WBEZ | Greece http://www.wbez.org/tags/greece Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The refugees stranded in Greece http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-30/refugees-stranded-greece-113995 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20921696859_bb9c386da0_z.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Society)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235459198&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Closed European borders put pressure on Greece</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The investigation into the Paris attacks has revealed that at least two of the attackers traveled to France via Greece, mixed in with the refugees coming in from Syria. Since the attacks several European countries have closed their borders, stranding a large number of would be asylum seekers and migrants in Greece. Dr. Zaher Sahloul, the former president of the Syrian American Medical Society, has just returned from working with refugees in Lesbos, Greece. He joins us to discuss the latest developments.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong><em>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-eb161a56-5a2e-1c33-89d6-7c4604afff8c"><a href="http://twitter.com/sahloul">Dr. Zaher Sahloul</a> is former president of the Syrian American Medical Society. He&rsquo;s just returned from Greece.</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/235459527&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The implications of pro-Kurdish activist Tahir Elci&#39;s murder</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">A prominent Kurdish lawyer and human rights activist, Tahir Elci, was killed in Turkey over the weekend. He was shot, after a battle with police and after making a statement to journalists, where he called for an end to violence between the Turkish government and the Kurdish group the PKK. Elci had faced death threats after saying the PKK is not a terrorist organization. A curfew was imposed in the city where the killing took place, with police afraid Elci&rsquo;s death could lead to more violence and unrest. Taner Akcam is a professor at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University, joins us to discuss the implications of Elci&rsquo;s killing.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-eb161a56-5a2f-d550-7bc3-69c756ff8e16"><em>Taner Akcam is a professor at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at <a href="http://twitter.com/ClarkUniversity">Clark University</a></em>.</span></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 30 Nov 2015 14:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-30/refugees-stranded-greece-113995 Chicago Doctor Treated Syrian Refugees On Greek Island Of Lesbos http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-doctor-treated-syrian-refugees-greek-island-lesbos-113950 <p><div id="storytext"><p>NPR&#39;s Kelly McEvers talks to Dr. Zaher Sahloul, head of the Syrian American Medical Society Foundation, who recently returned from the Greek island of Lesbos where he treated Syrian migrants.</p></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div id="commentBlock"><h3>&nbsp;</h3></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 25 Nov 2015 16:14:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-doctor-treated-syrian-refugees-greek-island-lesbos-113950 Discovery from 3,500 years ago challenges gender roles http://www.wbez.org/news/discovery-3500-years-ago-challenges-gender-roles-113758 <p><div style="text-align: justify;"><img alt="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/pylos_embed2.jpg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="One of more than 45 seal stones found within the tomb, each bearing intricate designs. Long-horned bulls and, sometimes, human bull jumpers leaping over their horns are a common relief from the Minoan period. (Credit: Jennifer Stevens)" /></div><div><article about="/stories/2015-11-12/discovery-3500-years-ago-challenges-gender-roles" typeof="sioc:Item foaf:Document"><div><p style="text-align: justify;">Husband-and-wife archaeologist team Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker have just made the biggest archaeological discovery of its kind in at least half a century.</p></div><p style="text-align: justify;">&ldquo;It was kind of a combination of expertise and dumb luck,&rdquo; says Jack Davis, &ldquo;We were not planning to excavate in this area.&rdquo;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">Davis and his wife Stocker, both archaeologists from the University of Cincinnati, had been trying to purchase a plot of land near the ancient city of Pylos in southwestern Greece.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" draggable="true" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/gallery_image/public/pylos_embed1.jpg?itok=s77Nihmr" style="height: 539px; width: 400px;" title="University of Cincinnati's Sharon Stocker, left, and Jack Davis led a team of 45 archaeologists and experts in various specialties, as well as students, during this summer's excavations in Pylos, Greece. (University of Cincinnati, Pylos Excavations)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><div style="text-align: justify;">When plans for that purchase fell through, they turned instead to an adjacent property - a plot located near where the Palace of Nestor, long since destroyed, was built.