WBEZ | diet http://www.wbez.org/tags/diet Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Can you lose weight on the marijuana diet? http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/can-you-lose-weight-marijuana-diet-108996 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Marijuana Diet.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">The <a href="http://themarijuanadiet.org/">&quot;marijuana diet&quot;</a> may sound like something you&#39;d read about in The Onion. But for its creator, the diet is no joke.</p><p dir="ltr">Art Glass, 66, whose background is in marketing and advertising, says he ballooned up to 345 pounds years ago but returned to a healthy weight by following the tenets of his self-styled strategy, which includes light to moderate smoking but also a healthy diet. <a href="https://soundcloud.com/morningshiftwbez/eat-this-author-offers">He talked about it on WBEZ&rsquo;s Morning Shift Wednesday.</a></p><p dir="ltr">Glass&rsquo;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Marijuana-Diet-Anonymous-1-ebook/dp/B00EP0UUGA"> e-book &ldquo;The Marijuana Diet&rdquo; &nbsp;went up on Amazon</a> this week and prescribes lots of fresh fruits, vegetables, sprouts and nuts along with occasional fasting and superfood smoothies. It further recommends modest amounts of high-quality pastured and grass-fed animal protein, and the elimination of processed foods, white sugar and flour.</p><p dir="ltr">This alone might be enough to improve a dieter&#39;s health, but Glass also suggests regular exercises--mostly long-held poses that can be done on a chair, a couch or standing.</p><p dir="ltr">So is the marijuana aspect of the diet really that crucial? &nbsp;Maybe not for some.</p><p dir="ltr">But for those whose unhealthy eating habits stem from psychological or emotional issues, Glass believes smoking can help them explore the triggers or experiences that have led to their self-destructive behavior.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Losing weight is one of the most challenging things there is,&rdquo; Glass said on the Morning Shift Wednesday. &nbsp;&ldquo;Marijuana helps you get in touch with yourself and let go of the crap you don&rsquo;t need and when you let go of that psychological crap, you will let go of your weight.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Glass uses his own experience as evidence and, in his book, catalogues more than 100 testimonials from Internet users who also report pot-induced weight loss. Their screen names include &ldquo;stonerchick609&rdquo; or &ldquo;smotpoker&rdquo;.</p><p dir="ltr">But he also cites peer reviewed studies that show correlations between pot smoking (among adults) and better metabolic health.</p><p dir="ltr">One <a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/08/24/aje.kwr200.abstract">2011 study that appeared in the American Journal of Epidemiology</a> looked at two large populations of American adults and found obesity rates of 22 percent and 25.3 percent among non-marijuana smokers but only 14.3 percent and 17.2 percent among marijuana smokers, even when researchers controlled for other factors.</p><p dir="ltr">Another <a href="http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343%2813%2900200-3/abstract">2013 study that appeared in the American Journal of Medicine</a> showed lower insulin levels and waist circumference (an indicator of dangerous visceral fat) among regular pot smokers.</p><p dir="ltr">Still, for Dr. Rasa Kazlauskaite, who is the Acting Medical Director at Rush University and a researcher of &nbsp;cannabinoids, these studies show association not causation. In other words, she thinks that the better health could be linked to other factors.</p><p dir="ltr">She also points out what munchie sufferers know well: that marijuana has been traditionally associated with appetite stimulation and increased food consumption rather than appetite suppression. She points to the drug rimonabant that aided weight loss by blocking human cannabinoid (marijuana) receptors--it was later withdrawn from the market due to dangerous side effects.</p><p dir="ltr">Glass says that he&rsquo;s no stranger to the munchies but suggests combating them by taking no more than three tokes per smoking session, smoking alone and never eating while under the influence. &nbsp;He recommends using that time for exercise and self-guided reflections on the root causes of one&rsquo;s unhealthy behavior.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It sounds like the author is recommending self-treatment, being your own psychologist,&rdquo; Kazlauskaite said. &ldquo;For some people it might work but others might benefit from guidance. I would recommend meeting with a behavioral specialist who specializes in therapy for obesity.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Kazlauskaite, however, agrees with some of Glass&rsquo; nutritional advice, especially his emphasis on fresh fruits and vegetables and the removal of sugar and processed foods.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Some of these recommendations are really desirable changes for people who want to lose weight or maintain a lighter weight,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;So if someone smokes marijuana but also makes better meal and snack choices then that is better than not making healthy nutritional decisions at all. But it might be that without smoking marijuana people might lose more weight. If someone wants to test this hypothesis the ideal study would be to compare diet alone with diet and marijuana.&rdquo; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><em>Monica Eng &nbsp;is a WBEZ producer. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/monicaeng" target="_blank">@monicaeng</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/can-you-lose-weight-marijuana-diet-108996 Morning Shift: Diet trends, bikes and music http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-06-28/morning-shift-diet-trends-bikes-and-music-107894 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Chicago Bike Sharing_courtesy of Associated Press.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>As Chicago launches its bike-share program, we hear from you about if this new service will be utilized or largely ignored. Also, Monica Eng gives us the facts and fallacies about diet trends. And Chicago&#39;s Black Ensemble Theater pays tribute to Howlin&#39; Wolf.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-diet-trends-bikes-and-music.