WBEZ | Puerto Rico http://www.wbez.org/tags/puerto-rico Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Sheriff calls on feds to investigate Puerto Rican agencies that send addicts to Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/sheriff-calls-feds-investigate-puerto-rican-agencies-send-addicts-chicago-112079 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/tomdart ap.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart is asking the federal government to investigate P<a href="http://interactive.wbez.org/puertoricochicagopipeline/">uerto Rican agencies and government officials who send addicts to Chicago</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">Dart filed a fraud report with the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development inspector general this week. In it he warns the inspector general that recipients of HUD funding in Puerto Rico may be using federal funds to send heroin addicts off the island.</p><p dir="ltr">He said he hopes his report will move to the top of the inspector general&rsquo;s pile.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When you have instances where people have committed some type of fraud where the only individual who was harmed was a governmental entity &hellip; it&rsquo;s a heck of a lot different than when you literally pluck people out of their country and drop them thousands and thousands of miles away,&rdquo; Dart said.</p><p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">WBEZ reported last month</a> that Puerto Rican agencies and government officials have been sending people seeking treatment to unlicensed rehab centers on the mainland. Dart said that violates requirements that recipients of the federal funding &nbsp;only use licensed or certified rehab professionals. He also said the HUD rules direct organizations to minimize displacement. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;These deceptive at best operations of giving people one way tickets to the United States ... are gonna be in violation of the contracts that they have with HUD,&rdquo; Dart said.</p><p dir="ltr">Dart&rsquo;s report lists two examples of possible fraud:</p><p dir="ltr">The first is the municipality Bayamon, which operates the Nuevo Amanacer program. It has been receiving HUD funding since at least 2007, according to Dart&rsquo;s report. In 2014 Bayamon got a $217,977 HUD Emergency Solutions Grant.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It is unknown what portion of this grant is awarded to the Nuevo Amanecer program,&rdquo; the fraud complaint reads. But if it is being funded by HUD money, the program is in violation of several federal regulations, Dart alleges.</p><p dir="ltr">The second example sites the program Vuelta a la Vida. According to Dart, Vuelta a la Vida received more than $1.5 million from HUD in 2014 in the form of a continuum of care grant.</p><p dir="ltr">The rules for that grant require groups to use services that are in compliance with all state and local licensing laws. But none of the rehab centers identified in WBEZ&rsquo;s reporting are licensed by the state.</p><p dir="ltr">Dart said if the inspector general confirms his allegations, the groups could lose their federal funding. He also said his office is continuing its own investigation to see if unlicensed, unofficial addiction-help centers in Chicago are breaking any local laws.</p><p dir="ltr"><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid" target="_blank">@pksmid</a>. Adriana Cardona-Maguigad contributed to this story.</em></p></p> Fri, 22 May 2015 15:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/sheriff-calls-feds-investigate-puerto-rican-agencies-send-addicts-chicago-112079 Morning Shift: Reparations ordinance http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-05-05/morning-shift-reparations-ordinance-111986 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/r.nial_.bradshaw.jpg" style="width: 420px; height: 560px;" title="Flickr/r.nial.bradshaw" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204045766&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">James Beard Awards descend on Chicago</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Monday marked the first time the prestigious <a href="http://www.jamesbeard.org/awards">James Beard Awards</a>&nbsp;for chefs and restaurants was held in Chicago. Some of the nation&rsquo;s culinary giants walked the red carpet at the Civic Opera House hoping to go home with a Beard medal. The weekend was jam packed with culinary events to welcome Beard attendees to town after Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the Illinois Restaurant Association wooed the celebration away from New York for this, its 25th year. So how did the festivities go? Who were the big Chicago winners? WBEZ food reporter Monica Eng was there and gives us the 411.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/monicaeng">Monica Eng</a> is a WBEZ reporter/producer.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204045755&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Puerto Rico update</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Last month we brought you <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">the story</a> about the sad fate of Puerto Rican heroin addicts who arrive in Chicago. They come here-usually to the West Side-after receiving a one-way ticket from the Puerto Rican government. They&#39;re promised high-end treatment and a path recovery. What they find is very different and many end up homeless or sometimes in jail. Reporter Adriana Cardona-Maguigad brought us this story, and since it aired here and on This American Life, local, state and national officials have been asking questions about why this is happening. And she&#39;s finding more men in this situation. Adriana brings us an update about what&#39;s unfolded in the last month.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/nanisc99">Adriana Cardona-Maguigad</a> is a reporter/editor for </em>The Gate.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204045752&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">New study reveals truth about the &#39;users pay&#39; model for road building and upkeep</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">When it comes to our roads, highways and bridges, we&rsquo;ve always been taught that &ldquo;users pay.&rdquo; The money it takes to build, maintain, and widen comes from the gasoline taxes, tolls and other car-and-truck-related fees paid by those who drive. But a <a href="http://www.illinoispirg.org/reports/ilp/who-pays-roads">new study</a> by Illinois PIRG shows that the &ldquo;users pay&rdquo; model is a myth. Between inflation, the efficiency of newer vehicles and less driving overall, every American, regardless of if they drive and how often, bears a large tax burden when it comes to our roads. Abe Scarr of Illinois PIRG talks about how we are, and how we should be financing our transportation in the 21st Century.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/abescarr">Abe Scarr</a> is the <a href="https://twitter.com/IllinoisPIRG">Illinois PIRG</a> Director.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204045759&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">LGBTQ teens throw a prom in their style</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Ah Prom. The night where twinkly lights and streamers hang from the school gym ceiling and teenagers come to dance, celebrate their youth and bid farewell to the year behind them. On Friday, students from 38 high schools across Chicagoland took part in celebrating their right of passage at the Chicago Gay Straight Alliance Prom.&nbsp;Chicago Public Schools&#39; Northside College Prep played host to nearly 200 students. The goal of the night? Not to conform to any typical prom standard, but to spread awareness and provide continued support for teens in Chicago&#39;s LGBTQ community. While some donned tuxedos and tiaras, the theme of &quot;Emerald City,&quot; aimed to remind all students whether they come dressed as Dorothy, Glenda or the Tin Man, all are welcome. We hear from a group of students from Friday&#39;s event who shared the importance of having a &quot;prom for all.&quot;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/clareifying">Clare Lane</a> is The Morning Shift&#39;s intern.