WBEZ | Cook County http://www.wbez.org/tags/cook-county Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Judge allows same-sex couples to marry in Cook County starting now http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/judge-allows-same-sex-couples-marry-cook-county-starting-now-109751 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP935573141163.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A federal judge is allowing same-sex couples to get married in Cook County, starting immediately.</p><p>Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman&rsquo;s ruling, issued this morning, applies only to Cook County, Illinois&rsquo; most populous county, which includes the city of Chicago.</p><p>Coleman&rsquo;s written order says couples should not have to wait for a state law, passed last year, to go into effect. The measure passed by the legislature and signed by Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn set June 1 as the date on which same-sex couples could legally marry in Illinois.</p><p>Coleman wrote, &ldquo;Committed gay and lesbian couples have already suffered from the denial of their fundamental right to marry.&rdquo;</p><p>She also quoted Martin Luther King, Jr. writing, &ldquo;The time is always ripe to do right.&rdquo;</p><p>The American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and Lambda Legal filed the lawsuit against the Cook County Clerk on behalf of a handful of same-sex couples seeking the right to marry immediately.</p><p>County Clerk David Orr was the state officer formally listed as the defendant. But because Orr supports same-sex marriage, there was no opposition to the lawsuit, and he moved promptly to announce and put the order into effect.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re thrilled that Judge Coleman recognized the serious harm to the many Illinois families from continuing to deny them the freedom to marry,&rdquo; said John Knight, LGBT and AIDS Project Director for the ACLU of Illinois. &ldquo;The U.S. Constitution guarantees these families the personal and emotional benefits as well as the critical legal protections of marriage now, and we are thankful that the court extended this dignity to couples immediately.&rdquo;</p><p>Couples in Cook County must wait a day after getting a license before they can be married.</p><p>Meantime, county clerks in the rest of Illinois are waiting to see if the ruling applies to them as well. Coleman wrote in her ruling, &ldquo;Although this Court finds that the marriage ban for same-sex couples violates the Fourteenth Amendment&rsquo;s Equal Protection Clause on its face, this finding can only apply to Cook County based upon the posture of the lawsuit.&rdquo;</p><p>Katherine Schultz -- clerk of McHenry County in Chicago&rsquo;s outer northwest suburbs -- said she&rsquo;s waiting for June 1 to issue marriage licenses until told specifically otherwise.</p><p>&ldquo;Until there is something more definite given to McHenry County, and I would assume other outlying counties, we will go by what the state statute says,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Schultz said that even if she were ordered to start granting marriage licenses to gay couples, she doesn&rsquo;t have the right state forms yet.</p><p><em>Tony Arnold covers Illinois politics for WBEZ. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/tonyjarnold">@tonyjarnold</a>.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Alex Keefe covers politics for WBEZ. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/akeefe">@akeefe</a>.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 21 Feb 2014 12:16:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/judge-allows-same-sex-couples-marry-cook-county-starting-now-109751 Cook County morgue gets new cooler, hires workers http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-morgue-gets-new-cooler-hires-workers-109699 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/morgue.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>The Cook County Medical Examiner&#39;s office says conditions are improving at the morgue thanks to more employees and a new $1.4 million cooler.</p><p>Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle and Medical Examiner Dr. Stephen Cina offered media a look at the cooler on Thursday.</p><p>The event was meant to show how much the office has improved 18 months after a string of embarrassing news stories about bodies bing stacked haphazardly and the remains of stillborn babies tossed into boxes.</p><p>Officials noted that improvements included the hiring of nearly two dozen employees in addition to the cooler.</p><p>Cina was hired in 2012 to replace the former medical examiner, who retired when Preckwinkle announced that she would overhaul the office.</p><p>Cina was chief administrator at the University of Miami&#39;s Tissue Bank.</p></p> Thu, 13 Feb 2014 15:33:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-morgue-gets-new-cooler-hires-workers-109699 Cook County Commissioners unanimously approve 2014 budget http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-commissioners-unanimously-approve-2014-budget-109117 <p><p>As Republican Cook County Commissioner Peter Silvestri put it, the 2014 budget is one the board and county residents can be proud of.</p><p>&ldquo;No taxes, no fees, no layoffs, no problem,&rdquo; Silvestri said, during the final vote on the budget Friday.</p><p>All 17 Cook County commissioners voted to approve the $3.2 billion dollar spending plan for the next fiscal year. The budget came out balanced in the end, even though the county originally faced a $152 million dollar shortfall.