WBEZ | Water http://www.wbez.org/sections/water Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Lampreys http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2016-02-12/lampreys-114833 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Lamprey_NOAA-Great-Lakes-Enviromental-Research_Flickr.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">In recent years, The Great Lakes have been terrorized by a little, tiny foe called the Sea Lamprey. Usually found in the Atlantic, the parasite has been killing fish by the millions each year feeding on it&rsquo;s blood and moving on to larger prey once it&rsquo;s done.</p><p dir="ltr">Scientists have been working to develop the most effective way to rid our waters of these tiny terrors. Michael Wagner, Fish ecologist and MSU professor, guides us through research on a plan to remove lampreys by smell.</p></p> Fri, 12 Feb 2016 14:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2016-02-12/lampreys-114833 Global Activism in India: PUKAR helps Mumbai's slum-dwellers http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-india-pukar-helps-mumbais-slum-dwellers-114718 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA-Pukar.JPG" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-8b78c428-b23a-9de4-9005-5faab26778f6"><a href="http://pukar.org.in/"><em>PUKAR</em></a>&nbsp;is an independent research collective and an urban knowledge production center based in Mumbai, India. PUKAR means to &ldquo;call out&rdquo; in Hindi. Worldview visited the collective when it took the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-09/special-series-global-activism-worldview-visits-india-111888">Global Activism series on the road to India</a>. One of their projects is known as the &quot;Barefoot Researcher&quot; project. Young people from disadvantaged communities take on research projects and &nbsp;document what is happening with things like water quality or tuberculosis in their community. Then, they use that knowledge to generate change. PUKAR Executive Director, Dr. Anita Deshmuk, gave us a tour of the slum area.</span></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/243130684&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 21 Jan 2016 09:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-india-pukar-helps-mumbais-slum-dwellers-114718 Perspectives From India & Chicago: Citizen Empowerment For Human Rights http://www.wbez.org/sections/water/perspectives-india-chicago-citizen-empowerment-human-rights-114476 <p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Perspectives is a solutions-oriented symposium of multi-media arts, academic experts and community conversations around human rights in India and in Chicago. The event will engage and educate Chicagoans on issues faced by women, children, and other vulnerable populations in India and parallel challenges in the city of Chicago. Parallels between the regions will be highlighted with an emphasis on promoting cross-cultural learning and engagement. Themes will include community led solutions to challenges in access to justice, education, and environmental resources.</span></span><br />&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Session 1, 12:00 &ndash; 4:00</strong></span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Start with lunch and stay for panels and conversations with experts on human rights in India and Chicago.</span></span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Session 2, 4:00 &ndash; 7:00</span></span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Kick off the evening with a tasting of India&rsquo;s famed outdoor culinary delicacies and explore human rights through visual snapshots of India and a live musical performance.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">This event is <strong>FREE</strong>. Registration is required at Brown Paper Tickets.</span></span><br /><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Learn more at: <a href="http://www.artworksprojects.org/perspectives">www.artworksprojects.org/perspectives</a></span></span><br /><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Questions? Contact us at: <a href="mailto:info@artworksprojects.org">info@artworksprojects.org</a></span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Co-produced by ART WORKS Projects / India Development Service / WBEZ Worldview<br />Sponsored by The Chicago Community Trust</span></span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">ABOUT THE SPEAKERS</span></span></strong></p><p><em><strong><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Human Rights:</span></span></strong></em></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Brian Citro</strong> is a Clinical Lecturer in Law and the Associate Director of the International Human Rights Clinic. He is also the Director of &ldquo;Developing a Rights-Based Approach to TB in India,&rdquo; a project funded by the University of Chicago Center in Delhi and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights. Among many experiences, he previously worked for two years in New Delhi, India, as a Senior Research Officer to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health and Project Manager of the Global Health and Human Rights Database for the Lawyers Collective, HIV/AIDS Unit.