WBEZ | FOIA http://www.wbez.org/tags/foia Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Campus police: real deal or rent-a-cops? http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/campus-police-real-deal-or-rent-cops-111071 <p><p>Say you are driving around Chicago and you happen to run a red light. There are no Chicago police officers around, but there is a university police car right behind you. Could you still get a ticket?</p><p>That&rsquo;s exactly what Jef Johnson was wondering when he started noticing University of Chicago Police Department cars all over his Bronzeville neighborhood.</p><p>Here&rsquo;s the question Jef sent our way:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>Are police forces at local universities real police or simply security companies? How much policing power do they have?</em></p><p>We found a straightforward legal answer about how this works in Illinois. There is a spectrum of authority that ranges from security guard to all-out cop. At the far end of that spectrum are Jef&rsquo;s own University of Chicago police. He didn&rsquo;t know it at the time but UCPD is almost unique, with a particularly strong hand when it comes to power and jurisdiction. Those officers don&rsquo;t just protect students, staff and campus &mdash; the UCPD serves as the primary police force for 65,000 Chicagoans, and most are not affiliated with the university.</p><p>That prompted a question that should interest anyone, even those who never encounter these officers: How can a private police force get jurisdiction over so much of the public?</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Not your father&rsquo;s rent-a-cops</span></p><p>Let&rsquo;s start with that legal distinction we found. If you&rsquo;re anything like Jef, you probably assume that campus police officers aren&rsquo;t real police, and they have little authority other than the power to break up rowdy parties.</p><p>&ldquo;I always thought somehow that they were rent-a-cops,&rdquo; Jef said.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not always the case, according Cora Beem, who manages mandated training for the<a href="http://www.ptb.state.il.us/aboutus.htm" target="_blank"> Illinois Law Enforcement Standards &amp; Training Board</a>. She said the big distinction to be made is between campus security guards and campus police. The latter undergo the same basic training and certification that state and municipal police officers do. With that certification, they have the same authority as any other police officer in the state, even if they are privately employed.</p><p>Illinois&rsquo; public universities employ campus police, but private universities can choose to hire plain old security guards. Those guards might be armed, but they don&rsquo;t have the power to give Jef Johnson a ticket, and they certainly cannot patrol off campus.</p><p>Like many private schools in Illinois, the University of Chicago voluntarily upgraded its security force to a police force 25 years ago. According to Beem, that means they are definitely not rent-a-cops.</p><p>&ldquo;They can write you a ticket. They can arrest you,&rdquo; Beem explained. &ldquo;They can counsel and release you, so yes, they&rsquo;re real cops.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">The UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction</span></p><p><iframe height="480" src="https://mapsengine.google.com/map/u/0/embed?mid=zD1cveoHRWh8.kfGTEakNbuXk" width="620"></iframe></p><p>With more than 100 full-time officers, the University of Chicago&rsquo;s police department is one of the largest private police forces anywhere. Not only that, UCPD also has a really big patrol area &mdash; they cover 6.5 square miles, most of which is beyond the core of the University of Chicago&#39;s South Side campus.</p><p>But why can UCPD officers patrol so far from campus in the mid-South Side? According to Craig Futterman, a clinical professor of law at University of Chicago Law School, the department&rsquo;s status is almost unique.</p><p>&ldquo;The deal is that there is a city ordinance in Chicago that grants the police superintendent the power to appoint special policemen for the city of Chicago,&rdquo; he explained.</p><p>This <a href="http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Illinois/chicago_il/title4businessesoccupationsandconsumerpr/chapter4-340specialpolicemenandsecurityg?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:chicago_il$anc=JD_Ch.4-340" target="_blank">ordinance allows private police forces to assume the powers and responsibilities of municipal police</a>, not just on campus but in surrounding neighborhoods. UCPD is only one of two private forces in Chicago with this &ldquo;special police&rdquo; designation. The other force is that of Northwestern University Law School, but its <a href="http://directives.chicagopolice.org/attachments/S12-01_Att2.jpg" target="_blank">patrol area extends just a few blocks beyond its Streeterville campus </a>north of Chicago&rsquo;s Loop.