WBEZ | census data http://www.wbez.org/tags/census-data Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Chicago-area population grows at snail’s pace http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-area-population-grows-snail%E2%80%99s-pace-106085 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/capture1_0.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>The Chicago region has the slowest population growth of the nation&rsquo;s 10 biggest metro areas, according to estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau.</p><p>By last July, the population of the region&rsquo;s 14 counties had edged up to 9.52 million &mdash; about 0.28 percent more than a year earlier.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re a big <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-area-population-grows-snail%E2%80%99s-pace-106085#Factors">exporter of population</a>,&rdquo; Chicago-based demographer Rob Paral said. &ldquo;The only thing that offsets it is immigration. Indeed, if the economy spurred even more native-born people to leave the area, it would take [the] flat growth into negative territory.&rdquo;</p><p>As defined by the bureau, the region includes the Illinois counties of Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Grundy, Kane, Kendall, Lake, McHenry and Will; the Indiana counties of Jasper, Lake, Newton and Porter; and the Wisconsin county of Kenosha.</p><p>Most of those counties hovered slightly above zero population growth for a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-area-population-grows-snail%E2%80%99s-pace-106085#Charts">second consecutive year</a>. The number of Cook County residents increased by 0.33 percent to 5.23 million.</p><p>Two counties in the region actually lost residents. The Indiana counties of Lake and Newton saw population drops of, respectively, 0.31 percent and 0.62 percent.</p><p>Kendall County led the region with a population increase of 1.19 percent &mdash; a far cry from that county&rsquo;s double-digit growth as recently as 2007.</p><p>Some distant suburbs that were counting on fast growth have taken desperate steps. Yorkville, a Kendall County city 50 miles southwest of Chicago, on Tuesday extended an offer of $10,000 to anyone who buys a new single-family home there.</p><p>Lynn Dubajic, executive director of the Yorkville Economic Development Corporation, calls the program a success. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve done nearly 60 permits since its inception about 14 months ago,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>But some experts warn that exurban towns won&rsquo;t attract hordes again unless gas prices drop. As for the Chicago region as a whole, they say quicker population growth would depend largely on jobs.</p><p><em>Follow <a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> on <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.<br /><br /><a name="Charts"></a></em></p><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0AluraWM750W7dGEyNFZhbm9rWEZUNkp0T212MUljdEE&transpose=1&headers=1&range=A1%3AAE96&gid=0&pub=1","options":{"titleTextStyle":{"bold":true,"color":"#000","fontSize":16},"curveType":"","animation":{"duration":500},"width":620,"lineWidth":2,"hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"gridlines":{"count":"8"},"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null},"chartArea":{"height":"75%","width":"60%","top":40},"vAxes":[{"useFormatFromData":true,"title":null,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null}],"booleanRole":"certainty","title":"Chart 1: Population in selected Chicago-area counties","height":413,"legend":"right","useFirstColumnAsDomain":true,"tooltip":{}},"state":{},"view":{},"isDefaultVisualization":true,"chartType":"LineChart","chartName":"Chart 2"} </script><br /><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0AluraWM750W7dGEyNFZhbm9rWEZUNkp0T212MUljdEE&transpose=1&headers=1&range=A1%3AX100&gid=1&pub=1","options":{"titleTextStyle":{"bold":true,"color":"#000","fontSize":16},"series":{"0":{"targetAxisIndex":0,"lineWidth":1}},"curveType":"","animation":{"duration":0},"backgroundColor":{"fill":"#ffffff"},"width":620,"lineWidth":2,"hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"gridlines":{"count":"6"},"maxValue":null},"chartArea":{"height":"75%","width":"60%","top":40},"vAxes":[{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"gridlines":{"count":"10","color":"#d9d9d9"},"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null}],"title":"Chart 2: Rates of population change in selected Chicago-area counties","booleanRole":"certainty","height":413,"legend":"right","useFirstColumnAsDomain":true,"tooltip":{}},"state":{},"view":{},"isDefaultVisualization":true,"chartType":"LineChart","chartName":"Chart 3"} </script><br /><p><a name="Factors"></a><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0AluraWM750W7dGEyNFZhbm9rWEZUNkp0T212MUljdEE&transpose=1&headers=1&range=A1%3AX100&gid=23&pub=1","options":{"titleTextStyle":{"bold":true,"color":"#000","fontSize":16},"series":{"0":{"targetAxisIndex":0,"lineWidth":1}},"curveType":"","animation":{"duration":0},"backgroundColor":{"fill":"#ffffff"},"width":620,"lineWidth":2,"hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"gridlines":{"count":"6"},"maxValue":null},"chartArea":{"height":"75%","width":"60%","top":40},"vAxes":[{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"gridlines":{"count":"10","color":"#d9d9d9"},"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null}],"title":"Chart 