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/204045747&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Reparations proposal</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">There&rsquo;s an unprecedented ordinance that the outgoing Chicago City Council will take up this week. It would give monetary reparations and more to victims of torture under former Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge and his officers. WBEZ&rsquo;s Katie O&rsquo;Brien has the <a href="https://soundcloud.com/wbez/chicago-set-to-approve-historic-reparations-ordinance">story</a>. In addition to the proposed $5.5 million reparations fund for dozens of torture victims connected to Burge, the proposal also includes that victims and their families receive free tuition at the City Colleges of Chicago, free counseling for psychological and substance abuse and a formal apology. Mayor Rahm Emanuel has backed this plan. In 1982, the late attorney Ronald Samuels and the Cook County Bar Association organized hearings on the conduct of the Chicago Police Department in what we now know as the Jon Burge Case. Attorney Samuels&rsquo; daughter, journalist Adrienne Samuels Gibbs, joins Morning Shift to discuss her father and his colleagues fight for justice for the torture victims, and torture survivor Mark Clements shares his story.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/AdrienneWrites">Adrienne Samuels Gibbs</a> is a journalist and daughter of Attorney Ronald Samuels.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Prisonspeaks">Mark Clements</a> is a torture survivor.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Tue, 05 May 2015 07:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-05-05/morning-shift-reparations-ordinance-111986 Sheriff Dart to investigate unlicensed rehab centers http://www.wbez.org/news/sheriff-dart-investigate-unlicensed-rehab-centers-111938 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/pr follow.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart is vowing to investigate whether unlicensed rehab centers in Chicago are breaking any criminal laws.</p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">As WBEZ recently reported</a>, some of the people who end up at these unlicensed residences are heroin addicts who are sent to Chicago from Puerto Rico. &nbsp;They are told to expect well-appointed treatment centers with nurses and pools. Instead they often wind up in rundown residences, and when they don&rsquo;t get the care they need, some of them end up homeless or in jail.</p><p>Dart said he was disgusted to learn of the practice.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">Puerto Rico exports its drug addicts to Chicago</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s no one in good conscience on the other end, in Puerto Rico, who could say they&rsquo;re doing anything other than dumping hapless people in a foreign country,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;These folks are being misled at best &hellip; and the places they&rsquo;re being steered to, you wouldn&rsquo;t send anybody to in good conscience.&rdquo;</p><p>At least two people mentioned in WBEZ&rsquo;s recent story wound up in Cook County Jail.</p><p>Dart said one of the men, who used the alias Manuel, spent 50 days in the jail, for a cost to taxpayers of more than $7,000.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s expensive because once they find there&rsquo;s no services here, it&rsquo;s not as if they just hop back on the plane, no they&rsquo;re-one way tickets. And it&rsquo;s not as if they can go to plan B, there was no plan B. For many of them there&rsquo;s no family around either, so what&rsquo;s going to happen, they&rsquo;re going to end up in our hospitals, they&rsquo;re going to end up in our jails,&rdquo; Dart said.</p><p>While Dart saved his strongest words for those responsible in Puerto Rico, he also said local agencies need to step in.</p><p>&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t imagine there are not some criminal violations that are involved if you purport to be something that you&rsquo;re not and you end up harming people as a result of that,&rdquo; Dart said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re pushing our lawyers that we have in our office to see what it is that we can do.&rdquo;</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related: <a href="http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/554/not-it">This American Life: Not It!</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>He also thinks other local agencies could do more.</p><p>&ldquo;I understand we are under all sorts of cuts throughout the state and the city and so on, but I thought at a minimum we would be having some cursory analysis of the different types of entities that put themselves out as treatment facilities,&rdquo; Dart said.</p><p>But the state and the city both say they aren&rsquo;t responsible.</p><p>Chicago mayoral spokesman Adam Collins said the city&rsquo;s health department looked into the story and determined that it was a state issue, because the state&rsquo;s Department of Alcohol and Substance Abuse is responsible for licensing treatment centers.</p><p>But the director of that department, Theodora Binion, said her department doesn&rsquo;t get involved until someone applies for a license.</p><p>&ldquo;The city has jurisdiction over the actual buildings, what can happen in a building,&rdquo; Binion told WBEZ&rsquo;s <a href="https://soundcloud.com/morningshiftwbez/sets/morning-shift-april-23-2015">Morning Shift</a>. &ldquo;Zoning is not our area, nor is the building itself&hellip;. That would come from the city.&rdquo;</p><br /><p>But she said they are &ldquo;hoping to identify&rdquo; the people coming from Puerto Rico so as to help them get proper treatment.</p><p>&ldquo;Even though our jurisdiction &hellip; is fairly limited, we can talk to the people that are there and give them information about how they can get legitimate help,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Some of these residences are in Ald. Scott Waguespack&rsquo;s 32nd Ward.</p><p>Waguespack said such unlicensed, unofficial residences exist in a sort of legal gray area between the city and state. Still, he said the city should be doing more to make sure these places are up to snuff.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s pretty amazing that [the city] would try and push it off on the state,&rdquo; Waguespack said.</p><p>Waguespack said he will look at what is already in the zoning code for ways to &ldquo;rein in these businesses so they can&rsquo;t operate above the law.&rdquo; He also said he would explore ways the city could help the people being sent from Puerto Rico.</p><p>Waguespack also called on state officials to draft a law or policy that allowed Illinois government to regulate the centers.</p><p>While most officials said there is more the city or state could be doing to help, they were especially critical of the government of Puerto Rico for allowing - or even sanctioning - the practice.</p><p>Dart said they were an example &ldquo;of people at their absolute worst.&rdquo;</p><p>In a recent <a href="http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/554/not-it?act=1">interview on This American Life</a>, Puerto Rican Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla acknowledged his state was giving heroin addicts one-way tickets to Chicago. But he insisted the addicts were getting good treatment here.</p><p>Since it has been revealed that often isn&rsquo;t the case, Padilla thus far has refused to do another &nbsp;interview explaining what he plans to do now.</p><p><em>Adriana Cardona-Maguigad contributed to this story. Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/pksmid">@pksmid</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/sheriff-dart-investigate-unlicensed-rehab-centers-111938 Morning Shift: DASA Director responds to Puerto Rico story http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-04-23/morning-shift-dasa-director-responds-puerto-rico-story-111929 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Ricymar%20Photography.jpg" style="height: 901px; width: 600px;" title="Flickr/Ricymar Photography" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202204136&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">DASA Director responds to Puerto Rico story</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">As you&rsquo;ve been hearing on WBEZ, heroin addicts from Puerto Rico are being sent to Chicago - sometimes with one-way tickets from police there, or from government authorities. The men are told they&rsquo;re coming for high-end treatment. The places they end up are often rundown, unlicensed residences with no treatment, and many addicts leave. They end up on the street and sometimes in jail. <a href="https://twitter.com/nanisc99">Reporter Adriana Cardona Maguigad</a> brought us this <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">story</a>, which aired recently here and on This American Life. Theodora Binion is acting director of the Illinois Department of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, the agency that licenses treatment centers, and she talks about what&rsquo;s going on here and what should be done.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Theodora Binion is the acting director of the <a href="https://twitter.com/dhscommunicator">Illinois Department of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202204133&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Cabrini meeting</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><a href="https://twitter.com/theCHAtweets">Chicago Housing Authority</a> is hosting a community meeting Wednesday night at Cabrini Green to discuss the future of more than 60 acres on the site, and the agency&rsquo;s plans. WBEZ South Side reporter Natalie Moore brings us an update from the meeting.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202204129&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Judge approves billion-dollar deal in NFL concussion suit</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Nearly two years ago, Federal District Judge Anita Brody put a halt to an original settlement between the NFL and former players over how to handle the medical fallout of head injuries sustained during their playing days. Judge Brody wanted the agreement revised because she believed the cap on money to be paid out, and the number of conditions covered, was too low. Yesterday, she gave final approval for a deal that includes money for payouts to players, medical monitoring for all players, and concussion education. ESPN Senior Writer and Legal Analyst Lester Munson breaks down the details of the settlement.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/lmunson2">Lester Munson</a> is a Senior Writer and Legal Analyst for <a href="https://twitter.com/espn">ESPN.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202204124&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Armenian Church canonizes genocide victims</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Armenian Apostolic Church is canonizing the victims of the Armenian Genocide this morning. An estimated 1.5 million Armenian Christians died under the Turkish Ottoman government. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of that genocide. There are <a href="http://chicagogenocidecentennial.com/calendar-of-events/">multiple events and prayer services</a> in Chicago this week. Father Aren Jebejian is Pastor of St. Gregory the Illuminator Armenian Church on Chicago&rsquo;s Far West Side and he gives is the history of the Church and why this moment is important.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://www.facebook.com/fr.aren.jebejian">Father Aren Jebejian</a> is the Pastor of St. Gregory the Illuminator Armenian Church.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202204122&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Makaya McCraven</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Over the last few years, drummer Makaya McCraven has been one of the most in-demand cats on Chicago&rsquo;s jazz and improvised music scene. But beyond lending his talents to other people&rsquo;s gigs and albums, McCraven has created spaces and places for other musicians to play and work out their material. His weekly residency at The Bedford became one of the city&rsquo;s hot spots for musical collaboration. His new album, In The Moment, captures the energy of The Bedford. But not content to merely release live recordings, McCraven took the taped material and cut, copied, pasted, overdubbed, and made something completely new and fresh. He joins Morning Shift ahead of his album release show at Door No.3. Check out a clip&nbsp;<a href="https://instagram.com/p/10nIbcL-U4/?taken-by=wbezchicago">here.</a></p><p><strong style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><a href="https://twitter.com/MakayaMcCraven">Makaya McCraven</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/JuniusPaulMusic">Junius Paul</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/diller2001">Dave Miller</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/iamjustefan">Justefan</a>.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Thu, 23 Apr 2015 07:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-04-23/morning-shift-dasa-director-responds-puerto-rico-story-111929 Puerto Rico exports its drug addicts to Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/01%20Angel%20and%20Manuel%20in%20abandoned%20house%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguigad.jpg" style="height: 409px; width: 620px;" title="Over the summer Angel and Manuel lived together in an empty house near 51st and Throop, an area where vacant homes are common. (Adriana Cardona-Maguigad)" /></div><p>It all started about a year ago when I began noticing more homeless men in the Chicago neighborhood where I work. Back of the Yards is a community that faces some of the city&rsquo;s toughest problems: joblessness, crime, drug use.<br /><br />Many of these men would be sitting in doorways or shuffling along, many times asking for money.<br /><br />One day, I asked one of them: &ldquo;Where are you from?&rdquo; He told me a story that I later heard again and again and again.<br /><br />The men told me they were&nbsp; from Puerto Rico. They were addicted to heroin and they ended up in Chicago because someone in Puerto Rico drove them to the airport and put them on a plane with a one-way ticket to Chicago.<br /><br />They were promised a great rehab place, with over-the-top services and plenty of medical staff. One of them is Angel, a short and dark-skinned man. He&rsquo;s missing most of his top teeth. He said he came to Chicago from Puerto Rico seven years ago for help kicking a heroin addiction.</p><hr /><blockquote><p><strong>Puerto Rico to Chicago in Photos</strong></p><div class="image-insert-image "><a href="http://interactive.wbez.org/puertoricochicagopipeline/"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/photogallerypuertorico.jpg" style="height: 160px; width: 200px; float: left;" title="" /></a></div><p><em><a href="http://interactive.wbez.org/puertoricochicagopipeline/">Click here to explore more photos from the story</a>&nbsp;and get a glimpse into the world of addicts traveling from Puerto Rico to Chicago, including their lives on the island.</em></p></blockquote><hr /><p><span style="font-size: 22px;">&#39;I no see nothing&#39;</span></p><p>&ldquo;Somebody told my family is one rehab in Chicago got nurse, got pool, got medication, when I get here I no see nothing,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />Angel said that when he landed in Chicago he was met at the airport and taken to a place that definitely had no pool. That place didn&rsquo;t have social workers or doctors. Instead, it was just a rundown building with other addicts trying to stay clean, sleeping on dirty mattresses on the floor, going cold turkey.</p><p>Other guys told me something that was hard to believe. They said that it was the police in Puerto Rico who had driven them to the airport and put them on the plane to Chicago.</p><p>And the one-way plane ticket? Some of the men said if someone didn&rsquo;t have the resources to travel, their mayor or some other local official would help buy them a ticket.<br /><br />I have been a journalist in this neighborhood for five years and I couldn&rsquo;t believe this was happening here, right outside my door.