WBEZ | nuclear http://www.wbez.org/tags/nuclear Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en How do you find plutonium? Go to nuclear inspector school http://www.wbez.org/news/how-do-you-find-plutonium-go-nuclear-inspector-school-113395 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/There&#039;s no playground at nuclear inspector school. Inside a nondescript building at Los Alamos National Laboratory known as TA-66, nuclear weapons inspectors are carefully trained in the detection of plutonium..jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="primaryaudio"><div id="res449862134"><div style="text-align: center;"><img alt="There's no playground at nuclear inspector school. Inside a nondescript building at Los Alamos National Laboratory known as TA-66, nuclear weapons inspectors are carefully trained in the detection of plutonium." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/16/lanl-ta66-17_custom-302d74745f23b874eab60f2cdd5a308f0ee773b2-s900-c85.jpg" style="height: 378px; width: 620px;" title="There's no playground at nuclear inspector school. Inside a nondescript building at Los Alamos National Laboratory known as TA-66, nuclear weapons inspectors are carefully trained in the detection of plutonium." /></div></div></div><div id="storytext"><div id="res449222294" previewtitle="There's no playground at nuclear inspector school. Inside a nondescript building at Los Alamos National Laboratory known as TA-66, nuclear weapons inspectors are carefully trained in the detection of plutonium."><div><div><p>No names. No pictures. No direct conversation.</p></div></div></div><p>And don&#39;t touch the plutonium.</p><p>Those were the ground rules before NPR was allowed a rare opportunity to see nuclear inspectors learning their craft. The inspectors came from the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.iaea.org/">International Atomic Energy Agency</a>, the world&#39;s nuclear watchdog.</p><p>This week, the agency will be looking on as Iran begins to scale back its nuclear program. Under the terms of a multinational agreement, Iran is to dramatically cut its uranium stockpile, mothball much of its nuclear equipment and restrict the rest to peaceful use. In exchange, the U.S. and other nations are to lift economic sanctions.</p><p>The IAEA&#39;s role in the deal is somewhere between that of a football referee and a tax accountant. Its inspectors will crisscross the country, visiting labs, reactors and even uranium mines. They will meticulously catalog equipment and material, to make sure it&#39;s all accounted for. If something seems off, they are the ones who will cry foul.</p><p><strong>School Of Nukes</strong></p><p>The inspectors NPR met were visiting&nbsp;<a href="https://www.lanl.gov/">Los Alamos National Laboratory</a>, which is (ironically enough) a nuclear weapons lab in Los Alamos, New Mexico.</p><p>&quot;We used to wear buttons that said, &#39;It&#39;s The Plutonium, Stupid,&#39; &quot; says Nancy Jo Nicholas, who oversees global security at Los Alamos. &quot;That&#39;s why people come here.&quot;</p><p>Plutonium and uranium are used in ordinary nuclear power reactors all around the world. But when they are properly purified and enriched, they can also be used to make nuclear weapons.</p><p>Inspectors must learn everything about plutonium &mdash; the civilian kind, which is used in some power reactors, and also the kind used in nukes. And Los Alamos has plenty of both.</p><p>Behind barbed wire and security checkpoints, the eight inspectors are working in an anonymous-looking building known as &quot;Technical Area 66.&quot; They&#39;re an unassuming bunch, dressed in ordinary street cloths. Their accents suggest they come from all over the world.</p><p><a href="http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Santi2">Peter Santi</a>, who is heading the training for Los Alamos, takes me across the classroom to pick up some pure plutonium oxide. It&#39;s sealed in a metal container about the size of a paint can, with makeshift handle made of tape to make it easier to carry. (Dropping the plutonium &quot;makes a loud noise and it scares everybody,&quot; Santi jokes.)</p><p>We put the can of plutonium into another container about the size of an oil drum. It&#39;s designed to catch radioactive particles flying out as the plutonium decays.</p><div id="res449221433" previewtitle="Each kind of nuclear material has a unique radioactive fingerprint. Inspectors use that signature to identify and quantify the material."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Each kind of nuclear material has a unique radioactive fingerprint. Inspectors use that signature to identify and quantify the material." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/16/lanl-ta66-5_custom-1a985a24018a89dcea55581b28760551b57b57ac-s900-c85.jpg" style="height: 415px; width: 620px;" title="Each kind of nuclear material has a unique radioactive fingerprint. Inspectors use that signature to identify and quantify the material. (Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory)" /></div><div><div><p>&quot;Nuclear material, when it decays, produces very unique signatures,&quot; Santi explains. The radiation acts as a fingerprint for the substance, and it&#39;s virtually impossible to mimic.