WBEZ | Immigration http://www.wbez.org/tags/immigration Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Child migrant expert: The kids will keep coming http://www.wbez.org/news/child-migrant-expert-kids-will-keep-coming-110612 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/unaccompanied minors.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Federal officials recently announced they would close three temporary detention shelters in Oklahoma, Texas and California, in part because the flow of children across the southern U.S. border has slowed. The news comes weeks into a heated debate over what to do about large numbers of unaccompanied minors fleeing Central America.</p><p>But one Chicago expert, recently returned from studying migrant children in Guatemala, believes the slowdown won&rsquo;t last.</p><p>&ldquo;There is a culture of migration where, in many ways, it is a rite of passage that you do start to think about your household, you think about your family, you think about your future at age 13, 14, 15,&rdquo; said Lauren Heidbrink, an anthropologist and Assistant Professor at National Louis University in Chicago.</p><p>Heidbrink has authored a book on the topic, titled <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Migrant-Youth-Transnational-Families-State/dp/0812246047"><em>Migrant Youth, Transnational Families and the State: Care and Contested Interests</em></a>, and recently returned from a field study in the Departments of San Marcos and Quezaltenango in western Guatemala.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a different cultural context. There are different expectations of young people in Guatemala than we have of a 14-year old in the U.S,&rdquo; said Heidbrink.</p><p>While there, Heidbrink said she witnessed a widespread campaign to dissuade children from making the dangerous journey to the U.S.-Texas border. The U.S. Department of Customs and Border Protection has launched a <a href="http://www.dvidshub.net/unit/USCBP#.U-Kos_ldWSo">multimedia campaign</a> &mdash; which included commissioning a <a href="http://www.dvidshub.net/audio/37278/radio-psa-la-bestia-norte-full-version#.U-Kon_ldWSr">radio tune</a> modeled in the tradition of popular gangster ballads known as <em>narcorridos</em> &mdash; to emphasize the dangers of the journey to children and their families.</p><p>But in the indigenous, subsistence-farm communities where Heidbrink works, the messages are not taking root.</p><p>&ldquo;They know the risks,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;But the risks of remaining outweigh the risks of migration.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said many children believe subsistence farming won&rsquo;t be enough to support their families &mdash; and that way of life has been further threatened by toxic mining activity nearby. In other parts of Guatemala and Central America, kids may face different hardships. But in most cases, Heidbrink says they decide to leave for the same reason: they see little future where they are.</p><p>&ldquo;People don&rsquo;t want to migrate,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a last resort for many people.&rdquo;</p><p>But Heidbrink said once children make the decision to leave, they&rsquo;re thrown into a vicious cycle. Those that are deported don&rsquo;t bring home the message that they shouldn&rsquo;t make the journey. On the contrary, Heidbrink said it becomes more necessary than ever for the children to try to reach the U.S. again.</p><p>&ldquo;Youth and families are being returned to the very situations that they fled, and nothing has changed,&rdquo; she explained. &ldquo;And in fact, layered on top of that, for many youth, is the added debt it takes to migrate.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said many families pay smugglers between $7,500 and $10,000 to get their children to the U.S. safely, with whopping monthly interest rates as high as 15 percent. Even with a college education, Heidbrink said most Guatemalans can&rsquo;t earn that kind of money. So many kids feel their only way to pay the debt is to <em>re-</em>migrate.</p><p>Heidbrink believes the U.S.&rsquo;s renewed focus on deporting migrant children faster will only make the problem worse. That&rsquo;s because the stigma of returning to their home without having successfully made it in the U.S. means they feel pressured to try again.</p><p>Additionally, Heidbrink said boys typically face ridicule for wearing different clothes, more hair gel, or listening to different music, upon being deported back to their communities. For girls, there&rsquo;s an assumption that they had to sleep their way to the U.S. &mdash; or that they were raped.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s one family that I&rsquo;m working with who let their community members know their daughter had migrated to Guatemala City to work as a domestic laborer in someone&rsquo;s home, when in fact, she had migrated to the U.S.,&rdquo; said Heidbrink. &ldquo;And when she was apprehended and removed, they met her in Guatemala City&hellip; brought her traditional clothing and told her what story to tell the community so that she could avoid that type of stigmatization in her community.&rdquo;</p><p>She said the children see the U.S. as one of their only ways out of poverty, and emphasizing the dangers of the trip isn&rsquo;t enough to deter them. Instead, she said they might give the decision more pause if they realized how difficult life in the U.S. could be when they get here.</p><p>Daniel Restrepo can attest to that.