WBEZ | photography http://www.wbez.org/tags/photography Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en From Indiana's icy roads to Sochi's ski slopes http://www.wbez.org/news/indianas-icy-roads-sochis-ski-slopes-109666 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Olympic photog 2-way.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Winter Olympics get underway today in Sochi, Russia. For most athletes, the Olympics are the pinnacle of their sport.</p><p>The same could be said for the journalists covering the games. Guy Rhodes lives in Northwest Indiana and is a freelance photographer who works with the <em>Sun-Times</em> Media Group.</p><p>Today he&rsquo;s in Sochi to shoot the games for <em>USA Today</em>. WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente sat down with Rhodes before he left town to hear how he&rsquo;s preparing for the games &mdash; and the threat of terrorism.&nbsp;</p><p>You can follow Guy Rhodes at the Winter Olympics and see all his photos <a href="http://www.guyrhodes.com/blog" target="_blank">on his blog</a>.</p></p> Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:44:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/indianas-icy-roads-sochis-ski-slopes-109666 Inside the eye of photographer Todd Diederich http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-12/inside-eye-photographer-todd-diederich-109348 <p><div><img alt="" at="" by="" chicago="" class="image-original_image" diederich="" displayed="" exhibit="" is="" new="" pentagram="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/pp.jpg" style="float: left; height: 279px; width: 350px;" the="" title="" todd="" />Todd Diederich&rsquo;s work is robust. His passion as a photographer can be measured by the heft of each of his images. Subjects and scenes tell a complete story in each photograph, never leaving room for doubt in their liveliness or authenticity.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>He captures a part of Chicago far from the sterilized energy of downtown&mdash;one that is young and potent.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One of his many images, shown left, is on display at &quot;<a href="http://d-weinberg.com/" target="_blank">Chicago Style</a>,&quot; a new salon-style group exhibition at David Weinberg Photography.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;Chicago Style&quot; features 34 Chicago photographers &quot;whose eclectic works,&quot; according to the gallery, reflect &quot;the nuanced and refined style of the stormy, husky and brawling city of big shoulders.&quot;&nbsp;It runs through February 15, 2014.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diederich hails from Brookfield and attended Columbia College on scholarship before leaving the downtown art school in 2003. Afterward, he left the city entirely, spending time in Athens, Georgia, a city known for its extensive arts and culture community. Diederich eventually moved back to Chicago in 2009.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diederich&rsquo;s breakthrough came with work for the Chicago Reader and a column with Vice&nbsp;Magazine online. From both experiences, he has gained a greater sense of control of what he photographs and how the images are represented. Diederich&#39;s chosen photograph for the exhibit,&nbsp;titled &quot;Pentagram Perception,&quot; was taken during his residency with local nonprofit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.acreresidency.org/">Artists&#39; Cooperative&nbsp;Residency&nbsp;and Exhibitions</a>,&nbsp;or ACRE.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;It is a good representation of my mind pressed flat against a two-dimensional surface,&rdquo; Diederich&nbsp;said of the photograph. His time at ACRE &ldquo;cracked open something inside me. My future was there and where I am still headed ... a bridge between the celestial and terrestrial.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Since then, Diederich&#39;s projects have included a successful <a href="http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/752279352/luminous-flux-photography-book" target="_blank">Kickstarter campaign</a> to fund his first photography book, &quot;Luminous Flux&quot; (the cover of which featured &quot;Pentagram Perception&quot; and was created with the help of <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;ved=0CDMQFjAB&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wbez.org%2Fblogs%2Fbritt-julious%2F2013-03%2Fground-building-new-art-communities-chicago-106218&amp;ei=kaeoUun5GaGr2QX2yYDIBg&amp;usg=AFQjCNER4uLl13nA6M1LzMyF2-7zN-UNxw&amp;sig2=aGqXN3xYK2ybV4wX5Dg7AA&amp;bvm=bv.57799294,d.b2I" target="_blank">Matt Austin and The Perch</a>), an exhibition at Johalla Projects, and directing a&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&amp;v=lmg3uXezQCY">music video</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>His tumblr,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.beodddierich.com/" target="_blank">Be (T)Odd Die(De)Rich</a>,&nbsp;remains the most prominent and updated source for his work. It is also where he has gathered a substantial fanbase of other artists and creatives.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I do what I love. I&#39;m trying to continue with that,&rdquo; Diederich said. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s all I can meditate on.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Each blog post gives a look at a sliver of Diederich&rsquo;s life, and the blog as a whole is a visual diarie that reveals without sacrificing the friendships and bonds he has formed with his subjects. It&#39;s his reality shared with those who may not live in Englewood or attend underground balls, but are curious.