WBEZ | Culture http://www.wbez.org/tags/culture Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en The Cultural Impact of Bill Cosby’s Arrest http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2016-01-06/cultural-impact-bill-cosby%E2%80%99s-arrest-114396 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/15632863209_c03270276b_h.jpg" style="height: 259px; width: 310px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="(flickr/Ted Eytan)" />The last year for actor-comedian-philanthropist Bill Cosby was rife with allegations of sexual assault, and now for the first time he&rsquo;s facing criminal charges. The Black community has had mixed feelings about Cosby&rsquo;s innocence or guilt, leaving some feeling betrayed. Is the Black community alone in this? NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans explains the cultural impact of Cosby&rsquo;s arrest.&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 06 Jan 2016 14:20:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2016-01-06/cultural-impact-bill-cosby%E2%80%99s-arrest-114396 Nike opening store with only Michael Jordan items in Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/nike-opening-store-only-michael-jordan-items-chicago-113461 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/16521749482_5aed601a6f_z.jpg" style="height: 327px; width: 620px;" title="The Jordan Store at 166 Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn. (flickr/Maxim Pierre)" /></div><p>Nike is opening a Michael Jordan-only store in Chicago&#39;s Loop this weekend.The new Jordan Brand store opens Saturday.</p><p>The <a href="http://trib.in/1GrWtmt" target="_blank">Chicago Tribune reports</a> it will sell merchandise with the trademarked Michael Jordan &quot;Jumpman&quot; silhouette. Nike also plans stores in New York, Los Angeles and Toronto featuring the former Chicago Bulls star. Jordan Brand offers basketball, training, sportswear and kids&#39; products.</p><div><p>Nike Chief Executive Mark Parker says Jordan&#39;s popularity opens up a &quot;world of opportunity&quot; for the company.</p><p>Nike also said last week that it will report Jordan Brand financial results separately from its basketball division.</p><p>Sarah Mensah is general manager of the Jordan Brand in North America. She says consumers wanted a place to see everything Jordan-related. She says stores also will feature items chosen &quot;specifically by Michael.&quot;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 22 Oct 2015 10:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/nike-opening-store-only-michael-jordan-items-chicago-113461 Photographer captures http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-10-20/south-korean-photographer-shows-cost-plastic-surgery-113433 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/billboard advertising double-jaw surgery at a subway station in Seoul.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="attachment_94579"><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="This picture taken on May 22, 2013 shows a South Korean woman walking past a street billboard advertising double-jaw surgery at a subway station in Seoul. South Korea's obsession with plastic surgery is moving on from standard eye and nose jobs to embrace a radical surgical procedure that requires months of often painful recovery. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/1020_plastic-surgery-624x413.jpg" style="height: 410px; width: 620px;" title="This picture taken on May 22, 2013 shows a South Korean woman walking past a street billboard advertising double-jaw surgery at a subway station in Seoul. South Korea’s obsession with plastic surgery is moving on from standard eye and nose jobs to embrace a radical surgical procedure that requires months of often painful recovery. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)" /></p><p>They call it the plastic surgery capital of the world. In a single mile of Seoul&rsquo;s upscale Gangnam neighborhood, nicknamed the &ldquo;Improvement Quarter,&rdquo; there are between 400 and 500 clinics and hospitals, most dedicated to plastic surgery procedures.</p></div><p>It&rsquo;s a $5 billion a year industry in a country where it&rsquo;s not unusual for parents to give their graduating high school senior a new nose or eyes as a graduation present.</p><p>Ji Yeo&nbsp;grew up in that culture and struggled with it through adolescence. Now, as an adult and a photographer, she&rsquo;s chosen to photograph it.</p><p>Her series called <a href="http://jiyeo.com/the-beauty/" target="_blank">&ldquo;Beauty Recovery Room&rdquo;</a> depicts South Korean women in that secret stage after their surgeries, before they reveal their new look. It&rsquo;s the stage where they sport bandages, bruises and sometimes drainage tubes &ndash; revealing a less glamorous side to the culture of plastic surgery.</p><p><a href="http://jiyeo.com/" target="_blank">Ji Yeo</a> talks with&nbsp;<em>Here &amp; Now&rsquo;s</em> Robin about her photographs and the South Korean plastic surgery culture.</p><p><span style="font-size:18px;"><strong>Images From &lsquo;Beauty Recovery Room&rsquo;</strong></span></p><div id="attachment_94575"><img alt="An image from Ji Yeo's &quot;Beauty Recovery Room&quot; series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/0Beauty-Recovery-Room-009_34-years-old_Seoul_South-Korea_2010-624x469.jpg" style="height: 466px; width: 620px;" title="An image from Ji Yeo’s “Beauty Recovery Room” series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" /><p><img alt="An image from Ji Yeo's &quot;Beauty Recovery Room&quot; series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/0Beauty-Recovery-Room-008_25-years-old_Seoul_South-Korea_2010-624x468.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="An image from Ji Yeo’s “Beauty Recovery Room” series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" /></p></div><div id="attachment_94574"><p><img alt="An image from Ji Yeo's &quot;Beauty Recovery Room&quot; series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/0Beauty-Recovery-Room018_29yearsold_Seoul-Korea-624x468.