WBEZ | mothers http://www.wbez.org/tags/mothers Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Poet Kate Daniels remembers her delicious baby girl http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-kate-daniels-remembers-her-delicious-baby-girl-107080 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Kate_Daniels_310x230.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Kate Daniels describes herself &ldquo;as a poet who has always been interested in what could not or should not be said.&rdquo; Just in time for Mother&rsquo;s Day, she talks about the truth of motherhood &ndash; its strangeness, its wonder, and its lusciousness. She fearlessly tells of her experiences breast feeding, raising children, and falling in love &ndash; and trusts that these stories of gritty, juicy living have a collective significance. They are not meant to be kept secret but joyously shared.</p><div><strong>Kate Daniels</strong> is a recent recipient of a Guggenheim Award, a Professor of English at Vanderbilt University and author of four volumes of poetry: <em>The White Wave</em> and <em>The Niobe Poems,</em> from the Pitt Poetry Series, and <em>Four Testimonies </em>and <em>A Walk in Victoria&rsquo;s Secret</em>, from LSU Press. Her poetry explores aspects of gender-based and Southern working-class experience.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">First launched in April 2013 to celebrate National Poetry Month, WBEZ now continues our weekly series, </em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/gift" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">The Gift</a><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;&ndash; produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of&nbsp;</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">September: Poems</span><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">. This project is a collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.universeofpoetry.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">UniVerse of Poetry</a>, a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. &nbsp;Each piece drops us into a poets&rsquo; inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Fri, 10 May 2013 06:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/gift/poet-kate-daniels-remembers-her-delicious-baby-girl-107080 Are Mommy and me meant to be...BFF? http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/are-mommy-and-me-meant-bebff-99057 <p><p>A recent <em>New York </em>magazine <a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/mother-daughter-best-friends-2012-4/" target="_blank">article</a> sparked an interesting conversation about the often complicated relationship between mothers and their daughters. The piece, titled, “My Mom Is My BFF,” profiled a mother and daughter so close that mom stays in touch with her daughter’s exes. Their story, experts say, is not unique—but it left many wondering: Should mothers and daughters be best buds?</p><p>I consider my mother a dear, albeit deeply disturbed, friend. She didn’t appeal to me—friend wise—until I was through those awkward tween years. But she was very quick—too quick, really—to say, “I’m not your friend, I’m your mother.</p><p>Harsh? Sure. Cruel? I’m still working through that. But after reading the <em>New York</em> magazine article, I wondered whether our relationship had become friendlier, me being a grown-a$# woman and all.&nbsp; So I thought I’d begin a dialog with my mother that mirrored one I might have with a friend—inappropriate and via text.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Mother%20Dearest_0_0.png" style="width: 300px; height: 682px; float: left;" title="">I think we can all agree that this experiment backfired—touché Mommy Dearest, touché.</div></div></div><p>My mother, after all, is a Baby Boomer. And she was certainly more lenient, warm and friendly than her own mother. Boomers, social psychologist <a href="http://www.susannewmanphd.com/wordpress/" target="_blank">Dr. Susan Newman</a> says, rejected their parents domineering, authoritative style and vowed to give their children space—they weren’t going to be so strict and cold; they were much more permissive.</p><p>“After that,” Newman told me, “we got into what I call, ‘everyone wanting to raise star children.”</p><p>Meet the Momager. More broadly referred to as helicopter parents—young, new parents who aim to control and design every aspect of their child’s life: She’ll play the violin, and speak Mandarin between tennis matches and pageants and her androgynous name will throw off future employers—and agents of course.</p><p>Despite its current popularity in our culture—and on reality television—Newman does think this trend will ebb; and that like most relationships, the mother-daughter connection evolves throughout its lifetime. And that it’s healthy and rewarding for parents to become their child’s friend—once they are independent, mature adults. So perhaps I’ve got some room to grow on that last bit.</p><p>But enough about me—what do you think? As we prepare to celebrate mothers this weekend, <em>Afternoon Shift </em>explores our evolving roles and relationships we have with mothers—mother and daughter, mother and son, mother and husband, all of it!</p><p>MJ Tam, lead blogger for <a href="http://thechicagomoms.com/" target="_blank">thechicagomoms.com</a>, and Dr. Newman join Steve Edwards for this conversation—join them! Call <strong>312-923-9239</strong> or find us on Twitter at #AfternoonShift.