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diederich understands this, certainly more than most, and captures within each photograph the complexity of his settings and subjects&mdash;their wealth and ambition, their pride and beauty, their youth and tradition.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I am really photographing a strange reflection of my minds eye,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Subjects are friends, or friends of friends, or new friends. Situations can be loving, sweet, soft, angry, demonic and ugly. But the energy attracted me. It&#39;s one element of the magic of photography.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>He makes a point of mentioning that he is not afraid of death. And so he makes art that looks like his subjects are willing to die for their performances or relationships or passions. During the course of our two-hour long interview, Diederich recounts stories and anecdotes which are at once humorous, shocking, and unnerving.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I photograph for the future, for the next Earth, the one after this era ends,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Because if I&#39;m reincarnated again, it would be fun to see what really went down in this place called Chicago.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>His use of pineal gland&nbsp;or &quot;third eye&quot;&nbsp;activation plays a large part in his vision, allowing him to unlock a personal vision that captures more than just the essence of his subjects and settings. He also recognizes their humanity and leaves it open to be visually consumed by audiences online and in person.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Since I noticed their energy I am sure others will,&rdquo; Diederich said. &ldquo;They are not ignored, they are just down the street from me vibrating.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>David Weinberg Photography is located at 300 W Superior, Suite 203.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Britt Julious&nbsp;blogs about culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow her essays for WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/">here</a>&nbsp;and on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 11 Dec 2013 12:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-12/inside-eye-photographer-todd-diederich-109348 In defense of the selfie http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-11/defense-selfie-109225 <p><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20130215_031431.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 310px; float: left;" title="" />I joined Facebook during the summer before my freshman year of college and nearly every photo I used as a profile picture was a selfie.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Back then, we didn&rsquo;t have a name for them. Some people referred to them as &#39;angled shots&#39; or &#39;MySpace photos,&#39; for their ubiquity on that social networking site. The chorus of &#39;vanity&#39; and &#39;deception&#39; was as evident then as it is now. People were upset by others&rsquo; desire to control their visual narrative.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One day, an old high school friend left a comment on my Facebook wall asking why I could not just find a decent photograph of myself that I did not take. It was the first time I considered the difference between a photo of my making and a photo someone else took of me.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Oxford Dictionaries recently <a href="http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/press-releases/oxford-dictionaries-word-of-the-year-2013/" target="_blank">named</a> &quot;selfie&quot; as its word of the year.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Numerous writers responded, including&nbsp;News Editor&nbsp;Erin Gloria Ryan of Jezebel, who <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;ved=0CDkQFjAB&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fjezebel.com%2Fselfies-arent-empowering-theyre-a-cry-for-help-1468965365&amp;ei=yWyPUqrlBIipqwHAsYCoAQ&amp;usg=AFQjCNGfYkGx1eSegWROvMnpT2QbK8LLwg&amp;sig2=ea3yPmZ3oGcB9ZkQvnEeOQ&amp;bvm=bv.56988011,d.aWM" target="_blank">described</a> selfies as a cry for help, a sign that we are in desperate need of validation from others.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;Young women take selfies because they don&#39;t derive their sense of worth from themselves, they rely on others to bestow their self-worth on them &mdash; just as they&#39;ve been taught,&quot; she wrote.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But I think her view ultimately reduces why people use technology and choose to manipulate their own image.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Online reaction largely critcized Ryan&rsquo;s article for its limited view of why people take selfies, as well as for her implied desire to erase the existence of self documentation. Social media users started using the hashtag #FeministSelfie to extend the conversation outside the Jezebel article, and to document themselves in ways that were goofy and weird and lovely.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Those selfies documented people that deem the practice not as a way to ask, &#39;why?&#39; but, &#39;why not?&#39;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Ryan&#39;s interpretation of the photo as a cry for help disregards the personal autonomy and self-esteem of the photographer. For many, selfies are a solution to the problem. They are not looking to please others, but instead to please themselves &mdash; to see themselves outside the harsh eyes of others.