</p><p>Once the ordinance was passed in 1992, UCPD negotiated its extended jurisdiction with Chicago&rsquo;s police superintendent. To the north, University of Chicago&rsquo;s main campus stops at 55th Street. UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction, however, extends all the way to 37th Street, even farther than Jef Johnson&rsquo;s home in Bronzeville.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/u%20of%20c%20charters.png" title="University of Chicago's Woodlawn Charter School, left, and Donoghue Charter School, right, are on the southern and northern ends of UCPD's extended jurisdiction. (Ellen Mayer/WBEZ) " /></div><p>Futterman says Chicago&#39;s police superintendent has granted UCPD more independence than it once had. In years&nbsp;past, university police needed administrative assistance to complete arrests.</p><p>&ldquo;The arrest, though, would be formalized and would be processed at a local chicago police department district station, usually whatever district the arrest was because UCPD operated in more than one Chicago police district,&rdquo; Futterman explained. Last year that changed. Now UCPD reports directly to the state and can process arrests independently. According to the university, this arrangement allows both departments to operate more efficiently.</p><p>Maintaining a large police force is expensive, but the university says its worth it. On this, an emailed statement from the UCPD reads: &ldquo;The extended patrol area enhances safety and security through the mid-South Side, which is home to a large number of University of Chicago faculty members, students and staff.&rdquo; The statement mentions the university&rsquo;s interest in protecting its charter schools and other properties within the extended patrol area.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">The community speaks</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/meeting%20WEB.jpg" title="University of Chicago students and South Side residents held a forum October 29, 2014, at Hyde Park's Experimental Station to discuss UCPD's presence in their neighborhoods. (WBEZ/Ellen Mayer)" /></p><p>UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction doesn&rsquo;t just include university students and employees; again, the department protects approximately 65,000 residents. How do they feel about UCPD&rsquo;s presence in their neighborhoods?</p><p>On Wednesday, October 29, <a href="http://www.experimentalstation.org/" target="_blank">Hyde Park&rsquo;s Experimental Station</a> held a forum for students and South Side residents to discuss exactly that. Organizers also invited former UCPD chief Rudy Nimocks. He was at the helm when UCPD expanded its jurisdiction. As he recalls it, the university received community support as it broadened its jurisdiction.</p><p>&ldquo;We had public hearings,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We were asked to come in. At each one of the sessions I said, &lsquo;We&rsquo;ll stay here as long as you want us.&rsquo; That&rsquo;s how it&rsquo;s been ever since.&rdquo;</p><p>Nimocks has a point. Almost every speaker at the community forum expressed gratitude that UCPD has made their neighborhoods safer. That being said, almost every speaker also had a story to tell about UCPD racially profiling black residents who live within the extended jurisdiction.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/triggs%20FOR%20WEB.jpg" style="float: left; height: 246px; width: 370px;" title="Jamel Triggs, who attended the recent forum on neighborhood UCPD presence, says he's been stopped by UCPD six times since returning from the Marine Corps in May. (Ellen Mayer/WBEZ)" />Jamel Triggs, a young black man who works at the Experimental Station&rsquo;s bike shop, said he had been stopped by UCPD six times since he returned from the Marine Corps in May. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re supposed to be protecting and serving us. That&rsquo;s supposed to be the goal,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, not the other way around.&rdquo;</p><p>According to Triggs, the neighborhood doesn&rsquo;t feel safer if he has to worry about being stopped by UCPD. He said he is also concerned about the safety of the younger kids he mentors at the bike shop. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want these kids walking around being scared of the police and being scared of the gangbangers out in the streets,&rdquo; he said, &ldquo;because I was, and it hurts.&rdquo;</p><p>A student group called South Side Solidarity Network has launched a campaign to end perceived racial profiling by UCPD. The trouble is, all their evidence is anecdotal. To firm up accusations of wrongdoing, SSSN has asked UCPD to release records indicating the race of residents the department stops and searches. So far, the department has refused.