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="An image from Ji Yeo’s “Beauty Recovery Room” series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" /></p></div><div id="attachment_94577"><p><img alt="An image from Ji Yeo's &quot;Beauty Recovery Room&quot; series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/0Beauty-Recovery-Room-005_36-years-old_Seoul_South-Korea_2012-624x468.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="An image from Ji Yeo’s “Beauty Recovery Room” series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" /></p></div><div id="attachment_94573"><p><img alt="An image from Ji Yeo's &quot;Beauty Recovery Room&quot; series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.wbur.org/wordpress/11/files/2015/10/0Beauty-Recovery-Room-010_23-years-old_Seoul-South-Korea_2011-624x468.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="An image from Ji Yeo’s “Beauty Recovery Room” series. (Courtesy of Ji Yeo)" /></p></div><div id="attachment_94576"><p>&mdash; <a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/10/20/south-korea-plastic-surgery-photos" target="_blank"><em>via Here &amp; Now</em></a></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 20 Oct 2015 14:29:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/here-and-now/2015-10-20/south-korean-photographer-shows-cost-plastic-surgery-113433 Meet Mozzified, a site for Ramadan recipes, Sharia memes and nosy-auntie jokes http://www.wbez.org/news/meet-mozzified-site-ramadan-recipes-sharia-memes-and-nosy-auntie-jokes-113223 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Zainab Khan.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res446254259"><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Zainab Khan, founder of Mozzified.com" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/06/zainab-sweater-14a436f4f9de96a56d09df6909ee3e116fd48f4a-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 456px; width: 610px;" title="Zainab Khan, founder of Mozzified.com (Courtesy of Zainab Khan)" /></div><div><div><p>A Muslim pop culture website: The idea seemed so obvious, Zainab Khan waited years for someone else to make one. A place for jokes about nosy aunties, sharing hijab hacks and Ramadan recipes, and advice on navigating Minder (yup, there&#39;s a Muslim Tinder).</p></div></div></div><p>But existing sites for young Muslims tended to focus on international news and politics.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/10/07/445261490/mozzified.com">Mozzified</a>, which Khan launched in January while attending journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley, is geared toward what Khan and her friends call &quot;Mozzies,&quot; young, socially aware Muslims who might, say, &quot;binge-watch&nbsp;Friends&nbsp;on Netflix, play basketball after Friday prayers and buy eco-friendly products.&quot;</p><p>Khan and a team of four classmates have put out dozens&nbsp;of articles on everything from Muslim street artists to the whereabouts of a post-One Direction Zayn Malik. The site thrives on inside jokes, like the&nbsp;<a href="http://mozzified.com/2015/02/26/thoughts-every-muslim-has-while-making-wudu-in-a-public-restroom/">12 thoughts every Muslim has while prayer cleansing in a public restroom</a>.</p><p>What you won&#39;t find? Apologies. Khan looks for content that she thinks will appeal to other young Muslims, and says she refuses to pander to fear-mongers or Islamophobes.</p><p>Khan expected the site to be popular with people like her &mdash; high school and college students who grew up with Muslim and American identities. She says she&#39;s been surprised at how many young Muslims from Australia, the U.K., Pakistan and India have been checking the site out, too.</p><p>Given that her target audience is one of the world&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pewforum.org/2015/04/02/religious-projections-2010-2050/">fastest-growing&nbsp;</a>demographic groups &mdash; Pew estimates there will be&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pewforum.org/2011/01/27/future-of-the-global-muslim-population-main-factors/#age">540 million Muslim youth worldwide</a>&nbsp;by 2030 &mdash; Khan says Mozzified is just getting started. I had a few questions for her:</p><div><hr /></div><p><strong>So, what does </strong><strong>Mozzified</strong><strong> mean?</strong></p><p>Mozzify is a made-up word. At Wesleyan, we had a small but active Muslim Students Association, this really cool community of international students and people from across the country who all had shared experiences, and we started calling each other &quot;Mozzies.&quot; The idea was this intersectional identity of being everything else&nbsp;and being Muslim.</p><div id="res446105150"><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="&quot;Food&quot; on Mozzified.com" src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/mozzified-website-751d6905118ded8701230137d6b31a3c07dc06d6-s600-c85.png" style="height: 458px; width: 610px;" title="&quot;Food&quot; on Mozzified.com (Mozzified.com)" /></div><div><div><p>To &quot;mozzify&quot; is to take something from any culture and reinterpret it through a Muslim lens. So, for example, when I walk into a Nordstrom and I see a rack of scarves, I&#39;m like, &quot;Oh, that&#39;s the hijab section.&quot; Being a Mozzie, I&#39;m filtering the information that I&#39;m seeing. I think a lot of people do this, and it&#39;s really, really powerful for us to be able to give voice to that community.</p></div></div></div><blockquote><p><em>To &#39;</em><em>mozzify</em><em>&#39; is to take something from any culture and reinterpret it through a Muslim lens. So, for example, when I walk into a Nordstrom and I see a rack of scarves, I&#39;m like &#39;Oh, that&#39;s the hijab section.&#39; - Zainab Khan, founder of&nbsp;</em><em>Mozzified</em></p></blockquote><p><strong>Why did you start this website?