WBEZ | social media http://www.wbez.org/tags/social-media Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The digital afterlife http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2014-10-31/digital-afterlife-111035 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Beersheba_War_Cemetery.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The world has changed more in the past 10 years than in the previous 500.</p><p>It used to be that when mankind stopped wandering and settled down with a desire to own property and things, laws or wars were required to settle disputes.</p><p>Property was easy to manage, because it was mostly physical. Land, papers, livestock and personal belongings. Today our music, pictures, books, movies, financial information and medical records are digital, and managing property has become exceedingly complex.</p><p>Somewhere along the way fiduciaries were created, people whose job it was to represent the best interests of those who were either dead or incapacitated. Into their hands, the law gave access to property and things that might be stored on that property or in other places.</p><p>People began to plan their estates and create orders for their handpicked fiduciaries to carry out upon their death. In this way, property passed from one person to another in a more or less peaceful and orderly fashion.</p><p>While most people still have physical properties like homes or cars or businesses, many people have developed digital assets that are increasingly valuable.</p><p>Online banking, insurance, forms filled out for the department of motor vehicles, medical records, credit cards and almost every aspect of our lives is digitized today.</p><p>We have tens if not hundreds of passwords to access our digital lives. And we have the cloud.</p><p>Because the World Wide Web is only 25 years old, we don&rsquo;t have much of a plan for how to pass along our digital property.</p><p>One big difference is that until recently, individuals owned and controlled their physical property, because it was mostly in a physical space where people could go and collect it. In the digital age, for the most part, they still own and control their physical property, but it&rsquo;s often maintained by a third party like your photos on Facebook or your online bank records or your investment portfolio.</p><p>There are three things you need to know about your digital life if you are thinking about how to preserve it should you become incapacitated or die.</p><p><strong>The Fiduciary System</strong></p><p>The age-old fiduciary system still is strongly in place. If you draw up a will and name a fiduciary to handle your business, the courts of law will honor this.</p><p>The problem with fiduciaries is that they can often access your physical property and records without too much trouble, but they might not be able to access your digital property.</p><p>This is because each state has different laws governing digital assets, if they have laws at all, and companies like <a href="https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/utos-173.html">Yahoo</a>, <a href="https://support.google.com/mail/answer/14300?hl=en">Google</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/help/150486848354038">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://support.twitter.com/groups/33-report-a-violation/topics/122-reporting-violations/articles/87894-how-to-contact-twitter-about-a-deceased-user#">Twitter </a>and many others like banks or even government agencies have very few policies detailing how loved ones or even fiduciaries can get access to a deceased or incapacitated person&rsquo;s account. And with no overarching law to govern them, it&rsquo;s kind of like the wild west out there.</p><p>That was until the <a href="http://www.uniformlaws.org/Committee.aspx?title=Fiduciary+Access+to+Digital+Assets">Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act</a> was created last summer.</p><p>&ldquo;What the new law does is it extends the old law of fiduciary access to allow people to manage someone else&#39;s property and it extends it to digital assets which are now online,&rdquo; Ben Orzeske, legislative council for the Uniform Law Commission said.</p><p>If you put in your will how you would like your digital assets handled upon your death or incapacitation, UFADDA, as the law has come to be called, should help insure that your digital assets become accessible to your fiduciary.</p><p>This is if you live in Delaware, of course.</p><p>For now, it&rsquo;s the first and only state to have adopted UFADDA.</p><p>Because the uniform legislation was created and approved this summer and most legislative sessions in most states won&rsquo;t begin again until January of 2015, the law hasn&rsquo;t had a chance to circulate widely.</p><p>Legal experts say that the most effective way to handle your digital assets is to include them in your will, so even without UFADDA firmly in place in all 50 states, you&rsquo;re more likely to secure your digital belongings if you include information about them in a will.</p><p><strong>Digital Death Services</strong></p><p>Like digital undertakers, a new type of service is emerging as people using social media pass away. As of 2012, there were upwards of <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/07/death-facebook-dead-profiles_n_2245397.html">30 million accounts of dead people</a> on Facebook alone. And <a href="http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/digital-assets">a recent study estimates</a> our digital assets average about $34,000 in value, which creates the impetus for entrepreneurs to provide the kind of help that can make it easy to manage your digital estate upon your passing or incapacitation.</p><p>Companies like <a href="https://www.afternote.com/">Afternote</a>, <a href="http://www.b-emortal.com/">b-eMortal</a> and <a href="https://www.deadmansswitch.net/">Dead Man&rsquo;s Switch</a> offer users a way to do everything from distribute their digital assets to providing access by sending emails posthumously. <a href="http://www.thedigitalbeyond.com/online-services-list/">This is a pretty comprehensive list</a> of digital death services, but none of them are the complete package, and few will provide the kind of peace of mind that legally documenting your digital assets in a will could provide.</p><p><strong>Password Management</strong></p><p>The simplest solution to the problem of what happens to your digital life once you die is to just give someone you trust access to your passwords.