</p><p>I wanted to find more people in this situation. I had seen all these men&nbsp; on the streets before, selling lotions, batteries or socks around 47th Street.&nbsp; It turned out, many of them were also from Puerto Rico.</p><p>In just a few months, I met 23 Puerto Ricans with similar stories.&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Has anyone else heard these stories?</span></p><p>I needed to figure out who else knew about this. I called&nbsp; homeless organizations, shelters, official drug rehab centers, local aldermen, drug policy experts, but no one had heard about what all these guys were describing to me.</p><p>Until I talked to Jose Alvarez. He has been working with injection drug users in Chicago for 11 years and he&rsquo;d heard the same story I had, from users in Humboldt Park.<br /><br />&ldquo;They were thinking they were going to have their own room,&nbsp; a nice warm place in the winter,&rdquo; Alvarez said. &ldquo;A couple of them even said that some of these places had pools.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/21%20Jose%20Alvarez%20cleans%20up%20needles%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguidad.jpg" style="height: 427px; width: 320px; float: left;" title="Jose Alvarez picks up used needles from outside an empty house on 51st and Paulina. Alvarez works with drug users through the Community Outreach Intervention Project at UIC. (Adriana Cardona-Maguigad)" /></div><p>Alvarez is from Puerto Rico too. He is a case manager with the Community Outreach Intervention Projects , an HIV and Hepatitis prevention program at the University of Illinois at Chicago.</p><p>A few years ago, he was able to get inside one of these residences to do HIV testing.<br />&nbsp;<br />&ldquo;It was dark, damp and dirty,&rdquo; Alvarez said. &ldquo;Not only that -- we saw a couple of mice running across the floor.&rdquo;<br /><br />Alvarez knew this was going on, but even he didn&rsquo;t know how many Puerto Ricans had been sent here.</p><p>So after our conversation he spent four days going to shooting galleries and shady corners on the West Side.<br /><br />&ldquo;I also went south of the park, around Chicago, around Division all the way west,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo; Do the same with Augusta, you do the same thing with Ohio. Ohio Street? Forget about it. I&rsquo;m pretty sure the police here in Chicago know all about Ohio Street.&rdquo;<br /><br />In all those places, he heard the same story I had, from 93 people in four days.<br /><br />&ldquo;And I&rsquo;m pretty sure that overall in the city, the numbers are a lot higher, because these are only the people that were in the Humboldt Park area and the majority of them wind up in Back of the Yards and Pilsen, Little Village,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Hiding in plain sight</span><br /><br />I asked Carlos, one of the first guys I heard the story from, to show me the rehab place where he ended up.</p><p>Almost all the men I talked to in Back of the Yards went there too. It&rsquo;s called Segunda Vida, Second Life.</p><p>Carlos said it was on 50th Street and Ashland Avenue, but the place is hard to find. It&rsquo;s almost like hiding in plain sight.<br /><br />Finally, I saw a tiny sign in an upstairs window. It was a version of the AA logo.</p><p>Segunda Vida is on the second floor&nbsp; of a rundown gray stone building. It sits between a parking lot and a pawnshop. On a busy street.<br /><br />The first time I tried to visit, I went through a narrow doorway and up a steep staircase. At the top was an open room. Men were hanging around, smoking cigarettes.&nbsp;</p><p>They told me I had to leave. But I went back again and again. Each time I asked to speak to a person in charge. I was repeatedly told to call later or to come back on a different day.&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Slowly, a picture forms</span></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/15%20Grupo%20Renacimiento%20sign%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguigad.jpg" style="height: 459px; width: 620px;" title="Grupo Renacimiento is a 24-hour group on the North Side of Chicago, on Western near Armitage. (Adriana Cardona-Maguigad)" /></div><p>But slowly, I did start to piece it together. These places are informal drug treatment programs that cater to Spanish speakers.</p><p>Some Mexican families know about them and send relatives with drug or alcohol problems there. They call themselves 24-hour groups because they&rsquo;re open around the clock.</p><p>Addicts sleep there, eat there and they are not supposed to leave for the first three months.</p><p>Drive along parts of Western or Cermak in Chicago and you&rsquo;ll see the buildings. Most of them have &lsquo;24 hours&rsquo; written in Spanish on their sign, next to an AA logo.</p><p>I called the headquarters of Alcoholics Anonymous;&nbsp; a representative there said they have nothing to do with these rehab places. She said AA doesn&rsquo;t offer treatment, transitional living or social services. Its sole purpose is to offer support for people trying to quit drinking.</p><p>I checked on 14 places to see if they had licenses from the state. But they had none.</p><p>I checked with Joseph Lokaitis, a public service administrator with DASA, the Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse under the Department of Human Services,&nbsp; but he said he&nbsp; had no idea that these unofficial treatment groups existed.&nbsp; &ldquo;I have not from what you described,&rdquo;&nbsp; Lokaitis said. &ldquo; I think that&rsquo;s surprising. That&rsquo;s not something I have heard of.&rdquo;</p><p>I&nbsp; went to the city department of planning and development, which gives permits for residential drug treatment centers. They had no records.</p><p>I requested information from the Chicago Department of Buildings and there were many violations and complaints connected to the addresses where some of the&nbsp; treatment groups are housed.</p><p>These facilities spring up now and then. They&rsquo;re run by former addicts and they&rsquo;re easy to fold up, move and relocate.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Finding Manuel</span></p><p>As I found out more about these groups, I kept finding more people, men and women, on the street with a similar story. Like Manuel, a tall, skinny man who is using a different name to protect his identity.<br /><br />He can only see through one eye and often stares vacantly into space.<br /><br />I asked if he came to Segunda Vida. He said yes, he&rsquo;d been here for two weeks. He seemed scared. He looked lost, alone and worried about the winter.</p><p>He told me what a lot of other guys had &mdash; the &lsquo;treatment&rsquo; there was mostly a lot of yelling and harsh behavior.</p><p>When Manuel walked out, he left his ID and other documents. He said he tried to get them back, but was turned away.&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Manuel%20diptych.jpg" style="height: 424px; width: 620px;" title="Manuel when he arrived in Chicago (left) and another photo taken in April 2015." /></div><p>I offered to go with him to Segunda Vida to get his papers. That Saturday afternoon as we walked towards Segunda Vida, my heart was racing. I could tell Manuel was nervous too.<br /><br />Manuel went up the narrow stairway, I followed closely behind. When the people there saw me coming up with a microphone, they blocked us at the top. Manuel asked for his documents.<br /><br />A man told us to leave, that we needed to wait outside. More people came up the stairway, surrounding us. Everyone was tense.&nbsp;</p><p>I kept telling them that I wouldn&rsquo;t leave until I get Manuel&rsquo;s documents: &ldquo;No first of all, we are accompanying him so that he can get his papers.&rdquo;<br /><br />A participant from the group kept insisting that we need to wait outside and that I won&rsquo;t be able to interview or speak with anyone from Segunda Vida.</p><p>&ldquo;You know why I come here?&rdquo;&nbsp; a man from the group said. &ldquo;Cause I do have problems, that&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s anonymous. That&rsquo;s why we come here to liberate our pressure. Like, we can&rsquo;t do that in front of you because you won&rsquo;t understand us.