&nbsp;</div><p style="text-align: justify;">Stocker and Davis first cleared brush away from the plot of land. Then, they and their team noticed five stones above the surface of the earth. At first they thought it was the corner of a Bronze Age house. Then, after some digging, Davis got a phone call: &ldquo;We hit bronze,&rdquo; the area supervisor said.&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;"><img alt="" draggable="true" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/gallery_image/public/pylos_embed3.jpg?itok=MKbKnbio" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="An elaborate necklace decorated with ivy leaves and measuring more than thirty inches long was found near the neck of the warrior’s skeleton. (Jennifer Stephens)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><p style="text-align: justify;">Davis and Stocker rushed back to the site.</p><img alt="" draggable="true" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/gallery_image/public/pylos_embed5.jpg?itok=_rmqLk5o" style="text-align: center; height: 509px; width: 300px; float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="An illustration of the contents and arrangement of the excavated tomb. (Denitsa Nenova)" typeof="foaf:Image" /><p style="text-align: justify;">What&nbsp;had been discovered was the ancient tomb of a warrior who was buried with a sword and a trove of jewelry some 35 centuries ago.&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">He likely died &ldquo;several centuries before the time that Homer was writing about, which I think makes it all the more spectacular,&rdquo; Stocker says, &ldquo;This could have been perhaps even the founder of the dynasty Later Nestor who ruled at Pylos.&quot;&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">In the warrior&rsquo;s grave the archaeologists&nbsp;found a sword, a gold-hilted dagger, and more than 45 seal stones, each bearing intricate designs like long-horned bulls and human bull jumpers.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" draggable="true" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/gallery_image/public/Picture35.jpg?itok=NF0tV1Ss" style="text-align: center; height: 372px; width: 620px;" title="One of six ivory combs discovered in the tomb by Sharon Stocker and Jack Davis (University of Cincinnati, Pylos Excavations)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><p style="text-align: justify;">There were also several combs, a mirror, and an elaborate necklace decorated with ivy leaves near&nbsp;the skeleton&rsquo;s neck.&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">The discovery is changing the way archaeologists are interpreting ancient graves, and ancient civilization.&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;">&ldquo;Up until now people have speculated that certain artifacts can be ascribed to a particular gender,&rdquo; Stocker says, &ldquo;But now we have one man buried with objects that&nbsp;until now&nbsp;have been thought of as female artifacts. He had six combs, he had a bronze mirror, he had beads, he had necklaces. He had all of these things, and so we&#39;ve learned from this burial that the grave goods now cannot necessarily be attributed along gender lines. That&#39;s one thing that I find really exciting.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;"><img alt="" draggable="true" src="http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/gallery_image/public/pylos_embed4.jpg?itok=MFE_-iwg" style="text-align: center; height: 477px; width: 620px;" title="Sharon Stocker with the 3,500 year-old skull found in the warrior's tomb. (University of Cincinnati, Pylos Excavations)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></p><p style="text-align: justify;">Stocker and Davis say they have a lot of work ahead of them to continue studying their discovery.&nbsp;</p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="text-align: center;">&ldquo;Probably for the rest of our lives will be working on this amazing find. It&#39;s something to look forward to,&rdquo;&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: center;">Stocker says.&nbsp;</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><em>This&nbsp;<a href="http://www.studio360.org/story/the-things-they-carried-in-1500-bc/" target="_blank">story</a>&nbsp;first aired on PRI&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.studio360.org/" target="_blank">Studio 360</a>&nbsp;with Kurt Andersen.</em></p></article></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 12 Nov 2015 13:34:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/discovery-3500-years-ago-challenges-gender-roles-113758 Icelanders say they want to house Syrian refugees — but in Greece the government and residents are overwhelmed http://www.wbez.org/news/icelanders-say-they-want-house-syrian-refugees-%E2%80%94-greece-government-and-residents-are <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/RTX1P1HW.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>When Iceland&#39;s government announced that it was only willing to take in 50 Syrian refugees during the next two years, Reykjavík resident Bryndís Björgvinsdóttir got angry.