</strong></p><p>I wanted to do something for people like me, in college or in high school, who are maybe the only Muslim students in their entire school, or just one of a few. They have these experiences that are very similar, but they don&#39;t know that there are massive groups of people throughout the world who are experiencing the same thing.</p><p>I grew up in a traditional Pakistani Muslim household, but being at Wesleyan University was the first time that I saw people perform both their American and Muslim identities comfortably. That was something that was really foreign to me, because growing up in my household, to be Muslim meant to be Pakistani, but here I was, a kid who was raised in the suburbs of Chicago. I didn&#39;t feel very culturally Pakistani. But at Wesleyan, I noticed this unique culture of Muslims owning all of our identities.</p><p>I had a Muslim chaplain who was Egyptian and American Muslim, and the first time I saw her, she was wearing a Gap hoodie, a long denim skirt and a hijab. I thought that kind of epitomized this Muslim American identity, and that was really cool. As a kid, I was agnostic in high school, I wasn&#39;t practicing, and then I get to one of the most liberal colleges in this country and I saw that it was possible to perform all of my identities and to do it well.</p><p>How does your site address Muslim identity differently from spaces that already exist on the Web?</p><p>There&#39;s two ways to form an identity. One is by deciding who you are not, and in my opinion that&#39;s a very dangerous way to form an identity, because you&#39;re building yourself based on reactions rather than affirmations. So I wanted to create something that was based on an &quot;I am&quot; sort of identity formation.</p><p>But there&#39;s a vast breadth of knowledge on Islam and Muslims on the Web already, and I don&#39;t feel the need to re-explain. Instead, I get to have my contributors and myself and this large, large, large group of people share their stories as they want to, and as they see them. I think post 9/11, a lot of Muslims and a lot of Muslim organizations have gotten into this trap of being apologetic, and always responding. It&#39;s much more powerful to tell your own story on your own terms. I think it&#39;s really healthy for us as Muslims, as communities, to start understanding ourselves from inside out rather than outside in.</p><p><strong>What&#39;s next for </strong><strong>Mozzified</strong><strong>?</strong></p><p>There&#39;s a whole bunch coming. We&#39;re going to do a &quot;dirty laundry&quot; column, a platform to talk about the issues that we as a community want to ignore. The idea is that I want Mozzified to be an inclusive space for all kinds of Muslims. I don&#39;t really turn anyone away.</p><div id="res446351016"><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Mozzified is a website about Muslim pop culture." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/06/mozz-final-picture-bottom-ef22142cea0c46e089d778655f1788e5ab9f95c6-s600-c85.png" style="height: 456px; width: 610px;" title="Mozzified is a website about Muslim pop culture. (Mozzified.com)" /></div><div><div><p>One of my really good friends wants to write a piece called &quot;The F-word.&quot; And it&#39;s not the F-word that you would imagine; it&#39;s &quot;feminism.&quot; Why does that cause such a reaction in the community? Really exploring things that need to be aired out, airing out our dirty laundry. That&#39;s something I&#39;m really excited about.</p></div></div></div><p>Articles you&#39;ve written in the past that have gotten large reactions, both positive and negative: What were some of those reactions, and how have those experiences affected the way you pick what goes on Mozzified?</p><p>I&#39;m so happy the community called me out for this: I wrote a piece for the&nbsp;<em>Islamic Monthly</em>&nbsp;called &quot;<a href="http://theislamicmonthly.com/deconstructing-the-hijabi-bride-even-islam-in-america-is-hegemonic/">Deconstructing the Hijabi Bride</a>.&quot; When I talked about American Islam, I didn&#39;t even know that I was doing it, but I was promoting second-generation, educated Arabs and Pakistanis and South Asians as the communities that represent American Islam. People were really quick to call out the fact that I had completely disregarded black American Muslims, African-American Muslims and West African Muslims. I&#39;m thinking about model minorities, and within the American Muslim communities, who interacts with whom, whose narratives we are trying to erase, whose narratives we are not giving prominence. I think putting that piece out there was great in making me more self-aware.</p><p>I&#39;ve written pieces that end up on all these sub-Reddits where people just hate me, they hate my face, hate everything that I have to say. At first it&#39;s alarming, but I learned fairly quickly what it takes to do this kind of stuff. It&#39;s prepared me for the Internet and reactions in general.</p><p>My first major decision with Mozzified was that I don&#39;t want our posts to be reactionary. That&#39;s my philosophy when it comes to building an American Muslim voice, or a Muslim voice, or identity formation, whatever it may be. I wanted to do things on our own terms. Obviously, there&#39;s gonna be some news that really calls for our reaction, but for the most part, I still have the philosophy of, just put it out there and see what happens. I don&#39;t think it&#39;s smart to hold back.</p><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/10/07/445261490/meet-mozzified-a-site-for-ramadan-recipes-sharia-memes-and-nosy-auntie-jokes"><em>via NPR&#39;s Code Switch</em></a></p></p> Wed, 07 Oct 2015 12:13:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/meet-mozzified-site-ramadan-recipes-sharia-memes-and-nosy-auntie-jokes-113223 The surreal reasons girls are disappearing in El Salvador: #15girls http://www.wbez.org/news/surreal-reasons-girls-are-disappearing-el-salvador-15girls-113187 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/After Aby Salas&#039; best friend disappeared, she stopped leaving her house except to go to school..jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res446006664" previewtitle="A girl looks away from the body of an assassinated man, who was killed by a gang member in San Salvador."