WBEZ | Menominee http://www.wbez.org/tags/menominee Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Clever Apes #29: Nature and human nature http://www.wbez.org/blogs/clever-apes/2012-04/clever-apes-29-nature-and-human-nature-97867 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/classroom drawing.jpg" alt="" /><p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/classroom%20drawing_1.jpg" title="Menominee students integrate natural systems into their language learning. (WBEZ/Gabriel Spitzer)"></div><p>First off, this episode is sort of a goodbye. I will be departing my beloved WBEZ shortly to strike out for new adventures. I’ll include my weepy valedictory at the bottom of this post. But the story this week is important, so before your attention wanders …</p><p>As kids, we usually learn about nature from a decidedly human point of view. The world exists in relation to us. People are the stars in this scenario: We are Hamlet, while nature is like Denmark – the place where we happen to be. The conventional wisdom has been that this is a universal way the mind develops its awareness of the natural world.<!--break--></p><p>But an eclectic group of researchers are challenging that. The team is made up of psychologists from Northwestern University, and researchers from the Menominee Reservation and the American Indian Center of Chicago. They started looking carefully at the way Native and non-Native children come to learn about nature. They found some distinctive differences.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/Richard%20falls_0.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 10px; height: 225px; width: 300px;" title="Richard Annamitta is hoping to restore Keshena Falls to the state it was in when his ancestors saw it. (WBEZ/Gabriel Spitzer)"></div><p>Namely, Native kids tend not to have that anthropocentric view in the early years. They come to see the biological world in terms of relationships and connections – what psychologists call “systems-level thinking.” Non-Native kids, on the other hand, generally think more in hierarchical categories like taxonomy – kingdom, phylum, species, etc. So the human-centered learning may not be universal after all, but instead flavored by the culture we grow up in.</p><p>This goes deeper than just having different beliefs. The scientists say those distinctive worldviews actually change the way we think, learn and reason. Over the last decade or so, the team has been designing experiments to tease out the ramifications of that change. It has major consequences for education, an<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/Bear%20clan_0.jpg" style="float: left; width: 240px; height: 320px; " title="This Bear Clan figure demonstrates how the Menominee see humans and animals as connected. (WBEZ/Gabriel Spitzer)">d might (this is my speculation!) influence our attitudes about the environment.</p><p>So, this will be my final episode of Clever Apes. We are hopeful that it will continue in some form, so you may not have heard the last of WBEZ’s science experiment. Creating this series has been a rare privilege – I have had one of the greatest gigs in media. My deepest gratitude goes to my editor Cate Cahan, whose gusto and keen mind have long inspired me. Michael De Bonis has been a fantastic collaborator, friend and co-conspirator, without whom the Apes would be far less clever. And Sally Eisele has shown great vision (or folly) in supporting this weird project from the get-go.</p><p>Thank you for sticking with us, and of course you can still subscribe to our <a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wbezs-clever-apes/id379051174" target="_blank" title="http://feeds.feedburner.com/CleverApesPodcast">podcast</a>, follow us on&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/#%21/cleverapes" target="_blank" title="http://twitter.com/#!/cleverapes">Twitter</a>, and find us on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Clever-Apes-on-WBEZ/118246851551412" target="_blank" title="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Clever-Apes-on-WBEZ/118246851551412">Facebook</a>.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/Megan%20murals_0.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Megan Bang helped incorporate systems-level thinking into the design of an early education classroom. (WBEZ/Gabriel Spitzer)"></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Tue, 03 Apr 2012 10:16:50 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/clever-apes/2012-04/clever-apes-29-nature-and-human-nature-97867 American Indian activist Ada Deer comes to Chicago http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/american-indian-activist-ada-deer-comes-chicago <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/ada deer sec. of interior.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>For decades now, <a href="http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/topics/deer/" target="_blank">Ada Deer</a> has been fighting for the rights of American Indians.<br /><br />The activist and educator has even taken on the powers that be in D.C. to reinstate federal recognition of her own tribe, the <a href="http://www.menominee-nsn.gov/" target="_blank">Menominee of Wisconsin</a>.</p><p>Deer was later named Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs at the <a href="http://www.doi.gov/index.cfm" target="_blank">U.S. Department of the Interior</a>. She is also a long-time advocate for American Indian rights and a distinguished lecturer emerita at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.</p><p>It seems fitting, then, that the <a href="http://www.mitchellmuseum.org/" target="_blank">Mitchell Museum of the American Indian</a> asked Deer to speak on social justice Dec. 8. Her talk, entitled &quot;A Path to Social Justice,&quot; gets underway at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and will launch the museum's first anual <a href="http://www.mitchellmuseum.org/documents/MontezumaLecture_Flyer_2010.pdf" target="_blank">Dr. Carlos Montezuma Honororary Lecture</a>. It takes place at the <a href="http://www.musicinst.org/" target="_blank">Music Institute of Chicago</a> in Evanston.</p></p> Tue, 07 Dec 2010 13:57:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/american-indian-activist-ada-deer-comes-chicago