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;Fifty people is not even a good wedding party,&quot; she says.&nbsp;</p><p>So Björgvinsdóttir created a&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1481734488816658/1481836258806481/" target="_blank">Facebook event page</a>, where some 10,000 of her fellow Icelanders offered their homes, as well as food and clothing to Syrians on the run. &nbsp;</p><p>&quot;The idea is to show we can raise that number from 50 to 100 to 500, even 5,000,&quot; she says. &quot;One man offered a house with 11 bathrooms. People just really want to do something.&quot;&nbsp;</p><p>But Björgvinsdóttir&#39;s Facebook page has also attracted skeptics, who argued that extending a welcome&nbsp;to refugees only encourages vulnerable populations to&nbsp;risk their lives in rickety boats or as stowaways.</p><p>Others who commented on the website were hateful.</p><p>&quot;Tell us the date when you&#39;ll leave Islam, we can talk about immigration then,&quot; one post reads.</p><p>For her own part, Björgvinsdóttir says she can&#39;t offer Syrians shelter since she lives with her parents. But she&#39;s teamed up with a friend who says he has enough extra space to house five refugees fleeing Syria&#39;s war. Björgvinsdóttir has promised to pay the costs of plane tickets for the five Syrians.&nbsp;</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t think it&#39;s that much for five lives,&quot; she says.</p><p>Meanwhile, further south in the Greek island of Lesbos, residents have been facing a sharp increase in the number of refugees arriving on the island&rsquo;s shore. Greece has called on governments in northern Europe, places like Iceland, to help relieve the pressure.</p><p>According to Kirk Day, the emergency field director on Lesbos with the International Rescue Committee, 4,000 refugees arrived on the island last Saturday alone.</p><p>Similar numbers made it there on Sunday.&nbsp;Day says the situation is &ldquo;near complete chaos.&rdquo;</p><p>He says the town of Mytilini&nbsp;has a population of around 30,000.</p><p>&ldquo;One out of every four or more people that you see are refugees,&rdquo; he says.&nbsp;&ldquo;People are sleeping on the sidewalks, alleyways and parks.&rdquo;</p><p>But while the situation has left Mytilini residents overwhelmed, Day says that for some businesses, the refugee influx has been good. That&rsquo;s because many of them have brought with them their entire life savings and some have been spending that money on food and lodging.</p><p>But on the whole, the tiny island can&rsquo;t handle the&nbsp;sheer number of people.</p><p>&ldquo;If you take five years of austerity measures and you take the most recent financial crisis and their consequences, then how well-suited do we think an administrative structure should be on this remote island to handle this massive influx of refugees?&rdquo; Day asks.</p><p>While the Greeks have been feeling pressure from the large number of refugees, things certainly haven&rsquo;t been easy for the refugees, either.&nbsp;Many, Day says, never wanted to leave their country in the first place.</p><p>&ldquo;The Syrians love their country and they don&rsquo;t want to necessarily leave, but they say that there were simply no way that they and their families could live safely in their homes,&rdquo; he says.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-09-01/icelanders-say-they-want-house-syrian-refugees-greece-government-and-residents" target="_blank"><em>The World</em></a></p></p> Wed, 02 Sep 2015 11:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/icelanders-say-they-want-house-syrian-refugees-%E2%80%94-greece-government-and-residents-are Greece and its creditors agree to new deal http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-13/greece-and-its-creditors-agree-new-deal-112370 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/European%20Parliament.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/European Union)" /><br />&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214565302&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size:22px;"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The politics and potential impact of the latest Greek bailout&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">package</span></span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>After a marathon session that lasted all weekend, Eurozone leaders came to an agreement that granted Greece a third bailout, and, for now, keeps the country in the euro. The agreement starts negotiations on a loan package for Greece worth $91-96bn in exchange for reforms that aim to streamline the pension system, boost tax revenue, privatize electricity, and extend common business hours, among other reforms. Endy Zemenides discusses the latest developments and what they mean for Greece&rsquo;s economic future.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Zemenides">Endy Zemenides</a> is executive director of the <a href="http://hellenicleaders.com/">Hellenic American Council</a> and an Emerging Leaders fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214564633&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Negotiators keep working for nuclear deal with Iran</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Negotiators are continuing to hash out the remaining details of a deal that would limit Iran&rsquo;s nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. Earlier today the Associated Press reported that a deal would be announced this evening, but so far, no official announcement has been scheduled. We discuss the final hurdles with Joseph Cirincione of Ploughshares Fund.