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-diet-trends-bikes-and-music" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Diet trends, bikes and music " on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Fri, 28 Jun 2013 08:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-06-28/morning-shift-diet-trends-bikes-and-music-107894 Study: Diet May Help ADHD Kids More Than Drugs http://www.wbez.org/story/children039s-health/2011-03-11/study-diet-may-help-adhd-kids-more-drugs-83599 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/berries.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Hyperactivity. Fidgeting. Inattention. Impulsivity. If your child has one or more of these qualities on a regular basis, you may be told that he or she has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. If so, they'd be among about 10 percent of children in the United States.</p><p>Kids with ADHD can be restless and difficult to handle. Many of them are treated with drugs, but a new study says food may be the key. Published in <em>The Lancet </em>journal, the study suggests that with a very restrictive diet, kids with ADHD could experience a significant reduction in symptoms.</p><p>The study's lead author, Dr. Lidy Pelsser of the ADHD Research Centre in the Netherlands, writes in <em>The Lancet</em> that the disorder is triggered in many cases by external factors — and those can be treated through changes to one's environment.</p><p>"ADHD, it's just a couple of symptoms — it's not a disease," the Dutch researcher tells <em>All Things Considered</em> weekend host Guy Raz.</p><p>The way we think about — and treat — these behaviors is wrong, Pelsser says. "There is a paradigm shift needed. If a child is diagnosed ADHD, we should say, 'OK, we have got those symptoms, now let's start looking for a cause.' "</p><p>Pelsser compares ADHD to eczema. "The skin is affected, but a lot of people get eczema because of a latex allergy or because they are eating a pineapple or strawberries."</p><p>According to Pelsser, 64 percent of children diagnosed with ADHD are actually experiencing a hypersensitivity to food. Researchers determined that by starting kids on a very elaborate diet, then restricting it over a few weeks' time.</p><p>"It's only five weeks," Pelsser says. "If it is the diet, then we start to find out which foods are causing the problems."</p><p>Teachers and doctors who worked with children in the study reported marked changes in behavior. "In fact, they were flabbergasted," Pelsser says.</p><p>"After the diet, they were just normal children with normal behavior," she says. No longer were they easily distracted or forgetful, and the temper tantrums subsided.</p><p>Some teachers said they never thought it would work, Pelsser says. "It was so strange," she says, "that a diet would change the behavior of a child as thoroughly as they saw it. It was a miracle, a teacher said."</p><p>But diet is not the solution for all children with ADHD, Pelsser cautions.</p><p>"In all children, we should start with diet research," she says. If a child's behavior doesn't change, then drugs may still be necessary. "But now we are giving them all drugs, and I think that's a huge mistake," she says.</p><p>Also, Pelsser warns, altering your child's diet without a doctor's supervision is inadvisable.</p><p>"We have got good news — that food is the main cause of ADHD," she says. "We've got bad news — that we have to train physicians to monitor this procedure because it cannot be done by a physician who is not trained." Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. </p> Fri, 11 Mar 2011 23:24:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/children039s-health/2011-03-11/study-diet-may-help-adhd-kids-more-drugs-83599 Study shows link between diet and mental illness http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/study-shows-link-between-diet-and-mental-illness <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/hair pulling.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img height="333" width="500" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2010-December/2010-12-17/hair pulling.jpg" alt="" /></p><p>Diet has long been thought to influence our moods. But researchers have discovered that certain foods might actually trigger certain forms of mental illness.</p><p>Dr. Joseph Garner, associate professor in the department of animal sciences at Purdue University, studies trichotillomania, a disorder that&rsquo;s characterized by repetitive hair pulling. Although trichotillomania has been recognized for thousands of years&mdash;it has been described in Ancient Greek medical texts&mdash;there has been little research done directly on the condition. Doctors know it starts in adolescence and affects between 2 and 4 percent of the population, mainly women.&nbsp; Treatment options are limited.</p><p>Garner and his team hoped to reduce hair pulling behaviors in mice by creating meals high in sugar and tryptophan (an amino acid found in turkey as well as dairy products, soy, tofu and nuts). All the mice were prone to body-focused repetitive behaviors, but only one group were active hair pullers. Instead of getting better, the mice who ate the high-sugar and tryptophan diet got worse.</p><p>&ldquo;The mice that were pulling hair started pulling more hair, mice that weren&rsquo;t pulling hair began to do so or else began scratching at themselves,&rdquo; said Garner. The diet triggered the disorder in the healthy (but genetically prone) mice and made those already sick even sicker.</p><p>Except for the high levels of tryptophan, the diet&rsquo;s equivalent in human terms would be one filled with lots of juices, soda and candy&mdash;pretty much the average American diet. So does this mean junk food heavy diets could be causing some mental illnesses? Maybe. Garner&rsquo;s next step is to replicate the study using the same diet excluding the tryptophan. But if he&rsquo;s right it could mean revolutionary changes in the way we view, and treat, these disorders.</p><p>Dr. David Carbonell, psychologist and director of the Anxiety Treatment Center of Chicago, works with people who have trichotillomania. He hadn&rsquo;t read the study but remains skeptical about the results. &ldquo;I haven&rsquo;t seen evidence in anxiety disorders that diet plays a strong role,&rdquo; he said. Although he welcomes more research into this under-studied disorder, he says cognitive behavioral therapy is the most effective treatment available.<br />&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 17 Dec 2010 20:20:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/study-shows-link-between-diet-and-mental-illness