WBEZ | Richard M. Daley http://www.wbez.org/tags/richard-m-daley Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en So, when is it Jane Byrne's turn? http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/so-when-it-jane-byrnes-turn-110556 <p><p><em>Editor&#39;s note: There&#39;s an update to this story. The City Council agreed <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/jane-byrne-closer-getting-memorial-110573" target="_blank">to name the Water Tower Plaza after Jane Byrne</a>. Read on to better understand why the issue gained momentum almost thirty years after Byrne left office&nbsp;</em><em>&mdash; while other city mayors received such honors within shorter timeframes.</em></p><p>Former Mayor Jane Byrne&rsquo;s name has been thrown around a lot lately, mostly as a debate about how to honor her &mdash; Chicago&rsquo;s first female mayor&nbsp;&mdash;&nbsp;is gaining momentum.</p><p>But for Curious City question-asker <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/so-when-it-jane-byrnes-turn-110556#qa">Shana Jackson</a>, it was a name she&rsquo;d never heard before. That is, until her father gave her a quick quiz one day.</p><p>&ldquo;My parents are former teachers, and so my dad is always quizzing me about things,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;Out of the blue, he asked me about the first woman mayor of Chicago. And I said, &lsquo;What woman mayor of Chicago?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Shana says her father, and later her Facebook friends, told her she should be ashamed that she didn&rsquo;t know about Jane Byrne. So then she hit the Internet.</p><p>There&rsquo;s a <em>lot</em> to be learned about Jane Byrne: There&rsquo;s her <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/chi-chicagodays-byrne-story,0,7583194.story" target="_blank">landslide victory </a>in 1979 over incumbent Mayor Michael Bilandic (and thus the so-called Democratic machine) in an election held shortly after his administration <a href="http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/The-312/February-2011/Snowpocalypse-Then-How-the-Blizzard-of-1979-Cost-the-Election-for-Michael-Bilandic/" target="_blank">botched handling a massive blizzard</a>.</p><p>Byrne served only one term, but many credit her as the brainchild behind some of the most recognizably &ldquo;Chicago&rdquo; events: the Taste of Chicago, Jazz Fest, and numerous neighborhood summer festivals. Ditto for the physical transformation of the city: O&rsquo;Hare&rsquo;s International Terminal, the redevelopment of Navy Pier and the museum campus, public transportation options to the airport and much more.</p><p>There&rsquo;s also her controversial decision (or PR stunt, depending upon your interpretation) to move into the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1981/04/02/us/chicago-s-mayor-spends-lovely-night-at-project.html?module=Search&amp;mabReward=relbias%3Ar" target="_blank">Cabrini-Green</a>&nbsp;public housing development,&nbsp;as well as the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DCLCX1cqAc" target="_blank">protest </a>that erupted when she held a public Easter celebration there.<a name="timeline"></a></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0" height="377" mozallowfullscreen="true" src="https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1gLzQq7ISqUuKt5ufNFfQOVXPTrjL_BBaImlnDBuSTc0/embed?start=false&amp;loop=false&amp;delayms=3000" webkitallowfullscreen="true" width="620"></iframe></p><p>But what Shana <em>didn&rsquo;t</em> find is any structure or building or street around Chicago named for Mayor Byrne. That&#39;s despite the fact that you <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/so-when-it-jane-byrnes-turn-110556#mayors">can find plenty named in honor of <em>other</em> Chicago mayors</a> &mdash; even some recent ones.</p><p>That led her to ask:</p><p style="text-align: center;"><em>Why is there rare mention and no memorials, buildings or streets named after the only woman mayor of Chicago &mdash; Jane Byrne?</em></p><p>Shana&rsquo;s question arrives as Chicago newspapers, local bloggers and columnists, city officials &mdash; you name it &mdash; are debating whether Jane Byrne deserves to have her name affixed on something, and whether or not she&rsquo;s been ignored.</p><p><em>Chicago Sun-Times </em>columnist Neil Steinberg wrote what he called an <a href="http://www.suntimes.com/news/steinberg/27312474-452/an-open-letter-to-jane-byrne.html#.U8VW35RdV8E" target="_blank">&ldquo;open letter&rdquo;</a> to Byrne ahead of her 80th birthday, where he talked about her legacy, and how she may think she&rsquo;s been &ldquo;forgotten, erased from history.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Sun-Times</em> columnist Michael Sneed, press secretary for Byrne for a short time in 1979, has led the charge. She&rsquo;s written extensive <a href="http://www.suntimes.com/news/sneed/27773585-452/sneed-jane-byrnes-daughter-tells-of-fearless-mom-with-incredible-instincts.html" target="_blank">columns </a>about Byrne, listing her accomplishments and pushing for the city to honor its first woman mayor. Sneed wrote that Byrne&rsquo;s &ldquo;<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/27761148-761/ex-mayor-jane-byrnes-trailblazing-legacy-unfairly-ignored-sneed.html#.U8VW4ZRdV8E" target="_blank">legacy has been ignored</a> by subsequent mayoral administrations, basically erased during Mayor Richard M. Daley&rsquo;s tenure in office, and long overdue for recognition.&rdquo;</p><p>Sneed&rsquo;s columns opened the floodgates for other <a href="http://abc7chicago.com/news/movement-pushes-for-recognition-of-former-mayor-jane-byrne/94032/" target="_blank">media outlets</a> to chase down the story, and for city <a href="http://politics.suntimes.com/article/chicago/sneed-proposals-introduced-honor-ex-mayor-byrne/wed-06252014-1053am" target="_blank">officials</a> to weigh in. Ald. Edward Burke (14th) has even pitched a few potential <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2014-06-25/news/chi-alderman-pitches-renaming-buckingham-fountain-navy-pier-ballroom-after-jane-byrne-20140625_1_alderman-pitches-navy-pier-buckingham-fountain" target="_blank">options</a>. But more on that later.</p><p>To answer why Byrne&rsquo;s name hasn&rsquo;t graced public assets, it helps to understand how something &mdash; anything &mdash; gets named by the city in the first place. And then, of course, there&rsquo;s the core of Shana&#39;s concern: <em>Why</em> doesn&rsquo;t Byrne have anything named after her?</p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">The process: Naming something after a Chicago mayor</span></strong></p><p>The city of big shoulders has a penchant for slapping peoples&rsquo; names on things. (Just ask <a href="http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/4rc83p/signfeud" target="_blank">Donald Trump</a>). But regardless of who the honored may be (<a href="http://www.nbcchicago.com/the-scene/food-drink/Charlie-Trotter-Honored-on-Eve-or-Retirement-168088876.html" target="_blank">Charlie Trotter</a>, <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2000-03-08/news/0003080158_1_honor-sinatra-statue-city-of-big-shoulders" target="_blank">Frank Sinatra</a>, or a Chicago mayor), the process eventually involves Chicago&rsquo;s City Council.</p><p>Let&rsquo;s start with city streets. Up until 1984, official street names and the green signs that depict their directions were up for grabs. For example Cermak Road, formerly 22nd Street, was named after Mayor Anton Cermak, who was <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/john-r-schmidt/2013-02/anton-cermak-chicagos-first-boss-105346" target="_blank">assassinated </a>while in office. Same goes for Hoyne Avenue, named after Mayor Thomas Hoyne. (Interestingly, Hoyne has a street named after him, despite the fact that he was <a href="http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/795.html" target="_blank">never allowed to take office</a>.)</p><p>But as one former alderman explained to the <em>Chicago Tribune</em> in <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2000-02-20/news/0002200122_1_street-signs-street-names-renaming" target="_blank">2000,</a> this street-naming process became onerous. It requires permanent changes to maps, surveys and other records. The Honorary Street Ordinance changed the game in 1984. After that, brown honorary street signs began popping up, directly underneath the green signs that identify Chicago&rsquo;s official street names.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><span style="font-size:18px;">What is named after Chicago&#39;s mayors?</span><a name="mayors"></a></span></strong></p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="700" src="http://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline/latest/embed/index.html?source=0Ag9RbLc9jJ4QdG1fcnlrSUlWNlExc3dDR0lIdDVSX0E&amp;font=Bevan-PotanoSans&amp;maptype=toner&amp;lang=en" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Chicago City Clerk Susana Mendoza says, currently, the process begins with one of the city&rsquo;s 50 aldermen. Any of them can write a resolution or ordinance to name a stretch of street. It then goes before the full council.</p><p>These resolutions pass unless they&rsquo;re controversial. Mendoza says some aldermen in 2006 wanted to create Fred Hampton Way, after a <a href="http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/142.html" target="_blank">leader in the Black Panther Party</a>. Another time, an alderman wanted to name a portion of Michigan Avenue after Hugh Hefner, the <em>Playboy Magazine</em> magnate.