</p></div></div></div><p>Inspectors use the radioactive fingerprint in two ways. First, they check it to verify the kind of material they are dealing with. And then they measure it to figure out how much material is there. Santi can nail down the amount of plutonium in this can to within a gram &mdash; a fraction of a percent of the total 606-gram mass.</p><p>In Iran, inspectors will work primarily with uranium, but they will bring the same dogged precision to their measurements. In addition to measuring nuclear materials, they will take environmental samples, install cameras and conduct visual inspections, among other things.</p><p><strong>Guarding The Globe</strong></p><p>The IAEA actually does this work elsewhere, too. &quot;We are inspecting all different types of facilities all over the world,&quot; says David Lacey, a training officer with the IAEA and a former inspector. The agency visits civilian reactors, fuel plants and plutonium handling facilities everywhere, from Brazil, to Japan to the US. Inspectors go in, make measurements, and then compare them to the official inventory, to make sure everything is accounted for. It&#39;s a challenging job even in the best of times.</p><p>&quot;An inspector has to be a little bit of everything,&quot; Lacy says. &quot;They need to be an accountant, a little bit of scientist, a little bit of diplomat.&quot;</p><p>The Iran deal carries its own complications. For one, Iran has not always been forthright with the IAEA, says&nbsp;<a href="http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/experts/2107/olli_heinonen.html">Olli Heinonen</a>, a former nuclear inspector now at Harvard University. Since the early 2000s, Iran has failed to disclose multiple facilities associated with its program.</p><p>And then there are the thorny global politics around the agreement. In the U.S. &quot;there are people in who don&#39;t trust the IAEA,&quot; says&nbsp;<a href="http://www.miis.edu/academics/faculty/JLewis/node/23027">Jeffrey Lewis</a>, an expert in non-proliferation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. In Iran, &quot;They think the IAEA is biased against them,&quot; Lewis says.</p><p>Both sides may try to pressure the agency, or even individual inspectors.</p><p>Despite the challenges, both Lewis and Heinonen agree the IAEA is a capable overseer of the deal.</p><div id="res449221644" previewtitle="Los Alamos National Laboratory is home to weapons-grade uranium and plutonium, making it an ideal place to train the inspectors."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Los Alamos National Laboratory is home to weapons-grade uranium and plutonium, making it an ideal place to train the inspectors." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/16/lanl-ta66-13_custom-0ee22df076af723342683815aa0bd8f3d1cdf175-s900-c85.jpg" style="height: 389px; width: 620px;" title="Los Alamos National Laboratory is home to weapons-grade uranium and plutonium, making it an ideal place to train the inspectors. (Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory)" /></div><div><div><p>&quot;They have a good track record,&quot; says Lewis, who notes that the agency has caught deception in Iran in the past, as well illicit activity in places like North Korea and South Africa.</p></div></div></div><p>The IAEA has also missed some things in Iran in the past, Heinonen says. But the agency inspectors have shown a light on many hidden aspects of that nation&#39;s nuclear program, including&nbsp;<a href="https://www.iaea.org/sites/default/files/gov2011-65.pdf">possible work on nuclear weapons</a>.</p><p>Heinonen says the greatest risk is that Iran has hidden entire facilities. But in the modern era, he believes, it would be hard to get the equipment, expertise and nuclear material together without anyone noticing.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s very difficult to build a nuclear program in isolation,&quot; he says.</p><p><strong>Final Exam</strong></p><p>There&#39;s no way to know whether the inspectors being trained on the day I visit will be sent to Iran. But what is clear is that the IAEA wants to be sure all of its inspectors are ready for anything.</p><p>For their final exam, the inspectors have been given a nuclear inventory from a fictional facility. Their task is to verify 12 unmarked items, and to see how much plutonium is inside each one. But in this exercise, just as can happen in the real world, not all is what it seems.</p><p>&quot;Several of the items, we&#39;ve lost the declaration for,&quot; says Santi, &quot;so they&#39;re completely unknown to the inspectors.&quot;</p><p>And have the instructors done anything else in the exercise to try to trip up the members of the class?</p><p>&quot;Yes,&quot; Santi says.</p><p>He won&#39;t say what tricks he&#39;s using to try and fool inspectors. But whatever it is, they will have to figure it out. And the IAEA&#39;s trainer David Lacey is confident they will.</p><p>&quot;They&#39;ll be fine,&quot; Lacey says. &quot;They&#39;ve had good teaching over the last two weeks. I can see now, looking around, that they&#39;re perfectly capable.