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Cirincione">Joseph Cirincione</a> is president of <a href="http://www.ploughshares.org/">Ploughshares Fund</a>, a global security foundation</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214564042&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: An ancient discovery</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Historian John Schmidt tells us about July 13, 1923, a day when a team led by American explorer and naturalist, Roy Chapman Andrews, made the first discovery of dinosaur eggs.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/">John Schmidt</a>&nbsp;is a historian and author of &ldquo;On This Day in Chicago History.&rdquo;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 15:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-13/greece-and-its-creditors-agree-new-deal-112370 What next for Greece? http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-06/what-next-greece-112328 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Bob%20Dass.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Bob Dass)" /><br />&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213536181&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">What&#39;s next for Greece?</span></p><div>Greece held a historic referendum on Sunday. Voters were asked to decide whether or not the government should accept the terms of a bailout package. A majority of Greeks voted no.What happens next remains unclear. Greece could exit the Euro or manage to negotiate some sort of new loan. In the meantime, the banks are running out of cash and certain essential supplies, including medicine, are already running low. A panel of Greek Americans weighs in on yesterday&rsquo;s vote and the impact it could have on their families and businesses in Greece.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></div><ul><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Stavzilla">Stavroula Harissis</a> is a Greek-American activist in Chicago. </em></li><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/teddyoenos">Ted Diamantis</a> is president of Diamond Importers and Naturally Greek. </em></li><li><em><a href="http://las.depaul.edu/departments/geography/faculty/Pages/alex-g-papadopoulos.aspx">Alex Papadopoulos</a> is a professor of &nbsp;geography at DePaul University.&nbsp;</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213535764&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">An update on Ebola</span></p><div>The Ebola epidemic in West Africa has taken the lives of at least 11, 000 people. Liberia, which was declared Ebola free in May, is now reporting new cases. &nbsp;Sierra Leone and Guinea have seen an increase in cases in recent weeks. &nbsp;Doctors Without Borders has been on the front lines of the fight against the virus. Heather Pagano of Doctors Without Borders, joins us for an update on the disease in West Africa.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/H_Pagano">Heather Pagano</a> is&nbsp;Ebola Advocacy and Communications Coordinator for Doctors Without Borders.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213534123&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Adoption in South Korea</span></p><div>Since the end of the Korean War, at least 160,00 children have been adopted from South Korea. At one point, South Korea became the largest supplier of children to developed countries. At first, many of the children were the result of wartime relationships with American soldiers. Today a majority of kids put up for adoption are the children of single mothers. Legislation was passed to place greater restrictions on foreign adoption. More recently, the Korean government amended legislation to try to reduce the stigma around adoption at home.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/KathyHSMoon">Katharine Moon</a> is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.</em></div></p> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 15:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-06/what-next-greece-112328 Greek financial future hangs in limbo http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-29/greek-financial-future-hangs-limbo-112279 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP%20PhotoGiannis%20Papanikos1.jpg" style="width: 602px; height: 375px;" title="(Photo: AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212538753&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Greek banks close as debt crisis continues</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Banks in Greece closed Monday. The government of Greece is trying to prevent the Greek financial system from collapsing by preventing Greeks from withdrawing all their funds in a panic. Greeks are now also limited on how much money they can withdraw from ATM machines and businesses are limited in the transactions they can do. It&rsquo;s known as capital control. Greek Prime Minister, Alexis Tsipras, has called for a referendum on July 5th to allow the Greek public to vote on whether or not it wants to remain in the European Union. Endy Zemenides, executive director of the Hellenic American Leadership Council joins us from DC, where he has been lobbying the US Congress to push for a deal that has sustainable debt levels for Greece.