</p><p>If an honorary street name ordinance passes City Council, the Chicago Department of Transportation creates the requisite brown sign and affixes it to the appropriate post.</p><p>The process works the same way for other structures, too: The council votes on a proposal to name a fountain, building or other public asset after someone. Mendoza says it&rsquo;s most common to wait until after a mayor (or anyone else) dies. For example: Richard J. Daley Center was rededicated and named after him just days after he passed away.</p><p>There are a few ways to name something for a former mayor without the council&rsquo;s purview. Private buildings, naturally, can be named without council approval. DePaul University&#39;s Richard M. and Maggie C. Daley Building is one notable example.</p><p>As for public school buildings, the Chicago Public Schools Board of Education has a written policy that a school can only be named after someone who has been deceased for at least six months. A sitting mayor and the district&rsquo;s CEO can seek special exemptions, however. A CPS spokesman says this was the case for the naming of Barack Obama College Prep.</p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">So, why nothing for Jane Byrne?</span></strong></p><p>When it comes to political history, no single person (or opinion) can tell &quot;the whole story.&quot; That&#39;s especially the case when it comes to why a controversial, so-called &ldquo;machine-fighting,&rdquo; tough cookie such as Jane Byrne has yet to be memorialized.&nbsp;</p><p>As for asking the lady herself, she&rsquo;s now 80 years old and is not in great health, after reportedly suffering from a stroke last year. Her only daughter, Kathy Byrne, a lawyer at local personal injury and mesothelioma firm Cooney and Conway, says her mom is &ldquo;doing okay. She&rsquo;s holding her own, she&rsquo;s stable.&rdquo;</p><p>Kathy Byrne was along for the roller coaster ride of her mom&rsquo;s campaign and then election to the 5th floor office in 1979. Even though she may be the next-best source for what Jane Byrne&rsquo;s wishes are, she says she&rsquo;s not sure how to answer Shana Jackson&rsquo;s &ldquo;why&rdquo; question.</p><p>&ldquo;You know, I think sometimes &mdash; what do they say? Politics isn&rsquo;t a beanbag?&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;And people take their politics very seriously in Chicago, and I think whether or not anything was intentional, it may just be sort of an effect where if someone perceived that if someone doesn&rsquo;t like someone, they&rsquo;re not going to do anything for the person they don&rsquo;t like. ... I don&rsquo;t know that anything was intentional, I think it may have been a misperception.&rdquo;</p><p>Kathy Byrne&rsquo;s obliquely referring to Chicago lore &mdash; printed in the papers and spoken in bars &mdash; that Mayor Richard M. Daley is behind Jane Byrne&rsquo;s absence from Chicago streets and buildings.</p><p>Several people I spoke with for this story are quick to blame him.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s an old adage, young lady,&rdquo; says Paul Green, Director of the Institute for Politics at Roosevelt University. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s called Irish Alzheimer&#39;s: You forget everything but your grudges, and the Daley family and the Byrne family have been grudging themselves for a long time.&rdquo;</p><p>Green says he believes the battle between Jane Byrne and Daley was &ldquo;personal&rdquo; and that Daley didn&rsquo;t want her recognized for anything. But he says it&rsquo;s also true that there was never any true grassroots support for Byrne. And there still isn&rsquo;t.</p><p>&ldquo;She left not exactly in the blaze of glory,&rdquo; Green says. &ldquo;She needed to be calm about what she was about, because not only was she the first woman, but it was the first time in approximately 70 years that the Democratic organization lost the mayoral primary, so she had to go slow, and she didn&rsquo;t.</p><p>&ldquo;To her credit, she had an amazing number of ideas, but it was more subject with no predicate.&rdquo;</p><p>But others, like Byrne&rsquo;s first campaign manager, Don Rose, blame it all on Daley.</p><p>&ldquo;Richie Daley did everything possible to make the world forget she ever existed,&rdquo; Rose says. &ldquo;They were mortal enemies. He conceived it that way.&rdquo;</p><p>Rose says he and Byrne didn&rsquo;t part on the best of terms, but he stresses that doesn&rsquo;t influence his appraisal of her. He says Daley&rsquo;s should have been the administration that took on the task of honoring her. Since <a href="http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2013/04/15/1983-mayoral-debate" target="_blank">Byrne had run against Harold Washington</a> in 1983, Washington was likely not in the mood to honor her in anyway during his time in office, according to Rose. By his recollection, a mayor will be honored posthumously, and perhaps one or two mayors down the road. Following this logic, Byrne would have been honored after Richard M. Daley took office in 1989.</p><p>&ldquo;[Daley] was, I have to say, very mean-spirited about Jane Byrne. Of course, I would say, she was mean-spirited about him too,&rdquo; Rose says. &ldquo;If the positions had been reversed, she might have tried to forget about naming anything after him.&rdquo;</p><p>But Ald. Burke &mdash; who served on the Council during Byrne&rsquo;s administration &mdash; says she originally eschewed recognition, and Daley isn&rsquo;t to blame.</p><p>&ldquo;He never, in my presence, expressed any reluctance to have Mayor Byrne honored in any way,&rdquo; he says.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:18px;"><strong>Listen: Jane Byrne on her legacy</strong></span><a name="byrne"></a></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/160299515&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Kathy Byrne says she&rsquo;s not certain Daley is to blame, either.</p><p>&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t explain anyone&rsquo;s motivation or even if they have motivation,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;I would imagine if somebody&rsquo;s running Chicago, they ought to have bigger things on their minds than erasing or not erasing someone else&rsquo;s legacy.&rdquo;</p><p>But one thing is for sure: Kathy says she and her mom have been bothered by the whole thing. She recalls school girls would interview her mother during Women&rsquo;s History Month projects. Jane, she says, couldn&rsquo;t point the girls to anything named after her.</p><p>&ldquo;She could tell them things, like the [CTA] Orange Line, museum campus, but there was nothing that backed up her assertion, and I think that was kind of frustrating,&rdquo; Byrne says.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it was kind of disillusioning, or the worry that it would be disillusioning to little girls that they could do all this work, and have all these achievements and then it might be ignored, and other people would take credit for them.&rdquo;</p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">Jane Byrne International Terminal?</span></strong></p><p>But now, just over 30 years since she left office, Byrne may soon have something to point to. Ald. Burke pitched a few ideas to the City Council in early July, and also asked members of the public, or any other officials, to suggest ideas as well.</p><p>The gesture is a far cry from one of the more infamous moments of Byrne and Burke&rsquo;s relationship. Byrne, while on the campaign trail, called out <a href="http://www.nbcchicago.com/blogs/ward-room/Why-Rahm-Cant-Get-Rid-Of-Ed-Burke-120609814.html" target="_blank">Ald. Burke as part of a &ldquo;cabal of evil men&rdquo;</a> who ran the City Council.</p><p>&ldquo;It was the legendary British statesman Edmund Burke who once said that, in politics, there are no permanent enemies, no permanent friends &mdash; only permanent interests,&rdquo; Burke says, referring to a quotation he often uses. &ldquo;I think it is in the municipal interest that a person who achieved what Jane Byrne achieved in our history should be accorded an appropriate honor.&rdquo;</p><p>Burke officially proposed renaming four structures to become Jane Byrne memorials: the Clarence F. Buckingham Memorial Fountain in Grant Park; Navy Pier&rsquo;s grand ballroom; the plaza surrounding the Old Chicago Water Tower; and the O&rsquo;Hare International Terminal. He says aldermen will also vote on any other ideas submitted to the committee.</p><p>Kathy Byrne says her mother is happy something is finally happening, and that she would be particularly excited about the Water Tower idea. It&rsquo;s right across the street from the Gold Coast apartment where she lived while mayor.</p><p>Byrne says a Water Tower memorial would be even better if the city could move her mom&rsquo;s beloved <a href="http://chicago-outdoor-sculptures.blogspot.com/2009/07/childrens-fountain.html" target="_blank">Children&rsquo;s Fountain</a> to that site. Jane Byrne, while mayor, originally dedicated the Children&rsquo;s Fountain on Wacker Drive. The fountain was later moved to Lincoln Park, where it sits today.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know what that would entail, but the plumbing is all there,&rdquo; Byrne says. &ldquo;If they could do that, that would be ideal, &nbsp;if they could name that park Jane Byrne Plaza. It&rsquo;s her neighborhood, it&rsquo;s the Chicago historical landmark of the Water Tower, and it would be a really nice tribute.