</p><p>Another emailed statement responds to accusations of racial profiling. &ldquo;The University of Chicago Police Department does not deploy tactics that support racial profiling,&rdquo; it states. &ldquo;As a department, we often and openly discuss our policing strategies to ensure our officers are not engaging deliberately or inadvertently in bias-based policing.&rdquo;</p><p>Without releasing records and data, however, UCPD is asking the public to take them at their word.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Private police and public accountability</span></p><p>This is where Jef Johnson&rsquo;s curiosity about &nbsp;potential traffic stops in Bronzeville morphed into a much bigger question about the transparency and accountability of a private police force. The 1992 Chicago ordinance that allows for the creation of special police includes technical language about certificates and licensing fees, but it doesn&rsquo;t address the public&rsquo;s right to information when a private force takes on the responsibilities of municipal police. UCPD is not a governmental agency, therefore it is not required to release records under Illinois&rsquo; Freedom of Information Act.</p><p>The University of Chicago does have a <a href="http://safety-security.uchicago.edu/police/contact_the_ucpd/complaint_process/" target="_blank">process for investigating complaints against UCPD</a>, but that process will soon get an overhaul. Until now, all investigations were performed in-house, by a fellow UCPD officer. In response to <a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140311/hyde-park/university-of-chicago-police-no-longer-accountable-petition-claims" target="_blank">criticism about UCPD&rsquo;s perceived lack of oversight</a>, the university recently announced the hiring of a new director of professional accountability. This new position will not be filled by a uniformed officer.</p><p>So what did Jef think about all this?</p><p>&ldquo;This is much bigger than I thought when I asked the question,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I worry about a private police force. It just sounds like maybe we&rsquo;re handing too much power to them.&rdquo; Jef said he is most concerned that the average Chicagoan might never know that UCPD had such a huge jurisdiction.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s scary in that sense,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m just finding this out, and I&rsquo;ve been living in this area ten years.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Now we have an answer. Who asked the question?</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jef.jpg" style="float: right; margin: 5px;" title="Jef Johnson asked our question about university police after noticing UCPD officers far from campus. (Photo courtesy of Jef Johnson)" />Judging by the number of questions Jef Johnson has submitted to our <a href="http://curiouscity.wbez.org/" target="_blank">list of question-based story pitches</a>, he is one very curious guy. (For the record, that would be seven ... and counting!) If you haven&rsquo;t run across any of his questions we haven&rsquo;t answered yet, you might remember Jef as the truck enthusiast who launched <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/question-answered-why-ban-pickups-lake-shore-drive-where-can-they-park-104631" target="_blank">our investigation about pickup truck laws in Chicago</a>.</p><p>It turns out this question about university police was also inspired by Jef&rsquo;s driving habits. He says he first began wondering about UCPD&rsquo;s authority on a day when President Barack Obama was visiting his home in the Kenwood neighborhood.</p><p>&ldquo;They blocked off a lot of my streets, so I was taking some back streets and I saw University of Chicago Police cars in areas that seem far away from the University of Chicago.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p><p>When Jef isn&rsquo;t thinking up questions for Curious City, he&rsquo;s a wedding minister employed by the city of Chicago.</p><p><em>Ellen Mayer is the Curious City intern. Follow her on Twitter at<a href="http://twitter.com/cementley" target="_blank"> @</a>ellenrebeccam.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 17:26:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/campus-police-real-deal-or-rent-cops-111071 CPS reveals that the only ingredients in its chicken nuggets are...chicken nuggets! http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/cps-reveals-only-ingredients-its-chicken-nuggets-arechicken-nuggets-109963 <p><p>Almost all the meals served in the Chicago Public Schools are paid for with your tax dollars. But if you want to know what&rsquo;s actually in those meals, good luck.</p><p>Early last month WBEZ filed a Freedom of Information Act request for data on what CPS students were eating. On Tuesday, WBEZ finally received an answer, if you can call it that.