</p><p>Oh, and Mom—pick up some singles at the bank: you can never have too many friends. Happy Mother’s Day to all the cool moms out there!</p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qde83d7-urM" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 11 May 2012 13:02:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-05/are-mommy-and-me-meant-bebff-99057 Women’s hospital aims for ‘baby friendly’ status http://www.wbez.org/story/women%E2%80%99s-hospital-aims-%E2%80%98baby-friendly%E2%80%99-status-96224 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-February/2012-02-09/breast feeding_Flickr_thekmancom.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="Northwestern Memorial’s Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago. (AP/File)" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2012-February/2012-02-08/Prentice.jpg" style="margin: 9px 18px 6px 1px; float: left; width: 254px; height: 380px;" title="The facility, part of Northwestern Memorial Hospital, delivers about 12,000 babies a year. (AP/File)">A hospital that delivers more than a quarter of babies born in Chicago is entering an international program that aims to improve the health of both newborns and their mothers. The program focuses on breastfeeding.</p><p>Prentice Women’s Hospital, part of Northwestern Memorial Hospital, is planning to follow 10 guidelines set by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, a program sponsored by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund, also known as UNICEF.</p><p>The guidelines include helping mothers begin breastfeeding within an hour of birth, providing infants no food or drink other than breast milk unless medically necessary, giving no pacifiers or artificial nipples to breastfeeding babies and allowing mothers and newborns to room together around the clock.</p><p>Prentice, one of eight Chicago hospitals to apply for the baby-friendly status so far, delivers about 12,000 infants a year, more than any other facility in the city. The path toward the designation includes extensive staff training and new hospital policies. The process could last years.</p><p>“All the staff in the hospital will get some exposure to what it means to be a baby-friendly hospital,” said Adam Becker, executive director of the Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children, a federally funded group that works with the city to help hospitals enter the international program. “Then there are many categories of staff that do more hands-on training.”</p><p>“If Prentice takes all these steps,” Becker added, “roughly 27 percent of babies born in Chicago and their mothers will have access to the most supportive environment possible to encourage breastfeeding from birth.”</p><p>But the program has a downside, according to Dr. Maura Quinlan, vice chairwoman of the Illinois section of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. “The main issue is time, especially documenting the whole process and the 10 steps,” she said. “I don’t think many smaller hospitals have the resources to go through the application.”</p><p>“The designation is something the hospital can show on its website but it doesn’t mean that other hospitals don’t provide the same services,” said Quinlan, who delivers babies at MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn.</p><p>Prentice’s quest for baby-friendly status marks a turnaround of sorts. Years ago the hospital eliminated many of its lactation-specialist positions.</p><p>Illinois birth-certificate data for the six months ending last July 31 suggest that about 80 percent of Prentice newborns breastfed there. By that measure, the hospital ranked sixth among 19 facilities that deliver babies in the city.</p><p>The first hospital in Chicago to apply for the baby-friendly status was Holy Cross last summer. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/after-wbez-report-hospital-steps-breastfeeding-efforts-90006">A top official there said a WBEZ report</a> about the hospital’s breastfeeding performance made improvement a priority.</p><p>The other Chicago applicants include Mount Sinai Hospital, St. Anthony Hospital, the University of Illinois Medical Center, St. Joseph Hospital, Resurrection Medical Center and Roseland Community Hospital.</p><p>More than 15,000 facilities in 134 countries have earned the baby-friendly status since the program’s 1991 launch, according to UNICEF. In the United States, just 125 hospitals had received the designation by December, according to New York-based Baby-Friendly USA Inc., a chapter of the international program. The only two in Illinois are Pekin Hospital in downstate Pekin and St. John’s Hospital, further south in Springfield.</p><p>U.S. health officials say breastfeeding helps newborns avoid infections, obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and asthma. For mothers, they say it reduces risks of breast and ovarian cancer. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies get no solids or liquids other than breast milk for the first six months of life.</p></p> Thu, 09 Feb 2012 11:12:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/women%E2%80%99s-hospital-aims-%E2%80%98baby-friendly%E2%80%99-status-96224 Hospital regulators let formula vie with breast milk http://www.wbez.org/content/hospital-regulators-let-formula-vie-breast-milk <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Vanessa3.JPG" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px; float: left; width: 266px; height: 199px;" title="Lactation consultant Vanessa Stokes says Cook County’s Stroger Hospital has a long way to go. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)"></div><p>A new French study shows that breastfeeding may have lasting benefits for a child’s metabolism. Other studies suggest breastfeeding helps prevent infections, chronic diseases and obesity. Evidence like this has moved the American Academy of Pediatrics to recommend giving babies no food or drink other than breast milk for their first six months. At many Chicago-area hospitals, though, breast milk competes with baby formula. At some of them, the real stuff usually loses. From our West Side bureau, we compare how the area’s hospitals approach breastfeeding and see whether watchdog agencies are paying much attention.</p><p>MITCHELL: Certified lactation consultant Vanessa Stokes landed a job in December.</p><p>STOKES: I was excited just to get to that place to really make a difference.</p><p>MITCHELL: That place was the maternity ward of Cook County’s Stroger Hospital. Stokes was there to encourage and train moms to breastfeed. But she noticed the hospital giving them signals it was OK to feed newborns formula.</p><p>STOKES: I saw bottles in the cribs.</p><p>MITCHELL: Then Stokes met one of the hospital’s newest mothers. Like many patients on the ward, she was young and black. What was less usual was her file. It showed she’d been planning to breastfeed.</p><p>STOKES: The baby was born and then, at night, she had some problems with latch-on, which happens. She said, ‘The nurse told me to give the baby a bottle.’ That’s what she told me.</p><p>MITCHELL: You believe her?</p><p>STOKES: Yes, I do. Most nurses, they just don’t want to take the time to help moms. They have a million other things to do.</p><p>MITCHELL: And there was no breastfeeding peer counselor or lactation consultant on duty overnight?</p><p>STOKES: No.</p><p>MITCHELL: One of Stokes’ supervisors at Stroger confirms that the hospital keeps bottles in cribs and that the nurses sometimes give out formula without any medical reason. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/baby-formula/breast-feeding-disparities-sharp-chicago-area-hospitals">Birth-certificate data</a> show that less than 60 percent of infants born at Stroger get to breastfeed there. And there are more places like this. A dozen Chicago-area hospitals have even lower rates. The data show there’s one on the South Side where just 10 percent of newborns start breastfeeding.</p><p>SOUND: Elevator door closes.</p><p>MITCHELL (on site): I’m inside that hospital now. It’s called Holy Cross. I’m taking an elevator to the 6th floor to see Anita Allen-Karriem. She directs what Holy Cross calls its Family Birth Center.</p><p>SOUND: Elevator door opens. Intercom voice. Birth Center door opens.</p><p>MITCHELL: Allen-Karriem shows me around the ward.</p><p>ALLEN-KARRIEM: And, as you can see, this is our rooming-in. And our moms are here and they can have their baby here 24/7...</p><p>MITCHELL: She says Holy Cross initiates breastfeeding within an hour of birth.</p><p>ALLEN-KARRIEM: My nurses have the tools that they need to assist with breastfeeding the mom. And we encourage breastfeeding on demand.</p><p>MITCHELL (on site): How many lactation consultants do you have on staff?</p><p>ALLEN-KARRIEM: We don’t have any. Our volume does not support that at this particular time.</p><p>MITCHELL (on site): Any peer counselors that come in as volunteers? Breastfeeding peer counselors?</p><p>ALLEN-KARRIEM: No, we don’t have that at the present.</p><p>MITCHELL: Allen-Karriem says convincing her patients to breastfeed is not always easy. She says most have not received any prenatal care before showing up in labor. Even more than Stroger Hospital, Holy Cross lets breast milk compete with formula. Allen-Karriem says her hospital sends moms home with a few days worth of formula. The idea’s to tide them over, until they get into a federal nutrition program that provides more.</p><p>ALLEN-KARRIEM: Is it the best method of nutrition? No, it is not. Breastfeeding is. However, it’s the mom’s choice. If she wants to exclusively breastfeed, we do not send her home with formula. However, because she has not chosen to breastfeed, would you send her outside your doors with no way to feed her infant and no way to buy any formula?</p><p>MITCHELL: Again, Holy Cross is at the bottom when it comes to breastfeeding rates in Chicago-area hospitals. Experts say that’s not a big surprise since it doesn’t have lactation consultants and gives out all that formula. But some hospitals are taking a different tack.</p><p>INTERCOM: Stroke alert for the Emergency Room...</p><p>MITCHELL: Like Stroger and Holy Cross, Mount Sinai on Chicago’s West Side serves mostly low-income patients. Last year about half the babies born at the hospital were getting breastfed there. To lift that rate, Mount Sinai says it’s planning to apply for a pro-breastfeeding designation from the United Nations called Baby Friendly.</p><p>SAIDEL: This is the room where the hearing screen is done...</p><p>MITCHELL: Lou-Ellen Saidel is one of two half-time lactation consultants on Mount Sinai’s maternity ward. She says you can see the effect of the Baby Friendly program right in this room. Saidel says the nurses used to quiet down babies for hearing tests by giving them formula. Now, she points to a big sign at eye level.