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>During college, I was obsessed with looking at nightlife photography not because I wanted to be photographed, but because I loved the narrative framed around the images. Nightlife photographs give some of the pieces, but let the audience fill in the rest of the story. In my mind, the story was better than anything I could have imagined with just words alone.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>When I was out for the night, however, I did whatever possible to avoid nightlife photographers. I did not want to be captured in their vision, and I did not want others to see what was not there, to form their own narratives and create an idea of the evening that outpaced and outweighed its reality.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20120818_132854.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 310px; float: right;" title="" />In his seminal collection of essays and vignettes on photography entitled &quot;Ghost Image,&quot; French photographer <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herv%C3%A9_Guibert">Herve Guibert</a> wrote, &ldquo;We alone can intercept the gaze that we exchange indirectly through a reflection. The consent in our gaze is our secret alone, a mirage suspended in air that will soon disappear.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Guibert&rsquo;s thoughts are on the photographer as well as the subject. Looking at the camera is a way to provide consent to the one creating the narrative. But if we are the ones creating the image of ourselves, then our consent is a conversation with the self.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I cannot speak for everyone, but for me, a good selfie is a way to reject how other people see you. It is a way to see oneself as one chooses, not as others see us. It takes control of our own visual narratives, as if saying, &#39;This is the story I want to tell.&#39;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Sometimes selfies act as a fun documentation of the places in which you were alone. I have selfies inside weird art installations, cool hotel lobbies, and dark club bathrooms. Sometimes I share them, but often, I keep them for myself like an added layer of memory.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Self photography acknowledges that we are alive, that we exist. For people whose existence (say as a woman, or a person of color, or a person with a disability, etc.) is often denied in mainstream culture or reduced to stereotype, perhaps a selfie is a way to control the narrative by documenting their time, alive and moving about the world like the people we see across media platforms.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Many of the selfies I see are not just about &ldquo;good hair&rdquo; or perfect makeup or trying to look sexually desirable. Some post selfies after a long night working on their masters thesis or in celebration of a marathon or as a documentation of their weight-loss. I&rsquo;ve seen selfies in elaborate stage makeup before theater performances and in the days after being laid off. I don&rsquo;t think these people are just looking for encouragement or for others to say how pretty they are.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Their selfies feel more like a stake in the land, a declaration of time and place, a sentence in a chapter in the novel of their lives.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Is this giving too much credence to the power of the selfie? Maybe.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>There will always be people who only see the selfie as a form of vanity. And there will also always be people who post excessively, who need to insert themselves into the ongoing &#39;conversations&#39; of social media with their visage because they need validation. But for many, the selfie is a project itself. It is a way of seeing oneself in the world and sharing it with others. It is multiple things at once.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div><div><div property="content:encoded"><div><em>Britt Julious&nbsp;blogs about race and culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow her essays for WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/">here</a>&nbsp;and on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>.</em></div></div></div></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 22 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-11/defense-selfie-109225 Take this job and shove it http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/take-job-and-shove-it-108780 <p><p>In 1949, when John Giolas was just 19, he started work at the U.S. Steel mill in Gary, Ind.</p><p>For a while, he had a plum job working in the metallurgical lab, testing all the steel. But then U.S. Steel started its downward slide, laying off workers. By the late 1950s, Giolas found himself working a series of increasingly &ldquo;low, demeaning jobs&rdquo; at the mill.</p><p>Giolas visited the StoryCorps booth with his sons Markus and Dale to remember the day he walked off the job and how he made a new life, despite his battles with depression.</p><p><strong>John Giolas</strong>: When you went in the mill, the gates closed. And there was no way you were going to get out until the next shift started, and that&rsquo;s when the gates opened. So I always called it a prison.</p><p>While Giolas was working at the mill, he started taking photographs of the other mill workers and their families.</p><p><strong>John</strong>: These guys would say, &lsquo;You do good work, this is your opportunity to get out of here, it&rsquo;s too late for us.