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em>Endy Zemenides is executive director of the&nbsp;<a href="http://hellenicleaders.com/">Hellenic American Leadership Council</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212536996&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Climate change threatens survival of Pukapuka</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Pukapuka is one of the most remote atolls in the Cook Islands. It&rsquo;s one of the world&rsquo;s oldest cultures dating back more than 2,000 years. Now, its entire existence is being threatened by climate change. The documentary, &#39;Homecoming: A film about Pukapuka,&#39; hopes to tell the island&rsquo;s story, before it&rsquo;s gone. The subjects of the film, John Frisbie and Amelia Borofsky, join us from Honolulu, along with filmmaker, Gemma Cubero del Barrio.<br /><br /><strong>Guests: </strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>John Frisbie and Amelia Borofsky are the subjects in the documentary <a href="https://www.facebook.com/HomecomingDoc">&#39;<span>Homecoming: A Film about Pukapuka.&#39; </span></a></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Gemma Cubero del Barrio is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/HomecomingDoc">&#39;<span id="docs-internal-guid-de1a98be-4115-f05b-e86b-ef0e46cbf432">Homecoming: A Film about Pukapuka.&#39;</span></a></em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212535540&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Theory of the sixth mass extinction</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Scientists maintain that in Earth&rsquo;s 4.5 billion years, there have been five &ldquo;mass extinctions.&rdquo; These events destroy life at an accelerated rate. The fifth mass extinction wiped out 96 percent of life on the planet, including the dinosaurs. A new article theorizes that we currently are witnessing Earth&rsquo;s sixth mass extinction. Professor Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University, co-authored the article, &#39;Accelerated modern human&ndash;induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction.&#39; We&rsquo;ll ask him what&rsquo;s causing our planet to lose &ldquo;species of other organisms&rdquo; at a pace &rdquo;unparalleled for 65 million years.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-9937d329-411a-8dc6-7377-5e2bf3583eb7"><a href="https://twitter.com/PaulREhrlich">Paul Ehrlich</a> is a professor at&nbsp;</span>Stanford University.</em></p></p> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 15:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-29/greek-financial-future-hangs-limbo-112279 Greek debt crisis http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-04/greek-debt-crisis-112142 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP%20PhotoYorgos%20Karahalis.jpg" style="width: 563px; height: 375px;" title="(Photo: AP/Yorgos Karahalis)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208829796&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Greece inches toward debt agreement</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Greek prime minister met with the country&rsquo;s Eurozone creditors in Brussels yesterday and during the night to try and negotiate the terms of a final loan agreement for its international bailout. Greece and the Eurozone lenders and the IMF have been in negotiations for months over what kinds of reforms Greece needs to make in order to secure the final group of loans. Greece is hoping to avert a default although the country has said it might not be able to make its next IMF repayment, 335 million dollars, which is due on Friday. The head of the International Monetary Fund has said she is &quot;confident&quot; Greece will make the key debt payment tomorrow. Stephen Nelson, a professor of political science at Northwestern University who specializes in the politics of debt and Nick Malkoutzis, editor of MacroPolis, join us to talk about the possible solutions to the crisis and its impact on Greece.<br /><br /><strong>Guests: </strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://www.polisci.northwestern.edu/people/core-faculty/stephen-nelson.html">Stephen Nelson</a> is a professor of political science at Northwestern University.</em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/nickmalkoutzis">Nick Malkoutzis</a> is the editor of MacroPolis.&nbsp;</em></li></ul><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208829794&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: Blind Foundation for India</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">According to World Health Organization, close to 300 million people globally are visually impaired, 39 million are blind and nine out of every ten visually impaired people are low-income. Manu Vora is president and founding director of the Blind Foundation for India (BFI), based in Naperville, IL. We first spoke with him in 2008. For our Global Activism segment, Manu is back to update us on BFI&rsquo;s work to provide aid and support to the tens of millions of India&rsquo;s visually impaired.