&rdquo;<br /><br />Finally, someone handed Manuel a white envelope with some documents, but they didn&rsquo;t include his ID.&nbsp;</p><p>After another tense wait, someone pushed through the crowd and handed over Manuel&rsquo;s ID.<br /><br />Other people were coming up the stairs. We knew we had to leave. Once we walked out, some of the men followed us out and watched us from the sidewalk.<br /><br />Among the documents were Manuel&rsquo;s one-way plane ticket and a copy of his medical records, where I found out he is HIV positive.<br /><br />This is crazy. Sick people are being sent thousands of miles from home to unlicensed drug rehab places in Chicago?<br /><br />I decided to go to Puerto Rico for some answers.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">An island of natural beauty</span></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/28%20Tourism%20in%20Puerto%20Rico%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguigad.jpg" style="height: 350px; width: 620px;" title="A cruise ship at port in El Viejo San Juan, Puerto Rico. Tourists flock to Puerto Rico for its natural beauty. (Adriana Cardona-Maguigad)" /></div><p>Puerto Rico is a captivating place. The island is a commonwealth of the United States and known for its natural wonders.</p><p>On any given night the echoes of salsa music travel across the narrow sidewalks of El Viejo San Juan.&nbsp;</p><p>But, away from the festive atmosphere lies a darker side. Puerto Rico sits between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. It&rsquo;s a key port for the illegal drugs that come from South America to the United States.</p><p>And drug addiction among Puerto Ricans has become one of the island&rsquo;s greatest struggles.</p><p>To serve drug users in need of services, community organizations, local agencies and even government officials are coming up with their own strategies.</p><p>On Monday nights medical students from the University of San Juan reach out to drug addicts living in the streets around the medical district. That&rsquo;s one of several projects inspired by Iniciativa Comunitaria, a non-profit that offers detox services and drug rehab treatment in the island.</p><p>The students offer basic first aid to the homeless, including I-V drug users who have developed skin ulcers. Last June, I followed them one night as they made their rounds.</p><p>Sahily Reyes is a PhD student at the University of Puerto Rico. She is with a group called Recinto pa la Calle, which translates to From Campus to the Streets.</p><p>Each week the students pack two cars with clothes, food and hygiene products. At one of their stops I met a young man, Louis Reyes Muriel. He was lying on the ground, rubbing baby lotion on his legs almost like he&rsquo;s getting ready to go to sleep.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/33%20Louis%20Reyes%20Muriel%20in%20Puerto%20Rico%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguigad.jpg" style="height: 194px; width: 320px; float: left;" title="Louis is a drug user who lives in Puerto Rico. He traveled to Chicago for treatment and then went back to the island after spending time in Humboldt Park. (Adriana Cardona-Maguigad)" />He said officials from the Puerto Rican town of Bayamon sent him to one of the unlicensed 24-hour groups in Chicago.</p><p>&ldquo;First of all, the government paid for my ticket,&rdquo; Reyes Muriel said. &ldquo;But the first thing they tell you is that you are going to a five-star hotel, with a pool and everything, but when you get there, it&rsquo;s alcoholics anonymous.&rdquo;</p><p>Several Puerto Ricans I have met in Chicago said they were also sent to Chicago by the same municipality. But I could not verify with the municipality of Bayamon if anyone there helped send users to Chicago. I called and faxed the municipality several times, but no one responded to my requests for more information.</p><p>Muriel said he left the group and lived in the streets of Chicago, mostly around Humboldt Park. He found his way back to the island and was living in the streets of San Juan when I talked to him.</p><p>During my time in Puerto Rico, it was clear that no one is hiding the fact that addicts are sometimes sent or referred to the mainland of the United States for services.</p><p>While some municipalities have programs aimed to connect drug users to services, the largest program, called De Vuelta a la Vida or Return to Life is run by the Puerto Rican police, and connects addicts to drug addiction services in and out of the island.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">&#39;Already reaching that success&#39;</span></p><p>I went to a rally in La Perla, a tiny neighborhood north of the old San Juan. That community is known for its ongoing drug enterprise.</p><p>I run into the governor of Puerto Rico, Alejandro Garcia Padilla and I asked him about the state program De Vuelta a la Vida.</p><p>Padilla said, it has been a successful initiative. &ldquo;A lot of people that isolated themselves from possibilities of success came back with successful options or already reaching that success,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;In many cases homeless and addicts.&rdquo;</p><p>I told the governor that some of the addicts that were sent to Chicago are ending up homeless in an unfamiliar city. Padilla then said they should seek additional help in Chicago, that there is help available.</p><p>&ldquo;I know that Mayor Emanuel of&nbsp; Chicago and Governor Quinn of Illinois have many programs, very successful,&rdquo; Padilla said last June. &ldquo;They should seek help. We want them in Puerto Rico. They are our brothers and here, they could get help and they have it there with Rahm Emanuel and Quinn.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/29%20Puerto%20Rican%20Governor%20Padilla%20plays%20basketball%20in%20La%20Perla%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguigad.jpg" style="height: 426px; width: 620px;" title="The Governor of Puerto Rico, Alejandro Garcia Padilla, plays basketball with a resident of La Perla. (Adriana Cardona-Maguigad)" /></div><p>Not only the governor of Puerto Rico was proud of De Vuelta a la Vida. The police were also proud of it.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>I met with agent Loribi Doval Fernandez. She is the coordinator of De Vuelta a la Vida.</p><p>She said police officers inform addicts about rehab programs available in other cities and sometimes help send them to the mainland of the U.S.</p><p>&ldquo;We put the participants in our vehicle &mdash; a patrol car &mdash; we take them to the airport and we do not leave until the plane takes off,&rdquo;&nbsp; Doval Fernandez said.</p><p>According to other municipal officials from Caguas and Juncos and even the founder of De Vuelta a la Vida, retired Puerto Rican Police Colonel Benjamin Rodriguez,&nbsp; if families don&rsquo;t have the money to buy a ticket then sometimes municipal mayors or some other officials will help come up with the money.<br /><br />I asked Doval how many addicts have been sent off the island, including to Chicago?</p><p>She said she gets reports on those numbers but doesn&rsquo;t have them handy. Then, I asked. How are the connections with the rehab groups in Chicago and other cities established?&nbsp;</p><p>She said De Vuelta a la Vida police have received information about the groups through word-of-mouth, from social workers and family members who say, &ldquo;Look I know this rehab home. My son is rehabilitated.&rdquo;</p><p>Then I asked: Have you checked with government agencies in Illinois or Chicago about those groups? Are they certified?</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/DeVuelta_1.jpg" style="float: right; height: 180px; width: 280px;" title="De Vuelta a la vida postcard" />She said the addict&rsquo;s relatives are responsible for checking out the rehab services. Doval Fernandez said it&rsquo;s up to the family to make sure the place they&rsquo;re going to is licensed and&nbsp;effective.</p><p>And once the person leaves, she said, they&rsquo;re not Puerto Rico&rsquo;s responsibility anymore.</p><p>&ldquo;The participant signs a liability waiver and they are informed and told that this&nbsp;[program] is outside of Puerto Rico and that we can&rsquo;t do the follow up,&rdquo; Doval Fernandez said. &ldquo;There are times when we call to verify but that&rsquo;s the least we do because that&rsquo;s then the responsibility of the family member.