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Asha Kowtal</strong> is the General Secretary of the National Dalit Women&rsquo;s movement, called the All India Dalit Mahila Adhikar Manch (AIDMAM), which works to promote and protect the rights of women who are subjected to caste and gender discrimination. Under her leadership, AIDMAM has undertaken significant activities including a National Tribunal on Justice for Dalit women, human rights training programs, and Dalit women self-respect marches. She is also the Convener of WinG-India (Women in Governance), addressing issues of conflict and structural violence against women in India.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Anisa Rahim</strong> is a public interest lawyer and writer. She has litigated in the areas of worker&rsquo;s rights, language access and domestic violence in NJ where she worked closely with the South Asian women&rsquo;s organization Manavi. She then worked at the Human Rights Law Network in New Delhi, India on reproductive rights and disability and taught courses at Jindal Global Law School. She is now pursuing her MFA in Creative Writing at Rutgers-Newark and works as Special Counsel at Legal Services of New Jersey.</span></span></p><p><em><strong><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Education:</span></span></strong></em></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Elaine Allensworth</strong> is the Lewis-Sebring Director of the Consortium on Chicago School Research, where she studies factors influencing student success and school improvement. Her research has been used to create student-tracking systems used in Chicago and districts across the country. She also conducts research in the areas of school leadership and school organization. She is one of the authors of the book, Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago, which provides a detailed analysis of school practices and community conditions which promote school improvement.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Renuka Gupta</strong> is CEO of the Pardada Pardadi Education Society (PPES), a non-profit operating schools for girls in rural India, and has over 25 years experience in the field of social work. PPES empowers community women from the poorest sections of society by providing free education for girls and job opportunities for women, breaking the cycle of poverty. Gupta previously worked in the sector in various different capacities ranging from policy and advocacy work to project management and strategic planning. Her expertise lies in the fields of education, child labor, health and gender.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Eric Reyes</strong> is a proud product of CPS, a parent of a CPS student, and the Vice-chairperson of the Local School Council at Telpochcalli Elementary School. His work in education has been driven by an interest in social justice. He holds an M.A. in Sociology and Education/Education Policy from Teachers College, Columbia University. There his graduate studies focused on school equity, dropout prevention, gender and schools, school discipline policies, charter schools, and education policy. Eric lives in Pilsen.</span></span></p><p><em><strong><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Environment:</span></span></strong></em></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Fred Carter</strong> is co-founder of the Black Oaks Center for Sustainable Renewable Living, working to transition to a post-carbon world. He is a certified teacher of Permaculture by the Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute. He was trained in photovoltaic &amp; biodiesel by Solar Energy International and is certified as a Peak Oil Community Leader by the Community Solution. Black Oaks Center for Sustainable Renewable Living is committed to Chicago and Pembroke communities by giving them tools and skills for the future.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Prakash Tyagi</strong> is the Executive Director of GRAVIS, a non-governmental organization in India that works on water conservation using rural techniques in over 1,300 villages in the Thar Desert, which gets less than 10 inches of rain each year. Dr. Tyagi is an established researcher, speaker and writer on global health and developmental issues with particular focuses on ageing and health, non-communicable diseases, HIV and TB and food and water security. His work ranges from a grass-root level to global levels in mentioned programmatic areas.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;"><strong>Moira Zellner</strong> is an Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Policy at UIC. Before coming to the U.S., she worked in Argentina as a consultant on environmental issues for engineering firms and the city of Buenos Aires, in projects related to hazardous waste management, river remediation, pollution control, and environmental impact assessments. In the United States, Moira&rsquo;s professional work includes greenway development and river restoration projects in Miami Beach and in California, and transportation surveys.</span></span></p><p><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva,sans-serif;">Cultural presentation by Guruprasad Kathavate, Classical Karnatik player</span></span></p></p> Thu, 14 Jan 2016 09:32:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/water/perspectives-india-chicago-citizen-empowerment-human-rights-114476 Worldview at Notebaert Nature Museum to talk Climate Change http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-10/worldview-notebaert-nature-museum-talk-climate-change-114134 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/web%20climate%202%20620.jpeg" title="WBEZ’s “Worldview” broadcasts at Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 10 December, 2015. from left – Jerome McDonnell, Adele Simmons, Joel Brammeier, Kathleen Dean Moore, Kate Sackman of EcoMyths Alliance &amp; Brooke Hecht of Center for Humans and Nature" /></div></div></div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/237022372&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-1fe3d367-8e97-6a8f-383e-f8884c09e811">Worldview is LIVE at Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum to talk COP21, Climate Change and Conservation</span></strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span>Negotiators are expected to work into the weekend at the climate change talks in Paris.