&rdquo;</p><p>The<a href="https://chicago.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank"> finance committee</a> meets in the last week of July. The measures would have to be approved first by committee, as well as the full council. As this story is published, more than 30 alderman had signed on to Burke&rsquo;s proposals.</p><p>As for our question-asker Shana Jackson, she says she has been keeping up with the news about the latest proposals, and believes it&rsquo;s time that Jane Byrne gets some recognition.</p><p>&ldquo;I think that is a travesty,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;How do we as Chicago &mdash; we put our names on everything &mdash; how did we let her down like this?&rdquo;</p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">Our question comes from: Shana Jackson<a name="qa"></a></span></strong></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/shanaJacksonMed.jpg" style="height: 322px; width: 230px; margin: 5px; float: right;" title="Shana Jackson asked our question about former Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne. (Photo courtesy of Shana Jackson)" />Shana Jackson calls herself a total South Side girl. She&rsquo;s been living in or around Chicago for her entire life, except when she pursued a degree from Hampton University in Virginia. She currently resides in the Ashburn/Wrightwood neighborhood.</p><p>And that&rsquo;s why she says she&rsquo;s embarrassed to admit the story behind her Curious City question. &nbsp;</p><p>Her parents are former teachers, and so her dad is always quizzing her on things. During a recent family night, Shana&rsquo;s dad shot her his latest pop quiz question:</p><p>&ldquo;So, what do you think about our only woman mayor in Chicago?&rdquo;</p><p>Shana&rsquo;s response?</p><p>&ldquo;&lsquo;What woman mayor?&rdquo; Shana recalls. &ldquo;And he gave me the weirdest stare ever, because I&rsquo;m super womanist, like &lsquo;yay woman power!&rsquo; And for me to not know there was a woman mayor in Chicago? I was so embarrassed.&rdquo;</p><p>She took to Facebook to see if any of her friends had heard of Jane Byrne, but that didn&rsquo;t go very well either. Tons of her friends made fun of her, and one even asked if she knew who Harold Washington was.</p><p>So she deleted her Facebook post, and opened up a Google browser window, where she began discovering more and more about Chicago&rsquo;s first woman mayor. But Shana says she couldn&rsquo;t find any streets or buildings named after Byrne, and so she came to Curious City to find out why.</p><p>Shana is currently pursuing a dual degree in social work and law at Loyola University Chicago.</p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">Lauren Chooljian</a> is a WBEZ reporter. Digital producer <a href="http://twitter.com/triciabobeda">Tricia Bobeda</a> contributed to this story.</em></p></p> Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/so-when-it-jane-byrnes-turn-110556 Swept from their homes, Chicago's Latinos built new community http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538 <p><iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/45010154&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><p>Chicago is famous for its ethnic neighborhoods. And there&rsquo;s a funny thing about them. A neighborhood&rsquo;s identity can seem like it has been in place <em>forever</em>, even when big ethnic shifts took place just one or two generations ago. This is how many Chicagoans see Pilsen and Little Village, a corridor with the biggest concentration of Latinos in the Midwest. These neighborhoods have so much vitality &mdash; dense housing, bustling commercial strips, packed playgrounds &mdash; that it seems like Latinos must have been there for ages. A curious citizen named <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538#CM">CM! Winters-Palacio</a> was wondering how long, so she asked us:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>Why are Latinos concentrated in the Pilsen and Little Village neighborhoods? When did it happen?</em></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/LUCY%20FINAL.jpg" style="float: right; height: 328px; width: 400px;" title="Near West Side resident Rosie Valtierra holds her goddaughter there on the day of her baptism in the mid-1950s. City Hall has embarked on massive construction projects that will raze much of the area. Valtierra and many other displaced Latinos will end up in Pilsen. (Photo courtesy of Rosemarie Sierra)" />We answered the <em>when</em> part of the question just by looking at census numbers: Pilsen did not become mostly Latino until the 1960s; Little Village didn&rsquo;t until the 1970s. Answering <em>why</em> those changes happened took a little more work. We interviewed experts, searched newspaper archives, pounded Pilsen&rsquo;s pavement and tracked down some of the neighborhood&rsquo;s first Latino residents. In our audio story (above), Lucy Gutiérrez, 87, tells us about bringing her family to Pilsen when the place was still populated mainly by Central and Eastern European descendants &mdash; including the Bohemians whose forebears named it after Plzeň, a city in what is now the Czech Republic. Our research also led to some text snapshots from the history. The snapshots begin on Chicago&rsquo;s Near West Side, which included the city&rsquo;s largest Latino enclave just a few decades ago.</p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">In old neighborhood, the beginning of the end</span></strong></p><p><strong>FEBRUARY 15, 1949</strong>: A Chicago housing official complains about residents refusing to leave a 14-block stretch from Desplaines to Paulina streets to make way for a new superhighway along Chicago&rsquo;s Congress Street. The official, Detlef E. Mackelmann, says some would not go &ldquo;until the buildings next door were being torn down.&rdquo; The highway&rsquo;s first section, completed in 1955, will displace thousands of people. It will be among several massive construction projects that will raze much of the Near West Side, including a Mexican neighborhood that dates back to the 1920s. The projects will include three expressways, a university campus and public-housing developments. Some of those Mexicans will move to Pilsen, a neighborhood just south. They will form the nucleus of what will become a much bigger Latino community. The Congress highway, for its part, will eventually be named the Eisenhower Expressway.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px;"><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538#sources">1</a></strong></span></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1%20TAYLOR%20STREET%20FINAL.jpg" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1%20TAYLOR%20STREET%20PIES%20FINAL.jpg" style="margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px;" title="(WBEZ illustrations by Erik Nelson Rodriguez)" /></div></div><p><br /><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">White exodus from Pilsen makes room for newcomers</span></strong></p><p><strong>OCTOBER 18, 1953</strong>: St. Procopius, a 72-year-old Czech parish in Pilsen, rededicates its school with a Sunday dinner. The meal includes turkey, dumplings, sauerkraut, rye bread and kolacky. The music includes the Czech anthem &quot;Kde domov můj?&quot; and an Antonín Dvořák composition. Although the school has begun to enroll some of Pilsen&rsquo;s first Latino children, today&rsquo;s program includes no hint of their cultures. And Rev. Peter Mizera, the St. Procopius priest, has been complaining to the archdiocese about &ldquo;the recent infiltration of the Mexicans.&rdquo; But Pilsen&rsquo;s white population is declining and growing older as young families head to suburbs. St. Procopius and other parishes will have to open their doors to Latinos. By 1955, six Pilsen parochial schools will be enrolling Mexican children. Over the next two decades, several Pilsen parishes will retool themselves, sending priests to learn Spanish in Mexico, building altars and shrines to the Virgin of Guadalupe, even bringing mariachi music into masses. Some other parishes, slow to adapt, will close.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px;"><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538#sources">2</a></strong></span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">Campus construction pushes more Latinos into Pilsen</span></strong></p><p><strong>MARCH 19, 1961</strong>: Led by a mariachi band, hundreds of Mexican protesters march from St. Francis of Assisi Church and tie up Near West Side traffic. The protesters slam a City Hall plan to replace their neighborhood with a University of Illinois campus. They blame Mayor Richard J. Daley and shout, &ldquo;Down with Daley,&rdquo; &ldquo;Daley sold us out&rdquo; and &ldquo;Respeten nuestros hogares&rdquo; (Respect our homes). The protest is part of a much larger effort to derail the university plan. Italians, the area&rsquo;s biggest ethnic group, are leading the resistance but Mexicans are also visible. Roughly 4,800 of them live in the census tracts the city wants the university to take over. The resistance will fail. On May 10, the City Council will designate 106 acres for the campus. Some of the Mexicans will move a few blocks west, but campus expansions will displace them again. Many will end up in Pilsen. The University of Illinois Chicago Circle Campus, meanwhile, will open in 1965.