&rdquo;</p><p>After my interview with Doval Fernandez, I filed numerous legal requests asking for data on the program. I sent faxes, e-mails, mail, I called,&nbsp; but I didn&rsquo;t get any answers.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Hundreds leaving the island</span></p><p>Finally, with legal pressure from the Center for Investigative Reporting in Puerto Rico, the <a href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/261490221/Programa-de-Vuelta-a-La-Vida">police gave me some numbers</a>. In the last decade, the Puerto Rican police say the number of &ldquo;participants transported to the United States provided by the police areas from year 2005 to 2014&rdquo; is of 758 people. Of those, 120 came to Chicago.</p><p>Rafael Torruella is the director of Intercambios Puerto Rico, a needle exchange program for drug users on the island. <a href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/261484228/Rafael-Torruella-Thesis">He wrote his dissertation about drug users who are sent off the island for treatment</a>. I showed him the numbers sent by the state police.</p><p>He said police have not collected adequate data. &rdquo;How many drug users are sent each year,&nbsp; for instance. And who is doing the follow ups? I think the numbers in the documents you sent me seems like a gross underestimate of what&rsquo;s been happening,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />Torruella, who&rsquo;s also doctor in social psychology with a postdoctoral degree from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, said this is happening far beyond Chicago.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s South Carolina, Wisconsin, New York, Boston,&rdquo; Torruella said. &ldquo;The more you ask, the more you see that this has been happening for a long time.&rdquo;</p><p>Another important question that is not answered by the police in Puerto Rico, he said, is, &ldquo;Do we know that they are being sent to places that are certified as drug treatment programs or this is just a house that&rsquo;s -- a fly-by-night -- quote unquote drug treatment services that was built in order to exploit drug users?&rdquo; Torruella said.</p><p>I filed formal requests with the municipalities of Juncos, Caguas and Bayamon--three places where users I&rsquo;d met in Chicago were from.<br /><br />How many people have they sent to Chicago each year?<br /><br />Only Juncos replied with complete information.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/261490219/Juncos-Numbers">From 2007 to 2013 that municipality alone sent 259 users outside of Puerto Rico to cities in the United States, and about 56 percent of them came to Chicago.</a><br /><br />The mayor of Juncos told me his office has offered financial help to those who can&rsquo;t afford the plane ticket. Caguas officials said they have sent only 25 people to Chicago in the last three years, but did not reply for request of data for previous years.<br /><br />Bayamon&rsquo;s program, Nuevo Amanecer or New Dawn, didn&rsquo;t respond to numerous requests for data.<br /><br />And those are only a few of many municipal programs or local agencies that work with the state police or the municipal governments to ship addicts to services off the island.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">A warning against sending addicts away</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/26%20A%20homelesss%20man%20in%20El%20Viejo%20San%20Juan%20by%20Adriana%20Cardona-Maguigad.jpg" style="height: 440px; width: 620px;" title="A homeless man rests on a sidewalk in El Viejo San Juan. (Adriana Cardona- Maguigad)" /></p><p>The only Puerto Rican official I talked to who seemed to know&nbsp; the reality of unlicensed rehab places actually left government last year.</p><p>He was an advisor on addiction affairs for Puerto Rico&rsquo;s drug addiction and mental health organization, known as ASSMCA.&nbsp;</p><p>His name is Doctor Angel Gonzalez. He helped put together a press release last year warning people about unlicensed treatment centers off the island.</p><p><a href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/261490220/Comunicado-de-Prensa">That press release was issued on January 14, 2014 and read</a>, &ldquo;Given the lack of treatment options Puerto Rico faces, some people, families or entities have opted to transfer people with substance abuse disorders to organizations located mainly in the eastern part of the United States, without getting the information about the qualifications of such centers. There is scientific and journalistic evidence about people who have been admitted into residencies without any facilities or adequate services thus having to leave the services without being able to recover their documents (driver&rsquo;s license, Social Security cards, voter registration, Medicaid, etc.)&rdquo;</p><p>The press release goes on to say that on many occasions, these participants find themselves outside Puerto Rico without a home, without the proper documentation to access other governmental services or without the resources to go back to the island.</p><p>I asked if he knew of any data saying that it is effective to treat users in Puerto Rico by sending them off the island?</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think there&rsquo;s any data,&rdquo; Gonzalez said. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think there is. This is basically done because of the lack of treatment opportunities on the island. And the desperate families that go to the mayors and say we tried everything on the island with our son or daughter and help us out.&rdquo;</p><p>Like Gonzalez, other experts I talked to in Puerto Rico said if all the drug addicts on the island were to seek drug addiction services there, only a small percentage would be able to get quality services.</p><p>Gonzalez said here are only six places on the island where a person can get methadone. He said for a lot of people, the closest place isn&rsquo;t close at all.</p><p>&ldquo;For example, I can tell you the people who go to methadone program in Cayey, they have to travel two hours from Guyama to Cayey, then two hours back,&rdquo; Gonzalez said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a huge problem and it&rsquo;s not going to be solved by sending people to these non-accredited programs in the U.S.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">A bad solution to a problem far away</span></p><p>So I had found some answers at least. Puerto Rican heroin users are ending up on the streets of Chicago as part of a bad solution to an overwhelming problem happening someplace else.</p><p>And even though it&rsquo;s a bad solution, it might not stop anytime soon. Even last December when I was about to leave my office in Back of the Yards, I met a new addict I had not seen before.</p><p>She was a young woman I met on a freezing night. She was beautiful, from Puerto Rico too. Perfect eyebrows, bright eyes, straight white teeth.</p><p>Like other users I talked to, she said she was sent by the municipal authorities from Bayamon. She said she had tried at least six 24-hour groups in Chicago since she came.</p><p>She said after being humiliated in the streets, users like her end up in 24-hour groups only to be yelled at and insulted. It was nothing like what she expected. And Instead of helping her, they have taken her further away from recovery.</p><p><em>For more, <a href="http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/554/not-it?act=1#act-1">follow as Adriana&#39;s story continues on This American Life.</a></em></p><p><em>Adriana Cardona-Maguigad did a lot of her investigation as a fellow with the Social Justice News Nexus, at Northwestern University. She went to Puerto Rico with support from the Fund for Investigative Journalism. Bill Healy and Kari Lydersen and The Center for Investigative Journalism in Puerto Rico helped with reporting. Jesse Dukes produced the audio piece. Chris Hagan produced the digital presentation. Special thanks to Viviana Bonilla Lopez and Wayne Rydberg.