</p><p>&ldquo;I remember my couple first days, I was so happy because I was made it in the United States,&rdquo; he said. Restrepo was 17 when he made the journey from Colombia three years ago.</p><p>Unlike the children that Heidbrink studies in Guatemala, Restrepo had an easy journey to the U.S.: he came on a plane with a tourist visa.</p><p>But Restrepo said he overstayed that visa because he felt Colombia was too violent and corrupt. He never thought life in the U.S. would also be hard.</p><p>Restrepo said he jumped at the opportunity to be a dishwasher in a restaurant, because his weekly paycheck of $300 was more than he&rsquo;d make in one month in Colombia.</p><p>&ldquo;But I came again to the real world that $300 is nothing,&rdquo; he continued, &ldquo;And I started to owe money, and that&rsquo;s when started the nightmare in the United States.&rdquo;</p><p>Restrepo works two jobs now, as a cook and a valet parking attendant, at downtown Chicago restaurants. He&rsquo;s barely making it. Last week the gas was shut off at his Logan Square studio because he owes $600 in unpaid bills. Restrepo said there are still no opportunities back home, but he&rsquo;s not making much headway here, either.</p><p>Heidbrink said it&rsquo;s been left to other parties &mdash; like non-profits in Guatemala &mdash; to share stories of struggle like Restrepo&rsquo;s.</p><p>&ldquo;People don&rsquo;t talk about those experiences, don&rsquo;t talk about the challenges and poverty that exists in the U.S.,&rdquo; she explained. &ldquo;So there is this idealized image of what it is to be living in America and working in America.&rdquo;</p><p>Heidbrink said, rather than emphasizing the dangers of the journey, the more effective way to convince Central American children to stop migrating to the U.S. may be to tell them what happens once they get here.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her </em><a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef"><em>@oyousef</em></a><em> and </em><a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud"><em>@WBEZoutloud</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Thu, 07 Aug 2014 10:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/child-migrant-expert-kids-will-keep-coming-110612 Feds set to divert refugee funds to deal with unaccompanied minors http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/feds-set-divert-refugee-funds-deal-unaccompanied-minors-110594 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Refugee cuts 2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Refugee assistance agencies in Illinois are steeling themselves for dramatic cuts in federal funding, which threaten to gut core services aimed at helping newcomers adjust and integrate to life in the U.S. The money instead is slated to go toward dealing with a crisis of unaccompanied minors streaming over the southern border, overwhelming temporary shelters that the U.S. is scrambling to expand.</p><p>&ldquo;This is really an impossible situation that we&rsquo;re being put in, in which we have to rob Peter to pay Paul, so to speak, and have to choose between two vulnerable groups of people,&rdquo; said Erol Kekic, chair of the Refugee Council USA and Director of Immigration and Refugee services at Church World Service.</p><p>&ldquo;This is happening against the backdrop of this incredible upheaval that is plaguing our world at this point in time with (the) refugee crisis getting way out of hand in Syria, Iraq, South Sudan and Somalia, etc,&rdquo; he added, &ldquo;and (the) U.S. has to do its part to assist in this process.&rdquo;</p><p>In Illinois, resettlement agencies and refugee support organizations stand to lose a total of $2.7 million in funds from the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement. The agency is responsible for services rendered to refugees from their point of arrival in the U.S., to up to five years after. Refugees, unlike unaccompanied minors, are legally present in the U.S., and have already undergone rigorous background checks by the Department of Homeland Security and immigration authorities before they are admitted to the U.S. by the State Department.</p><p>Statewide, the cuts represent $1.3 million in core programming for refugees, and an additional $1.4 million in discretionary grants which fund services for K-12 children, seniors, preventative health care, and intensive case management for refugees with particularly acute need of assistance. Currently, Illinois provides these services to about 3,500 refugees, according to Deborah Covington, Vice President of Planning and Allocation for Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago. That organization is Illinois&rsquo;s prime contractor for distributing and overseeing the bulk of ORR refugee funds.</p><p>Covington said programs funded by the discretionary grants will be completely eliminated. The state&rsquo;s seven refugee resettlement agencies, and two additional resettlement support organizations, will have discretion as to how to accommodate the cuts in core programming.</p><p>&ldquo;When budgetary crises happen, and we have a humanitarian crisis that&rsquo;s going on on the border, it&rsquo;s inappropriate to pit one deserving group against another,&rdquo; said Covington. &ldquo;The pie needs to be expanded, not simply rearranging the pie that&rsquo;s there.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We would pretty much be gutting our services,&rdquo; said Melineh Kano, Executive Director of RefugeeONE, which resettles the largest number of refugees in the City of Chicago. &ldquo;We have nine programs. Of the nine programs, four would totally shut down, and two programs would be drastically reduced.