</p><p>Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle said filling that hole is mostly thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The county is set to receive millions of dollars in federal reimbursements for expanding the county&rsquo;s Medicaid system, known as CountyCare. Dr. Ramanathan Raju, head of the Cook County Health and Hospitals system, said it has already surpassed their goal of 115,000 applications for the program. As of the budget vote, Raju said the county had initiated around 122,000 applications.</p><p>Democratic Commissioner Larry Suffredin said the assistance through the Affordable Care Act will help the county focus their attention elsewhere.</p><p>&ldquo;As we look at the sea change here from healthcare to public safety, we have a number of issues we need to work on,&rdquo; Suffredin said. &ldquo;We have, unfortunately, the largest single-site jail in the United States. We need to reduce the number of people who are in there.&rdquo;</p><p>Now that the 2014 budget is set, both Preckwinkle and Suffredin say the board&rsquo;s next task is to tackle the county&rsquo;s pension fund.</p><p>Lauren Chooljian is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">@laurenchooljian</a>.</p></p> Sat, 09 Nov 2013 08:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-commissioners-unanimously-approve-2014-budget-109117 Dart: Court records in Cook County shameful http://www.wbez.org/news/dart-court-records-cook-county-shameful-108890 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Court File.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>As the clerk of the circuit court Dorothy Brown&rsquo;s office gets a hundred million dollars a year to maintain the court files in Cook County.&nbsp; But despite that budget and 13 years in office, Brown has been unable to wean the system off of paper.</p><p>On Wednesday Sheriff Dart invited reporters into the jail to see the inefficiency first hand.</p><p>&ldquo;I am no longer going to sit by quietly and say, you know, you guys keep meeting and discussing this and talking about this,&rdquo; said Dart.&nbsp; &ldquo;The time for discussing and talking is over.&nbsp; This has got to get done now.&nbsp; It&rsquo;s frankly embarrassing that this is how our county operates through this paper driven system, that honest, when do you think the last time this changed?&nbsp; Probably the 1920s, 30s maybe?&rdquo;</p><p>Dart showed reporters the court file of one man and it was probably 10 inches thick.</p><p>&ldquo;You get stacks and stacks and stacks of paper that hasn&rsquo;t changed, truly, in 50, 60 years now.&nbsp; I mean honestly this is embarrassing that in our county this is how we move bodies through the system. Today I had 10 thousand people in here, and this is how we&rsquo;re tracking 10 thousand people,&rdquo; said Dart.</p><p>In a statement emailed to WBEZ last week Brown&rsquo;s office said they&rsquo;ve made many updates placing the system quote, &ldquo;well into the 21st century.&rdquo; Despite that statement, the fact remains they&rsquo;re still using carbon copies.</p></p> Thu, 10 Oct 2013 11:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/dart-court-records-cook-county-shameful-108890 In Cook County, you can be found not guilty, and still go back to jail http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-you-can-be-found-not-guilty-and-still-go-back-jail-108758 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Cook County Jail.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F112453764" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-5e307626-523e-fed3-04c3-447ac1fc4ec8">Brian Otero spent nearly two years in Cook County Jail waiting to go to trial for a burglary. The jury found him not guilty, but he didn&rsquo;t get to leave the courtroom like they do on TV. No, he was brought back into the Cook County Jail to be &ldquo;processed&rdquo; out. He was put in a small cell just off the front of the courtroom, to eventually be brought back into the jail.</p><p dir="ltr">Now remember, at this point, there are no charges against Otero, yet he&rsquo;s being detained against his will because that&rsquo;s just how we&rsquo;ve always done it in Cook County. Defendants who have been held in jail awaiting trial are brought back into the jail. They can be handcuffed, searched, and locked back up in their cell even though there are no charges against them.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Sheriff Tom Dart and county officials are doing little to change the seemingly unconstitutional practice and that could cost taxpayers millions</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>&quot;Free&quot; man</strong></p><p dir="ltr">On his way back into the jail after acquittal, Otero was put in a holding cell with a number of other inmates and three men attacked him.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;They approached me and asked me, &lsquo;Did you win your case, are you going home today?&rsquo;&rdquo; Otero said in an interview in his attorney&#39;s Loop law office. &ldquo;Upon me saying &lsquo;yes&rsquo; one of them swung at me and when he swung at me the other two grabbed me and they started hitting me all over my body.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Otero says two of his friends were in the same bullpen, and they pulled his attackers off but he had a busted lip and a sprained hand.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;To this day I got a torn ligament in my hand, but I did not seek or ask for no medical attention. &nbsp;I just let it be because I was just trying to hurry up and get out as fast as I can,&rdquo; said Otero.