WBEZ | photography http://www.wbez.org/tags/photography Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Afternoon Shift: Spotlight on suburban living http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-12/afternoon-shift-spotlight-suburban-living-112019 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Flickr%20spakattacks.jpg" style="height: 517px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/spakattacks)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205191862&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Are &#39;Best Places to Live&#39; lists accurate?</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">With the &ldquo;top 10&rdquo; and &ldquo;best places to live&rdquo; lists popping up all over the web, we&rsquo;ve been wondering which suburbs are the best to buy a house and raise a family. Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business real estate reporter, Dennis Rodkin, tells us what to believe and why we should be skeptical of those lists. Marty Winefield, an Evanston-based real estate broker with Coldwell Banker, also gives his insights.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a31-72d3-df2f-fdbdadf29c51"><strong>Guests: </strong></span></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Dennis_Rodkin?lang=en">Dennis Rodkin</a> is a Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business reporter.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a31-72d3-df2f-fdbdadf29c51"><a href="https://twitter.com/MartyWinefield">Marty Winefield</a></span> is a Coldwell Banker real estate broker.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205191457&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Photography collection depicts Cuba&#39;s Special Period</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a33-e80b-15c3-b96053ed3c2b">Madeleine Plonsker visited Cuba for the first time in 2002 and it changed her life. She saw examples of modern photography that haunted her and she has returned more than a dozen times since. Her visits in those years have resulted in a striking collection of photography that has been gathered in the new book &ldquo;The Light In Cuban Eyes&rdquo; from Lake Forest College Press. She joins us to talk about the book</span> and her experiences in Cuba.</p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a33-e80b-15c3-b96053ed3c2b"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Madeleine Plonsker is an art collector, philanthropist and author of </em></span><em><a href="https://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/programs/english/press/books/cubaneyes.php">&ldquo;The Light in Cuban Eyes.&rdquo;</a></em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192082&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Ogden Dunes Democrat enters Indiana governor&#39;s race</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">A Northwest Indiana woman hopes to become the state&rsquo;s first female governor. Democrat Karen Tallian officially kicked off her campaign on May 12 to seek her party&rsquo;s nomination for governor. The veteran lawmaker wants to increase Indiana&rsquo;s minimum wage and push for civil rights protections for the LGBT community. Tallian says current governor Mike Pence, a Republican, is beatable due to a series of missteps, but she&rsquo;s not the only Democrat seeking the nomination. WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter Michael Puente joins us to talk about Tallian&rsquo;s candidacy and the overall race for Indiana governor.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a35-00fd-4887-50be4cb9982d">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.twitter.com/mikepuentenews">Michael Puente</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192092&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Illinois High School Association launches initiative to make high school sports safer</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The group that represents Illinois high schools has a new campaign aimed at making high school sports safer. &ldquo;Play Smart. Play Hard.&rdquo; is an educational resource for coaches, parents and student-athletes. And there&rsquo;s another piece to the initiative: A new advisory council that will suggest changes to policies at the Illinois High School Association. Kurt Gibson, assistant executive director of the IHSA, joins us with more.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a36-a657-4337-2f6aea6e0af2">Plus Dr. Cynthia LaBella joins us to talk about the initiative. She&rsquo;s the medical director for the Institute of Sports Medicine at Lurie Children&rsquo;s Hospital and head of the concussion program. She&rsquo;s also a member of IHSA&rsquo;s Sports Medicine Advisory Committee. </span><br /><br /><strong>Guests: </strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="http://www.ihsa.org/AbouttheIHSA/AdministrativeSupportStaff/KurtGibson.aspx">Kurt Gibson</a> is associate executive director of the IHSA.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a36-a657-4337-2f6aea6e0af2"><a href="https://www.luriechildrens.org/en-us/care-services/find-a-doctor/Pages/LaBella_Cynthia_2236.aspx">Dr. Cynthia LaBella</a></span> is the medical director of the Institute of Sports Medicine at Lurie Children&rsquo;s Hospital.