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px;"><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538#sources">3</a></strong></span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">Chicano movement builds neighborhood&rsquo;s new identity</span></strong></p><p><strong>APRIL 24, 1969</strong>: More than 100 residents of Chicago&rsquo;s Pilsen neighborhood gather for a public meeting of the Latin American Alliance for Social Advancement, known by its Spanish acronym, ALAS. The meeting occurs at Howell House, a community center focused for decades on Czech immigrants. At the meeting, ALAS endorses Arthur Vázquez to lead Howell House; he will be its first Mexican-American director. The meeting also develops strategies to improve Pilsen schools, expose police brutality and publicize a national grape boycott. The organizing reflects two major changes in Pilsen. First, Mexicans have been pouring into the neighborhood for two decades. Along with the arrivals from the Near West Side, many have come from South Texas or various parts of Mexico. A smaller Latino group in Pilsen has roots in Puerto Rico. The 1970 census will record the neighborhood&rsquo;s first Latino majority. The other big change is the rise of the Chicano civil-rights movement. Reflecting that change, Howell House will get a new name: Casa Aztlán. <span style="font-size: 11px;"><b><u>4</u></b></span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/2%20MEETING%20TONIGHT%20FINAL.jpg" title="" /></p><p><strong style="font-size: 22px;">Latino community expands west to Little Village</strong></p><p><strong>OCTOBER 30, 1979</strong>: At the urging of Latinos and veterans, the Chicago Park District board agrees to a proposed memorial plaza honoring Manuel Pérez Jr., a World War II hero killed by enemy fire at age 22 and posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. Pérez grew up on the city&rsquo;s Near West Side long before his neighborhood was razed and before many of its Mexican residents moved to Pilsen. The city will build the plaza in 1980 in Little Village, a Southwest Side neighborhood known as the &ldquo;Mexican suburb&rdquo; because of its proximity to Pilsen, its larger homes, and its fast-growing Latino population. Next year&rsquo;s census will show that Latinos constitute the majority of Little Village residents. The Pilsen and Little Village corridor now has the largest concentration of Latinos in the Midwest.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px;"><b><u>5</u></b></span><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/3%20PLAZA%20FINAL.jpg" title="" /></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;"><strong>Neighborhoods help put Latino in Congress</strong></span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/web%20PilsenFoundGutierrez1crop_0.jpg" style="height: 242px; width: 190px; float: left;" title="" /><strong>MARCH 17, 1992</strong>: In a Democratic primary election for U.S. House, Chicago Ald. Luis V. Gutiérrez (26th Ward) easily defeats his strongest challenger, Juan Soliz. A 1990 court order required a Chicago district with a Latino majority. Shaped like an earmuff, the district covers the Pilsen-Little Village corridor and Puerto Rican neighborhoods on the Northwest Side. Gutiérrez, who was an ally of the late Mayor Harold Washington, has Mayor Richard M. Daley&rsquo;s backing in the Congressional race. After the general election, Gutiérrez will become the first Midwest Latino in the House. Although his family is from Puerto Rico, whose residents are born with U.S. citizenship, Gutiérrez will champion immigrant political causes and maintain strong support in Pilsen and Little Village. <span style="font-size: 11px;"><b><u>6</u></b></span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">Pilsen remains Latino, but for how long?</span></strong></p><p><strong>MAY 20, 1997</strong>: In the name of job creation, Ald. Danny Solis (25th) leads a rally for a plan that would extend the University of Illinois at Chicago southward to the edge of Pilsen. The Daley administration, meanwhile, is planning a tax-increment financing district to boost industry in Pilsen. Some residents are linking those efforts to gentrification on the neighborhood&rsquo;s east end. Those residents say the changes are threatening Pilsen&rsquo;s Mexican-American character and pushing rents and property taxes too high. This summer, artists led by Hector Duarte (<span style="font-size: 11px;"><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538#sources">7</a></strong></span>) will transform an outdoor wall at 1805 S. Bishop St. into a colorful mural called &ldquo;Stop Gentrification in Pilsen.&rdquo;&nbsp;The mural will depict United Farm Workers co-founder César Chávez and Mexican revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata flanking a multigenerational Pilsen family, a pushcart vendor and anti-gentrification protesters. Such efforts will not stop affluent newcomers from moving into Pilsen but, for years to come, the neighborhood will remain the cultural heart of the Chicago area&rsquo;s Mexican-American community. <span style="font-size:11px;"><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538#sources">8</a></strong></span></p><p style="margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt"><span style="color:red"><o:p></o:p></span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/4%20MURAL%20FINAL.jpg" title="" /></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;"><a name="CM"></a>Our question comes from: CM! Winters-Palacio</span></strong></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/cm winters FINAL.jpg" style="height: 194px; width: 185px; float: left;" title="" />African-Americans in Chicago cannot help but look at the city&rsquo;s most heavily Latino neighborhoods with some envy, according to WBEZ listener CM! Winters-Palacio, who lives in Auburn Gresham, a South Side neighborhood. &ldquo;If you drive through Little Village or Pilsen, they&rsquo;re thriving with little local stores,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;When you go on the South Side, it&rsquo;s a totally different experience.&rdquo;</p><p>Winters-Palacio chairs Malcolm X College&rsquo;s library department and tells us her interests include community development and racial segregation. So what does she think of our answer to her question? Pilsen&rsquo;s Latino identity is &ldquo;relatively new,&rdquo; Winters-Palacio says. &ldquo;It helps dispel one of the myths.&rdquo; Namely, that a strong community must have long historical roots.<a id="sources"> </a>Winters-Palacio says Pilsen and Little Village provide hope for her part of town.</p><p><strong><span style="font-size:22px;">Notes</span></strong></p><p><strong>1.</strong> Lilia Fernández, <em>Brown in the Windy City: Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in Postwar Chicago</em> (University of Chicago Press, 2012). &ldquo;City&rsquo;s &lsquo;DPs&rsquo; sit tight in path of big projects: Evacuation notices just a &lsquo;wolf cry&rsquo; to them,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Daily Tribune</em> (February 16, 1949). <strong>2.</strong> Deborah Kanter, &ldquo;Making Mexican Parishes: Ethnic Succession in Chicago Churches, 1947-1977,&rdquo; <em>U.S. Catholic Historian, Volume 301:1</em> (Catholic University of America Press, 2012).&nbsp;<strong>3.</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Protest rally today against U. of I. campus,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Daily Tribune</em> (March 20, 1961). &ldquo;Council OKs W. Side U. of I. site, 41 to 3: Crowd in gallery boos action, vows fight,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Daily Tribune</em> (May 11, 1961). Fernández, op. cit. <strong>4.</strong>&nbsp;Fernández, op. cit. Administrative History, Bethlehem Howell Neighborhood Center collection, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. <strong>5.</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;New post of Legion honors Mexican-American hero slain on Luzon,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Daily Tribune</em> (June 30, 1946). &ldquo;Slain vet who killed 75 Japs is honored in memorial service,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Daily Tribune</em> (February 14, 1949). &ldquo;Ordinance requesting the City of Chicago to convey the Manuel Pérez Jr. Plaza to the Chicago Park District,&rdquo; <em>Journal of the Proceedings of the Board of Commissioners of the Chicago Park District, </em>1979-1980. <strong>6.</strong> John Kass, &ldquo;Gutiérrez picks up Daley&rsquo;s backing for Congress,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Tribune</em> (December 10, 1991). Lou Ortiz, &ldquo;Gutiérrez coasts toward big win in Hispanic district race,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em> (March 18, 1992). <strong>7.</strong>&nbsp;Editor&#39;s Note: Duarte is married to WBEZ reporter Linda Lutton. <strong>8.</strong> Gary Marx, &ldquo;Opposition brewing to UIC expansion; proposal may drive out the poor, foes say,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Tribune</em> (March 12, 1997). Ernest Tucker, &ldquo;Latinos urge UIC to move forward with expansion,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em> (May 21, 1997). Teresa Puente, &ldquo;Pilsen fears upscale push may shove many out,&rdquo; <em>Chicago Tribune</em> (November 4, 1997).</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a>&nbsp;is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1" target="_blank">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud" target="_blank">@WBEZoutloud</a>. <a href="http://twitter.com/ero_nel" target="_blank">Erik Nelson Rodrigue</a><a href="http://twitter.com/ero_nel" target="_blank">z</a>&nbsp;is an&nbsp;illustrator and graphic designer in Chicago.