WBEZ | Android http://www.wbez.org/tags/android Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Picture or it didn't happen http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-04/picture-or-it-didnt-happen-106640 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP195640861850.jpg" style="float: right; height: 200px; width: 300px;" title="File: Fans at an Ellie Goulding concert use cell phones to capture the event. (AP/File)" />Art punk trio the Yeah Yeah Yeahs have been posting <a href="http://gawker.com/5994047/yeah-yeah-yeahs-post-sadly-necessary-sign-asking-fans-not-to-watch-their-show-through-a-smartphone-screen" target="_blank">this sign</a> at venues on their current tour: a polite reminder for fans to enjoy their shows without a &quot;I must take a million blurry pictures/horrible sound quality videos to prove that I was here!&quot; mentality.</p><blockquote><p>&quot;Please do not watch the show through a screen on your smart device/camera,&quot; the sign reads, &quot;PUT THAT [BLEEP] AWAY as a courtesy to the people behind you and to Nick, Karen and Brian.&quot;</p></blockquote><p>Understandably, the band has a zero tolerance policy for looking out at the audience and seeing a constellation of iPhones glowing back at them.&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image ">I will be the first to admit that I&#39;ve been guilty of this behavior. I&#39;ve snapped photos during shows for St. Vincent and Ty Segall, compelled to somehow immortalize the experience of seeing my musical idols in the flesh. I&#39;ve also developed a fondness for photo-sharing other aspects of my life, like the best cocktail I&#39;ve ever tasted or a new book that I can&#39;t wait to read. And I&#39;m not alone in what appears to be a <a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">millennial-specific</a>&nbsp;compulsion to photo-document even the tiniest minutiae, as the mobile app Instagram just topped <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2013/02/26/instagram-100-million/" target="_blank">100 million</a> monthly users this year.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">My generation came of age with Facebook, then mobile photo-sharing on a mass scale. We&#39;ve become a society of instant clickers, wracked with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">extreme anxiety</a> when parted from our electronic devices and a constant <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/03/20/social-media-anxiety-sites-like-facebook-twitter-stressing-teens-out/" target="_blank">needling desire</a> to prove our worth through social media. We ask ourselves, &quot;If I don&#39;t take a picture of this event, will my friends believe that I was there?&quot; With the rise of <a href="http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/tech-addiction/" target="_blank">tech addiction</a>&nbsp;and smartphone cameras literally right at our fingertips, the answer to that question is usually <a href="http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/pics-or-it-didnt-happen" target="_blank">no</a>.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papal_conclave,_2013" target="_blank">papal conclave </a>on March 12 was a glaring example of this phenomemon. Past popes (including Pope Benedict XVI in 2005) have been greeted with a smattering of camera flashes; but when the newly-elected Pope Francis appeared on the balcony of St. Peter&#39;s Basilica, almost everyone in the crowd raised their glittering smartphones and tablets in response.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">As the world&#39;s obsession with technology grows, so does our reliance on instant gratification and the gnawing impulse to photo-capture every moment. Facebook, Twitter and now Instagram have made <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-01-31/features/ct-tribu-social-media-oversharing-20130131_1_social-media-tweet-or-post-online-boundaries" target="_blank">oversharing</a> easier than ever before, and &quot;keeping up with the Joneses&quot; through social media&nbsp;even more stressful.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">According to the <a href="http://www.generationalinsights.com/tag/generation-y-millennials/page/2/" target="_blank">Pew study</a> of millennials, 40 percent of young people surveyed feel like they &quot;can&#39;t live&quot; without their smartphones. However, our parents did just fine without them, and perhaps had even better memories of their good times as a result of being 100 percent unplugged.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Can you imagine the Beatles playing to a sea of iPhones, or a Woodstock audience glued to their Twitter feeds? Back then, concert-goers could experience music in the moment, allowing the songs to wash over them completely, and never once think about which Instagram filter they should use to prove how cool they were for being there.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">To the compulsive photo-sharers: cutting back is key. Take one quick shot if you absolutely must, then sit back and enjoy whatever experience that you&#39;re supposed to be having. Pictures may last forever, but real-life moments are gone in a flash; so try really<em> living</em> them for a change, without the superficial barrier of your camera phone getting in the way. &nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Leah Pickett writes about popular culture for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Mon, 15 Apr 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-04/picture-or-it-didnt-happen-106640 CUB: Most smartphone customers paying for unused data http://www.wbez.org/story/cub-most-smartphone-customers-paying-unused-data-89681 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-July/2011-07-27/cell phones_xx_Flickr.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Citizens Utility Board says smartphone customers in Illinois could be paying over $300 dollars each year for data they don't use. CUB analyzed 19,000 cell phone bills over the last three years and found 70 percent of customers were paying for unused services.</p><p>CUB Executive Director Dave Kolata said most smartphone users only use one-quarter of the data they pay for -- and major cell phone carriers like Verizon Wireless are to blame.</p><p>"When you realize that 96 percent of consumers are using two gigabytes and below, and yet two gigabytes is the typical plan, it raises a lot of questions about fairness," he said.</p><p>According to Kolata, major carriers don't offer plans that suit the usage levels of most consumers. He said CUB will propose three reforms to cellphone companies: creating a lower tier data plan, offering a family shared data plan and offering rollover data.</p><p>Verizon Wireless spokeswoman Caroline Shaumburger said customers have a variety of options to choose from.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 26 Jul 2011 20:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/cub-most-smartphone-customers-paying-unused-data-89681 Schaumberg-based Motorola sued by Microsoft http://www.wbez.org/story/news/microsoft-sues-motorola <p><p>Microsoft says Motorola is violating the software maker's technology patent by using Google's Android software in Moto phones. The Android software includes an operating system and key applications for mobile devices. The functions in question include synchronizing e-mail, calendars and contacts.<br /><br />Microsoft filed its lawsuit today in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington. It's also filed a claim with the International Trade Commission.<br /><br /> In a statement, Horacio Gutierrez of Microsoft said, &quot;We have a responsibility to our customers, partners, and shareholders to safeguard the billions of dollars we invest each year in bringing innovative software products and services to market. Motorola needs to stop its infringement of our patented inventions in its Android smartphones.&quot;<br /><br />Motorola wouldn't immediately comment on the lawsuit. But a statement released by the company says it has one of the strongest intellectual property portfolios in the industry and that Motorola will &quot;vigorously defend itself in this matter.&quot;</p></p> Fri, 01 Oct 2010 14:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/news/microsoft-sues-motorola