WBEZ | Naperville http://www.wbez.org/tags/naperville Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The movie that brought Naperville face to face with its teens' drug use http://www.wbez.org/news/movie-brought-naperville-face-face-its-teens-drug-use-109332 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeff%20Cagle.1_0.jpg" title="Kelly McCutcheon and Jack Kapson (Jeff Cagle)" /></div></div><p>During the 2011-2012 school year, three students from one public high school in west suburban Naperville died from drugs. Kelly McCutcheon was a senior at Neuqua Valley High School at the time, and she started asking her classmates questions about their drug use. The project turned into a documentary that stunned the well-to-do, family-focused community.</p><p>Kelly had enlisted a high school junior, Jack Kapson, &nbsp;to help with sound recording, and together they videotaped more than 20 students talking about their experiences using heroin and other drugs.</p><p>Their project was filmed starkly and informally in backyards and bedrooms and cars. The filmmakers kept the footage away from parents, teachers and police. Kelly and Jack declined to be part of this story, but they gave me permission to use any part of their movie and quote from students they interviewed.</p><p><strong>Library agrees to host Naperville&rsquo;s first look&nbsp;</strong></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/95L 400.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Naperville's 95th Street Library hosted the screening (Bill Healy)" /></div><p>Kelly and Jack asked Naperville&rsquo;s 95th Street Public Library to host the first screening of the film, which they called, &ldquo;Neuqua on Drugs.&quot;</p><p>John Spears directed all of Naperville&rsquo;s public libraries at the time. &ldquo;The filmmakers were working on it up till the very end,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;And that was one thing we were nervous about, because we hadn&rsquo;t seen it either. Given all the potential legal ramifications of showing this, we were really putting a lot of trust in two high school students.&rdquo;</p><p>Library officials agreed to two showings on Wednesday evening, May 30, 2012. Advertising went out, and soon after, irate parents started calling..</p><p>Spears, the library director, remembers one phone call in particular. He received it at his desk the day before the scheduled screening. It was a parent on the other end, telling Spears, &ldquo;You cannot show this movie. It&rsquo;s going to be the destruction of my&hellip;. it&rsquo;s just&hellip;. We will sue.&rdquo;</p><p>The library decided to go forward anyway.</p><p><strong>The screening</strong></p><p>The evening of the first screening, adults and teenagers filed into the library auditorium and people waited outside for the second showing.</p><p>&ldquo;There were many, many glitches that night,&rdquo; said Denise Crosby, a longtime columnist with the Sun-Times suburban papers, including the Naperville Sun. &ldquo;There were people gathered outside waiting for the next session and there were people inside for this session and there was a long delay. But [the audience was] there for the long haul&hellip;. They wanted to see it.&rdquo;</p><p>Among the hundreds of people who came to the library that night were the principal from Neuqua Valley High School, a counselor from a nearby middle school, and a reporter from the local television station. Managers from Naperville&rsquo;s other libraries came in to deal with the overflow crowd.</p><p>The young filmmakers had altered the &nbsp;voices of some speakers they videotaped, &nbsp;and a few kids in the film tried to mask their faces. But most participants were fully visible. And, according to accounts from people who were there, &nbsp;many of the participants were seated in the audience.</p><p>&ldquo;When it finally did get started,&rdquo; Denise Crosby said, &ldquo;there wasn&rsquo;t one person that was not glued to that documentary. There wasn&rsquo;t sound being made at all.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeff Cagle.5_0.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Jack Kapson waits for video to render during an hour-long delay before the first screening (Jeff Cagle)" /></div></div></div><p><strong>The kind of thing parents heard</strong></p><p>&ldquo;The first time I tried heroin... I&rsquo;d probably say sometime during my sophomore year.&rdquo;</p><div>&ldquo;They were like snorting it and I snorted like some Adderall and they were like if you can snort Adderall you can snort this. It&rsquo;s basically like the same thing&hellip;. You&rsquo;re trying to be like happy and just like not worry about anything but you are like stressing about all these little things, and when you get high that just goes away so you can just like chill.