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swept-their-homes-chicagos-latinos-built-new-community-110538 Watch Chicago's 2nd Ward fly north over the years http://www.wbez.org/news/watch-chicagos-2nd-ward-fly-north-over-years-110293 <p><div class="image-insert-image ">Last week <a href="http://wbezdata.tumblr.com/post/86343915004/mapping-rahm-emanuels-2011-victory-and-how-that-may" target="_blank">we looked at</a> where Rahm Emanuel had support in his 2011 election and how that might shift, but one of the major pieces of geography that will change in 2015 are the boundaries themselves.</div><p>In 2012 aldermen approved a new ward map, as they do every 10 years with the decennial census. And as is also a Chicago tradition, there were calls of gerrymandering, civil rights abuses and the eventual lawsuit.</p><p>Chicago&rsquo;s redistricting efforts have been challenged in three of the past four attempts going back to 1980. That&rsquo;s why you&rsquo;ll find two different maps in use in the 1980s and 1990s, and very possibly later this decade as well (A lawsuit from the League of Women Voters is <a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140228/downtown/city-ward-map-lawsuit-headed-back-court" target="_blank">working its way through the courts)</a>.</p><p>Inspired by a <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/05/15/americas-most-gerrymandered-congressional-districts/" target="_blank">series of articles from the <em>Washington Post</em>&rsquo;s Christopher Ingraham</a>, we decided to see just how gerrymandered Chicago&rsquo;s wards have become. Ingraham created a 0-100 scale to measure the level of gerrymandering in congressional districts and we reproduced that to see how Chicago&rsquo;s wards stacked up to Congress.</p><p>We used maps from three sources: The <a href="http://hue.uadata.org">Historical Urban Ecological data set</a>, the <a href="http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/collections/maps/chigis.html">University of Chicago</a>, and the <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/doit/dataset/boundaries_-_wards.html">city</a> of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/no-sidebar/approved-ward-map-95662">Chicago</a>.</p><p>We loaded those maps in a PostGIS database and followed Ingraham&rsquo;s methodology, specifically applying the <a href="http://www.redistrictingthenation.com/whatis-compactness.aspx">Polsby-Popper method</a> to determine a gerrymandering score (on a 0-1 scale), then converting it to a 0-100 scale.</p><blockquote><p><em>If you&rsquo;re playing along at home, the formula we used was 100*(1-(((4*3.14)*Area)/Perimeter^2))</em></p></blockquote><p>A few caveats before we continue:</p><p>-Polsby-Popper isn&rsquo;t the only way to measure gerrymandering and may not capture aspects some would associate with gerrymandering. We followed along with Ingraham&rsquo;s method to make comparisons.</p><p>-A perfect compactness score of 0 would be a circle, but no area can be split into a bunch of circles. A series of perfect squares would score 21.5.</p><p>-Compactness of a ward doesn&rsquo;t take into account population, demographics or keeping communities together, something required by the Voting Rights Act. That means sometimes a less-compact district can better serve a community.</p><p>-Chicago is a weird looking city (geographically speaking). With Lake Michigan, the O&rsquo;Hare annexation and its extreme North-South orientation, there are a lot of irregular boundaries. The city itself scores 88.8 on our gerrymandering scale (which may say something about <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/gulp-how-chicago-gobbled-its-neighbors-109583" target="_blank">how the city came together</a>, but that&rsquo;s what we&rsquo;re working with).</p><p>With that said, this is a good starting point to look at how Chicago&rsquo;s wards have changed over the years, and how it compares to other civic divisions.</p><p><strong>1927</strong></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1927_0.jpg" style="height: 378px; width: 320px;" title="Chicago City Council Wards, 1927 (Source: Historical Urban Ecological data set)" /></div><p>Chicago first split into 50 wards in the 1920s. Before then there were 35 wards with two aldermen each. Reformers hoped that having one alderman per ward (and 50 instead of 70) <a href="http://www.lib.niu.edu/1979/ii790211.html" target="_blank">would help reduce corruption</a>. The fact that this story exists implies that it did not.</p><p>That first attempt at 50 wards (with annexation thrown in in 1927) is pretty compact, and contains mostly shapes your toddler could name. You can see in the map above that most ward lines are fairly straight, with the Chicago River the main natural divider creating some squiggles.</p><p>At this point the 2nd Ward is a fairly regular shape, more or less a six-sided polygon.</p><p><strong>2nd Ward score: 43.37. Chicago score: 48.74.</strong></p><p><strong>1986</strong></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1986_0.jpg" style="height: 378px; width: 320px;" title="Chicago City Council Wards, 1986 (Source: University of Chicago)" /></p><p>Fast forward to 1986 (the next year we could find electronic ward maps). These boundaries were drawn after the election of Harold Washington as mayor and a <a href="http://scholarship.kentlaw.iit.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2730&amp;context=cklawreview">4-year-long court battle</a>, so would only be in effect until 1992.</p><p>While the map as a whole has undergone some major changes, the 2nd Ward is relatively close to its original shape. The boundaries to the north, west and east are in basically the same spot, but it has grown to the south. Also, notice how the southern boundary is more irregular.</p><p><strong>2nd Ward score: 45.06. Chicago score: 61.58.</strong></p><p><strong>1992/1998</strong></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1998_0.jpg" style="height: 378px; width: 320px;" title="Chicago City Council Wards, 1998 (Source: University of Chicago)" /></p><p>Following the 1990 census the Chicago City Council couldn&rsquo;t decide on a new ward map so they sent two proposals to voters in a referendum. Again, the choice was challenged and went to the courts, and a new ward map came in 1998. The process <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-11-09/opinion/ct-edit-wards-1109-jm-20111109_1_new-chicago-ward-map-incumbent-aldermen-census" target="_blank">cost the city $18.7 million</a>.</p><p>This is the first major change for the 2nd Ward. Other than its eastern edge on Lake Michigan, the whole thing is blown up and now resembles something like a transposed &lsquo;L.&rsquo; Not only does most of it move north, but its long, skinny shape extends west halfway across the city.</p><p>In this one change, the 2nd Ward goes from one of Chicago&rsquo;s more regular wards to one of the more gerrymandered.</p><p>While the new 1998 map had some big changes for certain districts, there was little change as far as the gerrymandering score for the city or Ward 2.</p><p><strong>1992: 2nd Ward score: 84.89. Chicago score: 69.91.</strong></p><p><strong>1998: 2nd Ward score: 85.10. Chicago score: 69.71.</strong></p><p><strong>2002</strong></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/2002_0.jpg" style="height: 378px; width: 320px;" title="Chicago City Council Wards, 2002 (Source: City of Chicago)" /></p><p>After the 2000 census an amazing thing happened: Chicago passed a ward map that didn&rsquo;t get thrown out by the courts. In true Chicago style, though, this came because of more gerrymandering, not less.</p><p>Mayor Richard M. Daley <a href="http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=164131">worked with black and Latino councilors to craft wards that were acceptable to them</a>, creating safer constituencies at the expense of compactness.</p><p>The 2nd Ward is barely touching its original area, a plume of smoke rising from the ashes of its foundation. Its continued its northern path and now swallows up Burnham Harbor, Soldier Field and and the Field Museum.</p><p>This is the first time the 2nd Ward is Chicago&rsquo;s most gerrymandered, narrowly passing the 41st (91.28).</p><p><strong>2nd Ward score: 91.33. Chicago score: 69.71.</strong></p><p><strong>2015</strong></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/2015_0.jpg" style="height: 378px; width: 320px;" title="Chicago City Council Wards, 2015 (Source: City of Chicago)" /></div><p>These are the wards that will elect our next round of aldermen in February, unless of course they don&rsquo;t.</p><p>The 2nd Ward was moved not only entirely north of where it was in 1927, but north of where it was in 2002. This got a lot of attention after the <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2012-01-20/news/ct-met-city-council-new-ward-map-20120120_1_new-ward-map-aldermen-vote-whitney-woodward">map was approved in 2012</a>, because it moved current 2nd Ward Alderman Bob Fioretti into the 28th Ward, seemingly a punishment for not sticking with Mayor Rahm Emanuel.</p><p>WBEZ produced <a href="http://www.wbez.org/no-sidebar/approved-ward-map-95662">an interactive map of the new wards</a> along with demographic profiles of each ward back in 2012. Check out that link for more information on the process as well.</p><p>The end result is that the 2nd Ward is now solidly Chicago&rsquo;s most gerrymandered, with the 1st Ward ranking second at 91.48.