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="A girl looks away from the body of an assassinated man, who was killed by a gang member in San Salvador." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-2_custom-5a335e07affdb26df84a4e147462a27895e68a0b-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 401px; width: 600px;" title="A girl looks away from the body of an assassinated man, who was killed by a gang member in San Salvador. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div></div><p>In many countries, the decisions teens make at 15 can determine the rest of the lives. But, often, girls don&#39;t have much say &ndash; parents, culture and tradition decide for them. In a new series,&nbsp;#15Girls, NPR explores the lives of 15-year-old girls who are seeking to take control and change their fate.&nbsp;Warning: some of the depictions and images in this story are graphic.</p><p>It&#39;s our first morning in El Salvador&#39;s capital. We&#39;re eating breakfast and we get a call from a local reporter we know.</p><p>There&#39;s a crime scene, he says. A girl. You should come. We take a taxi to what looks like a major intersection in San Salvador. When we get there, we look around. And then we see her, slumped on a street corner.</p><div id="res446006632" previewtitle="Marcela, 15, was assassinated in San Salvador in July. She was walking with her sister when a man approached them and shot her twice in the head, killing her instantly."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Marcela, 15, was assassinated in San Salvador in July. She was walking with her sister when a man approached them and shot her twice in the head, killing her instantly." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-3_slide-0e50554dfaf64dd923afda32167d2f48a3fd1aff-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 600px;" title="Marcela, 15, was assassinated in San Salvador in July. She was walking with her sister when a man approached them and shot her twice in the head, killing her instantly. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div><div><p>The girl is dead. She&#39;s 15 years old and her name is Marcela. Witnesses tell us she was executed by a gang member.</p></div></div><p>We can&#39;t see her face. All we can see is her plaid pants and grey t-shirt. Her family is across the street, in a pickup truck. We can&#39;t tell you their names because it would put them in danger.</p><p>Marcela&#39;s mother is too upset to talk. So, we talk to her grandmother. She says Marcela left the house that morning with her sister. The two worked in downtown San Salvador, the capitol of El Salvador, making tortillas.</p><p><img alt="Marcela's grandmother cries at the scene of her granddaughter's death." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-4_slide-aef4db9716b0a6e2828fb0f71373bdae416d517d-s300-c85.jpg" style="height: 199px; width: 300px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Marcela's grandmother cries at the scene of her granddaughter's death. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></p><p>The grandmother tells us that Marcela&#39;s boyfriend was a bus driver in a gang-controlled neighborhood. First, he got threats. &quot;Help the gang or we&#39;ll kill you.&quot; Then he disappeared.</p><div id="res446006464" previewtitle="Marcela's grandmother cries at the scene of her granddaughter's death."><div><p>Then Marcela started getting threats. And now this: Marcela&#39;s body, laying on the ground, while people drive to work.</p></div></div><p>If you were standing at the U.S.-Mexico border two summers ago, during the so-called &quot;surge&quot; of unaccompanied minors trying to come to the U.S., you would have seen thousands of young girls from El Salvador.</p><p>If you had asked them why they came, they would have told you the answer is simple: gangs. Back in the 1980s, during El Salvador&#39;s civil war, many people migrated from El Salvador to the U.S. On the streets of cities like Los Angeles, they formed gangs.</p><p>Then, many of them were deported back to El Salvador. And they brought the gangs with them. Now, El Salvador&#39;s two main gangs &mdash; Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) and Barrio 18 &mdash; control much of the country. There is so much violence in El Salvador that someone dies there, on average, every hour.</p><p>Much of the killing is over turf or revenge. And sometimes people are just caught in the middle. Many times, those caught in the middle are girls.</p><p>We went to El Salvador to talk to these girls, to understand why they would want to make the perilous journey to the U.S., why they would ever want to leave home.</p><p>This is the story of four of those girls. In most cases, we&#39;re not using last names; to bring any attention to them would make them a target of the gangs.</p><h3><strong>Marcela</strong></h3><p>We find the police investigator on the case. He says Marcela was attacked from behind and shot twice in the head. He says Marcela&#39;s sister witnessed the killing. She&#39;s now in police protection.</p><p><br />We find the police investigator on the case. He says Marcela was attacked from behind and shot twice in the head. He says Marcela&#39;s sister witnessed the killing. She&#39;s now in police protection.</p><p>We ask him why a gang member would kill a 15-year-old girl. He speculates that it&#39;s because she didn&#39;t want to be someone&#39;s girlfriend or didn&#39;t want to do something for that gang.</p><p>Is this normal, we ask? Does it happen to young women a lot?</p><p>It happens every day, he says.</p><p>The police later release Marcela&#39;s sister from their protection, even though local reporters tell us the gangs will probably go after her now.</p><p>The family tells us their only option is to leave the country, ideally for the U.S. But they&#39;ve got about $200 to their name. It&#39;s not nearly enough to pay a smuggler.