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s gives you a really strange comfortable feeling. A feeling that everything around you is okay. It&rsquo;s kind of like a false sense of security.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Denise Crosby, the newspaper columnist, &nbsp;says that for the two kids who made the film, &nbsp;&ldquo;This really was them screaming at the community: Look. Stop. Putting your head in the sand.&rdquo;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeff Cagle.4_0.jpg" style="float: right;" title="(Jeff Cagle)" /></div></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>One mother&rsquo;s experience</strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>For another woman in the audience that night, the film was particularly painful.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Amy Miller&rsquo;s daughter Megan had died four months earlier from heroin. Megan was eighteen and a student at Neuqua when she died. The filmmakers had contacted Amy Miller beforehand to let her know that some of their interviews included stories about Megan.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>And still, Miller says she wasn&rsquo;t prepared for what happened when a girl in the film talked about going to see &ldquo;Alice in Wonderland:&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" jeff="" neuqua="" on="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/2_2_0.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Amy Miller watches the first showing of 'Neuqua on Drugs'." /></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Megan was grounded at the time &ndash; but she convinced her mom to let us go if her mom came too. And so her mom sat on the other side of the movie theater and we were just tripping balls. Like we were sweating so bad and Megan had drawn a giant heart over her eye with eyeliner &lsquo;cause she was the Queen of Hearts and she drew stripes on my face because she was the Cheshire Cat.&rdquo;</div><div>&ldquo;I had no idea,&rdquo; Amy Miller told me when I talked with her recently. &nbsp;&ldquo;And here they were rows behind me in the theater and they took acid to watch the movie. And this is the first I&rsquo;m hearing about this, sitting in the library among hundreds of people, and the girl was in the row behind me and she leaned forward and apologized to me&hellip;. And that was pretty tough, you know? That was really hard. I was angry. I was embarrassed. I was shocked. It was like my daughter, I didn&rsquo;t know her.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Library head John Spears said that feeling of disconnect was common among adults the evening of the screening, and for a long time. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the one thing &nbsp;I heard over and over and over from everyone is: How could this have been happening and we didn&rsquo;t even know it?&rdquo; Underneath their confusion, he says, was shock. There was a sentiment among some people in Naperville that &ldquo;these kinds of things don&rsquo;t happen here.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I spoke to dozens of people in Naperville and I asked everyone, &ldquo;Did this harsh film make a difference?&rdquo;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Dvdsss.jpg" style="float: right;" title="The shelf life of the documentary remains to be seen (Bill Healy)" /></div></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The high school principal pointed to a student-led discussion program, which he says was being created at the same time students were making the documentary. Neuqua&rsquo;s also part of an innovative pilot program specific to heroin--it&rsquo;s a project of &nbsp;the Robert Crown Center for Health Education. That program is in two middle schools that feed into Neuqua, too.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>A parent group recently got money from the city to create parent conversation circles.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Naperville police track where users live and sometimes do surveillance on kids buying drugs on Chicago&rsquo;s West Side.</div><div>Early on in my reporting, Jack Kapson - the young filmmaker who helped create &ldquo;Neuqua on Drugs&rdquo; - said heroin was still a problem in Naperville, though he thought it had gone back underground since the film was released.