money.</p><p>Supervalu CEO Craig Herkert attended Emanuel’s summit. The chain is the parent company of Jewel-Osco and Save-A-Lot.</p><p>Herkert says Supervalu will open 30 more discount Save-A-Lot stores in Chicago over the next five years.</p><p>HERKERT: Let me state clearly, this first and foremost, is a very good business decision for us.</p><p>Naturally, I asked if any Chicago-style sweetheart deals got cut.&nbsp;Herkert said no, just break the red tape.</p><p>HERKERT: What the mayor has offered us is his support from the mayor’s office to do what he can to help us get these things opened. He did not give us, nor did we request, financial aid or support. We can open these stores as a viable business option on our own.</p><p>ODOMS-YOUNG: I want to see what happens with the meat around that.</p><p>Angela Odoms-Young is a nutritional scientist at the University of Illinois-Chicago.</p><p>ODOMS-YOUNG: It’s easy to say we’re going to bring in grocery stores. But we really need to make sure the community has input in what that plan will be.</p><p>Odoms-Young says the food desert issue is a broad one and it’s not solved just by having successful businesses in a neighborhood.&nbsp;Even big stores can minimize fruits and vegetables, so someone will have to keep watch.&nbsp;After all, the federal government recommends eating five fruits and vegetables a day to prevent chronic disease.&nbsp;That only works if people have the food available - and children see it.</p><p>ODOMS-YOUNG: When you have young children, exposure actually can contribute to the development of dietary habits. So when you have flaming-hots in a community, you have these sweetened beverages and people are only exposed to those things, a lot of your habits are really sort of coming together and you’re greatly influenced by your environment.</p><p>As grocery chains, urban agriculture and retooled corner stores peck away at the food desert problem in Chicago, the philosophy is guided by a simple principle: everyone has to eat.</p><p>From Melissa Stratton, a spokeswoman from the mayor's office:</p><p><em>Below are the 11 sites we gave the grocery chain CEOs at the Mayor’s food desert summit. Each site contains a parcel of land that can sustain a grocery store based on our calculations. Specifically, each is commercially zoned and is in an ideal spot to absorb revenue because the area lacks grocery store options. The sites were identified by the City and given to each grocery chain.</em></p><ul><li><em>Cicero and Kinzie</em></li><li><em>63rd St and Justine Avenue</em></li><li><em>63rd and Halsted</em></li><li><em>63rd and State</em></li><li><em>47th and State</em></li><li><em>4400 W. Roosevelt Rd.</em></li><li><em>63rd St and Drexel Blvd.</em></li><li><em>63rd and St. Louis</em></li><li><em>7900 S. Perry</em></li><li><em>87th and Constance</em></li><li><em>114th and Western</em></li></ul><p><em>Music Button: Sounds from the Ground, "Delphine", from the CD The Maze, (Waveform)</em></p></p> Tue, 23 Aug 2011 10:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-takes-chicagos-food-deserts-90776