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192294&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Tech Shift: UI Labs opens its hub for advanced manufacturing</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">After much fanfare, &nbsp;Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute is open. After winning a $70 million federal grant back in 2014 for advanced manufacturing, the UI Labs tech hub is up and running. UI Labs chairman Warren Holtsberg &nbsp;gives us the details.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a3b-5cad-285b-f5d9f0045722">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.uilabs.org/board/">Warren Holtsberg</a> is the chairman at UI Labs.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192096&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Chicago gets Obama Library but exact site still undecided</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">After months of speculation and rumors surrounding where the Obama Presidential Library would break ground, Chicago is the place for that space. It&rsquo;ll be called the Barack Obama Presidential Center. According to the Obama Foundation, it&rsquo;ll include a library, museum, and archives. What&rsquo;s not clear is where it&rsquo;ll be. WBEZ&rsquo;s Yolanda Perdomo attended Tuesday&rsquo;s event and joins us in studio.</p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a3c-b161-1876-eb27efbb7cf1"><strong>Guest:</strong><em> </em></span><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/yperdomo">Yolanda Perdomo</a> is a WBEZ reporter.&nbsp;</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/205192098&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">What will the Obama Presidential Library look like?&nbsp;</span></div><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">AThe Obama Presidential Library is officially coming to Chicago. As for the design: obviously Chicago&rsquo;s a city known for its architecture. How much more pressure does that put on the Obamas and the Obama Foundation for their decisions regarding architecture, design and urban planning? Blair Kamin is architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune and has been busy writing about these aspects of the Library. He joins us with his thoughts and some tips for the First Family. &nbsp;</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-2808c723-4a3e-0775-7839-2154016b2b8c">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/BlairKamin?lang=en">Blair Kamin</a> is tChicago Tribune&rsquo;s architecture critic.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 12 May 2015 17:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-05-12/afternoon-shift-spotlight-suburban-living-112019 Morning Shift: New exhibit shows WWII through the eyes of Jewish Soviet photographers http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-02-24/morning-shift-new-exhibit-shows-wwii-through-eyes-jewish-soviet <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/whatsthatpicture.jpg" style="height: 490px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/whatsthatpicture" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192815393&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">U of C looks into opening trauma center</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">In January, University of Chicago Medicine launched a study to see what it would take to open an adult trauma center near its Hyde Park Campus. Crain&#39;s Chicago health care reporter Kristen Schorsch joins us with the latest on the health system&#39;s initiative. Read her article <a href="http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150224/NEWS03/150229949?template=printart">here</a>.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/kschorsch">Kristen Schorsch</a> is the health care reporter for Crain&#39;s Chicago.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192815387&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Wisconsin could be next right to work state</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Gov. Scott Walker has said he wouldn&rsquo;t press Wisconsin to be a right to work state, but legislative actions in that state may say otherwise. The Republican-led legislature is expected to take up a right to work bill as early as this week, and the Governor has not said that he would veto the measure. Walker&rsquo;s past anti-union moves are well-documented but rumors swirling about a possible 2016 presidential run could change his course slightly. Wisconsin Public Radio&rsquo;s State Government Reporter Shawn Johnson has the latest on what we can expect from our northern neighbor in the coming weeks.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/SJohnsonWPR">Shawn Johnson</a> is the state government reporter for Wisconsin Public Radio.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192815382&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">ACA tech glitches causing problems on tax forms</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">After a glitch in technology caused healthcare.gov to extend its open enrollment period last week, new reports suggest many taxpayers who were able to enroll for health coverage have received incorrect tax information and are being urged to postpone filing tax returns. According to reports, the issue might take weeks to resolve. We find out what this means for Illinois residents affected by the system-wide glitch with information from Ladder Up&#39;s Christine Cheng.