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In 2013 so far, &nbsp;Naperville has had three confirmed heroin deaths&mdash;down from six in 2011. Police stress, however, that the number of overdoses means kids are still using as much as they did in recent years.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Columnist Denise Crosby says it&rsquo;s a mistake to think &ldquo;Neuqua on Drugs&rdquo; was one high school&rsquo;s story, or even Naperville&rsquo;s story. &ldquo;People started looking at this as &ldquo;Oh, this is Neuqua Valley on drugs. So that&rsquo;s Neuqua&rsquo;s problem.&rdquo; And that&rsquo;s just simply &ndash; again I cannot reiterate that enough &ndash; that is simply not the case. Yeah, Neuqua was the epicenter for this. But this issue is in all of our high schools. It&rsquo;s everywhere. In all of our communities.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The film, she says, should have been titled, &ldquo;Your High School on Drugs.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Bill Healy is an independent producer. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/chicagoan">@chicagoan</a> and on <a href="http://billhealymedia.com">his website</a>.</em></div></p> Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:33:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/movie-brought-naperville-face-face-its-teens-drug-use-109332 Foster glides past Biggert after race that looked tight http://www.wbez.org/news/foster-glides-past-biggert-after-race-looked-tight-103708 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/foster_smal_1.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><p>Defying opinion polls that depicted a neck-and-neck contest, Democrat Bill Foster easily defeated Republican U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert in the 11th Congressional District on Tuesday. With nearly all precincts reporting, Foster had almost 58 percent of the vote; Biggert had 42 percent.</p><p>In his victory speech, Foster expressed misgivings about the race&rsquo;s negative television advertising, a months-long barrage funded by campaign contributions and outside spending totaling roughly $14 million. &ldquo;I sense that both Congresswoman Biggert and myself were forced into an increasingly ugly world of politics today &mdash; a world that we were both deeply uncomfortable with,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Biggert, a seven-term House member, appeared to blame her loss on congressional redistricting controlled by Illinois Democrats. &ldquo;This race wasn&rsquo;t supposed to happen,&rdquo; she told supporters in her concession speech. &ldquo;They thought that I would shy away from a tough race in a district tailor-made for my opponent, and they were wrong.&rdquo;</p><p>Other factors contributing to Biggert&rsquo;s defeat included strong Democratic get-out-the-vote efforts and growing Latino numbers in Chicago&rsquo;s suburbs. In the 11th District &mdash; which includes parts of Aurora, Naperville, Bolingbrook and Joliet &mdash; Hispanics constitute 22 percent of the population. Foster rallied them by pointing to Biggert&rsquo;s&nbsp;vote against the DREAM Act, a stalled bill that would have provided many young undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship.</p><p>Despite a bitter tone through much of the race, the candidates claimed to be moderate and eager to work across party lines. And they did not stand far apart on some hot-button issues. Both, for example, warmed up to legal recognition of same-sex marriage and avoided weighing in on whether Joliet should pursue a privately run detention center that would hold immigrants awaiting deportation.</p><p>On other issues, particularly economic matters, the candidates showed greater differences. Foster blasted Biggert&rsquo;s vote for a budget plan that would slash spending and overhaul Medicare, providing government subsidies to individuals who chose to buy private insurance.</p><p>On Social Security, Biggert backed enabling individuals to invest a portion of their contributions in the stock market &mdash; a proposal Foster called too risky. On health policy, Foster touted his vote for President Barack Obama&rsquo;s Affordable Care Act, a law Biggert characterized as a jobs killer and sought to repeal. On taxes, Biggert supported extending all of President George W. Bush&rsquo;s cuts, while Foster called for allowing them to expire for incomes above $250,000.</p><div><p>The election marks a comeback for Foster, 55, who served almost three years in a nearby House district. Republican Randy Hultren unseated Foster in a 2010 election that swept the GOP into control of the House.