&rsquo;&nbsp;</p><p>Lay-offs had started at the steel mill, and things grew worse:<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/giolas with cam cropped.jpg" style="float: right; height: 215px; width: 250px;" title="" /></p><p><strong>John</strong>: I ended up in a pit of steaming water with coke falling off of a conveyor belt, and it was my job as it landed in the water to scoop it up and put it back on the conveyor belt. And on one midnight turn I just lost it, I blew up. I asked the foreman, I said, &lsquo;Where&rsquo;s the gate? I want to leave, I want to quit,&rsquo; and he said, &lsquo;You can&rsquo;t quit,&rsquo; so I stayed there &lsquo;til morning, daylight -&nbsp; walked out of the mill and never went back.</p><p>To find out how what Giolas did next, click on the audio above.</p><p><em>Katie Mingle is a producer for WBEZ and the Third Coast Festival.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 27 Sep 2013 08:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/take-job-and-shove-it-108780 Vivian Maier's really moving pictures http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-09/vivian-maiers-really-moving-pictures-108640 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/leescreencap.PNG" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="420px" src="http://www.nowness.com/media/embedvideo?itemid=3316&amp;issueid=2587" width="620px"></iframe></p><div>Vivian Maier, the Chicago nanny who led a secret life as a street photographer, continues to be one of the city&#39;s more <a href="http://www.vivianmaier.com/about-vivian-maier/">arresting stories</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>After gaining notice in 2009 two years after her death, the thousands of photographs Maier took have been the subject of books, exhibitions and a documentary, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2o2nBhQ67Zc"><em>Finding Vivian Maier</em></a>, shown this week at the Toronto International Film Festival.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Her Chicago area photographs, taken from the 1950s through the 1970s have been of particular interest. But the 8mm movies she shot are also coming to light. The above film made of footage Maier shot in downtown Chicago in 1971 or so was posted a few days ago on the arts and culture site <a href="http://www.nowness.com/">Nowness</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>For my money, Maier was far better with a still camera, but she wasn&#39;t bad shooting movies. She seems to be drawn to the same elements that I felt marked her photography when I wrote about her still images in this blog in 2010: &quot;...doyennes seemingly lost in an increasingly modern city; workaday folk walking and shopping beneath the script of neon; old men in shabby suits, hanging out on downtown street corners.&quot;</div></p> Tue, 10 Sep 2013 05:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-09/vivian-maiers-really-moving-pictures-108640 What I See: Gary Eckstein http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-gary-eckstein-108522 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/what i see thumbnail gary_edited-1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Gary Eckstein is a Chicagoan who loves roaming around the city, photographing what he sees. Here, he takes us through a summer day from sampling &quot;dead body&quot; soup at a Korean Market in Chicago&#39;s Avondale neighborhood to visiting Pilsen&#39;s Fiesta Del Sol festival.</p><p>&quot;The things I try to emphasize when I take photos are love of place, people and culture and my attempt to capture the genuine character of a given location,&quot; Gary says. You can find more of his photos on <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/garyegarye/" target="_blank">Flickr</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="480" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fWikv9f2SHA?rel=0" width="640"></iframe></p><p><strong>More from the What I See project</strong></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-mimosa-shah-108384" target="_blank">Setting new roots with Mimosa Shah</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/art/what-i-see-katie-prout-108221" target="_blank">An afternoon run with Katie Prout</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-dmitry-samarov-107924" target="_blank">Painting, sketching and coffee-roasting with Dmitry Samarov</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-yolanda-perdomo-108041" target="_blank">The Illinois Railway Museum with Yolanda Perdomo</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/what-i-see-trainers-day-shedd-aquarium-107766" target="_blank">A trainer&#39;s day at the Shedd Aquarium with&nbsp;Jessica Whiton</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/what-i-see-bike-bee-107686" target="_blank">Bike-a-Bee with Jana Kinsman</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-early-morning-edition-107362" target="_blank">Early Morning Edition with Lauren Chooljian</a></p><p><em>&#39;What I See&#39; is a project which showcases photos from our community and what we&#39;re thinking when we take them. </em></p><p><em>Show us what your Chicago looks like! Email web producer Logan Jaffe ljaffe@wbez.org or tweet <a href="https://twitter.com/loganjaffe" target="_blank">@loganjaffe</a> to find out more about how to make a What I See slideshow for WBEZ.</em></p></p> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 11:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-gary-eckstein-108522 Places and spaces, courtesy of the University of Chicago photo archives http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-08/places-and-spaces-courtesy-university-chicago-photo-archives-108468 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-08489r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 479px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image ">The University of Chicago has been keeping me up at night lately.