WBEZ | Chicago Police Department http://www.wbez.org/tags/chicago-police-department Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Chicago Police's so-called 'black site' mischaracterized http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-polices-so-called-black-site-mischaracterized-111629 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/daley-homan-square.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Lawyers and local crime reporters say <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/feb/24/chicago-police-detain-americans-black-site" target="_blank"> a widely-shared article from <em>The Guardian</em></a> mischaracterized&nbsp;a Chicago Police Department facility called Homan Square as the equivalent of a CIA &quot;black site.&quot;</p><p>Black sites house detainees who undergo interrogation in highly secretive prisons. But the non-descript Homan Square building on the city&rsquo;s West Side is not exactly off-the-books.</p><p>In the past few years WBEZ reporters and other journalists have been to the facility for tours and interviews as well as press conferences.</p><p>The <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em>&rsquo; Frank Main says reporters on the police beat know Homan Square. He&rsquo;s visited 20 or 30 times during his career. He said the massive building located at 1011 S. Homan was once a Sears Roebuck warehouse.</p><p>&ldquo;The reasons I&rsquo;ve been there is going for essentially &lsquo;show and tells&rsquo; where the police will show huge amounts of drugs that they&rsquo;ve seized in various cases. And in those situations you&rsquo;ll have lots of media; television cameras, radio,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Main said Homan Square is a secured site. Visitors need to show ID and give a reason for their visit.<br /><br />&ldquo;There&rsquo;s some sensitive police bureaus there,&quot; he said. &quot;For example, there&rsquo;s the organized crime bureau which runs gang investigations and drug investigations. And a lot of people in those units are undercover.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago Police Department says advertising the location would put their lives at risk. A spokesman says gang members have been known to stake out the place to catch glimpses of undercover cops, a reason why some people might be denied access. But the building also has a public entrance where people can pick up stolen property and items inventoried in crimes.</p><p>If people know about this place and the media is invited for press conferences, can it be characterized as a &ldquo;black site&rdquo;?</p><p>&ldquo;No, it wasn&rsquo;t a mischaracterization,&rdquo; said <em>Guardian </em>reporter Spencer Ackerman of <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/feb/24/chicago-police-detain-americans-black-site">his story&rsquo;s headline describing Homan Square</a> as such. &ldquo;You can find certain black sites in Romania and Poland that are out in the open. It&rsquo;s not the visibility of the facility, it&rsquo;s what goes on in the facility that makes it secretive.&rdquo;</p><p>Ackerman reports arrestees are kept out of official booking databases and attorneys are denied access. He also notes a detainee at Homan Square who endured a beating, another a prolonged shackling and one who even died.</p><p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s what makes it, or as [lawyers] characterize, that&rsquo;s what makes it analogous to a black site,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>A CPD statement stands by the department&rsquo;s claim to always record arrests, and that&rsquo;s no different at Homan Square.</p><p>A few lawyers contacted for this story said clients, unfortunately, are sometimes held without being booked and attorneys are delayed in getting to clients, but that could happen anywhere in Chicago.</p><p>Flint Taylor, an attorney with the People&rsquo;s Law Office, was quoted in <em>The</em> <em>Guardian</em> story. He praised the article for highlighting the lack of police transparency, and said it&rsquo;s concerning that such things would happen in a centralized location. However, Taylor said he might&rsquo;ve used different analogies to describe Homan Square. In the end, he said he&#39;ll leave it to the reporter to do the characterization.</p><p>Craig Futterman, a clinical professor of law at the University of Chicago, said prisoners are held without being entered into the system all over the city, not just Homan Square.</p><p>Futterman says it&rsquo;s an exaggeration to call it a &quot;black site.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;If there&rsquo;s a risk, I think it&rsquo;s elevating this facility,&rdquo; Futterman said. &ldquo;And making it look like there&rsquo;s a problem in one particular station, as opposed to there&rsquo;s a broader systemic problem to people who are very vulnerable who are denied their basic fundamental constitutional right.&rdquo;</p><p>If similar complaints happen at other police facilities, these practices aren&rsquo;t unique to Homan Square. Ackerman said these practices happening at other places around Chicago is disturbing. But would those facilities also be considered black sites?</p><p>&ldquo;If it&rsquo;s not what goes on in Homan Square that you&rsquo;re disputing, the characterization I leave to people then to look at for themselves once they aggressively investigate the facts of what&rsquo;s going on here,&rdquo; Ackerman said.</p><p>Meanwhile, Futterman said policing practices everywhere in Chicago need to be reviewed.</p><p><em>Susie An is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/soosieon">@soosieon</a></em></p></p> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:04:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-polices-so-called-black-site-mischaracterized-111629 Morning Shift: Police brutality exported from Chicago to Guantanamo http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-02-20/morning-shift-police-brutality-exported-chicago-guantanamo-111594 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/FiDalwood.