</p><p>As the Republicans retain their majority, Foster is vowing to work with them by focusing on, as he puts it, &ldquo;numbers instead of political positions.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We have to make sure that government investments are as cost-effective and highest-return as possible,&rdquo; he told WBEZ late Tuesday. &ldquo;And that&rsquo;s something that Democrats and Republicans agree on.&rdquo;</p><p>Foster said bipartisan points of unity could include cutting &ldquo;military systems the Pentagon doesn&rsquo;t want&rdquo; and encouraging a rebirth of domestic manufacturing. &ldquo;One of the best things about the ongoing recovery is that U.S. manufacturing is leading that,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Foster also had a prediction about the election results. He said they would end acrimonious debates about Obamacare and financial reregulation.</p></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 07 Nov 2012 00:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/foster-glides-past-biggert-after-race-looked-tight-103708 Biggert, Foster turn to big names to drum up votes in tight House race http://www.wbez.org/news/biggert-foster-turn-big-names-drum-votes-tight-house-race-103671 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Judy Biggert AP cropped.jpg" alt="" /><p><div>After a firestorm of negative television advertising in their tight Illinois congressional race, Republican U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert and Democrat Bill Foster are trying to get their supporters to the polls using a few bells and whistles.<br><br>Foster, a former one-term U.S. House member, started robocalls Monday to potential voters in the suburban Chicago district using the voice of former President Bill Clinton, who said the candidate&rsquo;s experience in science and business provided &ldquo;the kind of common-sense experience and leadership we need in Washington.&rdquo;<br><br>Biggert, a seven-term House member, came up with an attention grabber of her own. In a YouTube video, U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk praised her as &ldquo;one of the ultimate suburban moms who should be representing us in the Congress next year.&rdquo; Kirk, the state&rsquo;s top Republican, has kept a low profile since suffering a stroke in January.<p>&nbsp;</p>The uplifting words from Clinton and Kirk stood out after months of mind-numbing accusations and counteraccusations in the TV ads. The money behind those ads flowed in as polls suggested the 11th District contest was one of the closest House races in the country. By October 17, according to their latest federal filings, the Biggert and Foster campaigns had raked in more than $2.5 million each.<p>&nbsp;</p>And that&rsquo;s just the beginning. The race attracted more than $8 million in outside money, according to the Federal Election Commission. Figures from the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics last month showed Biggert&rsquo;s campaign with an edge in that spending.<p>&nbsp;</p>On Friday, Foster resorted to lending his campaign $500,000. The money paid for his final TV ad, according to Foster campaign aide Aviva Bowen. &ldquo;We have to keep pace with the millions that [Biggert], her allies and the rightwing super-PACs have put up in false claims on TV,&rdquo; Bowen said.<p>&nbsp;</p>Biggert&rsquo;s team saw the loan differently. &ldquo;Congressman Foster is clearly desperate and terrified that Illinois voters are about to reject him and his dishonest smear campaigns once again,&rdquo; Biggert spokesman Gill Stevens wrote.<p>&nbsp;</p>On Monday, the candidates made a flurry of stops across the barbell-shaped district, which includes parts of Aurora, Naperville, Bolingbrook, Joliet and other suburbs west and southwest of Chicago. Foster&rsquo;s campaign said U.S. Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Maryland) was joining him on afternoon visits to sites set up for campaign volunteers. A Biggert aide said the Republican would attend a Joliet dinner hosted by the local chamber of commerce.<p>&nbsp;</p>Amid the combative TV ads, both candidates claimed to be moderate and eager to work across party lines. And they did not stand far apart on some hot-button issues. Both, for example, warmed up to legal recognition of same-sex marriage and avoided weighing in on whether Joliet should pursue a privately run detention center that would hold immigrants awaiting deportation.<p>&nbsp;</p>On other issues, particularly economic matters, the candidates showed greater differences. Foster blasted Biggert&rsquo;s vote for a budget plan that would slash spending and overhaul Medicare, providing government subsidies to individuals who choose to buy private insurance.