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Christine Cheng is the Director of <a href="https://twitter.com/LadderUp">Ladder Up</a>.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192815378&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">New exhibit shows WWII through the eyes of Jewish Soviet photographers</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Last month marked the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz by the Red Army. That event, and many others over the course of the war were documented by Soviet photographers. Adding additional power to these images is the fact that many of the people behind the cameras were Jewish. A new exhibition opened Sunday at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie. It&rsquo;s called Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust. It features 60 photographs taken by Jewish photographers in the Soviet Union from the 1930s through the end of World War Two. The exhibition is based on a book of the same name by Professor David Shneer. Morning Shift&rsquo;s Jason Marck caught up with Shneer for an inside look at the exhibit, and the history behind it. Since its earliest days of in Russia, photography was actually considered a &ldquo;Jewish profession,&rdquo; and Shneer explains how that came to be.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.colorado.edu/jewishstudies/faculty-and-staff/faculty/david-shneer">David Shneer</a> is a professor and author of the book &quot;Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust.&quot;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192815373&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">This is Modern Art (based on true events)</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Back in 2010 a group of graffiti artists, also known as graffers, looked at the prestigious and famous Art Institute of Chicago and thought something was missing. Even though the newly opened Modern Wing promised to be a world-class destination for modern art, this group thought the museum needed to display the visual work that was alive and present throughout so many parts of the city. And, while even museum workers agreed there was beauty in the graffiti bomb this group did on the facade of the building, it sparked a debate asking if this was art or vandalism. Steppenwolf Theatre has brought that story-and the public discourse it sparked-to the stage for <a href="http://t.co/T7D1SwmdMS">This is Modern Art (based on true events)</a>. Co-writer Kevin Coval and Steppenwolf for Young Adults Artistic and Educational Director Hallie Gordon detail the story of the graffiti bomb, and explain what questions the event elicits.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/kevincoval">Kevin Coval </a>is the co-writer of This is Modern Art, a performance artist and found of Louder Than A Bomb.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="https://twitter.com/hgordon66">Hallie Gordon</a> is the Artistic and Educational Director of Steppenwolf for Young Adults.</em></p></p> Tue, 24 Feb 2015 07:39:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-02-24/morning-shift-new-exhibit-shows-wwii-through-eyes-jewish-soviet Photographer Richard Stromberg taught his craft to thousands http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/photographer-richard-stromberg-taught-his-craft-thousands-111081 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/stromberg.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>He could be grouchy but Richard Stromberg&rsquo;s photography knowledge was unmatched and, during a teaching career that stretched more than 45 years, his tough love with students helped build a large following.</p><p>Stromberg, a lifelong Chicagoan, died Friday morning at age 66 in Presence St. Francis Hospital in Evanston after a two-year battle with pancreatic cancer, his wife Heidi Levin confirmed.</p><p>His achievements include the 1969 founding of a Jane Addams Center/Hull House photography program that spanned more than three decades. In 2002, he helped launch the Chicago Photography Center and, seven years later, he founded his own photography school.</p><p>Stromberg estimated having taught and mentored 25,000 students over the years. His courses covered everything from aperture settings to ethics, from color printing to the photographer&rsquo;s psychological relationship with the subject. During introductory sessions, he liked to say: &ldquo;I won&#39;t teach you to take fuzzy pictures here. For that, you need to spend thousands of dollars at the School of the Art Institute.&rdquo;</p><p>When not teaching, Stromberg squeezed in time for his own photography, which ranged from fashion assignments to investigative journalism in publications such as the Chicago Reporter. He took special pride in turning his camera against &ldquo;institutional racism,&rdquo; as he put it, including photos that helped expose ill-equipped Chicago Fire Department ambulances on the city&rsquo;s South Side.