WBEZ | Palestine http://www.wbez.org/tags/palestine Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Israel launches airstrikes in response to teen deaths http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-07-01/israel-launches-airstrikes-response-teen-deaths-110437 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP76527298289.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The bodies of three Israeli teenagers that went missing in the West Bank were found Monday in a Palestinian town. The Israeli government has launched a series of airstrikes in response. We&#39;ll talk with Alex Goldman-Shayman, the Israeli Deputy Consul General to the Midwest.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-israel-launches-airstrikes-in-response-t/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-israel-launches-airstrikes-in-response-t.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-israel-launches-airstrikes-in-response-t" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Israel launches airstrikes in response to teen deaths" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 01 Jul 2014 11:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-07-01/israel-launches-airstrikes-response-teen-deaths-110437 The Mideast peace talks http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-28/mideast-peace-talks-110086 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/(AP PhotoGali Tibbon, Pool).jpg" alt="" /><p><div>Last week the Israeli government withdrew from current peace talks after the Palestinian Authority and Hamas announced plans to form a unity government. We&#39;ll discuss the state of the peace process with Roey Gilad, &nbsp;the Consul General of Israel to the Midwest</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-collapse-of-the-mideast-peace-talks/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-collapse-of-the-mideast-peace-talks.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-collapse-of-the-mideast-peace-talks" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The Mideast peace talks" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 28 Apr 2014 11:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-28/mideast-peace-talks-110086 Muslims and Jews sing, talk and protest their way to interfaith cooperation http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/muslims-and-jews-sing-talk-and-protest-their-way-interfaith-cooperation-109452 <p><p>A program inside a theater on Chicago&rsquo;s North Side feels a little like a talent show, or maybe a family reunion. Performers step up from the audience to recite original poetry, do interpretative dance or sing.</p><p>The sound quality&rsquo;s spotty. The pacing&rsquo;s a little off. But this isn&rsquo;t about slick production values or seamless performances. The goal here is far more ambitious: to bridge the divide between Jews and Muslims in Chicago.</p><p>The show is called &ldquo;Café Finjan,&rdquo; after the Hebrew and Arabic words for a metal coffee pot. It showcases Muslim and Jewish poets, musicians, painters and more. It&rsquo;s one of several interfaith events that share the goal of getting Jews and Muslims to move past historical tensions and distrust so they can work together and help solve some of the city&rsquo;s urban problems.</p><p>But they&rsquo;re finding it&rsquo;s not always easy.</p><p>&ldquo;The paradigm that we&rsquo;re trying to create is that we have an interest in what kind of society we have here, even though we also have strong concerns and interests about what happens to our brothers and sisters, to our cousins and to our friends in other places in the world,&rdquo; said Asaf Bar-Tura, formerly of the <a href="http://www.jcua.org/">Jewish Council of Urban Affairs</a>. He spent five months with an interfaith team planning the café.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/iftar%202.jpg" style="float: right; height: 233px; width: 350px;" title="Gerald Hankerson, the outreach coordinator for CAIR-Chicago [left], chats with JCUA board member Kalman Resnick [right], and several others." />He acknowledged those political differences over Palestine and Israel remain painful and deep.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a tension there,&rdquo; Bar-Tura said. &ldquo;But we can&rsquo;t overcome these tensions, we can&rsquo;t discuss the issues, without getting to know each other first. You don&rsquo;t dive into &lsquo;Oh, tell me what your ideology is.&rsquo; You first (say), &lsquo;Tell me about your family, tell me about what you do, what does your day look like, what do you want for your kids?&rsquo; And then we can get into these deeper discussions.&rdquo;</p><p>The <a href="http://jmcbi.org">JCUA started working closely with Muslim groups</a> more than a decade ago, after noticing rising Islamophobia following the Sept. 11 attacks. Their most popular event is &ldquo;Iftar in the Synagogue,&rdquo; where Jews and Muslims share a meal to break the fast during Ramadan. In just four years, attendance jumped from 90 people to more than 500.</p><p>&ldquo;We started this program to stand in solidarity with our Muslim brothers and sisters to say, &lsquo;We feel your pain, and we are going to help you fight against discrimination,&rsquo;&rdquo; said Judy Levey, JCUA&rsquo;s executive director. &ldquo;Because that&rsquo;s what we do. That&rsquo;s who we are.