</p><p>What follows is the district&rsquo;s verbatim response to our FOIA&nbsp; request for the &ldquo;ingredient lists for the top five entrees in the CPS food service program.&quot;&nbsp;</p><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:207px;height:20px;"><p align="center"><strong>Entrée Item</strong></p></td><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:368px;height:20px;"><p align="center"><strong>Ingredient List</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:207px;height:20px;"><p>Chicken Patty Sandwich</p></td><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:368px;height:20px;"><p>Chicken Patty, Bun</p></td></tr><tr><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:207px;height:20px;"><p>Chicken &amp; Bean Nachos</p></td><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:368px;height:20px;"><p>Chicken Crumbles, Tortilla Chips, Cheese Sauce, Beans</p></td></tr><tr><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:207px;height:20px;"><p>Chicken Nuggets</p></td><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:368px;height:20px;"><p>Chicken Nuggets</p></td></tr><tr><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:207px;height:20px;"><p>Cheeseburger</p></td><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:368px;height:20px;"><p>Bun, Beef Patty, American Cheese</p></td></tr><tr><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:207px;height:20px;"><p>Penne with Marinara Meat Sauce</p></td><td nowrap="nowrap" style="width:368px;height:20px;"><p>Penne, Marinara, Beef Crumbles</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Yes, you read it correctly: The complete ingredient list for CPS chicken nuggets is two words: &ldquo;chicken nuggets.&rdquo; And it took more than a month for CPS Nutrition Support Services to figure this out.</p><p>When I last did a story on popular CPS lunch items for the <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.chicagotribune.com%2F2011-02-20%2Fhealth%2Fct-met-new-school-lunches-20110220_1_cps-students-chartwells-thompson-healthy-food&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2I3jbVb45SdZO7ve-7pVkO5ePRg">Chicago Tribune in 2011</a>, the district&rsquo;s spicy chicken patty contained dozens of ingredients, many too hard to pronounce. But, miraculously, CPS and its new caterer Aramark have pared the district&rsquo;s number one food item down to just two ingredients: a chicken patty and a bun, according to the district&rsquo;s response.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPS%20spicy%20chicken%20patty.jpg" style="margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px; height: 210px; width: 280px; float: left;" title="A chicken patty sandwich is the most eaten entree in Chicago Public Schools. But what’s in it? After a month, CPS will only disclose that it contains a chicken patty and a bun. Thanks CPS. (WBEZ/Monica Eng)" />A few years ago, the advocacy group Real Food For Kids criticized the <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2Fblogs%2Fthesalt%2F2012%2F04%2F02%2F149717358%2Fwhats-inside-the-26-ingredient-school-lunch-burger&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNGprtGWU49odQw1FT4Nn-B2pMTMsw">26-ingredient burger</a> served in American schools and called on districts to phase out such heavily processed foods in lunch programs. According to the ingredient lists WBEZ received from the district, CPS has bested the 26-ingredient burger by 23 ingredients, by listing only three in its burger: a bun, a patty and (if it&rsquo;s a cheeseburger) American cheese.</p><p>Is this an accurate picture of CPS entree ingredients? We can&rsquo;t tell. Because, although WBEZ responded almost immediately with emails and phone calls seeking an explanation for these limited ingredient lists, the district has, as of yet, offered none. Yesterday, one district representative said he would try to contact the head of school food, Leslie Fowler, to determine what happened. But we&rsquo;ve heard nothing back since then.</p><p>I have covered CPS food for at least five years now, and have met with my share of district resistance to sharing information. But this latest development shocked even me.</p><p>At least previous administrations were willing to share details on what our tax dollars were buying for school lunch. This one, however, seems bent on keeping the public in the dark. But why?</p><p>It should be noted that CPS&rsquo;s response arrived on April 1st. One can only hope this mockery of the Freedom of Information Act was all just some kind of joke.</p><p>We will keep you updated on CPS&rsquo;s response here.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>UPDATE: A CPS representative said Friday he would try to obtain the missing information, but would not say when. On Monday the district had still not produced the missing data, and WBEZ filed a request with the Illinois Attorney General&#39;s office to review the situation and assist in releasing the ingredient information.