</p><p>All this happened on our first full day in El Salvador. If this is how bad it is, how do girls live?&nbsp;<br /><br />To answer that question, we go to a school. And start interviewing 15-year-old-girls.</p><h3><strong>Aby</strong></h3><p>One girl stands out. Her name is Aby Salas &mdash; and she wants to study law. She says her favorite thing is to sit down with some hot chocolate and a book. That and go to church.</p><div id="res446006336" previewtitle="After Aby Salas' best friend disappeared, she stopped leaving her house except to go to school."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="After Aby Salas' best friend disappeared, she stopped leaving her house except to go to school." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-5_slide-f04bc535ff7437a75a68f98d415108b08057a244-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 600px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="After Aby Salas' best friend disappeared, she stopped leaving her house except to go to school. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div></div><p>It was at church that Aby met her best friend, Jessica. Aby and Jessica used to go to school together.</p><p>Then another girl at school started threatening Jessica.</p><p>&quot;At first it was like a little game,&quot; Aby says. &quot;If you don&#39;t give me this, you&#39;ll be in trouble.&quot;</p><p>Give me that blouse, the girl would say to Jessica. Give me those jeans.</p><p>&quot;And it got to the point when she wanted help cheating on tests,&quot; Aby says. &quot;And the threat was always like, &#39;We&#39;re going to be waiting for you outside of class, to beat you up.&#39;&quot;</p><p>It might sound like pretty typical bullying. But this bully&#39;s brothers were in a gang. One day the girl asked Jessica for a pencil. Jessica only had one pencil, so she said no.</p><p>A few days later, Jessica went to the store.</p><p>&quot;Her mom says she left at 3:30 in the afternoon, and then it was 4:00, and then it was 5:00, and this was a store that was right on the corner,&quot; Aby says. &quot;And we haven&#39;t heard from her since.&quot;</p><p>And now, ever since her best friend Jessica disappeared, Aby spends all her time at home.</p><p>A few days after we meet her at the school, she shows us her room. It&#39;s about 8 x 8 ft., painted pink with cinder block walls. If she&#39;s not in school or helping with dinner, she&#39;s here.</p><div id="res446011246" previewtitle="Aby spends most of her time in her room these days. She wants to study law or work for NASA someday."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Aby spends most of her time in her room these days. She wants to study law or work for NASA someday." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-6_custom-2b69efdbf04954abed191c6a9f29b39fac07e4a0-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 267px; width: 400px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" title="Aby spends most of her time in her room these days. She wants to study law or work for NASA someday. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div><div><p>And it&#39;s her choice, she says. It&#39;s basically a self-imposed lockdown. After what happened, Aby&#39;s too afraid to go out. And her parents are cool with that.</p></div></div><p>But her parents won&#39;t talk about what happened. They don&#39;t want to scare Aby&#39;s little brother and sister.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s too dangerous to talk about that,&quot; she says. &quot;If somebody hears you talk about it, something bad could happen to you.&quot;</p><p>The family of Aby&#39;s best friend, Jessica, has moved away. They&#39;re hiding from the gang. They&#39;re planning to come to the U.S.</p><p>&quot;Then I&#39;ll have nothing left of my friend, Aby says. &quot;She&#39;ll just be in my head.&quot;</p><p>After we meet Aby, we start asking people in El Salvador, &quot;Is it normal for girls to shut themselves in the house all day?&quot;</p><p>Yes, they tell us. It&#39;s the only way to stay safe from the gangs.</p><p>In other words, El Salvador is a country of girls with two main choices: hide from gangs or give in to them.</p><h3><strong>Mimi</strong></h3><p>We do find an exception to that rule.</p><p>Her name is Stephanie Noemi. Her friends call her Mimi. She&#39;s 15 years old. And instead of saying home on a Friday night, she puts on bright yellow coveralls, chants a prayer and starts the overnight shift as a volunteer ambulance worker with a group called the Commandos de Salvamento.</p><p>Mimi joined the squad when she was 10. A relative suggested she try it. Now, she says, it&#39;s the only way to get out of the house but stay out of trouble. Her neighborhood is completely controlled by gangs.</p><div id="res446005871" previewtitle="Mimi, 15, volunteers at Comandos de Salvamento. She deals with all kinds of emergencies, extreme violence and people that have been severely injured or killed by the gangs in El Salvador."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Mimi, 15, volunteers at Comandos de Salvamento. She deals with all kinds of emergencies, extreme violence and people that have been severely injured or killed by the gangs in El Salvador." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-7_slide-045beff50631af16ac7599601cd6a6b2ecc5ff42-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 600px;" title="Mimi, 15, volunteers at Comandos de Salvamento. She deals with all kinds of emergencies, extreme violence and people that have been severely injured or killed by the gangs in El Salvador. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div><div><p>As a paramedic, she likes being able to help people who are victims of the gangs.</p></div></div><p>&quot;It feels good to be somebody else&#39;s shield,&quot; she says.</p><p>We spend the night shift with Mimi. We watch as she and her colleagues help a girl with special needs, who has spiked a fever, get to a hospital. We watch as they respond to a man who has been hit by a car and is now unconscious.