WBEZ | Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights http://www.wbez.org/tags/illinois-coalition-immigrant-and-refugee-rights Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Durbin to undocumented youths: Watch out for unscrupulous lawyers http://www.wbez.org/news/durbin-undocumented-youths-watch-out-unscrupulous-lawyers-101546 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Durbin4cropscaled.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px 0px; float: left; height: 401px; width: 250px; " title="‘Don’t let them exploit you,’ the senator tells immigrants in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood Tuesday afternoon. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" />Two U.S. congressmen from Illinois are warning undocumented youths not to pay steep fees to get help applying for a deportation reprieve under a new immigration policy.</p><p>Sen. Dick Durbin and Rep. Luis Gutiérrez, both Democrats, say most eligible youths can take advantage of the policy, known as &ldquo;deferred action,&rdquo; without a lawyer or any payment beyond a $465 fee to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the agency accepting the applications.</p><p>&ldquo;There are <em>notarios </em>as well as attorneys out there who are trying to take money away from these young people and their families,&rdquo; Durbin said Tuesday afternoon at a meeting with immigrants in Chicago&rsquo;s Pilsen neighborhood. &ldquo;They say, &lsquo;Oh, give me $1,000, give me $2,000, and I will help you.&rsquo; &rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Don&rsquo;t let them exploit you,&rdquo; Durbin said.</p><p>Under the policy, announced by President Barack Obama&rsquo;s administration in June, undocumented immigrants can request permission to stay and work in the country by submitting a document starting August 15. The administration, which has not released that document yet, is expecting more than 1 million requests, according to an Associated Press report.</p><p>To qualify, immigrants must be 30 or younger, have arrived in the United States before turning 16, have lived in the country at least five years, and be in school or graduated or served in the military. They also must have no criminal record and pose no safety threat. The permission to live and work in the country lasts two years and is renewable.</p><p>The policy does not provide a path to citizenship &mdash; a key difference from stalled legislation, known as the DREAM Act, that Durbin has pushed for more than a decade.</p><p>Durbin and Gutiérrez urged immigrants who may be eligible for relief under the policy to attend an August 15 workshop at Chicago&rsquo;s Navy Pier, where the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights is organizing hundreds of volunteers to provide information and help fill out the applications.</p><p>Gutiérrez added that the policy could lead to an overhaul that stretches far beyond the youths. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s incumbent upon us, now that we&rsquo;ve got this, to move on to their moms and their dads,&rdquo; the representative said. &ldquo;Comprehensive immigration reform is what is necessary and that&rsquo;s what we&rsquo;re going to work on next.&rdquo;</p><p>Conservative critics call the Obama policy a backdoor amnesty plan aimed at increasing the president&rsquo;s Latino support before November&rsquo;s election.</p></p> Tue, 07 Aug 2012 16:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/durbin-undocumented-youths-watch-out-unscrupulous-lawyers-101546 Senate OKs bill blocking Crete detention center http://www.wbez.org/story/senate-oks-bill-blocking-crete-detention-center-97714 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-March/2012-03-28/CCA facility in New Jersey SCALED.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Illinois Senate on Wednesday approved a bill aimed at blocking an immigrant detention center proposed for south suburban Crete, but the measure could face rougher going in the House.</p><p>Passed by a 34-17 vote, SB1064 would make Illinois one of the nation’s first states to ban local governments and state agencies from contracting with private companies to build or run civil detention centers. The measure would expand a state law banning privately constructed or operated state prisons and county jails.</p><p>The proposal in Crete is for the village to contract with Nashville-based Corrections Corporation of America to build and run a 788-bed facility that would hold U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainees.</p><p>Crete officials have talked up the project’s expected jobs and tax benefits but have yet to approve the facility. Some village residents are rallying against it, saying it would hurt their community. The residents have aligned with immigrant-rights advocates who say CCA has provided poor conditions for its ICE detainees in other parts of the country.</p><p>“When you introduce the profit motive into corrections and detention, what you end up doing is ratcheting down conditions for detainees and for workers,” said Fred Tsao, policy director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, which is pushing the bill. ICIRR last year shepherded into law a measure that set up a state commission to oversee privately funded college scholarships for undocumented immigrants.</p><p>CCA disputes criticism about its detainee treatment. On its website, the company says its employees adhere “to the highest standards in corrections.”</p><p>Crete Village Administrator Tom Durkin said he hadn’t seen the Senate bill and declined to comment.</p><p>An ICE spokesman said his agency does not comment on proposed legislation.