&nbsp;</p><p>Here are the complete ingredient lists that CPS finally turned over after state law enforcement got involved in the case.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>Chicken Patty Sandwich</em></p><p><strong>Chicken Patty</strong>:</p><p>Chicken, water, textured soy protein concentrate, isolated soy protein, seasoning [brown sugar, salt, onion powder, chicken stock, canola oil, yeast extract, carrot powder, vegetable stock (carrot, onion, celery), garlic powder, maltodextrin, flavors, silicon dioxide, citric acid and spice], seasoning (potassium chloride, rice flour), sodium phosphates. BREADED WITH: Whole wheat flour, water, enriched wheat flour (wheat flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), salt, wheat gluten, sugar, dried onion, dried garlic, torula yeast, spice, dextrose, dried yeast, turmeric extract (color), paprika extract (color). Breading set in vegetable oil</p><p><strong>Chicken Patty Bun</strong>:</p><p>Water, Whole Wheat Flour, Enriched Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Wheat Gluten, Yeast, Soybean Oil, Contains 2% or less of the following: Salt, Dough Conditioners (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, Monoglycerides, Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Peroxide, Azodicarbonamide), Potassium Sorbate and Calcium Propionate (Preservatives), Yeast Nutrients (Monocalcium Phosphate, Calcium Sulfate, Ammonium Sulfate)</p><p><em>Chicken and Bean Nachos</em></p><p><strong>Chicken Taco Meat</strong>:</p><p>Dark chicken meat, seasoning (wheat flour, maltodextrin, salt, dried garlic, chili pepper, spice, paprika, dried onion, sugar, natural flavor, modified corn starch, soybean oil, malic acid, and less than 2% silicon dioxide), water, vegetable protein product (isolated soy protein, magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, niacinamide, ferrous sulfate, Vitamin B12, copper gluconate, Vitamin A Palmitate, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin), sodium phosphate, salt, flavor (caramelized sugar and maltodextrin)</p><p><strong>Pinto Beans</strong>:</p><p>Prepared pinto beans, water, salt, calcium chloride, and calcium disodium EDTA</p><p><strong>Cheese Sauce:</strong></p><p>Water, cultured pasteurized milk and skim milk, food starch-modified, contains less than 2% of potassium phosphate, sodium phosphate, salt, sodium citrate, pasteurized cream, tricalcium phosphate, whey, buttermilk, maltodextrin, annatto and oleoresin paprika (color), natural flavors, autolyzed yeast extract, lactic acid, vegetable mono and diglycerides, spice, enzymes</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Tortilla Chips</strong>:</p><p>Whole White Corn, Vegetable Oil (Corn, Soybean, Canola, and/or Sunflower Oil), and Salt</p><p><em>Chicken Nuggets</em></p><p>Chicken, water, vegetable protein product (isolated soy protein, magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, niacinamide, ferrous sulfate, vitamin B12, copper gluconate, vitamin A palmitate, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine mononitrate, and riboflavin), seasoning (salt, onion powder, modified corn starch, and natural flavor), sodium phosphates. BREADED WITH: Whole wheat flour, water, enriched wheat flour (enriched with niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), salt, contains 2% or less of the following: modified corn starch, spices, dextrose, garlic powder, extractives of paprika and annatto, spice extractives. Breading set in vegetable oil</p><p><em>Cheeseburger</em></p><p><strong>Burger patty</strong>:</p><p>Ground Beef (Not More Than 30% Fat), Water, Textured Vegetable Protein Product [Soy Protein Concentrate, Caramel Color, Zinc Oxide, Niacinamide, Ferrous Sulfate, Copper Gluconate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate (B1), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (B6), Riboflavin (B2), Cyanocobalamin (B12)], Salt, Sodium Phosphates, Caramel Color</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>American cheese</strong>:</p><p>Cultured pasteurized milk and skim milk, cream, sodium citrate, salt, contains less than 2% of milkfat, sorbic acid (preservative), lactic acid, beta-carotene and apo-carotenal (color), enzymes, soy lecithin and soybean oil blend</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Cheeseburger bun:</strong></p><p>Water, Whole Wheat Flour, Enriched Wheat Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Wheat Gluten, Yeast, Soybean Oil, Contains 2% or less of the following: Salt, Dough Conditioners (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, Monoglycerides, Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Peroxide, Azodicarbonamide), Potassium Sorbate and Calcium Propionate (Preservatives), Yeast Nutrients (Monocalcium Phosphate, Calcium Sulfate, Ammonium Sulfate)</p><p><em>Penne with Marinara Meat Sauce</em></p><p><strong>Penne</strong>:</p><p>Whole grain durum wheat flour, semolina (wheat), durum wheat flour, oat fiber, niacin, iron (ferrous sulfate), thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Ground beef crumbles</strong>:</p><p>Beef, Water, Textured Vegetable Protein [Soy Protein Concentrate, Caramel Color], Textured Vegetable Protein [Soy Flour, Caramel Color], Soy Protein Concentrate, Salt, Pepper, Sodium Phosphates</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Marinara sauce</strong>:</p><p>Tomato puree (water, tomato paste), diced tomatoes, fresh onions, less than 2% of: olive oil, salt, brown sugar, potassium chloride, citric acid, natural flavor, calcium chloride, garlic powder, spices, oregano</p><p>April 8, 2014, UPDATE: Last week, a Chicago Public Schools spokesman told WBEZ that the district simply didn&#39;t &quot;know the ingredients&quot; of the processed chicken products that it serves Chicago children. Yesterday, that same spokesman still would not share the information, saying that the district is &quot;still in the process of completing this request.&quot; &nbsp;Today Aramark headquarters says that it gave the information to CPS &quot;last week&quot; but it could not share the ingredient information with WBEZ because &quot;the District would need to release it to the media, not us.&quot;</p><p>April 10, 2014, UPDATE: Thursday WBEZ heard from Illinois&#39; Assistant Attorney General for Public Access Tim O&#39;Brien. He&#39;s been assigned to review the legality of CPS&#39;s response to WBEZ&#39;s Freedom of Information Act request for school food data. &nbsp;</p><p>Wednesday WBEZ was contacted by a company that creates online<a href="http://spps.nutrislice.com/menu/battle-creek-environmental-elementary/lunch/"> school menus for the St Paul </a>school district. In these schools, parents and reporters don&#39;t need to file FOIA&#39;s to find out what&#39;s in the food, nor do they need to enlist the help of the Attorney General&#39;s office. They simply put their cursor on the item and the ingredients and nutritional information emerge in a pop-up window.</p><p>April 11, 2014 UPDATE: CPS finally produces the ingredient lists for the Top 5 entrees. Each chicken product contains dozens of ingredients.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>---------------</p><p><em>(Full disclosure: One of Monica Eng&rsquo;s eight siblings works for a food company subcontracted by CPS to cater pre-prepared meals to many CPS schools without full kitchens.)</em></p><p><em>Monica Eng is a WBEZ producer and co-host of the Chewing The Fat podcast. Follow her at <a href="https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fmonicaeng&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNGoYzy7NkmnMSoIdG75anzNVCJ90A">@monicaeng or</a> write to her at meng@wbez.org</em></p></p> Thu, 03 Apr 2014 13:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/cps-reveals-only-ingredients-its-chicken-nuggets-arechicken-nuggets-109963 Morning Shift: Oh, Malort http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-04-30/morning-shift-oh-malort-106898 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/MorningShift_CMS_tile_1200x900_17.png" alt="" /><p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-21.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-21" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Oh, Malort!" on Storify</a>]<h1>Morning Shift: Oh, Malort!</h1><h2>Today we discuss new FOIA rulings with Steve Schwinn, find out about an Islamic health clinic from Dr. Altaf Kaiseruddin, talk about the new trend of movies being turned in to musicals, drink some malort with chef Abraham Conlon and the Chicago Reader and hear an original mashup from Fort Frances. </h2><p>Storified by <a href="http://storify.com/WBEZ"></a>&middot; Tue, Apr 30 2013 09:02:45</p><div><b>FOIA Rules:</b> SCOTUS ruled that if you’re trying to use FOIA to get information from a state where you don’t reside, you’re out of luck. We get the implications from John Marshall Law School’s <b>Steve Schwinn.<br></b></div><div>SCOTUS rejects 'sweeping' privileges claim by out-of-staters denied FOIA records in Virginia - ABA JournalVirginia does not violate the U.S. Constitution when it bars out-of-state residents from accessing state records through its Freedom of I...</div><div><p><b>Shariah law &amp; Healthcare:</b>&nbsp;A Chicago doctor wants to open a clinic that would adhere to some aspects of Islamic law.&nbsp;<b>Dr. Altaf Kaiseruddin, </b>Medial Director of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.imancentral.org/" class="">IMAN</a>, joins us to discuss the details.&nbsp;</p></div><div>Mixing Islam with medicine - Crain&amp;#39;s Chicago Business21 hours ago ... A Chicago doctor who owns a lavish Middle Eastern eatery on West Randolph ... Some interpretations of Shariah, or Isla...</div><div><b>Dueling Critics:</b> Successful Broadway musicals used to be turned into films (think Oklahoma, The King and I, etc). &nbsp;Now films are being turned into musicals (Ghost, Big Fish, Legally Blonde). Our Dueling Critics<b>&nbsp;Johnathan Abarbanel </b>and<b> Kelly Kleiman</b> discuss the trend.