&rdquo;</p><p>The events are about more than poetry and hummus. The JCUA, the <a href="http://www.juf.org/cbr/">Chicago Board of Rabbis</a> and the <a href="http://www.ciogc.org/">Council of Islamic Organizations of Greater Chicago</a> sponsor periodic rabbi-imam dialogues. They&rsquo;ve discussed things like the role of Shariah law in a democracy and their shared dietary traditions.</p><p>Jewish and Muslim activists have lobbied to demand immigration reform, to stop foreclosures and to protest anti-Muslim bus ads. After a baby was fatally shot in Chicago last spring, they went together to her funeral. There&rsquo;s even been &nbsp;<a href="http://jcuanews.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/jewish-and-muslim-cyclists-will-ride-together-narrowing-the-distance-between-faiths/">Jewish-Muslim bike rides</a>.</p><p>Activists on both sides hope these events will lessen suspicion and lead to partnerships in the city they share and call home.</p><p>But some say the results are mixed.</p><p>&ldquo;Qualitatively, in some ways, I would say maybe they are better,&rdquo; said Aaron Cohen, the spokesman for the <a href="http://www.juf.org/">Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicag</a>o. &ldquo;Quantitatively, in terms of seeing vast numbers of people engaging, I wouldn&rsquo;t say that needle has moved much either way.&rdquo;</p><p>Cohen&rsquo;s a hopeful guy, and well-liked by Jewish and Muslim activists. He&rsquo;s been part of Jewish/Muslim dialogues, and he took an interfaith trip to Turkey.</p><p>But he says there are stumbling blocks to interfaith cooperation. Unlike the JCUA, the Federation won&rsquo;t formally work with the <a href="http://www.cairchicago.org/">Chicago office of the Council of American Islamic Relations</a>, a civil rights agency well regarded by the Muslim community. Cohen said that&rsquo;s because many were offended by anti-Semitic signs spotted at a CAIR rally a few years ago.</p><p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s crossing a very big red line,&rdquo; Cohen said, adding that statements demonizing Jews or Israel can&rsquo;t be tolerated. &ldquo;History delivers on our doors an awful lot of baggage, and we really need to make conscious choices about how much of that baggage we&rsquo;re going to schlep with us into the future.&rdquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/iftar%203.jpg" style="height: 233px; width: 350px; float: left;" title="The annual Iftar in the Synagogue event drew more than 500 people this year." />&ldquo;Obviously, we can&rsquo;t control every single individual in a massive rally,&rdquo; said Ahmed Rehab, the executive director of Chicago&rsquo;s CAIR chapter. &ldquo;However, the facts are that when we saw the sign, we removed it as organizers, because it does not mesh with our values.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We stand against anti-Semitism,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Rehab said he believes his strong critique of Israeli policy, not the signs, is the real issue &ndash; which federation leaders deny.</p><p>Rehab said he thinks some federation leaders are out of touch with younger Jews:</p><p>&ldquo;Especially the new generation, it&rsquo;s not intuitive for these young men and women to look at each other through a fence, or see each other as enemies or rivals,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Because they do have a shared common culture; they share the same appreciation for music, for movies. They were born and brought up here.&rdquo;</p><p>Despite the challenges, Rehab is hopeful. He believes more Jewish and Muslim youth want to work together, and that cooperation is the wave of the future.</p><p>That seemed to be the case back at Café Finjan. Muslim girls wearing headscarves nodded along with a klezmer band. Gray-haired Jewish activists applauded warmly for a student who recited a poem about being a Pokemon master and a Muslim</p><p>One of the attendees, software developer Najim Yaqubie, is Muslim. He said he and his best friend &ndash; who&rsquo;s Jewish -- care more about their friendship than politics.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re both human, we&rsquo;re both American, we&rsquo;re both young and we&rsquo;re just trying to have some fun,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It doesn&rsquo;t matter who or where you&rsquo;re from.&rdquo;</p></p> Mon, 30 Dec 2013 17:24:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/muslims-and-jews-sing-talk-and-protest-their-way-interfaith-cooperation-109452 Palestinians and Jews both lay claim to Mandela’s legacy http://www.wbez.org/news/palestinians-and-jews-both-lay-claim-mandela%E2%80%99s-legacy-109375 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2013-12-13 at 11.25.41 PM.png" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">As memorials continue for Nelson Mandela this week, many groups are claiming Mandela as a champion of their cause, including Palestinians and Jews. Mandela&rsquo;s support for national self-determination garnered the appreciation and support of both sides in the intractable Middle East conflict. But while they share a common hero, they take away different lessons from his struggle.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We do consider Nelson Mandela to be our leader,&rdquo; said Hatem Abudayyeh, a Palestinian-American and the Executive Director of the Arab American Action Network in Chicago. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s a sort of replication of that anti-apartheid movement in Palestine and across the world for those that are doing Palestine advocacy and Palestine support work.