</p><p>&ldquo;Estate planning experts say the most important thing you can do, if you don&rsquo;t have a will, is just to have a list of your accounts and your usernames and passwords in some secure place, whether that be online or offline or wherever and to let someone that you trust know about it.&rdquo; Maeve Duggan, a research analyst with Pew Research Center, said.</p><p>Password management systems can be a useful way keep your digital assets protected while at the same time creating the peace of mind in knowing that someone other than you, whom you trust, can access your information should something happen to you.</p><p>Some of the best password management systems are <a href="https://agilebits.com/onepassword">1Password</a>, <a href="https://keepersecurity.com/">Keeper</a>, <a href="http://www.roboform.com/">RoboForm</a>, <a href="https://msevensoftware.com/msecure_ios">MSecure</a>, <a href="https://www.dashlane.com/">Dashlane</a>, <a href="https://www.passwordbox.com/">PasswordBox</a> and <a href="https://lastpass.com/">LastPass</a>. There are many others with too many features to mention, but they offer a good way to control where you digital assets go if you don&rsquo;t want to provide those instructions in a will.</p><p>Whatever way you choose to preserve your digital assets for those who come after you, you might want to consider your priorities.</p><p>&ldquo;I kind of see online assets as falling into two general categories,&rdquo; Maeve Duggan said. &ldquo;The first has a really practical or financial value. Stuff like your online bank accounts, any medical records, insurance documents, loans. The second is the sentimental, nostalgic kinds of things. Photos, music, certain emails. But I will say that it depends on which you think is more important to prioritize.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/takimoff" rel="author">Tim Akimoff</a> is the Director of Digital Content at WBEZ. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/timakimoff"> Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/timakimoff"> Facebook. </a></em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2014-10-31/digital-afterlife-111035 Morning Shift: Students' social media may hurt college admittance http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-26/morning-shift-students-social-media-may-hurt-college <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Jason A. Howie.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We look at the effects social media might have on college admissions. Plus a preview of the World Cup U.S. vs. Germany match. And later, we revisit music from pianist Henry Butler.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-students-social-media-may-affect-col/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-students-social-media-may-affect-col.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-students-social-media-may-affect-col" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Students' social media may hurt college admittance" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 26 Jun 2014 08:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-26/morning-shift-students-social-media-may-hurt-college Morning Shift: How social media is changing the way we monitor public health http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-24/morning-shift-how-social-media-changing-way-we <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/social media Flickr Jason A. Howie.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We look at how social media sites like Google and Wikipedia are tracking illness and wellness. Plus, what is the future of plastic shopping bags in Chicago? And we hear the music of Bobby Bare Jr.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-how-social-media-is-changing-the-way/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-how-social-media-is-changing-the-way.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-how-social-media-is-changing-the-way" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: How social media is changing the way we monitor public health" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 08:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-24/morning-shift-how-social-media-changing-way-we Morning Shift: The Beatles invade America-on the small screen http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-04/morning-shift-beatles-invade-america-small-screen <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flickr by Affendaddy.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Next weekend marks the 50th anniversary of The Beatles first appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show. We discuss that monumental moment and other important moments in musical/TV history. And, 10 years of Facebook-what&#39;s the social networking giant&#39;s future?</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-beatles-invade-america/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-beatles-invade-america.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-the-beatles-invade-america" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: The Beatles invade America-on the small screen" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 04 Feb 2014 07:58:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-02-04/morning-shift-beatles-invade-america-small-screen Morning Shift: How tweets are transforming gang activity http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-01-14/morning-shift-how-tweets-are-transforming-gang <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Flickr Jason A. Howie.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We look at how social media use has exploded among street gangs and is changing the way they operate. Also, we hear from the architect who proposed a plan for Obama&#39;s presidential library to be in Chicago&#39;s Woodlawn neighborhood.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-how-tweets-are-transforming-gang-act/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-how-tweets-are-transforming-gang-act.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-how-tweets-are-transforming-gang-act" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: How tweets are transforming gang activity" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 14 Jan 2014 10:25:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-01-14/morning-shift-how-tweets-are-transforming-gang In defense of the selfie http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-11/defense-selfie-109225 <p><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20130215_031431.