&nbsp;</span>And we&rsquo;re at the <a href="http://www.naturemuseum.org/">Peggy Notebart Nature Museum</a> with a panel of conservationists to discuss how climate change will transform our natural world. Thanks to the <a href="http://www.humansandnature.org/">Center for Humans and Nature</a> and <a href="http://ecomyths.org/">EcoMyths Alliance</a> for assembling the gathering.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>GUESTS:&nbsp;</strong></p><p><a href="http://www.metropolisstrategies.org/AdeleSimmons.html">Adele Simmons</a> is vice chair and senior executive for Metropolis Strategies; president of the Global Philanthropy Partnership. Previously, she has served as co-chair on the Task Force that developed the Climate Action Plan for the City of Chicago</p><p><a href="http://www.riverwalking.com/">Kathleen Dean Moore</a> is distinguished professor of philosophy at Oregon State University; founder, Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word.</p><p><a href="http://www.greatlakes.org/document.doc?id=610">Joel Brammeier</a> is president and CEO of the Alliance for the Great Lakes. He also advises state governors and provincial premiers on clean water policy.</p><p><a href="http://www.humansandnature.org/curt-meine">Curt Meine</a> is senior fellow at the Center for Humans and Nature and the Aldo Leopold Foundation; associate adjunct professor at UW&ndash;Madison. A conservation biologist, historian, and writer.</p><p><a href="http://www.jameswhitlowdelano.com/">James Whitlow Delano</a> is a photographer and curator of the exhibit, &ldquo;BODY OF WATER &ndash; Climate Change, Water, &amp; Human Rights&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 10 Dec 2015 10:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-10/worldview-notebaert-nature-museum-talk-climate-change-114134 Despite the drought, California farms see record sales http://www.wbez.org/sections/water/despite-drought-california-farms-see-record-sales-112741 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/gettyimages-471006602-99705b6d250521f4014e8c84f29849326d342a59-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>While prolonged drought has put a strain on California agriculture, most of the state&#39;s farms, it seems, aren&#39;t just surviving it: They are prospering.</p><p>The environment, though, that&#39;s another story. We&#39;ll get to that.</p><p>But first, the prosperity. According to new&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/farm-income-and-wealth-statistics/annual-cash-receipts-by-commodity.aspx#P892cc423657a499584e30a89895d0f4d_2_16iT0R0x5">figures</a>&nbsp;from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in 2014, the year the drought really hit, California&#39;s farmers sold $54 billion worth of crops like almonds or grapes, and animal products like milk.</p><p>That&#39;s an all-time record, up 5 percent over the previous year, and an increase of 20 percent from 2012.</p><p>If you&#39;re surprised by this, you haven&#39;t been paying close attention, says&nbsp;<a href="http://are.ucdavis.edu/en/people/faculty/daniel-sumner/#pk_campaign=short-name-redirect&amp;pk_kwd=sumner">Daniel Sumner</a>, an agricultural economist at the University of California, Davis. It&#39;s been clear for some time, he says, that California&#39;s farmers did very well last year.</p><p>There are two keys to the record-breaking revenues. The first is prices. &quot;You have all-time high prices over the whole range of crops,&quot; says Richard Howitt, another economist at UC Davis.</p><p>Second, even though farmers didn&#39;t get their normal supply of water from rivers and reservoirs, they pumped it from underground aquifers instead. According to a&nbsp;<a href="https://watershed.ucdavis.edu/files/biblio/DroughtReport_23July2014_0.pdf">report</a>&nbsp;that Sumner and Howitt co-authored last year, farmers in 2014 replaced about 75 percent of their surface water deficit by draining their groundwater reserves.</p><p>James McFarlane, who grows almonds and citrus near Fresno, is one of those farmers. He says that drought has been &quot;beyond terrible&quot; for some farmers. But for him personally? &quot;It&#39;s been a good year. We&#39;ve been able to make some money, and you have to just count your blessings and call that a good year,&quot; he says.</p><p>McFarlane has received some irrigation water from Kings River, via the Fresno Irrigation District, but he is also pumping water from his wells. &quot;If it weren&#39;t for the wells, we couldn&#39;t have made it work,&quot; he says.</p><p>Howitt says that there are two contrasting realities in California agriculture these days. &quot;Some people just don&#39;t have the underground water. You meet these people and they really are in poor shape,&quot; he says. But where there is water, &quot;you have investors pouring money into planting these almond trees at a rate that they&#39;ve never seen before.