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Abudayyeh points to the <a href="http://www.bdsmovement.net/">Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement</a>, started in 2005 by supporters of the Palestinian cause. The campaign aims to build international economic and political pressure against Israel, to secure withdrawal of Israeli settlements on Palestinian territories and a dismantling of the wall that separates Israel from the West Bank, among other demands. &ldquo;That is something that we learned from the anti-apartheid movement and that we&rsquo;re incorporating into our own movement,&rdquo; said Abudayyeh. An international divestment campaign helped to formally bring South Africa&rsquo;s apartheid era to an end in 1991.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Israel is your apartheid, pariah state, just like South Africa was your apartheid, pariah state in the &lsquo;70s and &lsquo;80s and during the movement,&rdquo; said Abudayyeh.</p><p dir="ltr">Other high-profile figures have compared Palestinian conditions to that of black South Africans under apartheid &mdash; and found themselves at the center of significant controversy as a result. Former U.S. president Jimmy Carter sparked a fierce debate with the 2006 publication of his book, &ldquo;Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid.&rdquo; South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu made a similar comparison. Mandela himself, however, never publicly used the word &ldquo;apartheid&rdquo; when speaking of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Arafat is a comrade in arms, and we treat him as such.&rdquo; Mandela famously said of Palestinian Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat in 1990. During an interview with ABC&rsquo;s Ted Koppel on Nightline, Mandela defended this position, even when Koppel pressed him to consider whether it could alienate American Jews from his cause in South Africa.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It would be a grave mistake for us to consider our attitude toward Yasser Arafat on the basis of the interests of the Jewish community,&rdquo; Mandela explained. &ldquo;We sympathize with the struggles of the Jewish people and their persecution right down the years. In fact, we have been very much influenced by lack of racialism amongst Jewish communities.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Mandela noted that many white leaders in the African National Congress party were Jewish, and that his first job as a lawyer was with a Jewish firm. For many Jews, Mandela&rsquo;s support of the Palestinian struggle for self-determination did not mean he was against Israel.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;There was no contradiction for Mandela of his also embracing Zionism as the national liberation movement of the Jewish people,&rdquo; says Aaron Cohen of the Jewish United Fund in Chicago. &ldquo;He supported Israel&rsquo;s right to exist as a Jewish state.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Cohen says comparisons between Israel and apartheid-era South Africa are false, and that they attempt to delegitimize Israel&rsquo;s right to exist. While Mandela reportedly called Israel a &ldquo;terrorist state&rdquo; in 1990 for offering military and arms support to South Africa&rsquo;s apartheid government, Cohen said that criticism was borne out of Mandela&rsquo;s belief that all people have a right to self-determination. It did not mean that Mandela was anti-Israel.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When he became president of South Africa, Mandela went out of his way to also assure Israel and the Jewish world that he supported Israel&rsquo;s safe and secure existence in the Middle East,&rdquo; said Cohen, &ldquo;and that furthermore, the Arab world should do the same.&rdquo;</p><p>Cohen says instead of being mired in the past, Mandela felt Israelis and Palestinians could resolve their differences if they simply looked to the future. The two sides may draw very different lessons from Mandela&rsquo;s legacy, but as they prepare for Mandela&rsquo;s burial this Sunday, they&rsquo;ll mourn together.</p><p><br /><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 13 Dec 2013 18:15:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/palestinians-and-jews-both-lay-claim-mandela%E2%80%99s-legacy-109375 Police brutality in Puerto Rico and the Mideast peace process http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-22/police-brutality-puerto-rico-and-mideast-peace-process-108132 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP68352310109.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Shafqat Munir explains the significance of Ghulam Azam&#39;s conviction for war crimes and looks at what&#39;s next for Bangladesh. The ACLU&#39;s William Ramirez tells us about police brutality in Puerto Rico. Natan Sachs weighs in on what&#39;s needed for Mideast peace talks.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102153321&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/police-brutality-in-puerto-rico-and-the-mideast-pe.