&rdquo;</p><p>Kano said unless Congress passes an emergency supplemental funding bill that replenishes the cuts, she will likely have to eliminate core services as soon as October 1. Slated for the chopping block would be programs for youth, seniors, intensive case management, medical case management, and English language training. In addition, she will drastically reduce regular case management services with bilingual staff and employment services. Kano anticipates she will have to cut 10 of her 33 full-time employees, and 7 of her 11 part-time employees.</p><p>&ldquo;Now, what that translates into in terms of service provision is that you have to have intensive services to help single mothers, to help individuals who perhaps don&rsquo;t have significant literacy skills, to help individuals who have been warehoused in refugee camps for several years, to be able to adjust to life in Chicago and become self-sufficient,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Kano and others said cuts would also come at a time that refugees need them more than ever. In accord with a <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/10/02/presidential-memorandum-refugee-admissions-fiscal-year-2014">Presidential Determination</a>, which announces the number of refugees that the U.S. may accept in a given fiscal year, and from which area of the world, the U.S. has increasingly been taking refugees from countries such as the Congo, Iraq, Bhutan, and starting next year, Syria.</p><p>&ldquo;These are definitely individuals who have been through war and trauma,&rdquo; said Kano, &ldquo;and without the important programs that we are here to provide for them, they would really have (a) hard time to integrate into society here and become self-sufficient.&rdquo;</p><p>Refugee advocates are hopeful that federal lawmakers will reach an agreement on a supplemental funding bill to replenish the cuts by September 30. While a proposal by President Barack Obama to provide $3.7 billion toward handling the unaccompanied minors crisis would have made the refugee services whole, neither the House nor Senate have shown an appetite for such a large allocation. In particular, funding contemplated by House GOP leaders doesn&rsquo;t appear to come close to restoring the cuts for refugee services.</p><p>&ldquo;The House leadership is interested in passing legislation that provides much less funding and is much more focused on border enforcement and limiting the President&rsquo;s authority than they are in really solving the humanitarian crisis,&rdquo; said Fred Tsao, Senior Policy Director at the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re still hoping that some kind of resolution will take place,&rdquo; he added, &ldquo;but obviously the clock is running.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is WBEZ&rsquo;s North Side Bureau reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 01 Aug 2014 17:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/feds-set-divert-refugee-funds-deal-unaccompanied-minors-110594 Global Activism: 'ConTextos' aiding children in Central America through literacy education http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-contextos-aiding-children-central-america-through-literacy <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/GA-debra_gittler.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-5ec3e45c-419f-6c53-a54b-a65dded641a7">While Central American children flood into the U.S. to escape crime &amp; poverty, Chicagoan Debra Gittler works to create conditions on-the-ground through literacy education, opportunity &amp; advocacy, that she hopes will help these children thrive and keep them in their home countries. Debra moved to Central America to start <a href="http://contextos.org/">ConTextos</a>. The group says &ldquo;[We do] more than just develop the mechanical skills of sounding out words. We encourage kids to think deeply, to be curious, and to question their environment.&rdquo; For <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism">Global Activism</a></em>, Gittler tells us how her work is spreading across Central America.</span></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-5ec3e45c-4188-13cc-6742-dee95fbd88c5"><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/159145115&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Just the other day, I was at a school in Usulutan, one of the areas of El Salvador that has had an explosion of violence post the gang truce. I sat with Manuel, a first grader, who told me: &quot;I have lots of family in the United States,&quot; he explained. &quot;Cousins and aunts and uncles. But I want to stay here in El Salvador. I like my school.&quot;</p><p>When we asked Debra to tell us about the importance of her work, she wrote:</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">I want to emphasize the relevance of our work in Central America, especially given the refugee kids at the border. To emphasize that the reality is, these kids have access to schools, but no education; ConTextos changes that. We are growing throughout the region and looking for greater support in our hometown here in Chicago. Those kids at the border... those are the same kids that we serve.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">Just the other day, I was at a school in Usulutan, one of the areas of El Salvador that has had an explosion of violence post the gang truce. I sat with Manuel, a first grader, who told me: &quot;I have lots of family in the United States,&quot; he explained. &quot;Cousins and aunts and uncles. But I want to stay here in El Salvador. I like my school.