&quot;</p></div><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/10/19/449031762/how-do-you-find-plutonium-go-to-nuclear-inspector-school?ft=nprml&amp;f=449031762" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Mon, 19 Oct 2015 10:42:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/how-do-you-find-plutonium-go-nuclear-inspector-school-113395 Abandoned but no wasteland: Chernobyl offers animals room to thrive http://www.wbez.org/news/abandoned-no-wasteland-chernobyl-offers-animals-room-thrive-113301 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/babyeagles.JPG" style="height: 411px; width: 620px;" title="Baby spotted eagles open wide for the camera in the Polessye State Radioecological Reserve in Belarus. (Valeriy Yurko/Polessye State Radioecological Reserve)" /></div><p>When you think of a nuclear meltdown, a lifeless wasteland likely comes to mind &mdash; a barren environment of strewn ashes and desolation.</p><p>Yet nearly 30 years after the disaster at the nuclear reactor in Chernobyl, in the former Soviet Union, a very different reality has long since taken root.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/elk.JPG" style="height: 371px; width: 560px;" title="A family of elk rove the forests. (Valeriy Yurko/Polessye State Radioecological Reserve)" /></p><p>In and around Chernobyl, wildlife now teems in a landscape long abandoned by humans. The area has been largely vacant of human life since 31 people died in the catastrophe and cleanup.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s well-established that when you create large reserves and protect wildlife from everyday human activities, wildlife generally tend to thrive,&quot; says Jim Beasley, a researcher at the Warnell School of Forestry at the University of Georgia.</p><p>He and a team of fellow researchers embarked on a study of the Chernobyl exclusion zone &mdash; specifically, the sector that rests on the Belarusian side of the Ukraine-Belarus border.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/exclusion%20zone.JPG" style="height: 374px; width: 560px;" title="A house, long since abandoned and fallen into disrepair, stands in Chernobyl's Exclusion Zone. The area is still avoided by humans — but animals are thriving. (Valeriy Yurko/Polessye State Radioecological Reserve)" /></p><p>They aimed to better understand how animal populations had been affected by the world&#39;s worst nuclear meltdown.</p><p>&quot;Our study specifically looked at mid- to large-size mammals,&quot; Beasley says, &quot;so everything from hare- or rabbit-sized animals, wild boar, moose &mdash; everything up to apex predators like wolves.&quot;</p><div id="res447251800" previewtitle="A wild boar stands for an informal portrait against the backdrop of an abandoned village in the Chernobyl exclusion zone."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="A wild boar stands for an informal portrait against the backdrop of an abandoned village in the Chernobyl exclusion zone." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/10/09/wild-boar-in-village-valeriy-yurko1_custom-8de868e23e7fc9398d437f168d0ab8ed7cc655fb-s300-c85.jpg" style="float: right; height: 257px; width: 200px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" title="A wild boar stands for an informal portrait against the backdrop of an abandoned village in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. (Valeriy Yurko/Polessye State Radioecological Reserve)" /></div><div><p>They wanted to see just how resilient these mammals were &mdash; and their data came back with a clear pattern: populations have resisted decline, and in many cases even flourished.</p></div></div><p>&quot;None of our three hypotheses postulating radiation damage to large mammal populations at Chernobyl were supported by the empirical evidence,&quot; Beasley and his co-authors concluded in a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(15)00988-4">paper they published</a>&nbsp;recently on the topic.</p><p>Now, that&#39;s not to say the animals themselves are healthy or not. Beasley is careful to note that their study did not look at particular health effects in the mammals. And, as for humans, Beasley cautions that we shouldn&#39;t get ahead of ourselves there, either. His findings have little to say about how safe the area is for humans to return.</p><p>&quot;Humans are much more long-lived than wild animals,&quot; he says. &quot;So I would be cautious to extrapolate those findings to humans.&quot;</p><p>But they did come to one clear conclusion.</p><p>&quot;What our study does suggest is that even if there are potential subtle genetic effects&quot; from the lingering radioactivity in the area, Beasley says, &quot;those effects are greatly overshadowed by the impacts humans have on the environment.&quot;</p><p>In other words, it may be a radioactive wasteland, still unsafe for humans, the simple fact of their absence has helped open the door for other mammals to flourish.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ponies.JPG" style="height: 409px; width: 620px;" title="A herd of ponies in the brush. Researchers studying large mammals in the area around Chernobyl found robust population numbers. (Polessye State Radioecological Reserve)" /></div><p>&mdash; <a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/10/10/447202281/abandoned-but-no-wasteland-chernobyl-offers-animals-room-to-thrive?ft=nprml&amp;f=447202281" target="_blank"><em>via NPR</em></a></p></p> Sat, 10 Oct 2015 15:17:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/abandoned-no-wasteland-chernobyl-offers-animals-room-thrive-113301 'Little Voices' aims to shed light on Fukushima's nuclear aftermath http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-07/little-voices-aims-shed-light-fukushimas-nuclear-aftermath-113230 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Lucas%20Wirl%20%282%29.