</p><p>And, toward the end of the shift, we watch as they confront El Salvador&#39;s gang violence up close.</p><p><img alt="A wounded woman arrives at the offices of Comando de Salvamento. Her companions claim she was pushed from a bus by gang members." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-8_slide-58afc0a8852eec046e0af6ca61903ecd728d51cb-s300-c85.jpg" style="height: 265px; width: 400px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" title="A wounded woman arrives at the offices of Comando de Salvamento. Her companions claim she was pushed from a bus by gang members. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></p><p>A woman stumbles into the Commandos headquarters, which is basically a garage for a handful of ambulances. One side of the woman&#39;s face is covered in blood and the men with her say she&#39;s been thrown from a bus by gang members. Her little boy&#39;s shirt is bloody, too.</p><p>The Commandos bandage the woman and Mimi cleans the boy. Then she puts them both into an ambulance that will take them to the hospital.</p><p>Mimi tells us she wants to say in El Salvador. She says if she helps people like this, maybe someday someone will help her, too.</p><h3>&nbsp;</h3><h3><strong>The Deported&nbsp;</strong></h3><p>One reason we&#39;re not seeing a &quot;surge&quot; in unaccompanied minors coming to the U.S. from Central America is that Mexico is catching them before they even reach the U.S.</p><p>If you&#39;re from El Salvador and you get caught, you end up in a place called the deportation center. It&#39;s one of the last places we go in El Salvador. And it&#39;s where we meet a girl who we&#39;re not even sure will make it to 15.</p><p>We can&#39;t tell you her name, because to do that would put her in a lot of danger.</p><p>She says she got caught in Tampico, Mexico. This 13-year-old girl went more than 1,000 miles and was only a few hours from the U.S.</p><p>The girl says the smuggler her family paid for left her alone on a bus. She fell asleep, got caught by Mexican immigration and was sent back to El Salvador.</p><p>We ask her why she left. It is not a happy story.</p><p>The girl says her father is in one of El Salvador&#39;s two main gangs. He&#39;s in prison for murder. And now he says if his ex-wife, the girl&#39;s mother, doesn&#39;t give him $50,000 when he gets out, he&#39;ll have the girl raped and killed.</p><p>This is how gangs work in Central America.</p><p>The girl says the family doesn&#39;t have $50,000. The girl&#39;s mom is in the U.S. Her grandmother works in a street stall. Her grandfather doesn&#39;t have a job.</p><div id="res446005779" previewtitle="Mother and daughter hang around the streets of a residential area in San Salvador controlled by the gang Barrio 18."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Mother and daughter hang around the streets of a residential area in San Salvador controlled by the gang Barrio 18." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-9_slide-3f545a102fdc5f671768061d9b6c26e16bd7fd2e-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 400px; width: 600px;" title="Mother and daughter hang around the streets of a residential area in San Salvador controlled by the gang Barrio 18. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div></div><p>It&#39;s a Catch 22 &mdash; one that so many girls in El Salvador find themselves in.</p><p>If this girl stays, she could be killed. But if she tries to go to the U.S. to claim asylum, she&#39;ll probably get caught again in Mexico. Or, worse. We know from people who study these migration routes, she could be robbed or kidnaped or raped along the way.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t want that to happen,&quot; she says. &quot;I&#39;m not one of those kids who waits &#39;til the last minute to make things right. I don&#39;t have to let these things happen to me.&quot;</p><p>Pretty soon, it&#39;s time for the girl to go. Her grandpa is here to pick her up and take her home.</p><p>We get her family&#39;s phone number and make plans to see her again. But we don&#39;t see her again.</p><div id="res446010954" previewtitle="View of San Salvador, the capital of El Salvador, where the murder rate in August 2015 was about 30 deaths a day."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="View of San Salvador, the capital of El Salvador, where the murder rate in August 2015 was about 30 deaths a day." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/05/elsalvadorgirls-10_custom-97190ed23ad6244f3a529852cfb3ebb17f57b7f0-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 407px; width: 610px;" title="View of San Salvador, the capital of El Salvador, where the murder rate in August 2015 was about 30 deaths a day. (Encarni Pindado/for NPR)" /></div><div><p>&mdash; <em><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/10/05/445985671/never-leave-your-house-survival-strategies-for-el-salvador-s-15girls?ft=nprml&amp;f=445985671" target="_blank">via NPR&#39;s Goats and Soda</a></em></p></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 05 Oct 2015 14:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/surreal-reasons-girls-are-disappearing-el-salvador-15girls-113187 First Chicago festival to highlight modern Filipino food and culture takes place Sunday http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-10-02/first-chicago-festival-highlight-modern-filipino-food-and-culture <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/kultura fest.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago has a lot of festivals, but none that highlight modern Filipino food and culture. But that changes this Sunday with the launch of <a href="http://filipino.kitchen/kultura-fest/">Kultura Filipino Food and Arts fest</a> in Logan Square.</p><p>Food journalist <a href="https://twitter.com/filipinokitchen">SarahLynn Pablo</a> and chef <a href="http://@chefsubido">Christine Subido</a> join us to talk about the new festival.