<p>&nbsp;</p>On Social Security, Biggert backed enabling individuals to invest a portion of their contributions in the stock market &mdash; a proposal Foster called too risky. On health policy, Foster touted his vote for President Barack Obama&rsquo;s Affordable Care Act, a law Biggert characterized as a jobs killer and sought to repeal. On taxes, Biggert supported extending all of President George W. Bush&rsquo;s cuts, while Foster called for allowing them to expire for incomes above $250,000.<p></p>Both Biggert and Foster said they were trying to protect the middle class but neither seemed to have a personal stake in reversing the economic squeeze of recent decades.</p><p>&nbsp;</p>Biggert, 75, lives in Hinsdale and grew up in Wilmette, a suburb north of Chicago. Her father was a Walgreen Co. executive who headed the drugstore chain in the 1960s. She received a Northwestern University law degree and clerked for a federal judge. In politics, she began on a Hinsdale school board and made it to the U.S. House.<p>&nbsp;</p>Foster, 55, and his brother launched a theater lighting business that made them rich. Foster, a Harvard-educated physicist, also spent more than 20 years at the U.S. Department of Energy&rsquo;s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Batavia, a suburb west of Chicago.<p>&nbsp;</p><div>Foster won a 2008 special election to replace retiring Republican U.S. Rep. Dennis Hastert, a former longtime House speaker. The Democrat served just one full term before Randy Hultgren, a Republican state senator, unseated him in 2010. Foster moved to a Naperville section included in the 11th, a new congressional district with borders drawn by state Democrats after the 2010 census.</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 05 Nov 2012 15:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/biggert-foster-turn-big-names-drum-votes-tight-house-race-103671 Naperville moves ahead with new tavern laws http://www.wbez.org/story/naperville-moves-ahead-new-tavern-laws-96194 <p><p>West Suburban Naperville is moving ahead with a plan to allow bars to stop serving food after 9 p.m. City Councilman Douglas Krause said he spoke out against the plan at Tuesday night's city council meeting.</p><p>"When you drink with no food, it gets absorbed into the body a lot faster. My concern is about over-serving and people being impaired when they leave the establishment going home," Krause said.</p><p>Last weekend second grade teacher Shaun Wild was stabbed to death in a Naperville bar fight. Krause said he worries the new liquor laws will lead to more dangerous behavior and drunk driving. But he said other council members argued it's too soon after the recent stabbing to change new liquor laws, and made the point that the bar Wild was at was serving food at the time of the incident.</p><p>Krause said starting in May, there could be up to 92 bars in Naperville serving alcohol without food after 9 p.m., up from six establishments with this kind of tavern license. Krause said he wants some kind of food available to bar-goers as well as more enforcement by inspectors to ensure businesses are following the law.&nbsp;</p><p>According to Krause, Tuesday night's council meeting was the last opportunity to reconsider the new liquor laws before having to wait a period of 62 days to bring it up again. The law passed prior to the recent stabbing incident.</p></p> Wed, 08 Feb 2012 12:47:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/naperville-moves-ahead-new-tavern-laws-96194 Owning chickens scratches up controversy http://www.wbez.org/story/owning-chickens-scratches-controversy-95624 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/archives/images/cityroom/cityroom_20071212_sallee_In D_large.png" alt="" /><p><p>Nationwide, the issue of raising chickens for eggs in residential areas keeps coming up - and same goes for Chicago's suburbs. West-suburban Naperville may start limiting the number of chickens its residents can raise.</p><p>Some towns have banned chickens altogether, while others like Northbrook and Naperville are still considering it. Naperville councilman Robert Fieseler said the few chicken coops in town have neighbors concerned.</p><p>"The unsightliness of a fairly crude chicken coop - it looks almost like a trash dumpster. And then the odor, and attracting predators - especially coyotes," Fieseler said.</p><p>At a Tuesday council meeting, the once-tabled issue came up again, and the council is now drafting an ordinance to cap ownership at eight chickens, require a registration fee and for coops to be a certain distance away from neighboring property. Naperville may vote on the ordinance as soon as next month.