&quot;</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">Before ConTextos, Manuel had no books and his entire experience was copy and dictation. He went to school four hours a day. Now, his school is open to him all day long, he has access to books and other materials, and he has real conversations in his classroom. We read a book called &quot;Where are the Giants&quot; about hidden magic in the world. Manuel says to me (I&#39;m translating): &quot;You know--and this isn&#39;t in the news, but it&#39;s true-- I&#39;ve heard that there are fairies in Mexico...&quot;</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">I asked his teacher about Manuel. She said that before, she used to scold him for his imagination. Now she encourages it. Her students are encouraged to think and imagine and explore. Classroom attendance is up.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">And this school is in the midst of gang territory. MS 18 is scribbled on the walls of the school. Manuel&#39;s photo is below.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">It&#39;s important to realize that even though we are a literacy organization-- and the only org in the region with the goal and implementation in multiple countries; whereas Africa and Asia have multiple orgs addressing the lack of resources and training across countries, Central Am/ Latin Am have NONE-- we go far beyond just teaching reading.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">At one of our schools--an area of extreme poverty where most live as subsistence farmers-- the school ran out of space for their school garden. &quot;Why can&#39;t we plant on the roof?&quot; asked one of the 5th graders. At first, the teacher balked that it was a ridiculous idea. Now they are growing basil and mint on their roof. The teacher explained: &quot;by changing how we teach-- asking questions, encouraging the kids to question-- we&#39;ve seen changes in how they approach life.&quot; These kids live in areas with plenty of problems. With ConTextos&#39; intervention, they&#39;re encouraged to think about those problems.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">That school was one of our first schools. There&#39;s now 13 schools in their network. Kids read at a &quot;1st world&quot; level. The Ministry uses the schools as models for teacher development.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-contextos-aiding-children-central-america-through-literacy Morning Shift: Evangelicals and immigration http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-04/morning-shift-evangelicals-and-immigration-110275 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Church Flickr wallyg.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We talk about the potential impact of new oversight rules for Illinois&#39; charter schools. Also we discuss evangelicals and the push for immigration reform. And, we listen to more reclaimed soul.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-evangelicals-and-immigration/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-evangelicals-and-immigration.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-evangelicals-and-immigration" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Evangelicals and immigration " on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 04 Jun 2014 07:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-04/morning-shift-evangelicals-and-immigration-110275 Critics blast CPS immigration test question as offensive, inaccurate http://www.wbez.org/news/critics-blast-cps-immigration-test-question-offensive-inaccurate-110232 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 12.22.12 PM.png" alt="" /><p><p><em>CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that the immigration test question was restored to an online &ldquo;performance task&rdquo; database. WBEZ regrets the error.&nbsp;</em></p><p><o:p></o:p><em>UPDATE: This article was updated on 5/27/14 at 5:50 p.m. with new information from Chicago Public Schools.</em></p><p><o:p></o:p></p><p>A test question for Chicago Public Schools seventh graders is being called &ldquo;offensive,&rdquo; &ldquo;<a href="http://cps299.wordpress.com/2014/05/09/chicagos-racist-test-questions/" target="_blank">racist</a>,&rdquo; and factually inaccurate by groups as disparate as the Illinois GOP and the Chicago Teachers Union.</p><p dir="ltr">Earlier this month the district &nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/afternoonshiftwbez/chicago-public-schools-test-question-on-immigration-causes-controversy" target="_blank">yanked the controversial question</a>&mdash;part of a new battery of tests meant to determine the effectiveness of teachers&mdash;with schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett issuing an apology for it. But WBEZ has learned that the district&nbsp;did not prohibit teachers from continuing to give the test. It &ldquo;recommended&rdquo; an alternative test, but allowed the immigration question to be administered with an &ldquo;addendum&rdquo; read aloud by the teacher.</p><p><o:p></o:p></p><p dir="ltr">The question asks pupils to read two commentaries&mdash;both opposed to undocumented immigrants becoming U.S. citizens&mdash;and evaluate the text and the authors&rsquo; biographies to determine which is &ldquo;the most authoritative and relevant to support your argument OPPOSING a pathway to citizenship.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s best to keep America for Americans and those who know how to speak English properly,&rdquo; says the first text. &ldquo;Save America for those of us who know how to behave in law abiding ways.