</p><p dir="ltr">Otero was eventually brought back to his cell, to wait. Ten hours after he was acquitted he was finally released from the jail.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When I walked out the front gate from division 5 onto the streets, it was 4 o&rsquo;clock in the morning.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Presumed innocent</strong></p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Mr Otero, when he walks into that trial is assumed innocent, right? &nbsp;And then he is found innocent, so the system ought to be better prepared to do this,&rdquo; says Otero&rsquo;s attorney Mike Cherry.</p><p dir="ltr">Cherry is suing Cook County and Sheriff Tom Dart on behalf of Brian Otero and other detainees. He says he thinks the practice of jailing people when they&rsquo;ve been found not guilty would offend most Americans&rsquo; sense of justice. On top of that, he says, it doesn&rsquo;t happen to people with money. It happens mostly to poor people, people who were in jail before trial because they couldn&rsquo;t afford to post bond.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Basically the lawsuit challenges as unconstitutional this process that happened, because it denies him his freedom,&rdquo; says Cherry. He says when Otero was acquitted he should have been released.</p><p dir="ltr">Sheriff Tom Dart, who runs the jail, says he wishes that were case too.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We&rsquo;re trying to get people out of the jail as quickly as possible for a myriad of reasons, whether it&#39;s just general overcrowding issues, potential liability issues, everything,&rdquo; Dart said in an interview with WBEZ in May of this year.</p><p dir="ltr">The sheriff didn&rsquo;t have a solution for the problem then, but said,&rdquo;I do think that probably in the next few weeks some of these limited cases, the limited ones, we probably can come up with some things, so if you circle back, you know in the next couple weeks, we could have something on some of them.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">I circled back, and I circled back again. Weeks turned into months and so far the grand solution is riding on two personal computers in the basement of the courthouse in north suburban Skokie.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Skokie pilot program</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Cook County has one jail but a number of courthouses, so every morning buses leave the jail at 26th and California on the city&rsquo;s Southwest Side, filled with detainees who have hearings at courthouses around the county. In Skokie, a bus from the jail drives into a secure garage in the basement. The detainees are nearly silent as they file two by two, handcuffed together, off the bus and past an officer who checks them in.</p><p dir="ltr">The new computers here emit beeping sounds every time an officer scans a detainee&#39;s I.D. card. The two computers are the start of a plan to finally digitize some of the paperwork in the jail, and a spokeswoman for Dart say it&rsquo;s possible that the update could potentially, one day, possibly allow people to be immediately released from courtrooms when they&rsquo;re acquitted.</p><p dir="ltr">But I ask Kelly Jackson, the chief of the civil division for Sheriff Dart, how long that will take?</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I couldn&rsquo;t even answer that for you. I have no idea,&rdquo; Jackson said. &ldquo;Skokie&rsquo;s operating right now but it&rsquo;s the only one of the 17 court facilities that are doing that. There would be no way to estimate if we could, when we&rsquo;ll finish rolling it out everywhere, and where our legal department and the state&rsquo;s attorneys office will take us with that.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">A spokeswoman for Dart says starting this week they&rsquo;re going to allow people found not guilty to leave from the Skokie courthouse. They still won&rsquo;t be walking right out of the courtroom, but at least they won&rsquo;t have to go back on the bus to the jail at 26th and California. It&rsquo;s a start.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>A court system stuck in past</strong></p><p dir="ltr">But even if the sheriff&rsquo;s office makes the technological leap to the 1990s in all 17 courthouses, the rest of the Cook County court system under Clerk of Courts Dorothy Brown is pretty solidly stuck in the 70s. The whole court system is paper and carbon copies. That presents a problem for Lt. Charles Luna when he&rsquo;s supposed to release someone from the jail.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We&rsquo;re still using carbon paper in the courts, so the clerks actually write on the mittimuses that are carbon paper, actually, the duplicates, so in order to transfer the records to the jail, it&rsquo;s actually in triplicate I believe, because one is kept in the court in the clerk&rsquo;s office and then two are sent to the jail for our purposes,&rdquo; says Luna. Whatever the case, it&rsquo;s a lot of paper and before Luna lets an inmate out of the jail he has to organize and verify the inmate&rsquo;s entire court file, which can be several inches thick with those carbon copies.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;At times it can be like looking for a needle in a haystack,&rdquo; Luna said.