</p><p><strong>2nd Ward score: 94.16. Chicago score: 74.18.</strong></p><p><strong>How Does Chicago Compare?</strong></p><p>Going back in Ingraham&rsquo;s work with states and congressional districts, Chicago and the 2nd Ward fit in pretty well. Chicago matches up well with states like Missouri as in the upper half, but not near the most gerrymandered. The 2nd Ward, though, would be just outside the top-10 for most-gerrymandered district (Illinois 4th is No. 8).</p><p>Again, these scores may be indicators of gerrymandering but is by no means the final word. That will come later from the legal system.</p></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 14:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/watch-chicagos-2nd-ward-fly-north-over-years-110293 Chicago seeks end to federal hiring oversight http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-seeks-end-federal-hiring-oversight-110188 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Shakman_Mik_03_jpg.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A crusading lawyer who fought for decades against Chicago&rsquo;s entrenched political patronage system is finally calling for an end to federal oversight of City Hall&rsquo;s hiring practices.</p><p>Attorney Michael Shakman told a federal judge on Thursday that the city has come into &ldquo;substantial compliance&rdquo; with the so-called Shakman decrees, which are a series of court orders that have sought to end the sort of politically-motivated hiring and firing practices that have been an inextricable part Chicago politics for decades.</p><p>Chicago has been under the watchful eye of a federal hiring monitor since 2005, following high-profile political hiring scandals involving top aides to former Mayor Richard M. Daley.</p><p>&ldquo;Over the past several years, the City has developed and implemented policies and procedures to help ensure that unlawful political reasons and factors are not and will not be considered in the City&rsquo;s employment actions,&rdquo; reads Thursday&rsquo;s joint court filing, which was also signed by Corporation Counsel Steve Patton, the city&rsquo;s top lawyer.</p><p>Speaking by phone on Thursday, Shakman said Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s administration has helped bring an end to the federal oversight by disciplining Daley-era workers who violated political hiring rules. He also praised Emanuel for implementing new hiring plans, and appointing aides and an inspector general who watchdog political hiring.</p><p>But Shakman added Chicago still has work to do to shed its reputation as a town where political supporters have often been rewarded with government jobs.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re not naive,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We don&rsquo;t think that politics is gonna disappear overnight from the minds of lots of people. But all we can really do in the real world is set up procedures that should prevent it.&rdquo;</p><p>If a federal judge approves the joint request at a hearing on June 16, the city&rsquo;s inspector general would take over hiring duties from the court-appointed monitor.</p><p>That would mark the end of a legal battle that has plagued City Hall for nearly 45 years. The fight began in 1969, when Shakman was an independent candidate running against the mighty Cook County Democratic Party for a seat at Illinois&rsquo; 1970 Constitutional Convention. Since then, several court orders - collectively known as the &ldquo;Shakman decrees&rdquo; - have sought to strip political considerations from most hiring decisions at City Hall.</p><p>The federal monitor was <a href="http://www.shakmanmonitor.com/court_orders/Court%20Order%20Appointing%20Shakman%20Monitor.pdf" target="_blank">appointed</a> in 2005, following the federal indictment of Daley&rsquo;s former patronage chief, Robert Sorich, for steering city jobs toward politically-connected applicants, in violation of the Shakman decrees. Also that summer, another top Daley aide, Donald Tomczak, pleaded guilty to similar criminal charges. Sorich was <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/guilty-verdicts-sorich-trial" target="_blank">found guilty</a> in 2006.</p><p>In addition to tempering Chicago&rsquo;s reputation for political cronyism, the hiring scandals have also cost City Hall big money. The city has had to foot the bill for the federal monitor, which has cost the city $6.6 million, according to Emanuel&rsquo;s administration. Another $4.3 million has gone to consultant and legal fees, and the city has paid out nearly $12 million to settle hiring-related legal cases since 2008, according to the an Emanuel aide.</p><p>&ldquo;Since the first day of my administration, we have made it a priority to take politics out of the hiring process, professionalize city government, and end the decades of practices that were a stain on our City,&rdquo; Emanuel was quoted as saying in an emailed statement. &ldquo;We are turning a page on the past to a future where the public knows that the City has a transparent and accountable system in place to ensure that city jobs will go to the candidate who is most qualified, not the most connected.&rdquo;</p><p>The end of federal hiring monitoring for the city may also mean the end of Joe Ferguson&rsquo;s tenure as Chicago Inspector General. Despite several <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/watchdog-emanuel-hamstrings-probes-waste-fraud-106705" target="_blank">public clashes</a> with Mayor Rahm Emanuel in the past, the mayor <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-disagreements-emanuel-reappoint-city-hall-watchdog-108590" target="_blank">reappointed</a> Ferguson to another four-year term last year.</p><p>But Ferguson told WBEZ then that he might &ldquo;move onto other things&rdquo; once the city was out from under the Shakman monitor, which he hoped to achieve by the end of this summer. On Thursday afternoon, a spokeswoman for the inspector general declined to comment on his future.</p><p><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/akeefe" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;" target="_blank">Alex Keefe</a>&nbsp;is political reporter at WBEZ. You can follow him on&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZpolitics" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;" target="_blank">Twitter</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://plus.google.com/102759794640397640028" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;" target="_blank">Google+</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 15 May 2014 15:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-seeks-end-federal-hiring-oversight-110188 Former Chicago Mayor Richard Daley hospitalized http://www.wbez.org/news/former-chicago-mayor-richard-daley-hospitalized-109621 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Daley.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley is undergoing tests in the intensive care unit at Northwestern Memorial Hospital this weekend, after feeling ill on his way home from a business trip Friday night, according to a spokeswoman.</p><p>Daley, 71, was taken to the hospital by ambulance Friday night after returning to Chicago from a legal conference in Arizona, said Jackie Heard, a spokeswoman for Katten Muchin Roseman, LLP,&nbsp; the law firm where the former mayor now works.</p><p>Heard said that Daley is awake and alert, but did not offer specifics as to his symptoms or his current condition.</p><p>&ldquo;Mayor Daley&rsquo;s not one to not feel well often, so just as a precaution the ambulance was there,&rdquo; Heard told WBEZ Saturday afternoon. &ldquo;He did walk from the plane to the ambulance.&rdquo;</p><p>Daley spent Friday night at the hospital and is currently undergoing monitoring and evaluation at NMH. His family has been visiting in between tests, according to a statement released to reporters.</p><p>Daley has kept a busy schedule since stepping down in 2011 after 22 years as Chicago&#39;s mayor, Heard said.&nbsp;</p><p>His illness came the same day that his nephew, Richard J. Vanecko, pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaugther for the death of another man in a fight outside a bar in Chicago&#39;s Gold Coast neighborhood in 2004.</p></p> Sat, 01 Feb 2014 15:06:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/former-chicago-mayor-richard-daley-hospitalized-109621 School closings? Beavers conviction? The results of our corrupt system http://www.wbez.org/blogs/achy-obejas/2013-03/school-closings-beavers-conviction-results-our-corrupt-system-106222 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS760_114218744-scr.jpg" style="height: 261px; width: 300px; float: right;" title="Mayor Emanuel presides without checks and balances over Chicago. (AP)" />Fifty-four school closings! How did we ever get in this mess?</div><p><br />Er, ahem, shall we do some math?<br /><br />Let&rsquo;s start with recent headlines. First, &ldquo;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-proposes-closing-53-elementary-schools-firing-staff-another-6-106202">Chicago Proposes Closing 54 Schools</a>&rdquo; plus &ldquo;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/jury-convicts-william-beavers-tax-evasion-106207">Jury Convicts William Beavers of Tax Evasion</a>.&rdquo;<br /><br />What does this equal?<br /><br />At a quick glance, the two stories may not share much except their sensational nature. But the closings of 54 schools and the conviction of the Cook County politician are the results of a long, enmeshed system that gives the mayor unprecedented power and breeds corruption, both big and small.