</p><p>Tsao acknowledged that Illinois would not be able to stop the federal government from contracting with private entities to build or run a detention center in the state. “What Illinois can do,” he said, “is control what the state itself does and what its political subdivisions — counties, townships and municipalities — do.”</p><p>In the House, the bill’s prospects are unclear.</p><p>“It’ll have difficulty if it ties the hands of the federal government in enforcing immigration law,” said Rep. Robert Pritchard (R-Hinckley). Pritchard voted against the scholarships measure.</p><p>Rep. Randy Ramey (R-Carol Stream) said the detention-center bill sounded like a bad idea. He vowed to help lead House opposition to it and predicted that many downstate Democrats would be on his side. Last year Ramey introduced an ill-fated bill modeled after a controversial Arizona crackdown on undocumented immigrants.</p><p>House Speaker Michael Madigan (D-Chicago) “probably has no position on the bill yet,” his spokesman Steve Brown said after the Senate vote. “I haven’t heard it discussed.”</p><p>Gov. Pat Quinn’s office said he would not take a stand until the measure reached his desk. “It still has to go through the House,” Quinn aide Annie Thompson pointed out. “The governor will have to take a look at the bill he receives.”</p></p> Thu, 29 Mar 2012 22:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/senate-oks-bill-blocking-crete-detention-center-97714 Dart slammed for mulling release of inmates wanted by ICE http://www.wbez.org/story/dart-slammed-mulling-release-inmates-wanted-ice-89317 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-July/2011-07-18/Dart-Craigslist-M-Spencer-JPG.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Supporters of tougher immigration enforcement are criticizing Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart for seeking legal options enabling the county’s massive jail to quit holding some inmates wanted for immigration violations.<br> <br> Dart <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/sheriff-mulls-freeing-inmates-wanted-immigration-charges-89233">told WBEZ</a> last week his department was looking for a way to end its blanket compliance with Immigration and Customs Enforcement requests that detainees be held 48 hours beyond what their local criminal cases require. The holds, financed by the county, help ICE take custody and begin deportation proceedings. Dart says the jail’s role erodes community trust in local law enforcement, discouraging witnesses and even victims from cooperating with police.<br> <br> Ira Mehlman, spokesman of a Washington-based pro-enforcement group called the Federation for American Immigration Reform, is not convinced. “This idea that turning people over to immigration authorities — who have already been picked up on suspicion of some crime — is somehow going to cause this massive chill just doesn’t hold water,” says Mehlman, who accuses Dart of “putting politics ahead of community safety.”<br> <br> The WBEZ report has also led to a torrent of comments on the station’s Web site. The visitors have labeled Dart everything from a “fool” to a “traitor.”<br> <br> But Dart’s review is also winning praise. “Sheriffs throughout the country are revisiting their policies with respect to the ICE holds,” says Fred Tsao, policy director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights. “The criminal justice system already distinguishes between people who can be released with no threat to public safety and those who cannot.”<br> <br> San Francisco County Sheriff Michael Hennessey on June 1 <a href="http://www.wbez.org/sites/default/files/San_Francisco_policy_on_ICE_detainers.pdf">quit honoring</a> ICE requests for holds of inmates arrested for certain traffic infractions and other low-level offenses if a background check finds no felony convictions and meets other requirements. Since then, his department has released four inmates with ICE detainers, according to Eileen Hirst, the sheriff’s chief of staff.<br> <br> ICE officials acknowledge that local jails have no legal requirement to comply with the detainer requests.</p></p> Mon, 18 Jul 2011 18:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/dart-slammed-mulling-release-inmates-wanted-ice-89317 DREAM Act backers at odds over how to pass it http://www.wbez.org/story/adalberto-united-methodist-church/dream-act-backers-odds-over-how-pass-it <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Dreamers3.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., wants the DREAM Act signed into law by year&rsquo;s end. But supporters disagree on how to advance the measure.<br /><br />The bill, passed by the U.S. House last week, would lay a path to citizenship for some undocumented youths who grew up in this country and attend college or join the military.<br /><br />Getting it through the Senate would depend on Republicans so the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights is urging calls and letters to the state&rsquo;s Republican senator, Mark Kirk.<br /><br />But some DREAM Act supporters call that effort a waste of time. &ldquo;Kirk is not going to do anything independently of the Republican Party,&rdquo; said immigrant-rights activist Rev. Walter Coleman, pastor of Adalberto United Methodist, a church in Chicago&rsquo;s Humboldt Park neighborhood.<br /><br />&ldquo;This is something that has to be worked out by leadership,&rdquo; Coleman said. &ldquo;Our pressure needs to go on Obama and it needs to go on the Democratic leadership, who&rsquo;ve been playing us for two years, to finally come through and meet their promises.&rdquo;<br /><br />Coleman said that would mean making the DREAM Act part of any deal with Republicans about taxes.</p></p> Mon, 13 Dec 2010 11:08:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/adalberto-united-methodist-church/dream-act-backers-odds-over-how-pass-it