</p><p>SAIDEL: It says, ‘Bottles should only be given for a documented medical reason.’ So now they don’t use formula on breastfeeding babies anymore in here.</p><p>MITCHELL: Saidel says Mount Sinai puts almost every staffer who comes into contact with new mothers or infants through breastfeeding training...</p><p>SAIDEL: ...from registered nurse to secretary. This is a process of people acquiring skills that were not taught in nursing school and medical school.</p><p>MITCHELL: For the Baby Friendly designation, some Sinai staffers will need more training. The sessions won’t cost the hospital much money but will eat up staff time. That could explain why no Chicago hospital has applied for the designation. But a lot of breastfeeding experts say the hospitals should give it a try.</p><p>ABRAMSON: Breastfeeding is one those priority areas that are life-and-death for their patients.</p><p>MITCHELL: Rachel Abramson is a former post-partum nurse who heads a Chicago nonprofit group called HealthConnect One.</p><p>ABRAMSON: Those of us who grew up thinking that formula feeding is the norm and perfectly adequate have a hard time shifting our vision to see the risks of illness in the first year of life, juvenile diabetes, of breast cancer for mother, of obesity and diabetes — lifelong — for mothers and babies.</p><p>MITCHELL: Abramson says the costs for treating these diseases often ends up on the shoulders of taxpayers. If that’s the case, you might think the government and hospital oversight groups would push hard for better breastfeeding rates. But they don’t push. They mostly nudge.</p><p>MITCHELL: One group with some accountability is the Oakbrook Terrace-based Joint Commission. It accredits hospitals. Ann Watt helps direct the commission’s quality-evaluation division. Watt says about a year ago the commission published some standards for hospitals to measure whether newborns were breastfeeding.</p><p>WATT: Our medical experts have indicated to us that this is a best practice.</p><p>MITCHELL: But these commission standards are voluntary. In fact, just three Illinois hospitals have adopted them.</p><p>MITCHELL (on phone): Could a hospital be performing poorly by these measures and still get accreditation?</p><p>WATT: Yes.</p><p>MITCHELL: Another group with some say is the Illinois Hospital Association. I asked the group whether it would support more public oversight of hospital breastfeeding practices. A spokesman declined to answer on tape but sent a statement saying the rules should not be rigid. The statement says breastfeeding management should begin with prenatal care, not the mother’s hospital stay. The hospital association also points out that the decision to breastfeed is personal.</p><p>MITCHELL: The folks with the most to say about hospitals breastfeeding rates are at the Illinois Department of Public Health. The department is in charge of enforcing the state’s hospital-licensing code. The code requires hospitals to follow basic breastfeeding guidelines that two physician groups published in 2007. In a statement to WBEZ, the Illinois Department of Public Health says it investigates breastfeeding infection-control issues. Otherwise, though, the department says it does not enforce the guidelines. That leaves public policy on breastfeeding largely up to individual hospitals — places like Stroger, Mount Sinai and Holy Cross.</p><p><em>Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the status of Mount Sinai Hospital’s Baby Friendly effort. Chicago officials announced in August 2010 that Mount Sinai was seeking the international designation. The hospital registered to begin that four-phase process in September 2011.</em></p></p> Thu, 05 May 2011 16:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/content/hospital-regulators-let-formula-vie-breast-milk Report: Breastfeeding in Illinois hinges partly on race, income http://www.wbez.org/story/report-breastfeeding-illinois-hinges-partly-race-income-85662 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-April/2011-04-25/breastfeeding.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Almost half of African-American mothers in Illinois never breastfeed their newborns, according to a report by state and university researchers and a nonprofit group called HealthConnect One.</p> <p> Among new black mothers in 2008, about 45 percent did not start breastfeeding their infants, according to the report, “<a href="http://www.ilbreastfeedingblueprint.org/">Illinois Breastfeeding Blueprint: A Plan for Change</a>.” That figure compares to 21 percent for whites, 14 percent for Latinas and 3 percent for Asian-Americans.</p> <p> The report also shows income disparities. The rate of low-income white mothers in the state who never started breastfeeding babies born in 2008 was 36 percent.</p> <p> “Hospitals should be doing more to encourage breastfeeding,” said University of Illinois at Chicago epidemiologist Deborah Rosenberg, who analyzed data for the report.</p> <p> Looking at all new Illinois mothers, the report says the number who did start breastfeeding was almost 78 percent by 2008 — up about 8 percent from 2000. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has set a national goal of almost 82 percent by 2020.