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Nothing nefarious, thankfully. But I have burned a bit of midnight oil checking out the photo archives from the university library&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/">Special Collection.</a>&nbsp;Much of the collection is devoted to the university&#39;s own buildings. The image above is an undated photo of White City Amusement Park that stood at 63rd and King Drive until was condemned in 1939.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">But a great number of the archive&#39;s images&mdash;and perhaps the best ones&mdash;were taken by midcentury photographers who documented the area surrounding the campus. The shooters captured a metroplis in transition as blocks were wiped away for big urban renewal projects. The 1951 photograph below shows an unidentified street that would be demolished to build the Lake Meadows residential development:</div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09565r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 463px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">This 1948 photograph shows a building that will be razed to make way for the Eisenhower Expressway (referred to as the Congress Street Superhighway in the sign in the photo):</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09141r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 745px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">And here&#39;s a color shot from 1958 of row houses on 29th and Prairie. These aged beauties were demolished in the 1960s:</div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09639r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 408px;" title="" /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">The archive is plentiful: parks, neighborhoods, the lakefront, downtown and, of course, Hyde Park, documented by different photographers. One photographers, the late Mildred Mead, stands out. All the images accompanying this post are hers, with the exception of the White City photograph.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">And perhaps her sense of humor was as sharp as her eye. The archive includes the image below that Mead took of a tow truck driver changing a flat tire on Mead&#39;s own car in 1952: She doesn&#39;t say where she is&mdash;dig the beautiful buildings in the background&mdash;but she does include this note: &quot;Going around demolition is hazardous to tires, you pick up nails.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09595r.jpg" style="height: 477px; width: 600px;" title="" /></div></p> Wed, 21 Aug 2013 05:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-08/places-and-spaces-courtesy-university-chicago-photo-archives-108468 Morning Shift: Owning the legacy of an artist http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-16/morning-shift-owning-legacy-artist-108439 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Vivian Meier - Flickr - Thomas Leuthard.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The late street photographer Vivian Maier found fame when her photos were discovered and were included in exhibitions, a book and a documentary. But who owns the rights to her work?</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-45.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-45" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Owning the legacy of an artist" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Fri, 16 Aug 2013 08:20:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-16/morning-shift-owning-legacy-artist-108439 Morning Shift: Exploitation or art? Photographing a city's deterioration http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-12/morning-shift-exploitation-or-art-photographing-citys <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Ruins-Flickr- stormdog42.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We discuss the trend of photographing modern ruins and whether it exposes viewers to a world they may never see, or exploits a city&#39;s dissent. And, the new play Invasion! stirs up conversation about the politics of racial profiling.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-41.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-41" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Exploitation or art? Photographing a city's deterioration" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Mon, 12 Aug 2013 08:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-12/morning-shift-exploitation-or-art-photographing-citys Laid off Sun-Times photo gallery shows 'What You Missed' http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/laid-sun-times-photo-gallery-shows-what-you-missed-108196 <p><p><em>The Chicago Sun-Times </em>terminated its entire photography department. It replaced 28 photojournalists &ndash; most of whom had been working at the paper for ten to forty-plus years &ndash; with writers using smartphones and freelancers if deemed necessary.</p><p>A little less than two months later, <a href="http://www.chicagophoto.org/">The Chicago Photography Center</a> is presenting a tribute to those laid off journalists, and reflecting on the loss to the community and industry. Their short-term exhibit, which kicked off on July 14 and runs through this weekend, is titled &ldquo;See What You Missed.