</p><p dir="ltr">But that doesn&rsquo;t do anything to sway attorney Mike Cherry, who is suing Cook County on behalf of Brian Otero, the guy at the beginning of the story who was found not guilty and then taken back into the jail where he was assaulted. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t have one ounce of pity when a system says I&rsquo;ve got to take advantage of someone because it&rsquo;s too complicated for me to protect the innocent. &nbsp;That&rsquo;s crazy,&rdquo; &nbsp;says Cherry. It&rsquo;s also potentially very costly.</p><p dir="ltr">Ten years ago Los Angeles County had to pay out $27 million to people who&#39;d been held in the jail after they were acquitted.</p><p dir="ltr">While it&rsquo;s Sheriff Dart who is detaining people, it&rsquo;s Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez who tells Dart what he needs to do to comply with the constitution. For two weeks Alvarez&rsquo;s office has failed to provide WBEZ with any explanation as to whether the current practices are constitutional, or what her office is doing to ensure Cook County doesn&rsquo;t have to pay out millions in settlements arising from this practice of detaining people after they&rsquo;ve been found not guilty.</p><p dir="ltr">Attorney Mike Cherry says he hopes his lawsuit is expensive enough that it finally forces the county to do something.</p></p> Wed, 25 Sep 2013 06:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-you-can-be-found-not-guilty-and-still-go-back-jail-108758 31 charged in alleged Chicago-area heroin ring http://www.wbez.org/news/31-charged-alleged-chicago-area-heroin-ring-108559 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP453323544602.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>WHEATON, Ill. &mdash; DuPage County prosecutors and the Drug Enforcement Administration say 31 people have been charged with allegedly taking part in a heroin-selling ring in Cook and DuPage counties.</p><p>Authorities announced Wednesday that the heroin conspiracy and sales charges came after a six-month investigation into the alleged ring.</p><p>Seventeen of those arrested also were charged with violating the state&#39;s new racketeering law targeting street gangs. Those charged under the law face tougher penalties upon conviction if prosecutors prove their illegal activities were part of a larger criminal conspiracy.</p><p>DuPage County State&#39;s Attorney Robert Berlin says heroin has led to led to 70 deaths in his county in the past 20 months.</p><p>He says he hopes the arrests serve as a deterrent to others considering dealing the drug.</p></p> Thu, 29 Aug 2013 10:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/31-charged-alleged-chicago-area-heroin-ring-108559 Lawmakers: Federal involvement needed to curb illegal gun trafficking http://www.wbez.org/news/lawmakers-federal-involvement-needed-curb-illegal-gun-trafficking-108456 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Gun Checks_130819_AYC.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Lawmakers said Illinois&rsquo;s new gun law needs federal involvement to truly stop or even curb illegal gun trafficking.</p><p>Illinois Governor Pat Quinn this weekend signed a new law that requires gun owners to report within 72 hours any lost or stolen gun .</p><p>The law also requires background checks for all gun purchases, including private sales.</p><p>But State Senator Kwame Raoul said there&rsquo;s more to be done.</p><p>&ldquo;We can continue to do (more) at the state level, but the reality is a lot of the gun trafficking occurs across the state lines,&rdquo; Raoul said. &ldquo;Enacting law is only one measure that we can do to combat gun violence, but we also need the help from the federal level.&rdquo;</p><p>Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez said the new requirement gives police more control in keeping track of illegal firearms.</p><p>&ldquo;This lost or stolen requirement will help police identify suspicious patterns of behavior by persons who fail to file reports yet continually claim their guns were lost or stolen after they are recovered at a crime scene,&rdquo; she said in a press release.</p><p>Illinois is the 9th state to require the reporting of lost or stolen guns. Michigan and Ohio are the only two nearby states with the same requirement.</p><p>The reporting requirement takes effect immediately, and the new background check system will start in the beginning of next year.</p><p><em>Aimee Chen is a WBEZ business reporting intern. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/AimeeYuyiChen">@AimeeYuyiChen</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 19 Aug 2013 16:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/lawmakers-federal-involvement-needed-curb-illegal-gun-trafficking-108456 Judge refuses to toss Democrat's tax convictions http://www.wbez.org/news/judge-refuses-toss-democrats-tax-convictions-107857 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/beavers_1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A federal judge in Chicago has refused to toss a former Cook County commissioner&#39;s tax-evasion convictions on grounds his jury had no African-American males.</p><p>The ruling came at a post-trial hearing Wednesday for once-powerful Democrat Williams Beavers.</p><p>Beavers is black and had argued that the jury selection was fundamentally flawed.</p><p>A jury of 10 whites, one Hispanic and one African-American female convicted Beavers early this year of using campaign money to gamble without reporting it as income.