&rdquo; The article says undocumented immigrants &ldquo;should go back to where they came from,&rdquo; and the author says he &ldquo;dream(s) of a time when we ban all new immigrants to America both legal and illegal.&rdquo; &nbsp;The author is pictured as a black man named Arie Payo, identified as a former aide to &ldquo;President Bush&rsquo;s Immigration Taskforce&rdquo; and a contributor to the &quot;Conservative Journal.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">But it turns out that Payo, his opinions, his credentials and even the &ldquo;Conservative Journal&rdquo; are all made up; so is the second text, in which small business owner &ldquo;Stella Luna&rdquo;&mdash; coincidentally the title of a children&rsquo;s book&mdash;is identified as the author of &ldquo;The Dream Act is a Nightmare.&rdquo; She worries that giving citizenship to immigrants &ldquo;will increase the number of poor people in town.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Eighty-five percent of CPS students are low-income. &nbsp;Many are immigrants or children of immigrants.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Shame on CPS, shame on whoever wrote this test question. From beginning to end I think it&rsquo;s egregious,&rdquo; said Sylvia Puente, director of Chicago&rsquo;s Latino Policy Forum, which works on both immigration and education issues. Puente said working on the 45-minute test question could be emotionally stressful for children living in situations the authors berate.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The language in these is really, really offensive and disconcerting and really reinforces negative stereotypes about immigrants,&rdquo; Puente said. &ldquo;As a seventh-grade child, I would say, &lsquo;What are they saying about me? What does this say about who I am?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The controversial immigration test question was first made public on social media. CPS officials removed it from the testing lineup after a predominantly Latino school on the Southwest Side refused to give the exam earlier this month. &nbsp;The &ldquo;addendum&rdquo; the district issued to the &nbsp;immigration question instructs teachers to remind students they were tested on two pro-immigration viewpoints at the beginning of the school year and says they will now encounter two viewpoints opposing immigration.</p><p>&ldquo;That addendum was sent to teachers because a number of the tests had been printed and distributed and CPS did not want students taking the exam without the broader context,&rdquo; said CPS spokesman Joel Hood. &ldquo;We have no reports of any additional students actually taking it.&rdquo;</p><p><o:p></o:p></p><p>The district said just 32 students from two different schools were given the immigration question before it was temporarily pulled. The alternative test is about climate change.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">The Latino Policy Forum&#39;s Puente questioned why the district is using made-up opinion pieces to teach kids which sources are &ldquo;authoritative.&rdquo; She pointed out factual errors even in the set-up to the question, which states that &ldquo;in January 2013, president Obama and Congress unveiled plans for immigration reform that included a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">That never happened.</p><p dir="ltr">And Puente is not the only one to find inaccuracies in the question. The fact that the comments were presented as those of a high-level Republican aide irked Illinois GOP leaders.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Ironically, it probably would have taken less time to just research and cite a real Republican viewpoint than it must have taken to make this nonsense up,&rdquo; said Jay Reyes, Republican state central committeeman from the heavily immigrant 4th Congressional District. Reyes said the question is &ldquo;an unfair, uninformed take on a Republican viewpoint.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The question is one of more than 160 &ldquo;<a href="http://www.cps.edu/sitecollectiondocuments/REACHStudentsPerformanceTasks.pdf" target="_blank">REACH performance tasks</a>&rdquo; that are part of the district&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cps.edu/Pages/reachstudents.aspx" target="_blank">new teacher evaluation system</a>. The tasks, given in all district-run schools this month, are designed to show how much students have learned this school year&mdash;and by extension, how effective their teachers are. The immigration question was being used to evaluate the effectiveness of school librarians. Performance tasks like this one count for between 10 and 15 percent of a teacher&rsquo;s evaluation this year.</p><p dir="ltr">Byrd-Bennett apologized: &ldquo;Teaching children the importance of diversity, acceptance, and independent thinking are important values at CPS. We apologize for any misunderstanding and have provided librarians an alternative test to administer to students,&quot; she said in a written statement earlier this month. She said the test question &ldquo;was intended for students to evaluate the biases, credibility and point of view of sources.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The district said a beginning-of-the-year exam asked students to consider two opinions from pro-immigration advocates. CPS said no concerns were raised about that activity.</p><p dir="ltr">The district said just 32 students from two different schools were given the immigration question before it was temporarily pulled. The alternative test is about climate change.