</p><p>Stromberg was also a big fan of WBEZ. A few years ago, he started training journalists from the station, at no charge, to help improve the photography on its website. &ldquo;He never let me leave his studio without catching up with me on how the station was doing and things he loved and hated about us,&rdquo; North Side Bureau Reporter Odette Yousef said. &ldquo;He knew every reporter&rsquo;s name.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;He created a committed community of lifelong photography learners and teachers,&rdquo; Yousef said. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s the best testament to his passion for photography and to his belief that anyone could learn it.&rdquo;</p></p> Fri, 07 Nov 2014 19:18:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/photographer-richard-stromberg-taught-his-craft-thousands-111081 From Indiana's icy roads to Sochi's ski slopes http://www.wbez.org/news/indianas-icy-roads-sochis-ski-slopes-109666 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Olympic photog 2-way.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Winter Olympics get underway today in Sochi, Russia. For most athletes, the Olympics are the pinnacle of their sport.</p><p>The same could be said for the journalists covering the games. Guy Rhodes lives in Northwest Indiana and is a freelance photographer who works with the <em>Sun-Times</em> Media Group.</p><p>Today he&rsquo;s in Sochi to shoot the games for <em>USA Today</em>. WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente sat down with Rhodes before he left town to hear how he&rsquo;s preparing for the games &mdash; and the threat of terrorism.&nbsp;</p><p>You can follow Guy Rhodes at the Winter Olympics and see all his photos <a href="http://www.guyrhodes.com/blog" target="_blank">on his blog</a>.</p></p> Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:44:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/indianas-icy-roads-sochis-ski-slopes-109666 Inside the eye of photographer Todd Diederich http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-12/inside-eye-photographer-todd-diederich-109348 <p><div><img alt="" at="" by="" chicago="" class="image-original_image" diederich="" displayed="" exhibit="" is="" new="" pentagram="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/pp.jpg" style="float: left; height: 279px; width: 350px;" the="" title="" todd="" />Todd Diederich&rsquo;s work is robust. His passion as a photographer can be measured by the heft of each of his images. Subjects and scenes tell a complete story in each photograph, never leaving room for doubt in their liveliness or authenticity.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>He captures a part of Chicago far from the sterilized energy of downtown&mdash;one that is young and potent.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One of his many images, shown left, is on display at &quot;<a href="http://d-weinberg.com/" target="_blank">Chicago Style</a>,&quot; a new salon-style group exhibition at David Weinberg Photography.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;Chicago Style&quot; features 34 Chicago photographers &quot;whose eclectic works,&quot; according to the gallery, reflect &quot;the nuanced and refined style of the stormy, husky and brawling city of big shoulders.&quot;&nbsp;It runs through February 15, 2014.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diederich hails from Brookfield and attended Columbia College on scholarship before leaving the downtown art school in 2003. Afterward, he left the city entirely, spending time in Athens, Georgia, a city known for its extensive arts and culture community. Diederich eventually moved back to Chicago in 2009.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diederich&rsquo;s breakthrough came with work for the Chicago Reader and a column with Vice&nbsp;Magazine online. From both experiences, he has gained a greater sense of control of what he photographs and how the images are represented. Diederich&#39;s chosen photograph for the exhibit,&nbsp;titled &quot;Pentagram Perception,&quot; was taken during his residency with local nonprofit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.acreresidency.org/">Artists&#39; Cooperative&nbsp;Residency&nbsp;and Exhibitions</a>,&nbsp;or ACRE.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;It is a good representation of my mind pressed flat against a two-dimensional surface,&rdquo; Diederich&nbsp;said of the photograph. His time at ACRE &ldquo;cracked open something inside me. My future was there and where I am still headed ... a bridge between the celestial and terrestrial.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Since then, Diederich&#39;s projects have included a successful <a href="http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/752279352/luminous-flux-photography-book" target="_blank">Kickstarter campaign</a> to fund his first photography book, &quot;Luminous Flux&quot; (the cover of which featured &quot;Pentagram Perception&quot; and was created with the help of <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;ved=0CDMQFjAB&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wbez.org%2Fblogs%2Fbritt-julious%2F2013-03%2Fground-building-new-art-communities-chicago-106218&amp;ei=kaeoUun5GaGr2QX2yYDIBg&amp;usg=AFQjCNER4uLl13nA6M1LzMyF2-7zN-UNxw&amp;sig2=aGqXN3xYK2ybV4wX5Dg7AA&amp;bvm=bv.57799294,d.b2I" target="_blank">Matt Austin and The Perch</a>), an exhibition at Johalla Projects, and directing a&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&amp;v=lmg3uXezQCY">music video</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>His tumblr,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.beodddierich.com/" target="_blank">Be (T)Odd Die(De)Rich</a>,&nbsp;remains the most prominent and updated source for his work. It is also where he has gathered a substantial fanbase of other artists and creatives.