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/police-brutality-in-puerto-rico-and-the-mideast-pe" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Police brutality in Puerto Rico and the Mideast peace process" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Mon, 22 Jul 2013 11:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-22/police-brutality-puerto-rico-and-mideast-peace-process-108132 Connecting Chicago to Palestine: A Conversation about Transnational Solidarity http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/connecting-chicago-palestine-conversation-about-transnational-solidarity <p><div>Both here and abroad, people of color struggle to protect their communities from violence, displacement, and systematic dismantling. Listen to activists from Chicago and Palestine share their experiences with working against forces threatening to undermine their communities. From this program, we hope to learn from each other&rsquo;s movements and gain strength in our common struggles for justice and liberation.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Abir Kopty</strong> is a feminist and political activist based in Ramallah. Abir is well known for being a key organizer of the Bab al-Shams protest village that garnered significant international attention earlier this year, a culminating moment of the weekly protests across the West Bank and East Jerusalem. She is a former Nazareth City Councilwoman and today works as a media analyst and consultant. She also blogs at http://abirkopty.wordpress.com/.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Aisha Truss-Miller</strong> works with Affinity Community Services, a social justice organization that works with and on behalf of Black LGBTQ communities and allies. Aisha has focused on youth leadership and development, as well as building connections between intersecting movements in Chicago. Aisha attended an African heritage delegation to Palestine in 2012.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Alaa Mukahhal </strong>is a Kuwaiti born Palestinian raised on Chicago&rsquo;s southside. Alaa came to the United Stated at the age of 6 with her family in 1993 from Jordan. Alaa and her family became undocumented after their tourist visa expired. Alaa applied for asylum in April of 2011, was referred to an immigration judge and was placed in deportation proceedings. Alaa has organized closely with undocumented and immigrant youth and is a graphic designer in Chicago. She currently works as the citizenship project manager for the National Partnership for New Americans.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Veronica Morris Moore</strong> is an organizer with Fearless Leading by the Youth (FLY), a Woodlawn based youth organization fighting to make the lives of people in their community better. She has been a fierce leader in the struggle to raise awareness about the lack and necessities of trauma centers on the south side of the city. As a member of the community, Veronica tirelessly supports issues such as restorative justice, housing rights, school closings and more.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/JAHH-webstory_10.jpg" title="" /><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AFSC-webstory_8.jpg" title="" /></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Recorded live Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at the Jane Adams Hull House Museum.</div></p> Tue, 11 Jun 2013 13:29:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/connecting-chicago-palestine-conversation-about-transnational-solidarity Worldview: Criminalization of youth and the best countries for motherhood http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-05-10/worldview-criminalization-youth-and-best-countries-motherhood-107123 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP06041704828.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F91611564&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Ahead of Mothers&#39; Day, Worldview asks: What is the best country in the world to be a mother? Then we compare the criminalization of youth in Palestine and Chicago. And Weekend Passport includes Afro beats, Balkan kebabs and a tour of Mexico through folkloric dance.<script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-comparing-the-criminalization-of-youth-a.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-comparing-the-criminalization-of-youth-a" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Comparing the criminalization of youth and the best countries for motherhood" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Fri, 10 May 2013 10:52:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-05-10/worldview-criminalization-youth-and-best-countries-motherhood-107123 A Home Denied: Struggling Against Displacement From Chicago to Palestine http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/home-denied-struggling-against-displacement-chicago-palestine-105605 <p><p>Both here and abroad, racist and militarized institutions threaten to uproot oppressed peoples from their communities. The housing justice movement in Chicago is connected to the Palestinian struggle against displacement and home demolitions.</p><p>Listen to the stories of people who have been forced from their homes, denied entry into their homeland, and resisted by occupying vacant homes and rebuilding after demolition. Join us as we learn from each other&rsquo;s movements and gain strength in our common struggles for justice and liberation.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F79962479" width="100%"></iframe></p><div>Speakers: Jenine [<em>last name withheld</em>], Maria Dolores Calvillo, Merlene Robinson-Parsons, Sabrina Morey, and Yousef [<em>last name withheld</em>].