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Lucas Wirl)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/227384329&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">&#39;Little Voices of Fukushima&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>In her film Little Voices from Fukushima, director Hitomi Kamanaka moves between two communities impacted by nuclear disaster- an area in Belarus that saw the effects of Chernobyl, and a community in Fukushima. Kamanaka looks to Belarus to see what, if any, lessons there might be for Fukushima&rsquo;s residents. Hitomi Kamanaka and Norma Field, professor of Japanese studies at the University of Chicago join us to talk about what&rsquo;s happened in Fukushima since the nuclear disaster struck in 2011.</p><p><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6a16040b-441f-02d4-61c3-83986236355e"><a href="http://twitter.com/kama38">Hitomi Kamanaka</a> is the director of </span>Little Voices from Fukushima.</em></li><li><em>Norma Field is a professor of Japanese studies at the University of Chicago.</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/227385129&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">European court throws out &#39;Safe Harbor&#39; Agreement</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The European Court of Justice has ruled that an agreement that allows for the free flowing transfer of data between the US and the EU is not valid. The agreement, known as &ldquo;Safe Harbor&rdquo; had been in effect for 15 years. The court found that the agreement violated the privacy rights of EU citizens because it exposes them to surveillance by the United States government. Thousands of companies, including tech giants like Google and Facebook, have relied on the agreement to transfer information. We&rsquo;ll talk about the ruling and its implications with Jenna McLaughlin, a reporter for The Intercept.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6a16040b-4424-eaa8-ecfb-3e55e047b85c"><a href="http://twitter.com/JennaMC_Laugh">Jenna McLaughlin</a> is a reporter for <a href="http://twitter.com/@the_intercept">The Intercept</a>.</span></em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/227387636&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Notes: The Lyre Ensemble</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Every week on Global Notes with Morning Shift and Radio M host Tony Sarabia we explore a facet of world music. Today we dive into really, really old world music, roughly 4,500 year old sounds from ancient Mesopotamia. There are very few people playing and singing this music; enter The Lyre Ensemble. It&rsquo;s a group of Brits who&rsquo;ve dedicated themselves to resurrecting music from that period; instruments as well as language and poetry. The group recently held a performance in the UK. We take a look at the group and its now 12 year old endeavor.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong>&nbsp;</p><ul><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6a16040b-442a-a08d-3236-6aef9c5a82ee"><a href="http://twitter.com/stefconner">Stef Conner</a> is a member of the Lyre Ensemble . </span></em></li><li><em><span><a href="http://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is host of WBEZ&rsquo;s </span>Morning Shift and Radio M</em></li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 07 Oct 2015 15:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-07/little-voices-aims-shed-light-fukushimas-nuclear-aftermath-113230 Iran nuclear talks extended http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-30/iran-nuclear-talks-extended-112289 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Iran.jpg" title="(Photo: Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212695002&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Iran nuclear negotiations continue in Vienna</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">P5+1 nuclear talks with Iran, being held in Vienna, were due to end today, but talks were extended to July 7th. We&rsquo;ll talk with Reza Marashi of the National Iranian American Council. He&rsquo;s currently in Vienna and will tell us what he thinks is happening behind closed doors and what this delay may mean for the sensitive negotiations.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-3a9b1b5e-4649-3502-9d7f-75972bfc36c0"><a href="https://twitter.com/rezamarashi">Reza Marashi</a> is </span>director of research with the&nbsp;National Iranian American Council.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212694523&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EPA sets new standards on Carbon emissions</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Environmental Protection Agency has set new Carbon emission standards to be met by 2030. This summer, the EPA will release its &ldquo;Clean Power Plan.