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I do what I love. I&#39;m trying to continue with that,&rdquo; Diederich said. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s all I can meditate on.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Each blog post gives a look at a sliver of Diederich&rsquo;s life, and the blog as a whole is a visual diarie that reveals without sacrificing the friendships and bonds he has formed with his subjects. It&#39;s his reality shared with those who may not live in Englewood or attend underground balls, but are curious.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Diederich understands this, certainly more than most, and captures within each photograph the complexity of his settings and subjects&mdash;their wealth and ambition, their pride and beauty, their youth and tradition.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I am really photographing a strange reflection of my minds eye,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Subjects are friends, or friends of friends, or new friends. Situations can be loving, sweet, soft, angry, demonic and ugly. But the energy attracted me. It&#39;s one element of the magic of photography.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>He makes a point of mentioning that he is not afraid of death. And so he makes art that looks like his subjects are willing to die for their performances or relationships or passions. During the course of our two-hour long interview, Diederich recounts stories and anecdotes which are at once humorous, shocking, and unnerving.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I photograph for the future, for the next Earth, the one after this era ends,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Because if I&#39;m reincarnated again, it would be fun to see what really went down in this place called Chicago.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>His use of pineal gland&nbsp;or &quot;third eye&quot;&nbsp;activation plays a large part in his vision, allowing him to unlock a personal vision that captures more than just the essence of his subjects and settings. He also recognizes their humanity and leaves it open to be visually consumed by audiences online and in person.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Since I noticed their energy I am sure others will,&rdquo; Diederich said. &ldquo;They are not ignored, they are just down the street from me vibrating.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>David Weinberg Photography is located at 300 W Superior, Suite 203.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Britt Julious&nbsp;blogs about culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow her essays for WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/">here</a>&nbsp;and on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 11 Dec 2013 12:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-12/inside-eye-photographer-todd-diederich-109348 In defense of the selfie http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-11/defense-selfie-109225 <p><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20130215_031431.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 310px; float: left;" title="" />I joined Facebook during the summer before my freshman year of college and nearly every photo I used as a profile picture was a selfie.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Back then, we didn&rsquo;t have a name for them. Some people referred to them as &#39;angled shots&#39; or &#39;MySpace photos,&#39; for their ubiquity on that social networking site. The chorus of &#39;vanity&#39; and &#39;deception&#39; was as evident then as it is now. People were upset by others&rsquo; desire to control their visual narrative.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One day, an old high school friend left a comment on my Facebook wall asking why I could not just find a decent photograph of myself that I did not take. It was the first time I considered the difference between a photo of my making and a photo someone else took of me.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Oxford Dictionaries recently <a href="http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/press-releases/oxford-dictionaries-word-of-the-year-2013/" target="_blank">named</a> &quot;selfie&quot; as its word of the year.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Numerous writers responded, including&nbsp;News Editor&nbsp;Erin Gloria Ryan of Jezebel, who <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=2&amp;ved=0CDkQFjAB&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fjezebel.com%2Fselfies-arent-empowering-theyre-a-cry-for-help-1468965365&amp;ei=yWyPUqrlBIipqwHAsYCoAQ&amp;usg=AFQjCNGfYkGx1eSegWROvMnpT2QbK8LLwg&amp;sig2=ea3yPmZ3oGcB9ZkQvnEeOQ&amp;bvm=bv.56988011,d.aWM" target="_blank">described</a> selfies as a cry for help, a sign that we are in desperate need of validation from others.