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 310px; float: left;" title="" />I joined Facebook during the summer before my freshman year of college and nearly every photo I used as a profile picture was a selfie.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Back then, we didn&rsquo;t have a name for them. Some people referred to them as &#39;angled shots&#39; or &#39;MySpace photos,&#39; for their ubiquity on that social networking site. The chorus of &#39;vanity&#39; and &#39;deception&#39; was as evident then as it is now. People were upset by others&rsquo; desire to control their visual narrative.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One day, an old high school friend left a comment on my Facebook wall asking why I could not just find a decent photograph of myself that I did not take. It was the first time I considered the difference between a photo of my making and a photo someone else took of me.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Oxford Dictionaries recently <a href="http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/press-releases/oxford-dictionaries-word-of-the-year-2013/" target="_blank">named</a> &quot;selfie&quot; as its word of the year.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Numerous writers responded, including&nbsp;News Editor&nbsp;Erin Gloria Ryan of Jezebel, who <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;ved=0CDkQFjAB&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fjezebel.com%2Fselfies-arent-empowering-theyre-a-cry-for-help-1468965365&amp;ei=yWyPUqrlBIipqwHAsYCoAQ&amp;usg=AFQjCNGfYkGx1eSegWROvMnpT2QbK8LLwg&amp;sig2=ea3yPmZ3oGcB9ZkQvnEeOQ&amp;bvm=bv.56988011,d.aWM" target="_blank">described</a> selfies as a cry for help, a sign that we are in desperate need of validation from others.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;Young women take selfies because they don&#39;t derive their sense of worth from themselves, they rely on others to bestow their self-worth on them &mdash; just as they&#39;ve been taught,&quot; she wrote.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But I think her view ultimately reduces why people use technology and choose to manipulate their own image.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Online reaction largely critcized Ryan&rsquo;s article for its limited view of why people take selfies, as well as for her implied desire to erase the existence of self documentation. Social media users started using the hashtag #FeministSelfie to extend the conversation outside the Jezebel article, and to document themselves in ways that were goofy and weird and lovely.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Those selfies documented people that deem the practice not as a way to ask, &#39;why?&#39; but, &#39;why not?&#39;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Ryan&#39;s interpretation of the photo as a cry for help disregards the personal autonomy and self-esteem of the photographer. For many, selfies are a solution to the problem. They are not looking to please others, but instead to please themselves &mdash; to see themselves outside the harsh eyes of others.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>During college, I was obsessed with looking at nightlife photography not because I wanted to be photographed, but because I loved the narrative framed around the images. Nightlife photographs give some of the pieces, but let the audience fill in the rest of the story. In my mind, the story was better than anything I could have imagined with just words alone.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>When I was out for the night, however, I did whatever possible to avoid nightlife photographers. I did not want to be captured in their vision, and I did not want others to see what was not there, to form their own narratives and create an idea of the evening that outpaced and outweighed its reality.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20120818_132854.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 310px; float: right;" title="" />In his seminal collection of essays and vignettes on photography entitled &quot;Ghost Image,&quot; French photographer <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herv%C3%A9_Guibert">Herve Guibert</a> wrote, &ldquo;We alone can intercept the gaze that we exchange indirectly through a reflection. The consent in our gaze is our secret alone, a mirage suspended in air that will soon disappear.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Guibert&rsquo;s thoughts are on the photographer as well as the subject. Looking at the camera is a way to provide consent to the one creating the narrative. But if we are the ones creating the image of ourselves, then our consent is a conversation with the self.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I cannot speak for everyone, but for me, a good selfie is a way to reject how other people see you. It is a way to see oneself as one chooses, not as others see us. It takes control of our own visual narratives, as if saying, &#39;This is the story I want to tell.&#39;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Sometimes selfies act as a fun documentation of the places in which you were alone. I have selfies inside weird art installations, cool hotel lobbies, and dark club bathrooms. Sometimes I share them, but often, I keep them for myself like an added layer of memory.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Self photography acknowledges that we are alive, that we exist. For people whose existence (say as a woman, or a person of color, or a person with a disability, etc.) is often denied in mainstream culture or reduced to stereotype, perhaps a selfie is a way to control the narrative by documenting their time, alive and moving about the world like the people we see across media platforms.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Many of the selfies I see are not just about &ldquo;good hair&rdquo; or perfect makeup or trying to look sexually desirable. Some post selfies after a long night working on their masters thesis or in celebration of a marathon or as a documentation of their weight-loss. I&rsquo;ve seen selfies in elaborate stage makeup before theater performances and in the days after being laid off. I don&rsquo;t think these people are just looking for encouragement or for others to say how pretty they are.