</p><p>Since December 2010, Evanston has allowed a max of <a href="http://www.cityofevanston.org/business/permits-licenses/hen-coop/">six hens per household</a>. Carl Caneva is the environmental health division manager for Evanston. He said seven households are currently registered and raising chickens, and so far there have been no officially reported complaints.</p><p>Brad Powers with Chicago's department of Animal Care and Control said Chicago does not currently have an explicit ordinance capping chicken ownership. He said other ordinances though do work to control potentially related violations. For instance, a rooster owner could get cited if the animal was too noisy, and his department would intervene if a person had too many animals to properly care for or was treating them inhumanely.</p></p> Wed, 18 Jan 2012 18:48:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/owning-chickens-scratches-controversy-95624 Naperville council votes to end red light cameras http://www.wbez.org/story/naperville-council-votes-end-red-light-cameras-93703 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/archives/images/cityroom/cityroom_20100610_akeefe_1238416_Red _large.png" alt="" /><p><p>West suburban Naperville is ending it's red-light camera program. A split vote on Tuesday resulted in the council nixing the red light camera program. They cited statistics that show red light cameras have reduced collisions at some intersections.</p><p>But two of the city's three cameras must be removed during upcoming construction. Council members have debated whether it makes financial sense to keep the last camera.</p><p>Karen DeAngelis is the Director of Finance for the city of Naperville. She said the average net monthly revenue is $65,000 dollars from all three cameras. The average monthly maintenance is $29,000 dollars. DeAngelis said the remaining camera is at the least violated of all intersections, so it may not result in the city making money off of it.</p><p>Councilman Bob Fieseler said that's in part because motorists have become more cautious and there are now fewer violations.</p><p>"Let's take government out of the enforcement business until there's a problem," Fieseler said.</p><p>Fieseler said the question remains as to whether violations will creep back up without the cameras.</p><p>In January, Naperville will go back to catching motorists entirely the old fashioned way with police officers.</p><p>Stopping the camera program will pile an additional $200,000 dollars to the city's $1.9 million dollar shortfall in next year's budget.</p></p> Wed, 02 Nov 2011 19:27:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/naperville-council-votes-end-red-light-cameras-93703 Daily Rehearsal: '5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche' http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2011-06-27/daily-rehearsal-5-lesbians-eating-quiche-88391 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2011-June/2011-06-28/5 lesbians quiche.jpg" alt="" /><p><p> <style type="text/css"> p { font-size:10pt} #s1 {font-size:13pt; color:#494646; font-family:georgia}</style> </p><p><span id="s1">1. The Trib's <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-20110624-best-theater-pg,0,1205164.photogallery">Best in Theater</a></span> for the year is out. (We're halfway through the year, so it's apparently time.) He includes <em>Porgy and Bess</em>, <em>The Outgoing Tide</em>, <em>Festen</em>, <em>A Twist of Water</em>, and <em>The Big Meal</em>. Thoughts? Our bloggers <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2011-05-27/dueling-critics-get-ready-summertime-porgy-and-bess-87137">called&nbsp;<em>Porgy and Bess</em></a> "less a production than an event," and <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2011-03-03/dueling-critics-review-big-meal-83320">Kelly Kleiman admits </a>she "saw many family dinners pass before [her] eyes" while debating the merits of<em> The Big Meal</em>.</p><p><img alt="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-27/lessies1.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 10px; float: right; " title=""><span id="s1">2. I'm convinced: See <a href="http://thenewcolony.org/view/5_lesbians_eating_a_quiche"><em>5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche</em></a></span>. This New Colony production launched at <a href="http://collaboraction.typepad.com/sketchbook/sketchbook-10-information.html">Sketchbook</a> last year as a 15-minute comedy sketch; the expansion sounds even better. The new version opened this past weekend and runs through July.