</p><p dir="ltr">Officials said they do not know exactly who wrote the test question, but CPS said, in general, REACH performance tasks have been designed by teachers, including librarians, &ldquo;in partnership with (the Chicago Teachers Union).&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Carol Caref, who works on teacher evaluation issues for the union, said CTU doesn&rsquo;t know what revisions take place to REACH questions between the time teachers help create them and the time they become official CPS &ldquo;performance tasks.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t believe that very many eyes were on this particular performance task,&rdquo; Caref said. &quot;Because I can&#39;t believe there isn&#39;t someone who would have looked at this and said, &lsquo;Whoa.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Caref said the district has raced to get things like performance tasks in place; state law requires that student growth be a factor in teachers&rsquo; performance evaluations. But at the time the district <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/chicago-unveils-new-system-rating-teachers-97770" target="_blank">adopted</a> its new teacher evaluation system in 2012, CPS &nbsp;had no formal way to measure how much individual teachers were contributing to student learning.</p><p dir="ltr">Caref said the immigration question &ldquo;raises a lot of questions about the validity of these performance tasks&hellip;. The system is not set up to carefully do this. It&rsquo;s done in a hurried way.&rdquo; This is the second year CPS has administered performance tasks; it&#39;s unclear whether any students took the immigration exam last year.</p><p dir="ltr">Chicago parent Cassie Creswell, an organizer with the anti-testing group More Than a Score, said the immigration question highlights how testing in schools is shifting education.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s pretty easy to say (the test) is racist. And to just present that to a student with no context?&quot; Creswell said the test wasn&#39;t designed by teachers to &quot;fit into a classroom discussion or as an exercise for the students where they&#39;ve had a lot of context leading up to it. That&#39;s the problem with a lot of standardized testing is that it&#39;s not really part of the curriculum,&quot; she says.</p><p>The pro- and anti-immigration test questions are posted below, along with the &quot;addendum.&quot;</p><p>Linda Lutton is the WBEZ education reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZeducation">@wbezeducation</a>.</p></p> Mon, 26 May 2014 11:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/critics-blast-cps-immigration-test-question-offensive-inaccurate-110232 Immigrant father describes overcoming obstacles http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/140425_Natalie Cruz and her dad Byron Cruz (1).JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Byron Cruz grew up the oldest of three kids as part of a wealthy family in Guatemala. When Byron was young, his dad died and Byron became the man of the house. He struggled to adjust to his new circumstances and was on the verge of being kicked out of high school, when he met his future wife. She helped him graduate and they married and had a daughter. But still they struggled.</p><p>Byron sat down with his daughter Natalie last week at the Latino Cultural Center at UIC. He told her about life in Guatemala when she was a baby. &ldquo;I got to the point that I had one good pair of shoes but if you would flip the shoe you would see that the shoe has one big hole. One day it was raining and I was walking a lot, I was going back to home and I saw you and I thought: I don&rsquo;t want my daughter to live in this way.&rdquo;</p><p>He decided to move to the United States in order to provide a better life for his family. Byron worked in the U.S. for six months, before sending for his family. He didn&rsquo;t know how to speak English and became frustrated when he was blamed for something he didn&rsquo;t do at a job. He went to school to learn English and wound up going to college. Their family grew and became more stable.</p><p>Byron sees himself as a Guatemalan-American. He tells his daughter, &ldquo;I always think about the day that I die, what is going to happen with me. And I wish that they take my ashes and divide it into the two countries because half of my people is over there but the other half is over here.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 25 Apr 2014 14:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/immigrant-father-describes-overcoming-obstacles-110078 Protesters want Obama to end mass deportations http://www.wbez.org/news/protesters-want-obama-end-mass-deportations-109982 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/protest1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>More than 200 people, including groups of children, are staging a two-day march drawing attention to mass deportations of undocumented immigrants. The protesters want the Obama administration to end the practice by executive order.</p><p>The march, which began this morning at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in downtown Chicago before heading west. It is an extension of this past weekend&rsquo;s National Day of Action against deportations.</p><p>As of this month, around 2 million undocumented people have been deported since Barack Obama took office, which is approaching the record set by his predecessor, George W. Bush.