&quot;</p><p>But this is also where the environmental damage comes in. Those underground reserves are getting depleted, wells are going dry, and in many locations, the land is sinking as water is drawn out. When this happens, it permanently reduces the soil&#39;s ability to absorb and store water in the future.</p><p>California has enacted new rules that eventually should stop farmers from pumping so much groundwater, but for now, it continues. This year, California&#39;s farmers are still pumping enough groundwater to replace about 70 percent of the shortfall in surface water, according to a new UC Davis&nbsp;<a href="https://watershed.ucdavis.edu/files/biblio/Final_Drought%20Report_08182015_Full_Report_WithAppendices.pdf">report</a>.</p><p>Such massive use of groundwater can&#39;t continue forever, and high commodity prices probably won&#39;t, either. Milk prices already have fallen, and if China stops buying so much of California&#39;s nut production, those prices may crash as well.</p><p>On the good side, though, maybe rain and snow will return, filling the reservoirs again.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/08/27/434649587/despite-the-drought-california-farms-see-record-sales?ft=nprml&amp;f=434649587" target="_blank"><em>NPR&#39;s The Salt</em></a></p></p> Thu, 27 Aug 2015 05:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/water/despite-drought-california-farms-see-record-sales-112741 Special Series: Global Activism - 'Worldview' Visits India http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-09/special-series-global-activism-worldview-visits-india-111888 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/India-series%20620%20good.JPG" title="From bottom l to r - Sonal Chaturvedi, co-director of Pravah, Nila Vora of India Development Service, Steve Bynum and Jerome McDonnell of WBEZ with the NGO Community Youth Collective in Delhi on Feb., 1, 2015 (Photo by Nilesh Kothari)" /><em>Worldview</em> took <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/water/special-series-global-activism-worldview-visits-india-111888">Global Activism</a></em> to India! And we take you along for the ride. For years, India Development Service <a href="http://idsusa.org/">(IDS)</a>, a Chicago-based investment NGO, has brought from India Global Activists to <em>Worldview&nbsp;</em>who work there to make life better. So IDS brought us to India to talk with people doing service and development projects on-the-ground. IDS guided us through big cities like, Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore and Hyderabad, as well as to remote villages and towns. We met people working to overcome challenges like illiteracy, abuse of women and children, class issues and water security.</p></p> Thu, 16 Apr 2015 09:32:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-05-09/special-series-global-activism-worldview-visits-india-111888 EcoMyths: Dangers of Microplastics http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-dangers-microplastics-112169 <p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-34d00667-da74-cf3b-6a33-f532ccbde9dc">Plastic makes up 90% of the trash picked up in Trash Free Seas (TFS) ocean cleanups, according to research by Ocean Conservancy</span>. And experts says that microplastics - pieces of plastic smaller than 5 millimeters (just under a fifth of an inch) - are just as dangerous as those 2-liter bottles you might see floating in Lake Michigan or the &ldquo;Great Pacific garbage patch&rdquo;. Kate Sackman, of EcoMyths Alliance, will help us find out why these microfibers are a big hazard from Allison Schutes, manager of the TFS Program at Ocean Conservancy and Olga Lyandres, research manager at Alliance for the Great Lakes.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196366595&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong>Does Size Matter When It Comes to Plastic Pollution?</strong></p><p>&quot;Don&#39;t sweat the small stuff&quot; is a great mantra&hellip;except when you&#39;re talking about plastic pollution. Devilishly tiny plastics, a.k.a. microplastics, are adding up to one massive problem in the world&#39;s waterways - acting as a sponge for other pollutants, not to mention confusing and harming wildlife.</p><p>On this month&#39;s EcoMyths segment, we&rsquo;ll find out how and why something so small can cause such a big fuss. We brought in Olga Lyandres, research manager for the <a href="http://greatlakes.org/">Alliance for the Great Lakes</a>, and Allison Schutes, manager of the <a href="http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/marine-debris/" target="_blank">Ocean Conservancy&#39;s Trash Free Seas program</a> for a tete-a-tete with Jerome McDonnell and Kate Sackman.</p><p><strong><u>Microplastics 101</u></strong></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" height="237" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/microbeads%201.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Microbeads! (Courtesy of Alliance for the Great Lakes/Lyandres)" width="306" />First, some perspective. Before the show, Olga showed the <em>Worldview</em> team a fairly nondescript bottle of <a href="http://www.ecomythsalliance.org/2015/02/minimyth-face-scrub-isnt-made-of-plastic/">microbeads</a>. While they may look unassuming, these types of microplastics are especially insidious, because they lurk inside so many personal care products, from face scrub to toothpaste, Olga explained.