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&quot;Young women take selfies because they don&#39;t derive their sense of worth from themselves, they rely on others to bestow their self-worth on them &mdash; just as they&#39;ve been taught,&quot; she wrote.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But I think her view ultimately reduces why people use technology and choose to manipulate their own image.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Online reaction largely critcized Ryan&rsquo;s article for its limited view of why people take selfies, as well as for her implied desire to erase the existence of self documentation. Social media users started using the hashtag #FeministSelfie to extend the conversation outside the Jezebel article, and to document themselves in ways that were goofy and weird and lovely.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Those selfies documented people that deem the practice not as a way to ask, &#39;why?&#39; but, &#39;why not?&#39;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Ryan&#39;s interpretation of the photo as a cry for help disregards the personal autonomy and self-esteem of the photographer. For many, selfies are a solution to the problem. They are not looking to please others, but instead to please themselves &mdash; to see themselves outside the harsh eyes of others.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>During college, I was obsessed with looking at nightlife photography not because I wanted to be photographed, but because I loved the narrative framed around the images. Nightlife photographs give some of the pieces, but let the audience fill in the rest of the story. In my mind, the story was better than anything I could have imagined with just words alone.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>When I was out for the night, however, I did whatever possible to avoid nightlife photographers. I did not want to be captured in their vision, and I did not want others to see what was not there, to form their own narratives and create an idea of the evening that outpaced and outweighed its reality.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/20120818_132854.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 310px; float: right;" title="" />In his seminal collection of essays and vignettes on photography entitled &quot;Ghost Image,&quot; French photographer <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herv%C3%A9_Guibert">Herve Guibert</a> wrote, &ldquo;We alone can intercept the gaze that we exchange indirectly through a reflection. The consent in our gaze is our secret alone, a mirage suspended in air that will soon disappear.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Guibert&rsquo;s thoughts are on the photographer as well as the subject. Looking at the camera is a way to provide consent to the one creating the narrative. But if we are the ones creating the image of ourselves, then our consent is a conversation with the self.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I cannot speak for everyone, but for me, a good selfie is a way to reject how other people see you. It is a way to see oneself as one chooses, not as others see us. It takes control of our own visual narratives, as if saying, &#39;This is the story I want to tell.&#39;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Sometimes selfies act as a fun documentation of the places in which you were alone. I have selfies inside weird art installations, cool hotel lobbies, and dark club bathrooms. Sometimes I share them, but often, I keep them for myself like an added layer of memory.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Self photography acknowledges that we are alive, that we exist. For people whose existence (say as a woman, or a person of color, or a person with a disability, etc.) is often denied in mainstream culture or reduced to stereotype, perhaps a selfie is a way to control the narrative by documenting their time, alive and moving about the world like the people we see across media platforms.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Many of the selfies I see are not just about &ldquo;good hair&rdquo; or perfect makeup or trying to look sexually desirable. Some post selfies after a long night working on their masters thesis or in celebration of a marathon or as a documentation of their weight-loss. I&rsquo;ve seen selfies in elaborate stage makeup before theater performances and in the days after being laid off. I don&rsquo;t think these people are just looking for encouragement or for others to say how pretty they are.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Their selfies feel more like a stake in the land, a declaration of time and place, a sentence in a chapter in the novel of their lives.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Is this giving too much credence to the power of the selfie? Maybe.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>There will always be people who only see the selfie as a form of vanity. And there will also always be people who post excessively, who need to insert themselves into the ongoing &#39;conversations&#39; of social media with their visage because they need validation. But for many, the selfie is a project itself. It is a way of seeing oneself in the world and sharing it with others. It is multiple things at once.