</p><p>Immigration reform advocates have shifted their focus recently&nbsp; to putting an emphasis on the number of mass deportations. Previously their priority was pushing for immigration reform legislation. An immigration bill passed the U.S. Senate early last year but has stalled in the House since June).</p><p>&ldquo;Two million (is) too many,&rdquo; says Rosi Carrasco, with Organized Communities Against Deportations. &ldquo;It is possible to stop deportations with the organization, determination, and strength of our community. President Obama can use his executive authority to avoid that detention centers continue to profit from human suffering.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago-area protests will continue into tomorrow. Lawrence Benito is executive director of the Illinois Commission for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, and he says the focus on mass deportations highlights the continued frustration he has with Obama -- who he said pledged to pursue immigration reform as an agenda item he would tackle during his second term.</p><p>&ldquo;He promised our communities that passing immigration reform would be a priority,&rdquo; says Benito. &ldquo;Instead he has prioritized enforcement. He can remedy the situation while Congress debates immigration reform, through administrative relief.&rdquo;</p><p>Advocates want the president to take the same approach he did in 2012 when he ended the deportation for so-called &ldquo;Dreamers,&rdquo; young people who were brought into the country with undocumented relatives.&nbsp;</p><p>Marchers began their demonstration at ICE shortly after 10 a.m today. Their route wends through the city, including a stop in the heavily Latino South Side community of Pilsen, before decamping tonight in the western suburbs.</p><p>Tuesday&rsquo;s events are scheduled to start at the Broadview Detention Center. That is where more people are scheduled to take part in civil disobedience protests.</p><p><em>Follow WBEZ Host/Producer Yolanda Perdomo on <a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/106564114685277342468/posts/p/pub">Google+</a></em></p></p> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 12:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/protesters-want-obama-end-mass-deportations-109982 Morning Shift: Leadership likability and the CEO gender gap http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-07/morning-shift-leadership-likability-and-ceo-gender <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/by Kumar Appaiah.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We explore what makes a well-liked boss - and whether people prefer male or female CEOs. Plus, we take a look at the complicated question of why segregation in Chicago Public Schools continues.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-leadership-likability-and-the-ceo-ge/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-leadership-likability-and-the-ceo-ge.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-leadership-likability-and-the-ceo-ge" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Leadership likability and the CEO gender gap" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 08:42:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-07/morning-shift-leadership-likability-and-ceo-gender Chicago man loses 200 pounds to give back to Little Village http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/chicago-man-loses-200-pounds-give-back-little-village-109972 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/storycorps.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Miguel Blancarte, Jr. is a proud resident of Chicago&#39;s Little Village neighborhood. A first generation college graduate from Brown University, he now works at a law firm specializing in immigration.</p><p>Miguel says the one thing he&rsquo;s always struggled with is his weight. It wasn&rsquo;t until his doctor warned him that he wouldn&rsquo;t live past his mid-40s that he knew something had to change:</p><p>&ldquo;Honestly the thought of losing anything more than 30 pounds was just not a reality to me,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>But Miguel managed to lose not just 30, but 200 pounds in all. He then ran his first ever 5k race to to raise money for Enlace, the local community center that provides health and social services in Little Village.</p><p>To hear how he lost all that weight so he could give back to his community, check out the audio above.</p><p><em>Meredith Zielke is a WBEZ producer.</em><br />&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 04 Apr 2014 16:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/chicago-man-loses-200-pounds-give-back-little-village-109972 Morning Shift: What does our favorite food say about us? http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-03-21/morning-shift-what-does-our-favorite-food-say-about <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Plate Phil Romans.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We take a look at the state of our plate as we talk with the man behind the annual tome, Eating Habits in America. Also, the sounds of bhangra pioneer DJ Rehka.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-what-does-our-favorite-food-say-abou/embed?header=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-what-does-our-favorite-food-say-abou.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-what-does-our-favorite-food-say-abou" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: What does our favorite food say about us?" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 21 Mar 2014 08:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-03-21/morning-shift-what-does-our-favorite-food-say-about