</p></p> Fri, 02 Oct 2015 12:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-10-02/first-chicago-festival-highlight-modern-filipino-food-and-culture Inaugural museum week kicks off tomorrow http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-30/inaugural-museum-week-kicks-tomorrow-113125 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/field museum Flickr Lisa Andres.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Starting Thurday and lasting for a week, 11 of Chicago&rsquo;s museums and the Lincoln Park zoo are taking part in Chicago&rsquo;s inaugural <a href="http://chicagomuseumweek.com/">Museum Week</a>. Visitors can enjoy free admission, discounts and special exhibits at select locations.</p><p><a href="https://twitter.com/dray4255?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">Don Hall</a>, museum lover and events director at WBEZ, talks about some of the best museums on and off the list for Museum week.</p></p> Wed, 30 Sep 2015 12:52:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-30/inaugural-museum-week-kicks-tomorrow-113125 Preview of the 33rd annual Japan Day celebration http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-17/preview-33rd-annual-japan-day-celebration-112413 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/sushi Harald Groven.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215156267&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">Arlington Heights is the home of the largest Japanese market in the Midwest, called Mitsua. And for year&#39;s Mitsua&#39;s parking lot played host to the annual Japan Fest. But as the festival continued to grow, it changed its name, stretched out over two days and now, for its 33rd edition, has moved to Arlington International Racecourse. We wanted to find out more about the festival and the story of the Japanese community in the Northwest suburbs, so we speak with Kimiyo Naka and Dayne Kono to fill us in.</span></p></p> Fri, 17 Jul 2015 12:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-17/preview-33rd-annual-japan-day-celebration-112413 Remembering Abena Joan Brown http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-15/remembering-abena-joan-brown-112392 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/abena joan brown Photo courtesy of eta Creative Arts Foundation.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214847039&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">She&rsquo;s been called a visionary and a pioneer in Chicago&rsquo;s Black theater community. Abena Joan Brown passed away last Sunday. One of the founders of ETA Creative Arts Foundation, she lead the organization for more than 40 years. One of the most notable facets of her legacy was creating a space where African American playwrights, directors, and performers could share their work with an African American audience. Dr. Carol Adams is the retired head of the DuSable Museum of African American History and she was a close friend of Ms. Brown. She joins us to talk about the life and work of Abena Joan Brown.</span></p></p> Wed, 15 Jul 2015 12:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-15/remembering-abena-joan-brown-112392 Afternoon Shift: How different cultures honor the dead http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-04-20/afternoon-shift-how-different-cultures-honor-dead-111910 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/gifts%20for%20the%20dead.jpg" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="(Photo Courtesy of Monica Eng)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201763673&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">Chinese Americans stay connected to the past during Ching Ming holiday</span></font></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Earlier this month, thousands of Chicago area Chinese poured into a little-known cemetery in west suburban Stickney. They were there for Ching Ming, one of the two most important memorial holidays on the Chinese calendar. &nbsp;Despite being generations away from China, many immigrants still engage in ancient ancestor worship traditions that link them to their past and their family&rsquo;s country of origin. WBEZ&rsquo;s Monica Eng and Chicago author Wen Huang join us to discuss to discuss how different cultures mourn and honor the dead and how those traditions evolve.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8d6-0fc3-7eaf-5eb701df7c75">Guests: </span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8d6-0fc3-7eaf-5eb701df7c75"><a href="https://twitter.com/monicaeng">Monica Eng</a></span> is a WBEZ reporter and co-host of WBEZ&rsquo;s Chewing the Fat podcast.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8d6-0fc3-7eaf-5eb701df7c75"><a href="http://wenwrites.com/">Wen Huang</a></span> is the author of &ldquo;The Little Red Guard.&rdquo;</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201763675&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Art exhibit uses found material to show the life of a community</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">South Shore artist Faheem Majeed&#39;s first solo museum exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art explores the relationship between people and the communities they live in. It features a room-sized installation and sculptural works made from the kinds of materials you might find in a neighborhood: particleboard to shutter windows, scrap metal, discarded signs. WBEZ&rsquo;s Natalie Moore caught up with Faheem at the MCA and brings us this interview from inside one of his installations.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8d7-fb54-ca6d-efc5811c5602">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.faheemmajeed.com/">Faheem Majeed</a> is a Chicago-area artist.