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Manu Vora is&nbsp;president and founding director of the <a href="http://www.blindfoundation.org/">Blind Foundation for India</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208829791&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Relief efforts continue in Nepal and US-South Asian relations</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Nepal continues to rebuild after a deadly earthquake struck the country last April. According the U.S. State Department, the earthquake destroyed or damaged 760,000 homes. The United States has provided temporary housing to many displaced Nepalis and is collaborating with the Nepali government on coordinating the reconstruction of the infrastructure that was destroyed. This week, U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced the US agreed to two new defense trade deals with India as part of a plan to strengthen military ties between the two countries. Nisha Desai Biswal, Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs, joins us to talk about the U.S. effort in Nepal and relations with India.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/biog/215789.htm">Nisha Desai Biswal</a>&nbsp;is Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs.</em></p></p> Thu, 04 Jun 2015 16:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-04/greek-debt-crisis-112142 Greek austerity update, 'Only God Forgives' reviewed and a world music festival http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-19/greek-austerity-update-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-world-music <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP57034231517.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We get an update on Greek austerity measures. Milos Stehlik reviews the French-Danish film &#39;Only God Forgives.&#39; Nari Safavi helps listeners plan a weekend full of international flair.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101763523&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-internati.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-internati" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Greek austerity update, 'Only God Forgives' reviewed and a world music festival" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Fri, 19 Jul 2013 11:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-19/greek-austerity-update-only-god-forgives-reviewed-and-world-music 'Fox hole' opens passage to Neolithic past, possibly Hades http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/fox-hole-opens-passage-neolithic-past-possibly-hades-103199 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/cave-crop.jpg" title="Alepotrypa Cave was home to a Neolithic community more than 5,000 years ago. The first archaeologist to dig inside unearthed hundreds of burials and hypothesized that the cave was believed to be Hades, or the underworld in Greek mythology. (Photo Courtesy of Bill Parkinson)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F63885878&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>A Field Museum curator is digging around a cave in Southern Greece that&rsquo;s been compared to the mythical underworld, Hades. &nbsp;That cave might help explain why people choose to migrate to big cities or high tail it to the suburbs.</p><p>And it has a surprising Chicago tie.&nbsp;</p><p>William Parkinson is the associate curator of Eurasian anthropology at the Field Museum. He is on a research team, called The Diros Project, made up of two Greek and two American archaeologists (both Chicago natives).</p><p>They are excavating Alepotrypa Cave, which is nearly four football fields long. The researchers compare the most striking room in the cave to a Cathedral.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a very awesome place, in the literal sense of the word,&rdquo; Parkinson said. &ldquo;I can only think that, several thousand years ago, when it was lit by torches, not by electric lamps like it is now, it would have been all that more striking.&rdquo;</p><p>They have unearthed tools and pottery that remain from a Neolithic (Stone Age) community between 5,000 and 8,000 years ago. Under the dripping stalactites, skeletons dating as far back as 8,000 years rest under layers of sediment.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s the closest thing we have to something like a Neolithic Pompeii in the Mediterranean,&rdquo; Parkinson said.</p><p>Alepotrypa was not resettled by later civilizations, so the authenticity is extraordinary, Parkinson said.</p><p>The settlers used the cave as a shelter, a cemetery and a sacred worship place. The population expanded outside of the cave and bloomed into an early urban center.</p><p>The pottery and &ldquo;ancient people&rsquo;s garbage&rdquo; the settlers left behind are the strongest evidence of a densely populated village, Parkinson said. A two-by-two meter unit revealed more than 30 pounds of pottery. The archaeologists unearthed materials and pottery styles from different regions, which indicate economic activity and a mingling of cultures.