&rdquo; It includes a &ldquo;non-mandatory&rdquo; benchmark for the year 2020. Illinois plans to be more than 80 percent compliant towards the 2020 goal, but many U.S. states are resisting the changes. We talk about the new Carbon standards and similar regulations abroad with energy policy expert, Steve Frenkel. He&rsquo;s Midwest director for the Union of Concerned Scientists.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-3b29d40f-464d-7154-758e-34f53fdf9da6">Steve Frenkel is </span>Midwest director for the <a href="https://twitter.com/UCSUSA">Union of Concerned Scientists</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212692927&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EcoMyths: Composting without the stink</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Many shy away from composting because they have images of rotting food, scavenging animals and neighbors complaining about the smell. But EcoMyths Alliance wants you to know that composting can be odorless. Kate Sackman of EcoMyths and Eliza Fournier of Chicago Botanic Garden say, &quot;It only stinks if you&#39;re not going at it right.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Eliza Fournier is Community Gardening Coordinatior at <a href="https://twitter.com/chicagobotanic">Chicago Botanic Garden</a>.&nbsp;</em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-674e01c1-4651-6ae3-20ff-cc5a6e73bff5">Kate Sackman is </span>founder and president of <a href="https://twitter.com/EcoMyths">EcoMyths Alliance</a>.</em></li></ul></p> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-30/iran-nuclear-talks-extended-112289 Worldview in India: Rag pickers organized into recyclers http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-india-rag-pickers-organized-recyclers-111815 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/P1012950.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="A network of rag pickers and sorting stations is working with the waste of 3 million people in Delhi. (Jerome McDonnell)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198962227&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: Rag pickers in India</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><span id="docs-internal-guid-56944a80-7fbc-9b85-6c10-02228cd13ea8">Rag-pickers are people in India who rummage through refuge to make a living and for their very survival. </span>Worldview traveled to India with India Development Service (IDS) to meet with the organizers of an initiative to educate, house and uplift rag-pickers&#39; and their children. We spoke with Ashish Jain, director of Indian Pollution Control Association about how he is teaching the rag-pickers how to recycle and develop the garbage they sort. The group provided a space for this rag-picker community by building a small village within a Delhi garbage dump. And IDS helped fund an on-site school for the rag pickers&rsquo; children.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guests:</strong></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Ashish Jain from the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ipcaworld.co.in/">Indian Pollution Control Association</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-104e7536-7c04-39a0-a4e6-ab69d78a7bb0">Nilesh Kothari is a founding board member of <a href="http://idsusa.org/">India Development Service</a>.</span></em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198964386&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Deal with Iran is reached, nuclear weapon manufacturing deemed &quot;impossible&quot;</span></font></p><p>After 18 months of deliberation a deal has been reached between major world powers and Iran. The deal would lift certain economic sanctions in favor of reducing Iran&#39;s nuclear capabilities and increasing the number of inspections leveled against it. We discuss the diplomatic implications for both Iran and the Western World with Trita Parsi and Amit Sadri.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-104e7536-7c07-79bb-5202-eef555c1d576"><a href="https://twitter.com/tparsi">Trita Parsi</a> is the </span>president of the <a href="https://twitter.com/niacouncil">National Iranian American Council</a>.</em></p><p><em>Ahmad Sadri is a professor of Islamic World Studies and professor of Sociology at <a href="https://twitter.com/LFCollege">Lake Forest College</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198966359&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World HIstory Moment: The Falkland Islands War</span></p><p>Every week, historian John Schmidt tells us about an important date in global history. Today he tells us about the anniversary of the Falkland Island War on April 2nd, 1982.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><a href="https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/">John Schmidt</a> is an historian and author of &ldquo;On This Day in Chicago History.&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 02 Apr 2015 16:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-india-rag-pickers-organized-recyclers-111815 Worldview: Nuclear talks with Iran to continue until Wednesday http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-31/worldview-nuclear-talks-iran-continue-until-wednesday-111794 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP233133249819.