</em></p></p> Fri, 10 Apr 2015 13:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852 Worldview: Battling AIDS in Kenya through sexual education http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-06/worldview-battling-aids-kenya-through-sexual-education-111828 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img a="" adolescents="" adults="" alt="" and="" ap="" are="" at="" ben="" better="" by="" catching="" center="" choices="" class="image-original_image" comprised="" due="" either="" for="" group="" healthy="" high="" hiv="" hiv-positive="" in="" kenya.="" kenyan="" korogocho="" neighborhood="" non-governmental="" of="" or="" organization="" photo="" risk="" run="" slum="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP728020647221.jpg" style="height: 394px; width: 620px;" the="" their="" title="In this photo taken Monday, Feb. 16, 2015, a child holds a book while attending an HIV prevention session entitled " to="" who="" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199561514&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Sex education in Kenya</span></font></p><p>As Kenya grapples with the aftermath of last week&rsquo;s terrorist attack on Garissa University College, security is not the only issue the country faces. It also has one of the world&rsquo;s highest HIV rates.&nbsp; According to USAID, in Kenya, an estimated 1.6 million people live with HIV/AIDS. Of those, 1.1 million are children left orphaned by AIDS. We&rsquo;ll talk with two organizations that work to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS and care for the children left orphaned by the disease. Kathy Tate Bradish, executive director of the ABC&rsquo;s of Sex Education and Phylis Nasubo Magina, Kenya country director of the ABC&rsquo;s of Sex Education, join us to talk about instructing Kenyan farmers to teach HIV prevention and sex education in their own communities. Robert Barasa, executive director of Ember Kenya Grandparent Empowerment, also joins us to talk about Kenyan grandparents caring for AIDS orphans.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-d8b2ee66-9097-25dc-7829-f582d22aea8f">Phylis Nasubo Magina is the Kenya Country Director of <a href="http://www.abcsofsex-ed.org">The ABCs of Sex Education</a>.</span></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-d8b2ee66-9097-25dc-7829-f582d22aea8f">Robert Barasa is the executive director of <a href="http://emberkenya.org">Ember Kenya Grandparent Empowerment </a></span><a href="http://emberkenya.org">Project</a>.</em></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-d8b2ee66-9097-25dc-7829-f582d22aea8f">Kathy Tate Bradish is the executive director of the <a href="https://twitter.com/ABCsofSexEd">ABC&rsquo;s of Sex Education</a>.</span></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199561854&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">A history of US intervention in Puerto Rico</span></p><p>Puerto Rico&rsquo;s relationship with the U.S. as a controlled territory is long and complicated.&nbsp; Denis joins us to discuss the legacy of U.S. influence in Puerto Rico through his book&nbsp;<em>War Against All Puerto Ricans Revolution and Terror in America&rsquo;s Colony</em>. The book looks back at the history of U.S. intervention into the politics of Puerto Rico and is based on interviews, oral histories, congressional testimony and recently de-classified FBI files from the 1898 U.S. invasion through today.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-9aee726c-909a-a368-9357-4e7d1c103f3e"><a href="https://twitter.com/NelsonADenis">Nelson A. Denis</a> is the author of </span></em>War Against All Puerto Ricans Revolution and Terror in America&rsquo;s Colony.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199562820&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: The first modern olympics</span></font></p><p>For today&rsquo;s World History Minute, historian John Schmidt, takes us back to this day in 1896 when the Olympic games were revived in Athens.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><a href="https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/">John Schmidt</a> is an historian and author of &ldquo;On This Day in Chicago History.&rdquo;</p></p> Mon, 06 Apr 2015 15:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-06/worldview-battling-aids-kenya-through-sexual-education-111828 Police brutality in Puerto Rico and the Mideast peace process http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-22/police-brutality-puerto-rico-and-mideast-peace-process-108132 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP68352310109.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Shafqat Munir explains the significance of Ghulam Azam&#39;s conviction for war crimes and looks at what&#39;s next for Bangladesh. The ACLU&#39;s William Ramirez tells us about police brutality in Puerto Rico. Natan Sachs weighs in on what&#39;s needed for Mideast peace talks.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102153321&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/police-brutality-in-puerto-rico-and-the-mideast-pe.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/police-brutality-in-puerto-rico-and-the-mideast-pe" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Police brutality in Puerto Rico and the Mideast peace process" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Mon, 22 Jul 2013 11:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-22/police-brutality-puerto-rico-and-mideast-peace-process-108132 Bioluminescent creatures keep predators at bay http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range/bioluminescent-creatures-keep-predators-bay-107012 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/bio%20bay%20youtube.jpg" title="The bioluminescent ripple effects of a splash in the Bio Bay. (YouTube/TobiasJHN)" /></div><p>When I was in my early 20s I traveled to Puerto Rico on vacation with some friends from high school. We sat on the beach and drank fruity drinks with tiny umbrellas, visited the colonial fort in old San Juan (a place that, with its rolling green meadows and stone turrets perched just above the ocean cliffs, looked to me like Narnia) and for several days we stayed in a rental in Vieques.</p><p>The diminutive island eight miles east of the mainland was for many years a U.S. naval base. Much of the heavily forested island was made into a wildlife preserve, which is now off-limits. But the rest of the island has retained a similar kind of rural, unspoiled beauty. There are white sand beaches and coral reefs, and even feral horses that trot around the pastel-colored houses. But Vieques&rsquo; most remarkable natural feature is its <a href="http://biobay.com/">Bioluminescent Bay</a>.</p><p>I went to the Bio Bay at night, on a bus that departed from the tiny town of Esperanza and wound its way east along the coast. It was perfectly dark when we arrived, and silent, except for the sound of insects and giggling tourists. Our tour guides produced canoes, and we filed in by twos and threes, paddling out to the center of the bay.</p><p>The water was black and glassy, but at the appointed time we jumped in to meet the creatures that give the Bio Bay its name. As we landed in the murk with one splash after another, the water around us flashed with a bright, milky blue glow, illuminating our limbs and reflecting up onto our faces. I swept my arm through the water and watched as it left a trail of blue stardust lit up behind it.</p><p>The Bio Bay, you see, is home to millions upon millions of tiny, one-celled microorganisms called dinoflagellates &ndash; in this case tiny marine plankton that are among the earth&rsquo;s many bioluminescent creatures. They produce their eerie light when they&rsquo;re disturbed, as they were when we decided to take a midnight swim in their home.</p><p>&ldquo;What&rsquo;s the <em>point </em>of that light?&rdquo; J. Woodland &ldquo;Woody&rdquo; Hastings asked at a recent Chicago lecture. The Harvard professor of Natural Sciences studies bioluminescence in creatures across the spectrum of life, from simple, one-celled bacteria to angler fish that swim in the deepest, darkest depths of the ocean and carry their light around with them.