<br /><br />The first story goes to a shock treatment to a school system that is in a deep, deep crisis after years of mismanagement, corruption and politicking by city government.</p><p>Remember how in 1988 the late Mayor Harold Washington helped pass the Chicago School Reform Act down in Springfield, which created Local School Councils and gave them unprecedented power to manage neighborhood schools? It was a new dawn, yes. And then a year later, Mayor Richard M. Daley got elected and began the push to strip the LSCs of virtually all say, finally accomplished in 1995 when the state made the mayor of Chicago the undisputed -- and I do mean <em>undisputed</em>, since the mayor appoints the board where the only possible pushback could come from -- czar of the Chicago Public Schools. The charter school craze in Chicago began just about then, and school closings became a part of every discussion about education reform.<br /><br />What does Beavers have to do with this? After all, he was on the City Council back then, a self-described &ldquo;master of the backroom deal&rdquo; and unabashed crony in our fair city&rsquo;s long history of crony corruption, and then on the county Board of Commissioners, neither of which has much say about schools.</p><p>But Beavers, who had a brief moment of progressive politics when, as a black politician, he rode the wave of Washington&rsquo;s historic 1983 election and simply could not oppose the mayor without risking his political life, quickly fell in line under Daley. The man never saw a screw-the-citizen deal he couldn&rsquo;t vote yes for, including parking meters and pension giveaways, private contracts to mayoral pals, etc., etc., etc.<br /><br />Still don&rsquo;t follow the math? Okay, add in his recent headline: &ldquo;<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/news/cityhall/18993800-418/city-of-chicago-hit-with-578-million-tab-in-parking-garage-snafu.html">City of Chicago hit with $57.8 Million Tab in Parking Garage Snafu</a>.&rdquo; It seems the city signed a 99 year-long $563 million dollar contract with a private company for parking services, promising them no competition, then turned around and gave a contract to some competitors just a few blocks away.<br /><br />Beavers was around then, nodding in Daley&rsquo;s direction like one of those little dashboard dogs, and giving pieces of the city away as part of the mayor&rsquo;s largesse towards his friends.<br /><br />Oh, I know, he wasn&rsquo;t alone. What is about Chicago that we keep electing strongmen as mayors, then fill an overstuffed, overblown, worthless City Council with lackeys that give that Caudillo lopsided votes guaranteeing they get everything they want in exchange for a few crumbs?</p><p>Let&rsquo;s be frank, with the single exception of Edward Burke, the 14th Ward Suzerain, the rewards to those who facilitate the mayor&rsquo;s grandiose giveaways are relatively minor. Especially in black wards, they mostly survive to vote again, to run again, to buy a steak dinner and impress neighbors and distant cousins.<br /><br />How bad is it? Over at <em>Chicago Magazine</em>, Steve Rhodes put together a little study that details <a href="http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/April-2013/The-Yes-Men-Near-Unanimous-Consent/">City Council votes</a> since Mayor Rahm Emanuel got elected. Wanna get depressed? A full third of the City Council has never voted against Emanuel, <em>ever</em> (and this is a improvement over the Council&rsquo;s bending over for Daley). In 26 meetings, our representatives have given the mayor 1,333 yes votes and only 122 nos (about half of those come from the same five aldermen and -- get this -- the only minority alderman who occasionally votes against the mayor is Leslie Hairston, from Hyde Park, where her political life depends on not being the mayor&rsquo;s total lap dog).<br /><br />In other words, the mayor presides over a City Council that&rsquo;s bought and sold. He appoints the members to the school board which is the only check and balance on his power over the city&rsquo;s schools.<br /><br />Checks and balances? <em>Please.</em> Look at this headline: &ldquo;<a href="http://www.suntimes.com/news/cityhall/19012878-418/state-supreme-court-rules-city-ig-cant-subpoena-chicago-documents.html">State Supreme Court Rules City IG Can&rsquo;t Subpoena Chicago Documents</a>.&rdquo; It turns out the city&rsquo;s Inspector General needs the mayor&rsquo;s approval to investigate anything having to do with the mayor&rsquo;s office. Does that make sense to anyone? The court&#39;s vote was unanimous. Let&rsquo;s not even bother to get into who&rsquo;s on the court, or their paths there.<br /><br />Yes, I know that much of what Emanuel is hammering through right now -- whether it&rsquo;s the school closings or the multiple million dollar settlements or dealing with the very bad deals the city has to contend with -- isn&rsquo;t his doing. I get that it&rsquo;s an inheritance.<br /><br />But here&rsquo;s the other thing I get: Unless this very corrupt and insular system itself changes -- and that starts with whom we, as citizens, elect to lower offices such as the City Council -- nothing else will change. Emanuel and Daley are of the same royally-entitled bloodline.</p><p>And Beavers? He&rsquo;s just one of thousands of bastard children willing to do anything for the royals&#39; approval.<br /><br />Add that up and it&rsquo;s pretty ugly.</p></p> Fri, 22 Mar 2013 11:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/achy-obejas/2013-03/school-closings-beavers-conviction-results-our-corrupt-system-106222 Chicago dips a toe into ‘bus rapid transit’ http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-dips-toe-%E2%80%98bus-rapid-transit%E2%80%99-101834 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jeffery.jpg" style="margin: 4px 0px 0px 0px; float: left; height: 327px; width: 250px; " title="Construction crews are beginning work to speed up express service along the South Side’s Jeffery Boulevard. (Photo courtesy of CTA)" />Construction crews have begun work on what Chicago is billing as its first &ldquo;bus rapid transit&rdquo; route.</p><p>The Chicago Transit Authority project, funded almost entirely by an $11 million federal grant, will speed up buses along the South Side&rsquo;s Jeffery Boulevard.</p><p>The CTA says buses there will get through stop lights more quickly and have their own lanes during rush hours. The buses will also have fancy stations spaced a half-mile apart with no stops between.</p><p>Joe Iacobucci, the CTA&rsquo;s strategic-planning manager, said the crews began Monday. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re preparing those stations for new bus pads &mdash; they&rsquo;re about a 60-foot length of concrete &mdash; and preparing the landscape for customer signage and bus shelters,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>The CTA expects the upgrades to shave travel times. In northbound morning peak hours, for example, Iacobucci said the project will cut 7 minutes, enabling buses to complete the 16-mile route in 65 minutes.</p><p>BRT delivers many benefits of rail at a fraction of the cost. The most advanced systems are running in Bogotá, the Colombian capital, and Guangzhou, the Chinese city formerly known as Canton. More modest lines are up in Cleveland, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Las Vegas and Eugene, Oregon.</p><p>Experts compare BRT systems using various criteria. The New York City-based Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, for example, grades systems using 30 factors.</p><p>The four factors the institute deems most important are all missing from the Jeffery Boulevard project. Those include barriers between bus and car lanes, use of the road&rsquo;s central verge for the bus lanes, off-bus fare collection and platform-level boarding.</p><p>A <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/story/city-devotes-73-million-downtown-brt-96580">BRT route downtown</a>, planned for 2014 construction, will be more robust but extend just a mile, running from Union Station to North Michigan Avenue. That project, which includes a redesign of the station, has $24.6 million in federal funding and $7.3 million in local tax-increment financing.</p><p>A third BRT route would span a 21-mile stretch of Western or Ashland avenues. The city is studying alternatives for that project using a $1.6 million federal grant.</p><p>In 2008, Mayor Richard M. Daley&rsquo;s administration announced that Chicago was diving into BRT with a $153 million federal grant, but the city missed a crucial application deadline and forfeited the money.</p><p>Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s mayoral transition plan last year promised a &ldquo;full bus rapid transit pilot&rdquo; within three years.</p></p> Mon, 20 Aug 2012 18:13:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-dips-toe-%E2%80%98bus-rapid-transit%E2%80%99-101834 Maggie Andersen on the Maggie Daley you didn't know http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2011-12-09/maggie-anderson-maggie-daley-you-didnt-know-94759 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2011-December/2011-12-09/AP110119094115.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-December/2011-12-09/Maggie Anderson web.