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766543&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">Designers and community members collaborate on Pullman District development</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Now that parts of Pullman have been named the city&rsquo;s first national monument, teams of architects, engineers, and designers are brainstorming ideas for the future of the historic Pullman District. On Saturday April, 18 the teams presented their ideas and took public comment on the proposals. Richard Wilson is an urban planner and helped organize the event. He joins us with details.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8d9-b405-73aa-6e18abfe225c">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://smithgill.com/team/senior_team/richard_wilson/">Richard Wilson</a> is an urban planner based in Chicago.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766564&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">Emergency room visits for mental health care skyrocket in Chicago</span></font></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">From 2009 to 2013 there was a 37% &nbsp;increase in discharges from Chicago emergency rooms for mental health, according to data obtained from the state. The Emergency Room visits grew, as both the city and state cut services. WBEZ&rsquo;s Shannon Heffernan visited an ER that literally is rebuilding parts of its hospital to accommodate the rise and she joins us with more.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8db-3f6c-ad9e-e13bbe191d02">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/shannon_h">Shannon Heffernan</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766786&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">Tech Shift: U.S. Technology Chief pushes for diversity in tech</span></font></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">On Friday April, 17 the Chief Technology Officer of the United States brought fifty tech organizers from around the country to Washington for a meet-up at the White House. The idea was to spark a conversation about how communities can get citizens more involved in technology. Demond Drummer of Smart Chicago, attended the event and joins us to talk about the meet-up and what his organization is working toward locally in Chicago.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8de-2687-62bb-ae8fa5369b9a">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/citizendrummer">Demond Drummer</a> is managing director of Smart Chicago.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766586&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Shadow of corruption nothing new for Byrd-Bennett, Chicago or Illinois</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8e0-8782-810b-abe71e2ac2b4">Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett is taking a leave of absence as the FBI digs into possible corruption charges involving CPS and a $2.5 million no-bid contract awarded to a principal training academy where she previously worked. This isn&#39;t the first time in her career that Byrd-Bennett has been under investigation. Dick Simpson, professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago and author of </span>Corrupt Illinois: Patronage, Cronyism, and Criminality, joins us to discuss how this situation fits into Illinois&#39; legacy of corruption.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8e0-8782-810b-abe71e2ac2b4">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://pols.uic.edu/political-science/people/faculty/dsimpson">Dick Simpson</a> is professor of political science at UIC.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766603&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">Judge dismisses all charges against CPD detective in Rekia Boyd shooting death</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">On Monday afternoon, a Cook County judge unexpectedly ended the trial of Chicago police detective, Dante Servin, charged with involuntary manslaughter in the shooting death of 22-year old Chicago woman, Rekia Boyd. WBEZ&rsquo;s Chip Mitchell joins us live from the Leighton Criminal Courthouse with details.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8e1-d140-94f5-f82806ba2abb">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side Bureau reporter.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766601&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">Hammond Police Department to wear body cameras</span></font></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Police in Hammond, Indiana will soon be the first in Northwest Indiana to wear body cameras. The purchase is the direct result of an ugly incident that took place last September when Hammond police officers pulled over a family for not wearing seatbelts. &nbsp;The dramatic altercation that followed was captured on a cell phone video and went viral, inviting comparisons to Ferguson, Missouri. Now Hammond&rsquo;s mayor hopes the new cameras will shed more light on such incidents in the future. WBEZ&rsquo;s Michael Puente joins us with more.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8e3-65a4-bd9d-37263d4a7e38">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.twitter.com/mikepuentenews">Michael Puente</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter.</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/201766594&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Illinois State&#39;s Attorney Office will no longer prosecute marijuana misdemeanor cases</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney Office will no longer prosecute most misdemeanor marijuana cases. The announcement was made on April, 20 at press conference with State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez. It&rsquo;s part of a larger overhaul of how the office handles low-level drug offenses. &nbsp;WBEZ&rsquo;s Susie An was at the press conference and she joins us with details.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-64e02661-d8e5-3a9e-9792-1b2ae551bf72">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="http://www.twitter.com/soosieon">Susie An</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 20 Apr 2015 16:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-04-20/afternoon-shift-how-different-cultures-honor-dead-111910