</p><p>&ldquo;If you&rsquo;re in an area where there is more trade more interaction, there&rsquo;s more variety in not just in food, but in life and the people you meet,&rdquo; Parkinson said. &nbsp;People may have gravitated toward Alepotrypa just for the sake of &ldquo;wanting to live together.&rdquo;</p><p>But Parkinson said all life in Alepotrypa abruptly ended, around 5,000 years ago, when the cave&rsquo;s population was most dense and dynamic. The cave entrance collapsed, possibly due to an earthquake. The cave&rsquo;s occupants were buried alive.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s sealed,&rdquo; Parkinson said. &ldquo;And it&rsquo;s not opened again until the 1950s.&rdquo;</p><p>After the collapse, settlers outside the cave fled the peninsula. Even today, the area surrounding the cave is scarcely populated.</p><p>&ldquo;The area is geographically marginal, you have to want to get there,&rdquo; Parkinson said.</p><p>Greeks have gravitated toward financial opportunities in big cities, like Athens.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/cave-2.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Paul Kondraros shared photos of his family in Diros, a village in Southern Greece. He said his uncle discovered Alepotrypa Cave when he was hunting with his dog. (Cassidy Herrington/WBEZ)" />Some, like 74-year-old Paul Kondraros, moved to Chicago. In 1953, Kondraros left Diros, the closest village to Alepotrypa and his hometown, &ldquo;to make more money&rdquo; as an electrical engineer.</div><p>Kondraros has a startling connection to Alepotrypa. He claims his uncle discovered the cave and is responsible for the name, which means &ldquo;fox hole&rdquo; in Greek. &nbsp;</p><p>Kondraros said his uncle was out hunting with his dog in the late 1950s, when the dog took off in pursuit of a fox and darted into a small hole.</p><p>&ldquo;After two hours or so, the dog never came out,&rdquo; Kondraros said. He said his uncle widened the hole and ventured inside. That hole, he said, was the opening to Alepotrypa Cave. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Anastasia Papathanasiou, a Diros Project archaeologist who works for the Greek Ministry of Culture, said the story &ldquo;might be true,&rdquo; but adds that there are several different tales of discovery circulating in the village.</p><p>An even greater legend, from Greek mythology, might be linked to Alepotrypa.</p><p>The first archaeologist to dig inside Alepotrypa was 90-year-old Greek Archaeologist Giorgos Papathanassopoulos, in 1970. He&rsquo;s spent 40 years studying the relics of the cave&rsquo;s Neolithic people and describes feeling a sense of awe when he imagines what their lives might have been like.</p><p>&ldquo;To this day, the richness and variety of the findings never cease to amaze me,&rdquo; Papathanassopoulos said in an e-mail. &ldquo;There is abundant scientific work for at least three more generations.&rdquo;</p><p>His initial findings included kilos of painted funeral vases and the remnants of blazing funeral rituals, Papathanassopoulos said. During the ceremonies, people intentionally broke pottery and set the cave walls on fire.</p><p>These rituals &ldquo;combined with the impressive, enormous hall,&rdquo; lead Papathanassopolos to an intriguing theory. He posited that the Neolithic people believed the cave was Hades.</p><p>&ldquo;You can easily see why Giorgos would make that hypothesis,&rdquo;Diros Colleague Michael Galaty said. &ldquo;The cave really does recall the underworld, Hades and the River Styx.&rdquo;</p><p>Colleague Anastasia Papathanasiou said she&rsquo;s hesitant to endorse her colleague&rsquo;s theory because &ldquo;it&rsquo;s just a scenario&rdquo; that obviously cannot be proven.</p><p>&ldquo;It might be, it might not be,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>She and the other team members have their sights set on big sociological questions: What was it about this cave that attracted people from all over the region? And why did they leave?</p><p>The reason for the exodus might help us understand why modern people migrate, The Field&rsquo;s Parkinson said. The source that brought people to the region was cut off, and the settlers outside the cave fled. Parkinson said they also may have abandoned the village due to the stresses of urban life like crime and disease.</p><p>&ldquo;People had never lived in groups this big before, and then they decide &lsquo;This isn&rsquo;t working,&rsquo;&rdquo; Parkinson said. &ldquo;Rather than dealing with the social stresses of having to live with your neighbor or on top of your neighbor, people just choose to establish settlements elsewhere.&rdquo;</p><p>Kind of like Chicagoans fleeing for the suburbs, Parkinson said.</p><p>The diversity of urban life could have been what made Alepotrypa so attractive to Neolithic settlers, much like downtown Chicago in recent decades.</p><p>&ldquo;Now it&rsquo;s bustling, there are restaurants, we&rsquo;re seeing more people living downtown,&rdquo; Parkinson said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s exactly those similar kinds of processes that were going on several thousand years ago.&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 18 Oct 2012 12:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/fox-hole-opens-passage-neolithic-past-possibly-hades-103199