<br></div><div>'Big Fish' Musical to Open in ChicagoA stage musical adaptation of the 2003 film &quot;Big Fish&quot; will play a five-week engagement in Chicago next spring, the producers announced o...</div><div>In Defense of Ghost: The Musical (No, Really)Twenty minutes into Ghost: The Musical, I knew the show was in for trouble. Not from me - I was sort of enjoying it - but from the rest o...</div><div>Legally Blonde - The Musicalkrystianya</div><div><div><b>Key Ingredient: </b>The Chicago Reader is hosting their first annual <a href="http://realdeal.chicagoreader.com/deals/admission-to-the-chicago-readers-first-key-ingredient-cook-off-on-may-5---see-option-purchased/" class="">Key Ingredient Cook Off</a> on Friday, May 3.&nbsp;Local chefs challenge one another to come up with an innovative dish using a key ingredient and document the process for the Chicago Reader.The key ingredient for this challenge? The notoriously “acquired taste” Malort. <b>Abraham Conlon</b>, executive chef of <a href="http://www.eatfatrice.com/" class="">Fat Rice</a> in Logan Square, Chicago Reader editor <b>Maria Shalhoup</b> and writer of the <a href="http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/chefs-key-ingredient-cook-off-fest-2013/Content?oid=9266557" class="">Key Ingredient</a> column <b>Julia Thiel</b> join us to discuss the challenge and swap some Malort horror stories. What’s the hardest ingredient&nbsp;you've&nbsp;ever tried to cook?&nbsp;</div></div><div>&quot;Malort Face&quot; and other Key Ingredient Cook-Off bites to comeWhen Julia Thiel and Michael Gebert head out to do the shoots for our chef-to-chef challenge, Key Ingredient, they never know what to exp...</div><div>Jeppson's Malort takes Chicago by stormHow the most disgusting shot in Chicago became a beloved nightlife icon The headquarters for Jeppson's Malort isn't much of an office. No...</div><div>Abraham Conlon of Fat Rice shows the &quot;right way&quot; and &quot;wrong way&quot; to cook a porcine reproductive organThe Chef: Abraham Conlon ( Fat Rice) The Challenger: Jake Bickelhaupt ( Sous Rising) The Ingredient: Pig uterus &quot;You thought bacon was a ...</div><div><p><b>Mashup Series: </b>Musician<b> David McMillin </b>spent years as a solo acoustic artist. &nbsp;But a few years ago, he branched out -- bringing in a couple more musicians to round out a proper “band,” and veering toward music with a decidedly more rockin’ sound. &nbsp;McMillin and his band, <b>Fort Frances</b>, are out now with a new EP,&nbsp;'Harbour'. &nbsp;<a href="http://fortfrancesmusic.com/" class="">Fort Frances</a> also kicks off our <i>Morning Shift</i> Mash-Up series with an ode to Chicago.</p></div><div>Fort Frances &quot;Summertime&quot; Official Music Video (HD)thefortfrances</div></noscript></p> Tue, 30 Apr 2013 11:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-04-30/morning-shift-oh-malort-106898 Tougher Illinois FOIA law marks busy first year http://www.wbez.org/story/tougher-illinois-foia-law-marks-busy-first-year <p><p>It&rsquo;s been one year since Illinois&rsquo;s tougher <a href="http://foia.ilattorneygeneral.net/FreedomofInformationAct.aspx">Freedom of Information Act </a>went into effect. The law required public officials to provide documents within five days instead of of the seven days they had been allowed. It also created a new office under the Illinois attorney general to handle appeals from members of the media or the public if their information requests are denied. Cara Smith runs that office as the public access counselor. She said her office has received more than 3,0000 appeals this year and has processed a little more than a third of those. The office staff includes 11 lawyers.&nbsp; Smith said they aim to move quickly on appeals, but also must be thoughtful with these first-time decisons, &quot;Part of our goal is that we want to get this right and we realize that with very little case law in Illinois, each one of these decisions is precedent setting and so our goal is to get it right and to get access to as much information as we can.&quot;</p><p>Josh Sharp of the Illinois Press Association says he expects the turnaround time on appeals will speed up in the second year the new FOIA law is in effect.&nbsp; But he says there's already an advantage, because public officials now have to take FOIA requests more seriously. &quot;For the past twenty-five years,&quot; he said,&nbsp; &quot;they could literally take your request, throw it in the trash and say, guess what, you don&rsquo;t like it? Go find yourself a lawyer, we&rsquo;ll see you in court. But now with the imposition of fines and penalties and a public access counselor, the days of ignoring FOIA are over.&quot; &nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 22 Dec 2010 20:03:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/tougher-illinois-foia-law-marks-busy-first-year