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, third left, chats with U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, as U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, second right, takes a note while waiting for the start of a meeting on Iran's nuclear program with other officials from Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia, the European Union and Iran at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday, March 31, 2015.(AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198621532&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Deal with Iran could be pushed to Wednesday</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Negotiations with Iran over a possible nuclear deal have reached their deadline. Signals are pointing to continuing the talks on Wednesday, with some of the more sensitive subjects to be dealt with three months from now, according to the New York Times. We opened the line to our listeners to chime in as we talked to John Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago and Nabeel Khoury from Northwestern University about the best and worst case scenarios on this deal.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-2db7f2a8-7185-01b3-c940-b7a5003e4384">John Mearsheimer is the</span> co-director of the Program on International Security Policy at the <a href="https://twitter.com/UChicago">University of Chicago</a>. He&rsquo;s written extensively on security issues and international politics, including the books </em>Why Leaders Lie: The Truth about Lying in International Politics.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><a href="https://twitter.com/khoury_nabeel">Nabeel Khoury</a> is a visiting associate professor of Middle East Studies at <a href="https://twitter.com/NorthwesternU">Northwestern University</a> and non-resident senior fellow at the <a href="https://twitter.com/ACmideast">Atlantic Council&#39;s Hariri Center</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198631270&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Eco Heroes: Cheryl Besenjak of Growing Healthy People</span></p><p>Cheryl Besenjak is a Vietnam-era veteran and community gardener. She and her husband started out by asking people to plant an extra row or two in their gardens. In time, their idea blossomed into a life&rsquo;s mission to train people, especially veterans, to become farmers. We&rsquo;ll talk with Cheryl about her organization, Growing Healthy People. It&rsquo;s a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging health through growing organic produce, nutritional education and local food production.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-50e6cfce-7187-ada4-69a5-9a9aa2a73c6e">Cheryl Besenjak is a</span> community gardener and executive director of &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/GrwngHealthyPpl">Growing Healthy People</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 31 Mar 2015 15:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-31/worldview-nuclear-talks-iran-continue-until-wednesday-111794 Worldview: Talks about nuclear Iran heads into final hours http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-30/worldview-talks-about-nuclear-iran-heads-final-hours-111787 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP783965890108.jpg" style="height: 395px; width: 620px;" title="Officials of Britain, Russia, China, France, Germany, European Union, the United States and Iran wait for the start of a meeting on Iran's nuclear program at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Monday, March 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198459815&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Iran nuclear talks continue as deadline looms</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-32665110-6c56-5ff1-1035-912bf926ef6d">Nuclear negotiations between the P5 + 1 countries are still under way in Switzerland. Ahmad Sadri, an Iranian American and professor of Islamic World Studies and sociology at Lake Forest College. He tells us what he thinks the odds are of reaching a deal</span> before the March 31 deadline.</p><p><strong><span>Guest:&nbsp;</span></strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-32665110-6c56-a481-3ca3-64526d97ea14">Ahmad Sadri is the </span>Gorter Professor of Islamic World Studies and Professor of Sociology at <a href="https://twitter.com/LFCollege">Lake Forest College.</a></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198460507&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">How Engineers Without Borders helps people in the developing world</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-3ebb3117-6c58-8f2c-72d3-351f3c6ce968">Engineers Without Borders-USA (EWB-USA) is an NGO created to &ldquo;support community-driven development programs worldwide...that design and implement sustainable engineering projects, while creating transformative experiences that enrich global perspectives and create responsible leaders.&rdquo; It has so far recruited 15,000 members in 365 chapters across 39 countries. We sat down with EWB-USA co-founder, Bernard Amadei, to find out what led him to decide to&nbsp; utilize technology for the common good.