3: Rates of population change in selected Chicago-area counties (with averages for 2010)","booleanRole":"certainty","height":413,"legend":"right","useFirstColumnAsDomain":true,"tooltip":{}},"state":{},"view":{},"isDefaultVisualization":true,"chartType":"LineChart","chartName":"Chart 3"} </script><br /><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0AluraWM750W7dG4zb3lrbDg1bkU3dEhIODZWdHZyT0E&transpose=0&headers=1&range=A1%3AD51&gid=0&pub=1","options":{"chart":{"width":"60%","height":"75%","top":40},"vAxes":[{"useFormatFromData":true,"title":null,"minValue":null,"gridlines":{"count":"10"},"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null}],"titleTextStyle":{"bold":true,"color":"#000","fontSize":16},"booleanRole":"certainty","title":"Chart 4: Contributors to 2012 population growth in the 10 largest U.S. metropolitan areas","animation":{"duration":0},"legend":"right","hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindowMode":null,"viewWindow":null,"maxValue":null},"isStacked":false,"tooltip":{},"width":620,"height":413},"state":{},"view":{},"isDefaultVisualization":true,"chartType":"ColumnChart","chartName":"Chart 3"} </script></p><p><a name="Notes"></a>NOTES: These charts stem from WBEZ analysis of U.S. Census Bureau intercensal estimates for July 1 of each year. The 2000 and 2010 estimates reflect bureau adjustments based on the decennial census. Those adjustments distorted the Chart 2 visualization for 2010. Chart 3, therefore, replaces each 2010 estimate with an average (2009 estimate plus 2011 estimate, divided by two). Chart 4 displays&nbsp;<a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/bulletins/2013/b13-01.pdf">metropolitan statistical areas</a> in order of their population growth rate.</p></p> Thu, 14 Mar 2013 07:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-area-population-grows-snail%E2%80%99s-pace-106085 Census changes congressional districts http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/census-changes-congressional-districts <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/redistricting census.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated at 1:32 p.m. on 12/09/2010</em></p><p>Census figures due at the end of the month could mean one less seat for the Land of Lincoln in the U.S. House of Representatives. State-by-state population figures compiled by the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.census.gov/">U.S. Census Bureau</a>, by law, must be delivered to the president by month&rsquo;s end. The information is used to determine the distribution of 435 seats in the U.S. House.</p><p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/">Bloomberg News</a> and political consulting firm <a target="_blank" href="http://www.electiondataservices.com/">Election Data Services Inc</a>. both expect Illinois to lose a seat based on their analyses of available data from the census and the Internal Revenue Service. The state is no stranger to the wrath of numbers: Illinois lost a congressional seat 10 years ago and lost two seats the decade before that.</p><p>The prospective loss would wean Illinois&rsquo; 19 members of Congress to 18, slightly diminishing the state&rsquo;s voice in that chamber. WBEZ&rsquo;s Sam Hudzik told &ldquo;Eight Forty-Eight&rdquo; host Alison Cuddy that redistricting, or a re-map, is a very political and contentious process.</p><p>Democrats could target one of the four congressional districts&mdash;the 8th, 11th, 14th and 17th&mdash;that turned Republican after the November mid-term election. Hudzik says his research suggests Democrats could try to swallow up Republican Don Manzullo&rsquo;s seat in northwest Illinois&rsquo; 16th District.</p><p>The Democratic point-man on redistricting in the Senate, Kwame Raoul, says that members of Congress, like the public, should provide input, not a decision.</p><p>&ldquo;One of the many things that came out of the hearings over the course of the last year and a half is that you just don&rsquo;t want the process to be simply about self-preservation,&rdquo; Raoul told Hudzik.</p><p>A spokesman for Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan said the topic of who will take responsibility for the map has not yet been discussed.</p><p>But as more specific numbers roll out, you can bet Rand McNally won&rsquo;t be the only map maker in town. The state constitution dictates that a lottery&mdash;yes, like pulling a number from a hat&mdash;determines which party charts the new boundaries in the event of a disagreement.</p><p>Hudzik will continue his coverage as Magellan-enthusiasts and vulnerable members of Congress await action from the Illinois House.</p><p><em>Music Button: Matorralman, &quot;Lunatica&quot;, from the CD Guateque Estelar, (Nacional)</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 09 Dec 2010 14:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/census-changes-congressional-districts