</p><p><span id="s1">3. Eric Ziegenhagen<a href="http://www.2amtheatre.com/2011/06/26/reviews-and-pull-quotes-telling-the-truth-and-courting-the-indifferent/"> talks about using the phrase</a> "The Critics Love Us!"</span> to promote a play, when in fact, the critics plural definitely do not love you. "The reviews are out there," says Ziegenhagen. "Quote the best parts, fine—but lying to your audience can bite you back. It’s BS-ing." He also wonders about how to reach those many individuals "who are indifferent to reviews."</p><p><span id="s1"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-27/115093416.jpg" style="width: 199px; height: 300px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 10px; float: left; " title="Russell Crowe was recently in another small town -- Durham, N.C. (Getty/Tommy Jackson)">4. Author Jessica Hopper reads</span><a href="http://www.avclub.com/chicago/events/jessica-hopper,247516/"> at the Harold Washington Library</a> Tuesday evening. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Girls-Guide-Rocking-Rolling-Stardom/dp/0761151419"><em>The Girls' Guide to Rocking: How to Start a Band, Book Gigs, and Get Rolling to Rock Stardom</em></a> encourages young women to get involved in music from the perspective of a woman who did so herself.</p><p><span id="s1">5. Less theater, more spectacle: <a href="http://triblocal.com/naperville/2011/06/24/have-you-seen-russell-crowe-in-naperville-some-say-they-have/">Russell Crowe was in Naperville</a></span>, and people freaked out. Or, the people who saw him are freaking out; other people may have seen him and are less sure what's happening.</p><p>Questions? Email <a href="mailto:kdries@wbez.org">kdries@wbez.org</a>.</p></p> Mon, 27 Jun 2011 15:13:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2011-06-27/daily-rehearsal-5-lesbians-eating-quiche-88391 Incumbents rule the day in suburban mayoral elections http://www.wbez.org/story/incumbents-rule-day-suburban-mayoral-elections-dnp-84794 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-April/2011-04-06/Naperville Riverwalk.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated on 4/7/11 at 11:06am</em></p><p>Voters throughout Chicago's suburbs cast ballots in more than two dozen races for mayor or village president.&nbsp; But amidst budget pressures and uncertain economic times, the response from voters in most communities was: stay the course.</p><p>That wasn't true in every community, of course. Several of the state's largest cities will see new leadership this year - the result of both ballot box rebukes and voluntary retirements.</p><p>In the latter case, Joliet's incumbent mayor Arthur Schultz is retiring after 20 years in office.&nbsp; He'll be succeeded by Tom Giarrante, a retired firefighter and incumbent city councilman.&nbsp; Giarrante defeated eight other candidates on Tuesday to become mayor of Illinois' fourth largest city.</p><p>But in northwest suburban Elgin, longtime mayor Ed Schock lost his bid for a fourth-term in office, as tallies showed challenger Dave Kaptain winning 54 percent of the vote.&nbsp;</p><p>Residents of west suburban Wood Dale also will have a new mayor soon.&nbsp; Voters denied incumbent Ken Johnson's bid for a fourth term, giving the nod instead to Annunziato Pulice.&nbsp; Pulice won a close two-way contest, capturing 51 percent of the vote, following revelations that Johnson owed the village thousands of dollars in unpaid health premiums.</p><p>CPA David Gonzalez won election to an open seat in Chicago Heights over Alderman Joe Faso.&nbsp; The south suburban community has had an interim mayor since the death of then-mayor Alex Lopez in August 2010.</p><p>Challenger Gopal Lalmalani defeated incumbent John W. Craig in the race for Oak Brook Village President, and in the open mayoral seat in Rolling Meadows, former city councilman Tom Rooney sailed to victory against Jonathan Trapani.</p><p>In a battle of ballot nicknames in Prospect Heights, Nichaolas "Nick" Helmes handily defeated incumbent Dolores "Dolly" Vole with better than 70 percent of the vote.</p><p>But elsewhere, it was business as usual for many other communities as incumbents cruised to re-election in races for mayor and village president, many of whom ran unopposed.</p><p><strong>Schaumburg</strong></p><p>In Schaumburg, long-time incumbent village president Al Larson faced his first challenge in more than 15 years but emerged victorious over 31-year-old challenger Brian Costin.&nbsp;</p><p>Much of the campaign focused on the village's recently instituted property tax, as well as the village's ownerhip of the Schaumburg Flyer's baseball stadium and the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel and Convention Center.