</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AFSC-webstory_4.jpg" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">Recorded live, Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at&nbsp;Grace Place.</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 23 Jan 2013 12:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/home-denied-struggling-against-displacement-chicago-palestine-105605 Worldview 5.9.12 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-02-21 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img all="" alt="" and="" ap="" bilal="" class="image-original_image" freedom="" mohammed="" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP120506089792.jpg" style="height: 379px; width: 620px;" the="" title="Palestinian schoolgirls chant slogans during a protest in solidarity with Palestinian prisoners jailed in the West Bank village of Kufr Rai. The poster left reads, &quot;Freedom to Bilal Diab, and all the prisoners.&quot; (AP/Mohammed Ballas) " to=""></div></div><p><em>Update: Wednesday May 9, 2012</em>, <em>11:31 a.m.</em></p><p>Why do some national movements turn to violence, while others commit to struggle in nonviolent ways? These are questions <a href="http://www.polisci.northwestern.edu/people/pearlman.html">author Wendy Pearlman</a> takes up in her book <em>Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement.</em></p><p>In a 2011 <a href="http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/10/10/will_palestinians_launch_a_new_non_violent_intifada" target="_blank">article</a> for <em>Foreign Policy, </em>Pearlman tried to explain why, despite recent events, the Palestinians had not launched a third Intifada or uprising:</p><p style="margin-left:.5in;"><em>Movements need national unity in order to muster the sweeping participation that fuels nonviolent protest, as well as the collective restraint to keep it from being provoked into violence. Political cohesion is critical for mobilization to be mass in scale and sustainable over time. That cohesion is currently lacking on the Palestinian scene, though one never knows when the tenacious vibrancy of Palestinian civil society might create it anew.</em></p><p>She goes on to write that the geographic space in which protests take place helps determine the type of protests that ensue, and that in this respect, Palestinians are at a disadvantage:</p><p style="margin-left:.5in;"><em>In Egypt, Yemen, and Bahrain, pro-democracy movements occupied a central square. In Tunisia and Libya, protest began in the periphery of the country and gained power as it moved toward the capital...If Palestinians have demonstrations in major towns in the West Bank of Gaza, Israelis will neither see nor care. Alternatively, Palestinians might have peaceful marches to Israeli checkpoints or settlements in the West Bank or toward Israel's crossing-points into the Gaza Strip.</em></p><p>This might help explain why in recent months (as <em>Worldview</em> reported recently) <a href="http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-05-01/hunger-strikes-bahrain-guantanamo-98715">many Palestinians have turned to one of the oldest forms of non violent protest-- hunger strikes</a>. An estimated 1,500 Palestinians are currently on a hunger strike protesting their detention in Israeli jails.</p><p>Wednesday on <em>Worldview, </em>we revisit an interview with Pearlman, who delves deeper into why so many Palestinians have chosen to return to this form of peaceful protest.</p><p><em>This interview originally aired on 2/21/12.</em></p></p> Wed, 09 May 2012 11:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/worldview/2012-02-21 Who profits from the occupation? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-03-16/who-profits-occupation-97355 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-March/2012-03-16/whoprofits2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><a href="http://www.globalexchange.org/events/speaker/dalit-baum" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Dr. Dalit Baum</a> is the co-founder of the group “<a href="http://www.whoprofits.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href, '', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">Who Profits from the Occupation</a>.” The group investigates corporations who do business in the Occupied Territories and publishes their research on their website. <em>Worldview </em>talks with Dalit about her work, which includes an examination into Hewlett Packard's development of a system to be used at checkpoints.</p><p><strong><em>Worldview</em> reached out to Hewlett Packard</strong> to see if a spokesperson would come on the show. They sent us the following statement:</p><p><em>The Basel System was developed to expedite checkpoint passage in a secure environment. The solution contributes to the development of the regional economy by enabling workers and others to get to their place of work or to carry out their business in a faster and safer way. HP also provides technical support on various aspects of the system.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>Dalit Baum will speak on Sunday, March 18th, 2012, 2:30 pm at the First United Church of Oak Park. Her presentation is called Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions--Can They End Israeli Occupation?</em></p></p> Fri, 16 Mar 2012 15:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-03-16/who-profits-occupation-97355