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div><div><div property="content:encoded"><div><em>Britt Julious&nbsp;blogs about race and culture in and outside of Chicago. Follow her essays for WBEZ&#39;s Tumblr&nbsp;<a href="http://wbez.tumblr.com/">here</a>&nbsp;and on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/britticisms" target="_blank">@britticisms</a>.</em></div></div></div></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 22 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013-11/defense-selfie-109225 Take this job and shove it http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/take-job-and-shove-it-108780 <p><p>In 1949, when John Giolas was just 19, he started work at the U.S. Steel mill in Gary, Ind.</p><p>For a while, he had a plum job working in the metallurgical lab, testing all the steel. But then U.S. Steel started its downward slide, laying off workers. By the late 1950s, Giolas found himself working a series of increasingly &ldquo;low, demeaning jobs&rdquo; at the mill.</p><p>Giolas visited the StoryCorps booth with his sons Markus and Dale to remember the day he walked off the job and how he made a new life, despite his battles with depression.</p><p><strong>John Giolas</strong>: When you went in the mill, the gates closed. And there was no way you were going to get out until the next shift started, and that&rsquo;s when the gates opened. So I always called it a prison.</p><p>While Giolas was working at the mill, he started taking photographs of the other mill workers and their families.</p><p><strong>John</strong>: These guys would say, &lsquo;You do good work, this is your opportunity to get out of here, it&rsquo;s too late for us.&rsquo;&nbsp;</p><p>Lay-offs had started at the steel mill, and things grew worse:<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/giolas with cam cropped.jpg" style="float: right; height: 215px; width: 250px;" title="" /></p><p><strong>John</strong>: I ended up in a pit of steaming water with coke falling off of a conveyor belt, and it was my job as it landed in the water to scoop it up and put it back on the conveyor belt. And on one midnight turn I just lost it, I blew up. I asked the foreman, I said, &lsquo;Where&rsquo;s the gate? I want to leave, I want to quit,&rsquo; and he said, &lsquo;You can&rsquo;t quit,&rsquo; so I stayed there &lsquo;til morning, daylight -&nbsp; walked out of the mill and never went back.</p><p>To find out how what Giolas did next, click on the audio above.</p><p><em>Katie Mingle is a producer for WBEZ and the Third Coast Festival.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6250422" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 27 Sep 2013 08:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/take-job-and-shove-it-108780 Vivian Maier's really moving pictures http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-09/vivian-maiers-really-moving-pictures-108640 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/leescreencap.PNG" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="420px" src="http://www.nowness.com/media/embedvideo?itemid=3316&amp;issueid=2587" width="620px"></iframe></p><div>Vivian Maier, the Chicago nanny who led a secret life as a street photographer, continues to be one of the city&#39;s more <a href="http://www.vivianmaier.com/about-vivian-maier/">arresting stories</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>After gaining notice in 2009 two years after her death, the thousands of photographs Maier took have been the subject of books, exhibitions and a documentary, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2o2nBhQ67Zc"><em>Finding Vivian Maier</em></a>, shown this week at the Toronto International Film Festival.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Her Chicago area photographs, taken from the 1950s through the 1970s have been of particular interest. But the 8mm movies she shot are also coming to light. The above film made of footage Maier shot in downtown Chicago in 1971 or so was posted a few days ago on the arts and culture site <a href="http://www.nowness.com/">Nowness</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>For my money, Maier was far better with a still camera, but she wasn&#39;t bad shooting movies. She seems to be drawn to the same elements that I felt marked her photography when I wrote about her still images in this blog in 2010: &quot;...doyennes seemingly lost in an increasingly modern city; workaday folk walking and shopping beneath the script of neon; old men in shabby suits, hanging out on downtown street corners.&quot;</div></p> Tue, 10 Sep 2013 05:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-09/vivian-maiers-really-moving-pictures-108640 What I See: Gary Eckstein http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-gary-eckstein-108522 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/what i see thumbnail gary_edited-1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Gary Eckstein is a Chicagoan who loves roaming around the city, photographing what he sees. Here, he takes us through a summer day from sampling &quot;dead body&quot; soup at a Korean Market in Chicago&#39;s Avondale neighborhood to visiting Pilsen&#39;s Fiesta Del Sol festival.