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">And when you wash the teensy plastic scrubbers off your face or spit &#39;em out with your toothpaste, down the drain they go&mdash;straight to the wastewater treatment facility, which is not equipped to remove them. So on the pearly pellets go, discharging into lakes, running down into streams, floating off into oceans&hellip;and contributing to the 10-20 billion pounds of plastics estimated to enter the world&#39;s oceans each year, according to Allison.</div><p>By the way, though they&#39;re the most hyped, microbeads aren&#39;t the only kind of microplastics, which generally are defined as any plastic measuring smaller than 5 millimeters (just under a fifth of an inch). Other types include:</p><ul><li><em>Fibers</em>: Little strands of synthetic fibers, from fishing line to cigarette filters to polyester and fleece clothing, to name a few</li><li><em>Fragments</em>: Big plastic trash doesn&rsquo;t go away&mdash;it simply breaks down into teensy, irregularly shaped plastic particles.</li><li><em>Film</em>: Thin, long pieces that may once have been food wrapping or plastic bags</li></ul><p><strong>So What? </strong></p><p>The quick rap sheet on microplastics is that once they <strong><em>get</em></strong> out into our waters, they tend to <strong><em>act</em></strong> out, to put it lightly. First, Olga explained that they basically act as sponges, adsorbing other pollutants willy-nilly and moving them around the Great Lakes or wherever they happen to float. Second, Allison pointed out that wildlife often accidentally eat them, which can directly or indirectly affect animals as varied as small fish, turtles, and even whales.</p><p>Both experts clarified that the research on the implications of microplastics is still emerging, but they&#39;ve pointed out some interesting studies. Consider:</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.csgmidwest.org/policyresearch/documents/Plastics-GLLC-20114.pdf" target="_blank">Sherri Mason&rsquo;s lab at SUNY Fredonia</a> found plastic in the guts and intestines of 18 different species, including 17 fish, and one waterbird.</li><li>Some research shows that ingesting too much plastic can result in serious digestive issues. <a href="http://ocean.si.edu/slideshow/laysan-albatrosses%E2%80%99-plastic-problem" target="_blank">Albatross chicks</a>, for instance, cannot regurgitate nor digest plastic debris they swallow, so it can fill up their stomachs such that they can no longer digest food.</li></ul><ul><li>Some <a href="http://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/1040530/Uptake-and-retention-of-microplastics-by-the-shore-crab-Carcinus-maenas.html">evidence</a> suggests that microplastics can make their way up the food chain, though this is still an early area of scientific inquiry.</li></ul><p>Plus&hellip;precisely because they&#39;re so small, microplastics are especially tricky and take &quot;astronomical costs&quot; to clean up, noted Allison. That&#39;s one big reason it&#39;s so important for folks to help keep plastic from entering the waste stream in the first place, whether it&#39;s by avoiding products like microbead-laden facial scrub or participating in a cleanup.</p><p><strong>Change is a&#39;comin&rsquo;</strong></p><p>But wait, there&#39;s good news! Olga and Allison are all about embracing individual impact, from swapping out plastic-studded face wash with apricot scrub to supporting legislation like <a href="http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/06/17/illinois-takes-a-big-stand-on-tiny-plastics/" target="_blank">Illinois</a>&#39; phase-out of the manufacture and sale of microbeads in personal care products. At least nine other states now have similar legislation on the docket, as does Ontario, Canada, added Olga.</p><p>Though the topic can be infuriating, to use Jerome&#39;s term, Allison cheered everyone up in the studio by reminding us that, &quot;We all have a part to play in the solution.&quot;</p><p>Nutshell: Small size doesn&rsquo;t mean small impact &ndash; in terms of plastic pollution, that&#39;s a bad thing. In terms of public involvement &ndash; it&#39;s great! Microplastics may be a big problem, but we can each make a difference.</p><p><strong>One Green Thing</strong></p><p>One easy way to keep plastic - big and small - out of waterways is to choose reusable instead of single-use products. Boom!</p><p><strong><em>More ways to help:</em></strong></p><ul><li><strong>Save the date for the <a href="http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/international-coastal-cleanup/" target="_blank">International Coastal Cleanup</a> day on September 19, 2015</strong></li><li>Participate in Alliance for the Great Lakes&rsquo; <a href="http://www.greatlakes.org/ADOPTABEACH" target="_blank">Adopt-a-Beach program</a></li><li>Try Ocean Conservancy&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/international-coastal-cleanup/10-things-you-can-do.html" target="_blank">10 Things You Can Do for Trash-Free Seas</a></li><li>Ask your state legislator to support microbead bans (the Alliance has tools <a href="http://takeaction.greatlakes.org/site/PageServer?pagename=Advocacy_Home" target="_blank">here</a>)</li></ul></p> Tue, 17 Mar 2015 09:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/ecomyths/ecomyths-dangers-microplastics-112169 Global Activism: 'Give Hope, Fight Poverty' helps HIV victims in Swaziland http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-give-hope-fight-poverty-helps-hiv-victims-swaziland-111360 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA-Swaziland.JPG" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-55ad30fc-ca71-7448-d356-c5fe34b22aa5">Getting her PHD led Annie Elbe Todt to the small African country of Swaziland. </span><span id="docs-internal-guid-55ad30fc-ca71-7448-d356-c5fe34b22aa5">It&rsquo;s a country with the highest rate of HIV in the world. Annie began helping some of the orphans and child headed houses she saw all around her. For <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a>, we talk with Todt about her organization <a href="http://www.ifightpoverty.org">Give Hope, Fight Poverty</a>. It supports 33 child headed households. Their network of support extends to 1500 </span>children. They dig wells, build homes and send children to school. A remarkable number of people have joined on service learning trips.