&nbsp; Costin criticized the village property tax, and he argued that the stadium and convention complex should be privatized.</p><p>Larson, 72, has led Schaumburg for 24 years and his victory on Tuesday returns him to office for another four-year term.</p><p><strong>West Suburbs</strong></p><p>Tuesday night also proved to be a big one for Naperville's four-term incumbent mayor George Pradel.&nbsp; He defeated two other challengers to win a fifth term in office, which Pradel says will be his last.&nbsp;</p><p>In nearby Wheaton, Mayor Michael Gresk defeated Councilman John Prendiville in his bid for re-election.&nbsp; Gresk garnered 53 percent of the vote to Prendiville's 47 percent.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>South Suburbs</strong></p><p>While voters in Joliet selected a new mayor, incumbents won the day in several other south suburban communities, including Country Club Hills, where voters elected Mayor Dwight Welch to a seventh term in office.</p><p>In Harvey, Eric Kellogg also won re-election, though he failed to win a majority of the vote in a five-person contest.&nbsp; A recent controversy over a vote that made Kellogg superintendent of Harvey's public schools and allegations of corruption swirled during his most recent term in office.</p><p>Meanwhile, John Ostenberg cruised to a record fourth-term as mayor of Park Forest by a two-to-one margin, but the race for mayor of University Park was much closer.&nbsp; With absentee ballots not yet counted, Vivian Covington holds onto a razor-thin lead over Joseph Roudez.</p><p><em>Correction:&nbsp; An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified Gopal Lalmalani as the incumbent in the race for Oak Brook Village President.&nbsp; He was the challenger.</em></p></p> Wed, 06 Apr 2011 14:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/incumbents-rule-day-suburban-mayoral-elections-dnp-84794 Lawmakers nix licensing midwives for homebirths http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/lawmakers-nix-licensing-midwives-homebirths <p><p>It will remain unlawful in Illinois for midwives who lack advanced medical training to attend homebirths without supervision. Illinois House members on Thursday night voted down <a href="http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=09600SB3712ham001&amp;GA=96&amp;SessionId=76&amp;DocTypeId=SB&amp;LegID=51899&amp;DocNum=3712&amp;GAID=10&amp;Session=">a bill that would have created a state license</a> for nationally certified midwives.<br /><br />Each year hundreds of Illinois women give birth in their home. Some are following religious beliefs. Other women are trying to avoid medical interventions such as C-sections.<br /><br />Physicians and advanced nurses willing to attend home births are in short supply. The bill would have set up state licensing for <a href="http://www.narm.org/htb.htm#whatis">certified professional midwives</a> to step in. The measure&rsquo;s sponsor, state Rep. Robyn Gabel, D-Evanston, said it would have increased safety for the mothers and babies.<br /><br />But the <a href="http://www.votervoice.net/Core.aspx?AID=162&amp;Screen=alert&amp;IssueId=21867&amp;SessionID=$AID%3d162:SITEID%3d-1:VV_CULTURE%3den-us:APP%3dGAC$">Illinois State Medical Society</a> and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists argued the midwives couldn&rsquo;t handle many birth complications.<br /><br />The vote against the bill was 71-47.</p></p> Sat, 08 Jan 2011 00:23:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/lawmakers-nix-licensing-midwives-homebirths Illinois bill for midwife licenses nears vote http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/illinois-bill-midwife-licenses-nears-vote <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/DianeSakowicz.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Illinois lawmakers are considering some hot-button measures this week. The state House of Representatives has voted down a medical-marijuana bill and approved an expansion of rights for same-sex couples. Some lawmakers also want to allow nationally certified midwives to attend home births in Illinois&mdash;attend them, that is, without supervision by a physician or an advanced nurse. WBEZ&rsquo;s Chip Mitchell is following the measure&rsquo;s progress and joins host Melba Lara in studio Tuesday. Her first question is what the legislation would do.</p></p> Tue, 30 Nov 2010 22:50:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/american-college-obstetrics-and-gynecology/illinois-bill-midwife-licenses-nears-vote