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Their selfies feel more like a stake in the land, a declaration of time and place, a sentence in a chapter in the novel of their lives.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Is this giving too much credence to the power of the selfie? Maybe.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>There will always be people who only see the selfie as a form of vanity. And there will also always be people who post excessively, who need to insert themselves into the ongoing &#39;conversations&#39; of social media with their visage because they need validation. But for many, the selfie is a project itself. It is a way of seeing oneself in the world and sharing it with others. It is multiple things at once.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div><div><div property="content:encoded"><div><em>Britt Julious&nbsp;blogs about race and culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow her essays for WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/">here</a>&nbsp;and on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>.</em></div></div></div></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 22 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-11/defense-selfie-109225 Morning Shift: Palm oil's unsavory beginnings http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-07/morning-shift-palm-oils-unsavory-beginnings-108314 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Palm Oil-Flickr- cyn_nister.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We discuss the Bloomberg investigation into the unsavory practices in the palm oil industry. And do you care who your children&#39;s role models are? Baseball&#39;s recent PED scandal is calling the issue of role models to the plate.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-37.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-37" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Palm oil's unsavory beginnings" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Wed, 07 Aug 2013 08:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-07/morning-shift-palm-oils-unsavory-beginnings-108314 Morning Shift: Open office space can threaten more than your privacy http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-26/morning-shift-open-office-space-can-threaten-more <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Office-Flickr- Phillie Casablanca.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Do offices need walls? One study shows that more privacy could mean more productivity at work. And, is it fair to blame Huma Abedin for supporting her husband Anthony Weiner during his latest scandal? Our panel and you weigh in.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-anthony-weiner-scandal-moves-blame-t.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-anthony-weiner-scandal-moves-blame-t" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Open office space can threaten more than your privacy" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Fri, 26 Jul 2013 08:20:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-26/morning-shift-open-office-space-can-threaten-more Social media becoming important tool for policing http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-20/social-media-becoming-important-tool-policing-95676 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-20/1884813924_893219388e_b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>For those who thought the future of crime fighting would look like <em>RoboCop</em>, think again. The future is here and it is social media. A recent incident where a 17-year-old Chicago Public School student was beaten in Bridgeport by a group of individuals shone a spotlight on law enforcement tactics. Specifically, the focus has been a sharp turn towards utilizing <a href="http://www.facebook.com" target="_blank">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://twitter.com/" target="_blank">Twitter</a> to catch bad guys.</p><p><em>Eight Forty-Eight </em>wondered how the <a href="https://portal.chicagopolice.org/portal/page/portal/ClearPath" target="_blank">Chicago Police Department</a> has been using social media--and how other cities have been using Twitter and Facebook?</p><p><em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> was joined in studio by Chicago Police Superintendent . Toronto Police Social Media liaison <a href="http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/socialmedia/" target="_blank">Scott Mills</a> and <a href="http://www.cityofevanston.org/police/" target="_blank">Evanston Police</a> Commander Jay Parrot and WBEZ's criminal and legal affairs reporter Robert Wildeboer joined the conversation.</p><p><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/insert-image/2012-January/2012-01-20/4897_transform.jpg" title="CPD Supt. Garry McCarthy with WBEZ's Robert Wildeboer. (WBEZ/Bill Healy)" height="526" width="630"></p></p> Fri, 20 Jan 2012 14:53:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-20/social-media-becoming-important-tool-policing-95676 Moving beyond the press-release tweet http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-30/moving-beyond-press-release-tweet-91233 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-August/2011-08-30/5301039823_2ce616aca9_b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483677-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/sites/default/files/gov't social media.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>Though Mayor Emanuel opened the microphone to constituents at Monday night's public budget hearing, it was not the first time the mayor surveyed the public--he has frequently used social media to conduct town halls and take comments. Twitter, Facebook and other social media have increasingly become a way for officials to connect with the public. But <em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> wondered if all the online chatter was actually creating accountabilty. Host Alison Cuddy spoke to <a href="http://www.law.depaul.edu/faculty_staff/faculty_information.asp?id=33" target="_blank">Sarah Klaper</a> of DePaul University’s College of Law; Klaper works on issues of government access and accountability.&nbsp;</p><p><em>Music Button: Mike Reed's Loose Assembly, "Day of the Dead", from the album Last Year's Ghost, (482 Music)</em><br> &nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 30 Aug 2011 13:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-08-30/moving-beyond-press-release-tweet-91233