</p><p>Hastings said this is the question he&rsquo;s invariably asked at his talks. In the case of one such organism he&rsquo;s studied, a luminous mushroom found in the Brazilian rain forest, Hastings posited that the glow of the fungi attracts insects, which will eat the mushroom and help disperse its spores. But in the case of the plankton in the Bio Bay, my tour guide had another explanation: supposedly, he said, the glow was meant to act like <a href="http://siobiolum.ucsd.edu/dino_bl.html">a &ldquo;burglar alarm,&rdquo;</a> meant to attract a secondary predator that would threaten and scare away the primary predator bothering the dinoflagellates.</p><p>As my tour guide spoke, I felt a blindingly painful sting on my left calf. A jellyfish that I could not see &ndash; but which had clearly seen me &ndash; had wrapped its tentacle around my leg. I hauled myself out of the water and back into the boat, howling with pain. Nature at work!</p><p>In the audio above you can hear Hastings&rsquo; account of another mystical spot of bioluminescent water, this time in the Indian Ocean, known to generations of sailors as the &ldquo;milky sea.&rdquo; And, you can hear more about the spectrum of creatures that cause our waters to glow like a softly lit siren.</p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range"><em>Dynamic Range</em></a>&nbsp;<em>showcases hidden gems unearthed from Chicago Amplified&rsquo;s vast archive of public events and appears on weekends. Woody Hastings spoke at an event presented by the Chicago Council on Science and Technology in February of 2013. Click</em>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/bioluminescence-living-lights-lights-living-106379"><em>here</em></a>&nbsp;<em>to hear the event in its entirety.</em></p><p><em>Robin Amer is a producer on WBEZ&rsquo;s digital team. Follow her on Twitter</em><a href="https://twitter.com/rsamer">&nbsp;<em>@rsamer</em></a><em>.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Sat, 04 May 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range/bioluminescent-creatures-keep-predators-bay-107012 A 51st state? Puerto Rico approves U.S. statehood in non-binding vote http://www.wbez.org/news/51st-state-puerto-rico-approves-us-statehood-non-binding-vote-103720 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/puerto%20rico%20statehood%202.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px; " title="Puerto Rican voters celebrate in San Juan on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)" /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">A slim majority of Puerto Ricans Tuesday sought to change their ties with the United States and become the 51st U.S. state in a non-binding referendum that would require final approval from Congress.</div><p><br />The two-part referendum asked whether the island wanted to change its 114-year relationship with the United States. Nearly 54 percent, or 922,374 people, sought to change it, while 46 percent, or 786,749 people, favored the status quo. Ninety-six percent of 1,643 precincts were reporting as of early Wednesday.</p><p>The second question asked voters to choose from three options, with statehood by far the favorite, garnering 61 percent. Sovereign free association, which would have allowed for more autonomy, received 33 percent, while independence got 5 percent.</p><p>President Barack Obama earlier expressed support for the referendum and pledged to respect the will of the people in the event of a clear majority.</p><p>It is unclear whether U.S. Congress will debate the referendum results or if Obama will consider the results to be a clear enough majority.</p><p>Puerto Rico&#39;s resident commissioner Pedro Pierluisi, who has championed statehood, did not return calls for comment. He received 48 percent or 874,914 votes, while his opponent, Rafael Cox Alomar, received 47 percent or 855,732 votes with 96 percent of precincts reporting.</p><p>The island is currently a U.S. territory whose inhabitants are U.S. citizens but are prohibited from voting in presidential elections. Its resident commissioner in the U.S. House also has limited voting powers.</p><p>The future of the island&#39;s political status, however, also is dependent on who governs the island.</p><p>According to partial election results, pro-statehood Gov. Luis Fortuno was ousted by a razor thin margin by an opponent who supports the island&#39;s current political status.</p><p>With 96 percent of precincts reporting, challenger Alejandro Garcia Padilla with the Popular Democratic Party received 48 percent or 870,005 votes. Fortuno, a Republican and leader of the New Progressive Party, received 47 percent or 855,325 votes.</p><p>Fortuno has not issued comment, while Garcia celebrated what he called a victory.</p><p>&quot;I can assure you we have rescued Puerto Rico,&quot; Garcia said. &quot;This is a lesson to those who think that the well-being of Puerto Ricans should be subjected to ideologies.&quot;</p><p>Election results also pointed to a major upset for Jorge Santini, who has been mayor of the capital of San Juan for 12 years. His opponent, Carmen Yulin Cruz, received 71,736 votes compared with Santini&#39;s 66,945 votes with 96 percent of precincts reporting.</p><p>The island&#39;s elections commission said it would resume counting votes late Wednesday morning.</p></p> Wed, 07 Nov 2012 11:24:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/51st-state-puerto-rico-approves-us-statehood-non-binding-vote-103720 Chicago jazz drummer Frank Rosaly gets in touch with his Puerto Rican roots http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2012-06/chicago-jazz-drummer-frank-rosaly-gets-touch-his-puerto-rican-roots-99857 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS5850_frank_rosaly_photo_johncrawford1-scr.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div><div class="mediaelement-audio"><br /><audio class="mediaelement-formatter-identified-1339001507-0" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Rosaly%20interview%20V3%20AP%20FINAL.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><a href="http://frankrosaly.com">Frank Rosaly</a> is known around Chicago as a phenomenally talented and prolific jazz drummer &ndash;he plays in 26 different music ensembles. Rosaly is best known for playing and composing improvised or avant garde jazz music, with occasional forays into rock and other genres. But in his most recent musical research he&#39;s venturing into entirely new terrain &ndash; his Puerto Rican roots.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Rosaly&#39;s parents are both Puerto Rican, but he grew up in Phoenix, Ariz., where he says he was &quot;Americanized&quot; by his family. He&#39;d visit the island as a child but was shy about not speaking Spanish. When he was 11 his parents divorced and he began spending summers with his father in and around San Juan.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Rosaly&#39;s Puerto Rican explorations will be most fully on display this August, when he performs at the Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park, with his new ensemble &iexcl;Todos de Pie!&nbsp;&ndash; part of the Made in Chicago jazz series.</p><p style="text-align: left;">You can catch a glimpse of these efforts every Tuesday night in June at <a href="http://whistlerchicago.com/">The Whistler </a>on Milwaukee Avenue in Logan Square. Rosaly just this week kicked off a month-long residency in the Whistler&#39;s Relax Attack Jazz Series.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Rosaly&#39;s group Bootstrap - bassist Nathan McBride, whirlitzer Jim Baker and saxophonist Mars Williams - will play what he calls &quot;rebel music,&quot; or music that responds in some way to social and political situations. Some of the music will be early Puerto Rican salsa. But they&#39;ll also perform music by Bad Brains and others &ndash; it&#39;s sure to be an interesting mix.</p><p style="text-align: left;">For more on Rosaly&#39;s Puerto Rican roots, check out my interview above.</p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>Bootstrap, Whistler Relax Attack Jazz series Tuesdays at 10, 2421 N. Milwaukee Avenue.</em></p><p style="text-align: left;"><em>&iexcl;Todos de Pie!, August 23, Made in Chicago Jazz series. Millennium Park.</em></p></p> Wed, 06 Jun 2012 11:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/alison-cuddy/2012-06/chicago-jazz-drummer-frank-rosaly-gets-touch-his-puerto-rican-roots-99857