&nbsp; Amadei is also chair of global engineering at the University of Colorado-Boulder and author of &nbsp;</span><em>Engineering for Sustainable Human Development: A Guide to Successful Small-Scale Community Projects.</em></p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/bamadei"><span id="docs-internal-guid-3ebb3117-6c59-61c3-90bc-7050b34a314d">Bernard Amadei </span></a>is the co-founder of <a href="https://twitter.com/EWBUSA">Engineers Without Borders-USA</a>, professor of Civil Engineering&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-3ebb3117-6c59-61c3-90bc-7050b34a314d">Mortenson chair in Global Engineering at the University of Colorado-Boulder, author of </span></em>Engineering for Sustainable Human Development: A Guide to Successful Small-Scale Community Projects</p></p> Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-30/worldview-talks-about-nuclear-iran-heads-final-hours-111787 Iran nuclear talks extended http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-24/iran-nuclear-talks-extended-111151 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP59866658391.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The deadline for a nuclear deal with Iran has been extended for seven months. We&#39;ll take a look at what the extension could mean with Trita Parsi, president of the National Iranian American Council, and Joseph Cirincione, president of Ploughshares Fund.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-iran-nuclear-talks-extended/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-iran-nuclear-talks-extended.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-iran-nuclear-talks-extended" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Iran nuclear talks extended" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 13:16:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-24/iran-nuclear-talks-extended-111151 The U.S. and Nuclear Weapons http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-07/us-and-nuclear-weapons-111078 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP307803699825.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Investigative journalist Eric Schlosser spent six years examining the state of the U.S. nuclear arsenal. His joins us to talk about his book &#39;Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety,&#39; which documents his findings.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-u-s-and-nuclear-weapons/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-u-s-and-nuclear-weapons.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-u-s-and-nuclear-weapons" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The U.S. and Nuclear Weapons" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 07 Nov 2014 11:25:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-07/us-and-nuclear-weapons-111078 Reduced nuclear output at some Illinois plants http://www.wbez.org/news/reduced-nuclear-output-some-illinois-plants-107789 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Nuclear.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Exelon, one of the largest utility providers in the country, will be reducing the amount of energy it provides from some of its Illinois nuclear power plants. That concerns David Kolata, executive director of The Citizen Utility Board. He worries the company is reducing supply, in order to increase the price of electricity. He says that kind of market manipulation, &ldquo;opens up a whole hornet nest of issues.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;What we don&rsquo;t want to happen from a consumers&rsquo; point of view is the worst of all possible worlds, where you get markets when they lead to higher prices, and no markets when they lead to lower prices,&rdquo; said Kolata.</p><p>Exelon says sometimes electricity prices drop so low, it actually cost the company money to produce energy. Those are the times it would take energy off-line. Exelon says they are working with <a href="http://www.pjm.com/about-pjm.aspx" target="_blank">PJM</a>, the company that oversees energy markets, to get advanced notice of when it looks like the price of energy will drop. The company says that is well within guidelines against market manipulation.</p><p>The reason for the very low energy prices is also under debate. Exelon blames wind subsidies, which they say makes it impossible for other forms of energy to compete.</p><p>Kolata says that claim is overblown. He says the low price of natural gas, a result of fracking, might have more to do with the price drop. He also says that the demand for electricity has dropped, which he attributes both to the recession and more energy efficient products.</p><p>Nuclear energy currently&nbsp; makes up about half of the energy used in Illinois. Kolata says as we move towards more renewable energy resources and smart grid technology, that the market will reward forms of energy that can quickly respond to demand. Nuclear, which generally runs 24/7 and needs notice to ramp up and down, could struggle. Exelon says as long as patterns are predictable, they will remain competitive.</p><p><em>Shannon Heffernan is a reporter for WBEZ. Follow her at <a href="http://twitter.com/shannon_h" target="_blank">@shannon_h</a></em></p></p> Thu, 20 Jun 2013 15:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/reduced-nuclear-output-some-illinois-plants-107789