</p><p>&quot;The things I try to emphasize when I take photos are love of place, people and culture and my attempt to capture the genuine character of a given location,&quot; Gary says. You can find more of his photos on <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/garyegarye/" target="_blank">Flickr</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="480" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fWikv9f2SHA?rel=0" width="640"></iframe></p><p><strong>More from the What I See project</strong></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-mimosa-shah-108384" target="_blank">Setting new roots with Mimosa Shah</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/art/what-i-see-katie-prout-108221" target="_blank">An afternoon run with Katie Prout</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-dmitry-samarov-107924" target="_blank">Painting, sketching and coffee-roasting with Dmitry Samarov</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-yolanda-perdomo-108041" target="_blank">The Illinois Railway Museum with Yolanda Perdomo</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/what-i-see-trainers-day-shedd-aquarium-107766" target="_blank">A trainer&#39;s day at the Shedd Aquarium with&nbsp;Jessica Whiton</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/what-i-see-bike-bee-107686" target="_blank">Bike-a-Bee with Jana Kinsman</a></p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-early-morning-edition-107362" target="_blank">Early Morning Edition with Lauren Chooljian</a></p><p><em>&#39;What I See&#39; is a project which showcases photos from our community and what we&#39;re thinking when we take them. </em></p><p><em>Show us what your Chicago looks like! Email web producer Logan Jaffe ljaffe@wbez.org or tweet <a href="https://twitter.com/loganjaffe" target="_blank">@loganjaffe</a> to find out more about how to make a What I See slideshow for WBEZ.</em></p></p> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 11:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/what-i-see-gary-eckstein-108522 Places and spaces, courtesy of the University of Chicago photo archives http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-08/places-and-spaces-courtesy-university-chicago-photo-archives-108468 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-08489r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 479px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image ">The University of Chicago has been keeping me up at night lately.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Nothing nefarious, thankfully. But I have burned a bit of midnight oil checking out the photo archives from the university library&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/">Special Collection.</a>&nbsp;Much of the collection is devoted to the university&#39;s own buildings. The image above is an undated photo of White City Amusement Park that stood at 63rd and King Drive until was condemned in 1939.&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">But a great number of the archive&#39;s images&mdash;and perhaps the best ones&mdash;were taken by midcentury photographers who documented the area surrounding the campus. The shooters captured a metroplis in transition as blocks were wiped away for big urban renewal projects. The 1951 photograph below shows an unidentified street that would be demolished to build the Lake Meadows residential development:</div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09565r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 463px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">This 1948 photograph shows a building that will be razed to make way for the Eisenhower Expressway (referred to as the Congress Street Superhighway in the sign in the photo):</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09141r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 745px;" title="" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">And here&#39;s a color shot from 1958 of row houses on 29th and Prairie. These aged beauties were demolished in the 1960s:</div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09639r.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 408px;" title="" /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">The archive is plentiful: parks, neighborhoods, the lakefront, downtown and, of course, Hyde Park, documented by different photographers. One photographers, the late Mildred Mead, stands out. All the images accompanying this post are hers, with the exception of the White City photograph.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">And perhaps her sense of humor was as sharp as her eye. The archive includes the image below that Mead took of a tow truck driver changing a flat tire on Mead&#39;s own car in 1952: She doesn&#39;t say where she is&mdash;dig the beautiful buildings in the background&mdash;but she does include this note: &quot;Going around demolition is hazardous to tires, you pick up nails.&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/apf2-09595r.jpg" style="height: 477px; width: 600px;" title="" /></div></p> Wed, 21 Aug 2013 05:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-08/places-and-spaces-courtesy-university-chicago-photo-archives-108468