</p> <p> Starting breastfeeding does not mean keeping at it. Twelve weeks after giving birth, just 47 percent of Illinois mothers were breastfeeding, according to the report. Of those, almost half were not breastfeeding exclusively.</p> <p> “Many women go back to work then,” Rosenberg said. “It means that employers need to be supportive of breastfeeding.”</p> <p> Rosenberg said resources for lactation consultants and peer counselors are also falling short.</p> <p> HealthConnect One, based in Chicago, published the report Monday in collaboration with the Illinois Department of Human Services and the University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Public Health.</p> <p> Next month the group and its partners plan to begin formulating a five-year action plan for hospitals, government agencies, employers, insurers and community groups.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/breastfeeding/calltoactiontosupportbreastfeeding.pdf"> Federal health officials</a> say breastfeeding helps babies avoid obesity, infections and chronic diseases. The <a href="http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/feb05breastfeeding.htm">American Academy of Pediatrics</a> recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months.</p></p> Tue, 26 Apr 2011 22:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/report-breastfeeding-illinois-hinges-partly-race-income-85662 Lawmakers nix licensing midwives for homebirths http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/lawmakers-nix-licensing-midwives-homebirths <p><p>It will remain unlawful in Illinois for midwives who lack advanced medical training to attend homebirths without supervision. Illinois House members on Thursday night voted down <a href="http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=09600SB3712ham001&amp;GA=96&amp;SessionId=76&amp;DocTypeId=SB&amp;LegID=51899&amp;DocNum=3712&amp;GAID=10&amp;Session=">a bill that would have created a state license</a> for nationally certified midwives.<br /><br />Each year hundreds of Illinois women give birth in their home. Some are following religious beliefs. Other women are trying to avoid medical interventions such as C-sections.<br /><br />Physicians and advanced nurses willing to attend home births are in short supply. The bill would have set up state licensing for <a href="http://www.narm.org/htb.htm#whatis">certified professional midwives</a> to step in. The measure&rsquo;s sponsor, state Rep. Robyn Gabel, D-Evanston, said it would have increased safety for the mothers and babies.<br /><br />But the <a href="http://www.votervoice.net/Core.aspx?AID=162&amp;Screen=alert&amp;IssueId=21867&amp;SessionID=$AID%3d162:SITEID%3d-1:VV_CULTURE%3den-us:APP%3dGAC$">Illinois State Medical Society</a> and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists argued the midwives couldn&rsquo;t handle many birth complications.<br /><br />The vote against the bill was 71-47.</p></p> Sat, 08 Jan 2011 00:23:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/lawmakers-nix-licensing-midwives-homebirths Illinois bill for midwife licenses nears vote http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/illinois-bill-midwife-licenses-nears-vote <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/DianeSakowicz.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Illinois lawmakers are considering some hot-button measures this week. The state House of Representatives has voted down a medical-marijuana bill and approved an expansion of rights for same-sex couples. Some lawmakers also want to allow nationally certified midwives to attend home births in Illinois&mdash;attend them, that is, without supervision by a physician or an advanced nurse. WBEZ&rsquo;s Chip Mitchell is following the measure&rsquo;s progress and joins host Melba Lara in studio Tuesday. Her first question is what the legislation would do.</p></p> Tue, 30 Nov 2010 22:50:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/illinois-bill-midwife-licenses-nears-vote State lawmakers mull licensing midwives for home births http://www.wbez.org/story/babies/state-lawmakers-mull-licensing-midwives-home-births <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Michael_Tryon.png" alt="" /><p><p>Illinois lawmakers are considering a bill that would license nationally certified midwives to attend home births in the state without supervision by a physician or an advanced nurse.<br /><br />The measure&rsquo;s chief sponsor, state Rep. Robyn Gabel, D-Evanston, has support from some Republicans, including state Rep. Michael Tryon of Crystal Lake.<br /><br />&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not illegal to have a baby at home,&rdquo; Tryon said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s just illegal to have a trained, professional midwife to assist you. And when you look at 27 other states that have midwifery legislation, I believe we need this passed so that citizens in Illinois have these same choices.&rdquo;<br /><br />Hundreds of Illinois women have home births each year. Some are following religious beliefs. Others are trying to avoid a C-section.<br /><br />The state House could vote on the legislation as early as Monday.<br /><br />The bill&rsquo;s opponents include the Illinois State Medical Society, which says the licensing would endanger mothers and babies.</p></p> Mon, 29 Nov 2010 02:31:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/babies/state-lawmakers-mull-licensing-midwives-home-births