</p><p>Judge James Zagel took issue with the defense&#39;s emphasis on an absence of African-American jurors. He said there&#39;s an &quot;African-American&quot; category under rules meant to promote racially balanced juries but no &quot;African-American males&quot; category.</p><p>Zagel set sentencing for Sept. 25. Beavers faces a maximum three-year prison term on each of four tax-evasion counts.</p></p> Wed, 26 Jun 2013 11:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/judge-refuses-toss-democrats-tax-convictions-107857 Board president Preckwinkle to seek second term http://www.wbez.org/news/board-president-preckwinkle-seek-second-term-107642 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP101123183747.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A campaign official says Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle is going to tell supporters that she will run for a second four-year term.</p><p>Scott Kastrup is finance director of Preckwinkle for President. He says Preckwinkle will make the announcement at a fundraiser in downtown Chicago on Tuesday evening. He says Preckwinkle will formally launch her campaign during the summer but that she will tell supporters at Tuesday night&#39;s annual fundraiser.</p><p>Preckwinkle is a former Chicago alderman. She was elected to the board in 2010. She was widely expected to run for re-election.</p></p> Tue, 11 Jun 2013 14:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/board-president-preckwinkle-seek-second-term-107642 ACLU finds racial disparities in Illinois pot arrests http://www.wbez.org/news/aclu-finds-racial-disparities-illinois-pot-arrests-107555 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/3635_7811e70cf25bbc2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Leaders of the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois say one way to address racial disparities in marijuana arrests is to stop making them.</p><p>A new report from the civil rights group calls for the legalization of marijuana. The study found that African Americans in Illinois are almost eight times more likely than whites to be arrested for pot possession.</p><p>Ed Yohnka, director of public policy for the ACLU of Illinois, says whites and blacks use pot at about the same rate, but enforcement focuses on African Americans.</p><p>&ldquo;We see this in the city of Chicago, we see it in other areas, that &hellip; where the enforcement is targeted is at people of color. And it results in this grossly disparate rate of arrest,&rdquo; Yohnka said.</p><p>In an emailed statement, a spokesman for the Chicago police Department said police officers enforce laws in the interest of public safety and without regard to race.</p><p>According to the ACLU report, Illinois has the fourth highest rate of race disparity in marijuana arrests in the country.</p><p>Yohnka says that disparity &ldquo;results in really tragic outcomes in &hellip; people&rsquo;s lives,&rdquo; because of court costs and the stigma of a criminal record.&nbsp; It cost the state about $221 million to enforce marijuana laws in 2010, according to the report.</p><p>&ldquo;This war on marijuana &hellip; is an abject failure,&rdquo; Yohnka said.</p><p>In its report the ACLU recommends that pot be legal for anyone over 21, and be licensed, taxed and regulated like any other product. The group also suggests that tax revenue from marijuana sales could be earmarked for substance-abuse prevention, among other things.Yohnka says the public wants marijuana to be legalized and that elected officials are lagging behind popular opinion.</p><p>Despite that, marijuana arrests are trending up, not down, in Illinois and throughout the country.</p><p>Illinois had 12,406 more pot arrests in 2010 than it did in 2001, according to the report.</p><p>The results of the study didn&#39;t come as a big shock to Juliana Stratton, but she says she was surprised to see that Cook County had the most marijuana possession arrests in the country.<br /><br />Stratton, who heads the Cook County Judicial Advisory Council, says the report confirms the importance of the work being done by Cook County President Toni Preckwinkle to try and cut down on the number of marijuana arrests in the county.<br /><br />She says more money and energy should be diverted away from law enforcement and toward treatment and prevention. In the coming months, she says the county will be unveiling programs that will divert minor drug offenders away from jail and toward rehabilitation.<br /><br />As for Cook County&#39;s high number of pot arrests, Stratton says part of the reason could be the Chicago Police Department&#39;s focus on quality-of-life policing and the drying up of state funds for drug treatment.<br /><br />Stratton says CPD&#39;s policy of arresting minor offenders as part of the &quot;broken windows theory&quot; of policing, runs counter to the county president&#39;s aim of decreasing the population of the Cook County Jail.</p><p>Illinois state Sen. Mattie Hunter, who heads the Illinois Disproportionate Justice Impact Study Commission, also said &nbsp;she was not surprised by the ACLU&rsquo;s findings. She says the report echoes what she and her colleagues have found in years studying racial inequality throughout the state.</p><p>But Hunter says the problem won&rsquo;t go away until racism is eradicated from the justice system.</p><p>Hunter does not support the legalization of marijuana.</p><p>Cook County led the nation in marijuana possession arrests in 2010 with 33,000, or 91 per day, according to the ACLU report.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 05 Jun 2013 17:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/aclu-finds-racial-disparities-illinois-pot-arrests-107555