&rdquo;</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.wbez.org/laid-sun-times-photo-gallery-shows-what-you-missed-108196#rob">Rob Hart</a> | <a href="http://www.wbez.org/laid-sun-times-photo-gallery-shows-what-you-missed-108196#michelle">Michelle LaVigne</a> | <a href="http://www.wbez.org/laid-sun-times-photo-gallery-shows-what-you-missed-108196#andrew">Andrew Nelles</a></p><p>&ldquo;This has really turned the photography world upside down,&rdquo; said Heidi Kohz, the center&rsquo;s executive director. &ldquo;We wanted to do something to help and give value to these photographers who had otherwise been dismissed and unappreciated.&rdquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" see="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Hart.png" style="height: 407px; width: 620px;" title="Rob Hart took photos of friends for the Chicago Photography Center's gallery." what="" you="" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102470425&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="734.4000244140625px"></iframe></p><p><a name="rob">The exhibit</a> showcases the work of 18 of the <em>Sun-Times</em>&rsquo; laid off photographers, who had from June 29 to July 3 to shoot any subject of their choice for the gallery. Over that week, they created 58 images, including joyful photos from the gay pride parade, somber shots at a fire, and quiet moments in a nursing home.</p><p>&ldquo;Killing off an entire department is kind of extraordinary, and a little frightening,&rdquo; said <a href="http://charlesosgood.photoshelter.com/">Charles Osgood</a>, a former <em>Chicago Tribune </em>photographer, who curated the exhibit along with his colleague at the center, José Moré. &ldquo;Anybody can take a picture, anybody can write a story, but not anybody is a writer, and not anybody is a photographer.&rdquo;</p><p>Kohz said the center&rsquo;s traffic has nearly tripled over the last two weeks because of the exhibit. About 300 guests have come through to see the photos, in addition to 300 more at the exhibit&rsquo;s kickoff celebration, making it the largest opening the center has ever had.</p><p>&ldquo;The support was breathtaking,&rdquo; Kohz said. &ldquo;A photojournalist from Boston came through, students visiting from Spain, family members, friends &ndash;&nbsp;it&rsquo;s been very impactful to people.&rdquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" see="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Nelles.png" style="height: 410px; width: 620px;" title="Andrew Nelles took photos of a 3-11 alarm fire in Bronzeville for the Chicago Photography Center's gallery." what="" you="" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102589518&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>The <em>Sun-Times</em> layoffs <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/may/30/chicago-sun-times-photography-staff">became international news</a> as a representation of drastic change in the news business.</p><p>Osgood has been an adjunct professor of photojournalism at Columbia College for more than 20 years. In the last five, he&#39;s started to preach the importance of skill diversification. Most of his students won&#39;t be able to make a living as photojournalists anymore.</p><p>At the same time, he said, photography is &ldquo;more valued than ever,&rdquo; at least by the public. Ironically enough, that&rsquo;s largely due to new ways of consuming media through digital technology &mdash; including that pesky smartphone mentioned earlier.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;When people go online, they look at the photo first, the headline second, the caption third, and then finally they get to the story,&rdquo; Osgood said. &ldquo;Photography is what draws you in, and if you&#39;re in the business of storytelling, it&rsquo;s incredibly important to have top quality images.&rdquo;</p><p>But for many, the <em>Sun-Times</em>&#39; decision confirmed the lurking suspicion that journalism&#39;s decision makers are discounting visual storytelling. Kohz said the<em> Sun-Times</em> may have been the first major paper to do this, but they won&rsquo;t be the last.</p><p>&ldquo;I was joking they should have gotten rid of all the writers and just given the photographers a pen,&rdquo; Osgood said with a chuckle. &ldquo;Someone said, don&#39;t give them any ideas.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago Photography Center is also planning a lecture series for this fall on the future of photography, and Kohz said she hopes to check in with the <em>Sun-Times</em> group in six months or a year to &quot;see where they&rsquo;ve landed.&quot;&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;They&rsquo;ve all reached the point where they&rsquo;re moving on, and are almost tired of the subject,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;But with this [exhibit,] at least for a moment, it wasn&rsquo;t taken for granted.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago Photography Center&rsquo;s &ldquo;See What You Missed&rdquo; exhibit will run through July 28 at 3301 N. Lincoln Ave. Find out more <a name="michelle">information on</a> <a href="http://www.chicagophoto.org/">its website</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" exhibit.="" see="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/LaVigne_0.png" title="Michelle LaVigne took photos of her mother in a nursing home for Chicago Photography Center's gallery." what="" you="" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102470427&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em>Alyssa Edes is an intern on WBEZ&#39;s digial team. Follow her on Twitter <a href="http://twitter.com/alyssaedes" target="_blank">@alyssaedes</a>. &nbsp;</em></p></p> Thu, 25 Jul 2013 17:02:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/laid-sun-times-photo-gallery-shows-what-you-missed-108196