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" title="Maggie Anderson manages not to shed a tear. (Photo by Ali Weiss Klingler)"></p><p>Writer Maggie Andersen says there was a "fierce love" between the Daleys that prompted former Mayor Richard M. to do some crazy things in wife Maggie's name:</p><p><em>I'm a sucker for a love story. December 1970. Richard M. Daley of Chicago met Margaret Corbett of Pittsburgh at a mutual friend's Christmas party. Perhaps there was mistletoe and </em>Nat King Cole's Christmas<em> on vinyl. I hope there's no shortage of boozy eggnog.</em></p><p><em>Their first proper date was on New Year's Eve in Chicago. I imagine they saw fireworks lighting up a frozen lake.</em></p><p><em>I and countless others believed that the Daleys loved each other in that lucky way. Their son Patrick has said that his mother was always the first one on the dance floor, and the last one off; that his parents' companionship was an inspiration to everyone who knew them.&nbsp;</em></p><p><em>Evidence can be found in the footage of them marching in the St. Patrick's Day Parade in their 30s; then hiking, fatter and grayer, in Jordan, decades later, but still laughing like children....</em></p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483839-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/sites/default/files/2011-12-03-papermachete-maggie-anderson.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>This&nbsp;<a href="http://thepapermacheteshow.com/2011/12/07/1210-line-up/" target="_blank">Saturday at the Horseshoe</a>&nbsp;is one of the last times you can see the&nbsp;Machete&nbsp;in December, before the holiday winds of change sweep us all away. They'll be talking about Blago, obviously, and the line-up includes&nbsp;<a href="http://www.madambarker.com/" target="_blank">Madame Barker’s Cabaret</a>&nbsp;(Molly Brennan&nbsp;and&nbsp;John Fournier); Occupiers Art and Nancy Brennan; Chad the Bird; comedian&nbsp;<a href="http://therealcameronesposito.com/" target="_blank">Cameron Esposito</a>;&nbsp;Kate James and Steve Waltien of The Second City and WBEZ's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey">Claire Zulkey</a>. With music by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.myspace.com/babyteethmusic" target="_blank">Baby Teeth</a>.</p><p><a href="http://thepapermacheteshow.com/" target="_blank">The Paper Machete</a>&nbsp;<em>is a weekly live magazine at the Horseshoe in North Center. It's always at 3 p.m., it's always on Saturday, and it's always free. Get all your&nbsp;</em>The Paper Machete Radio Magazine&nbsp;<em>needs filled&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.org/thepapermachete" target="_blank">here</a>, or download the podcast from iTunes&nbsp;<a href="http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-paper-machete-radio-magazine/id450280345" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 09 Dec 2011 15:14:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blog/onstagebackstage/2011-12-09/maggie-anderson-maggie-daley-you-didnt-know-94759 Parents resume sit-in at school field house http://www.wbez.org/story/parents-resume-sit-school-field-house-88287 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-24/Whittier2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Some parents in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood have resumed a sit-in at the Whittier Elementary School field house. Their protest concerns the fate of that building and the location of a library for the school.</p><p>A plan by Mayor Richard Daley’s administration to tear down the field house led to a month-long sit-in last fall by the parents and their supporters. The occupation ended after the district promised to spare the building and provide a library.</p><p>But the sides never agreed on the library’s location.</p><p>On Thursday, the district sent a dump truck and construction workers to Whittier. Chicago Public Schools spokeswoman Becky Carroll says the crew’s job was to clear space for the library within the main building.</p><p>“That room is not ADA accessible,” says Lisa Angonese, who has two kids in Whittier. “It’s one room. And they are going to demolish the field house and replace it with [artificial] turf.”</p><p>About two dozen Whittier parents and neighborhood activists were successful in turning away the crew. They want the library in the field house.</p><p>In a letter to the parents last week, new CPS chief Jean-Claude Brizard said he supported the agreement to leave the field house standing. But the letter said putting the library in the main building remained “the best option.”</p></p> Fri, 24 Jun 2011 10:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/parents-resume-sit-school-field-house-88287 Poor Pat Quinn: Are you ready for your legacy? http://www.wbez.org/blog/justin-kaufmann/2011-06-01/poor-pat-quinn-are-you-ready-your-legacy-87275 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/photo/2011-June/2011-06-01/AP110318141204.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Yay. New budget. Yay. New casino in Chicago. Yay. Quinn has 60 days to slow this story to a crawl, giving more and more media outlets the chance to speculate on what is next. Yay.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" height="436" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-01/AP110318141204.jpg" title="" width="512"></p><p>Poor Pat Quinn. Remember when his job was all about walking across the state to raise awareness for health care? Or telling us the dangers of household cleaners?</p><p>The one-time liberal crusader is now faced with the unthinkable: Approving a casino in Chicago. And not to mention approving a budget that will short-change education and social services. All that adds up to a legacy, gov'nor. It will definitely be historic and will tie Governor Quinn's name to gambling forever. All this while his <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/blagojevich-denies-he-used-state-action-force-donations-87173">former boss tells his life story</a> in Chicago.</p><p>And did you see this <a href="http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/news/local/chibrknews-chicago-casino-bill-advances-in-senate-20110531,0,891826.story">front page picture of State Senator Terry Link</a>?</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" height="225" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/blog/insert-image/2011-June/2011-06-01/trib-link.jpg" title="" width="400"></p><p style="text-align: center;">"YES. YESSSSS. YESSSSSS!!!!! YESSSSSSSSSS VICTORY IS OURS!!!!! YESSSS, NOW LET"S DESTROY THE JEDI KNIGHTS!!!!! YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS."</p><p><strong>B story</strong>: <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chibrknews-daley-joining-big-chicago-law-firm-20110601,0,5866658.story">Daley joined a law firm</a>. Not just any law firm, but the law firm that brokered the infamous parking meter deal. C'mon Rich. Seriously? Were you that hard up for work that you took the only offer on the table? This does nothing for your reputation.</p><p>But this is the way of the world of Chicago politics. Once you serve the public, you serve the corporations who want to benefit from the public. Daley says he won't have anything to do with city contracts, but that certainly woulnd't stop him from saying to colleagues, "Oh, that contract? Yeah, just call my buddy Jimmy..."</p><p><strong>C story</strong>: It's sort of like when an employer cuts a bunch of jobs and then when the economy turns around, they still don't fill those jobs. That's what it's like, <a href="http://www.suntimes.com/5700733-417/chicago-cancels-july-4-fireworks-leaves-shows-to-navy-pier.html">these 4th of July fireworks</a>. You are ruining the sacred ritual of drunk teenagers who come out in the cover of darkness to watch pretty fire.</p><p>Who wins? Lollapalooza. They get the runoff of drunk teens, looking for that one summer trip on the Metra.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Weather</strong>: I missed the news cycle on Monday, but caught up with <a href="http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/05/31/emanuel-heat-related-illness-forced-north-avenue-beach-shutdown/">Emanuel's presser about the closing of North Avenue Beach on Memorial Day</a>. Too much heat, he said. The Tribune has an <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/videobeta/d140e6f1-9168-43e0-aafa-3a0c26d8a692/News/North-Avenue-Beach-The-morning-after">awesome next morning video</a>, right out of a zombie movie. But in the end, was the unusual closing really about too much heat? Or <a href="http://www.suntimes.com/news/sneed/5694076-452/did-street-gang-activity-really-close-north-ave.-beach">was it about gangs</a>?</p><p><strong>Sports</strong>: Last night, the NBA Finals began with a Game 1 win for the Miami Heat. I watched the 4th quarter and during a timeout, noticed a big celebrity sitting courtside. His name is Julius Peppers and he plays defensive line for the Chicago Bears. In the Eastern Conference Finals, Peppers was spotted sitting courtside with a Chicago White Sox hat on. I gave him mad props for supporting the Chicago team. But now, I'm not so sure. Is it possible that <a href="http://mvn.com/2011/04/05/photo-of-the-day-julius-peppers-beaching-it-with-his-girlfriend/">Peppers is a Heat fan</a>? And if that's the case, should the Bears just cut him outright? Forget what I said earlier about how great he is on the football field, what I mean to say is that he is lazy, unproductive and a liability.</p><p>Because of this betrayal, I hope football never comes back.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 01 Jun 2011 14:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blog/justin-kaufmann/2011-06-01/poor-pat-quinn-are-you-ready-your-legacy-87275