</p><p dir="ltr"><em><strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185104920&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe>EVENT:</strong></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><a href="http://www.hamburgermarys.com/chicago/bingo.php">Hamburger Mary&rsquo;s &lsquo;HamBINGO&rsquo;</a></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Sun, January 11, 8pm &ndash; 10pm</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Andersonville...5400 N. Clark</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>$15 to play all night. Proceeds go to &lsquo;Give Hope, Fight Poverty&rsquo;</em></p></p> Thu, 08 Jan 2015 09:45:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-give-hope-fight-poverty-helps-hiv-victims-swaziland-111360 Global Activism: Physician creates 'Lamp for Haiti' to serve people of Cite Soleil http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-physician-creates-lamp-haiti-serve-people-cite-soleil-110885 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA-Lamp for Haiti.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-50e5d565-d1c9-bc21-8a42-124915665096">James Morgan is a physician who trained at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood. In 2003, he went to Haiti with high school students on a humanitarian mission. Morgan was struck by the extreme poverty and privation he saw, particularly the residents of Cite Soleil. So in 2006, Dr. Morgan and a human rights attorney founded <a href="http://lampforhaiti.org/">Lamp for Haiti</a>. For <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a>, Morgan will share his group&rsquo;s aim to provide medical and human rights services to the residents of Cite Soleil.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/170363557&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 02 Oct 2014 09:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-physician-creates-lamp-haiti-serve-people-cite-soleil-110885 Global Activism: el Fuego del Sol works for sustainability in Haiti and Dominican Republic http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-el-fuego-del-sol-works-sustainability-haiti-and-dominican <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/FdS IOM workers and stove.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Years ago, when we first met Global Activist and Chicagoan Kevin Adair, founder of <a href="https://sites.google.com/a/elfuegodelsol.com/elfuego/">El Fuego del Sol</a> (FdS), his group primarily focused on eco-tourism in the Dominican Republic. But since then, FdS has branched out into humanitarian work in places like Haiti. For our <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism">Global Activism</a></em> segment, Kevin will update us on his work. FdS is &ldquo;a social-eco enterprise that works in Haiti and the Dominican republic to create long-term jobs and address intractable social and ecological issues.&rdquo;<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/165203922&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">I remember another wild story from the past year. Last November (2013), 9-year-old Karen, the daughter of our General Manager, Franky was struck by a car on her way home from school in the DR. She was critically injured, but no hospital would admit her because most of the FdS team was working Haiti, and the hospitals in the DR required needed huge cash up-front before the would accept her. So she was driven overnight by ambulance from hospital to hospital for over 10 hours. Five hospitals refused to treat her because her injuries were so severe.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">Fortunately, we were planning for the mission trip of the Hinsdale Adventist Health medical mission who were arriving in January 2014. And we had been networking with hospitals for follow-up care in conjunction with the doctors&#39; visit.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">So FdS Supervisor, Frida, who is Karen&#39;s aunt, called from Haiti and coordinated with one of those hospitals in Santo Domingo to let Karen in to their emergency room, while we were sending funds from Haiti by Western Union. The hospital treated Karen and saved her life.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">When the Doctors came in January, their orthopedic specialist confirmed that Karen had been very close to death, but complemented the care that Karen received that saved her life, including a &#39;hip-splint&#39; that saved her leg.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">The need for medical missions is great in the DR and Haiti, and that&#39;s why FdS is seeking more medical groups to come down, work with us and provide medical care to some of the most impoverished people in the Americas.</p></p> Thu, 28 Aug 2014 09:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-el-fuego-del-sol-works-sustainability-haiti-and-dominican