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/FiDalwood" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192128793&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Some wards may face run-off</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Chicago&rsquo;s municipal elections are right around the corner. And for anyone running for office, the magic number is &ldquo;50% + 1&rdquo;. If they get that, they win. If they don&rsquo;t, they face an April runoff against their opponent with the next-highest vote total. Some of the aldermanic races are tight. Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business&rsquo; Greg Hinz hits us up with his <a href="http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20150217/BLOGS02/150219844/is-your-ward-headed-for-an-aldermanic-runoff">predictions</a>&nbsp;of which of the city&rsquo;s 50 wards are likely go to a runoff.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/greghinz">Greg Hinz</a> is a political reporter for Crain&#39;s Chicago Business</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192131493&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Election study guide cont.</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">While on the topic of municipal elections - there will be five other big names on that ballot next week. WBEZ&rsquo;s Lauren Chooljian has been keeping us up to date on how each of the mayoral candidates wants to lead the city. She&rsquo;s compiled a study guide of the top issues and she joins us now to go through a few more.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian">Lauren Choolijan</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192128779&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Ed Bus is sick of Chicago politics</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">If you follow Chicago politics, you know Alderman Ed Bus of the 53rd Ward. The fictional persona of WBEZ&rsquo;s Justin Kaufmann brings out his character inspired by old city politics as part of the comedy troupe Schadenfreude. And after many years running the Ward, Alderman Bus is angry. He tells us why he&rsquo;s sick of the way politics are now run (he likes them dirtier), and why he thinks elections are a waste of time (he likes disengaged voters). You can spend office hours with Alderman Bus tomorrow at 6:30 at The Hideout.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/JustinKaufmann">Justin Kaufmann</a> is a WBEZ producer.&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192128777&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Police brutality exported from Chicago to Guantanamo</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Chicago&rsquo;s darkest chapter in police brutality is perhaps best captured in the career of Police Commander Jon Burge. He gained notoriety for torturing more than 200 criminal suspects between 1972 and 1991. But according to an investigative series of reports by The Guardian, another former Chicago cop allegedly tortured confessions from suspects and brought his methods to Guantanamo Bay Prison. The Guardian&rsquo;s Spencer Ackerman joins us with the story of former detective and Gitmo operative Richard Zuley.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/attackerman">Spencer Ackerman</a> is the&nbsp;</em><em>U.S. national security editor at the Guardian.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/192128775&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Super Ager brains</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">In 2007 researchers at&nbsp; Northwestern&rsquo;s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer&rsquo;s Disease Center identified a group of people they dubbed &ldquo;Cognitive SuperAgers.&rdquo; They&rsquo;re folks whose minds and memories stay sharp well into their 80s. Late last month a group of SuperAger researchers at Northwestern University&rsquo;s Feinberg School of Medicine published a study detailing the physical similarities of these brains. Changiz Geula, the study&rsquo;s senior author and a research professor at the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer&rsquo;s Disease Center, talks to us about it.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Changiz Geula is a&nbsp;</em>research professor at <a href="https://twitter.com/nufeinbergmed">Northwestern University&rsquo;s Feinberg School of Medicine.</a></p></p> Fri, 20 Feb 2015 07:43:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-02-20/morning-shift-police-brutality-exported-chicago-guantanamo-111594 Morning Shift: Grading Rahm on public safety http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-01-28/morning-shift-grading-rahm-public-safety-111467 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/flickr%20EssG.jpg" style="height: 415px; width: 620px;" title="(Flickr/EssG)" /></div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/188320986&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">College of DuPage President may have to kiss sweet severance package goodbye</span></p><p>Last week the College of DuPage Board of Trustees approved a severance package for the school&#39;s president, but details weren&#39;t released to the public. The Illinois Attorney General&#39;s office said that such details must be made public under the state&#39;s open meetings law. The board meets today in a special session to deal with the fallout, and <em>Chicago Tribune</em> reporter Jodi Cohen brings us the <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-college-of-dupage-president-buyout-revote-0127-20150127-story.html">latest</a>.</p><p><strong>Guest: </strong><em><a href="http://twitter.com/higherednews">Jodi Cohen</a> is a </em>Chicago Tribune<em> reporter.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/188320306&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Food Wednesday: What do you feed your pet?</span></p><p>In recent years, pet food trends have mirrored what we&rsquo;ve seen among a certain class for human foodies. Some want it gluten free, homemade, raw, low carb and organic. Is this a good thing? Chewing the Fat&rsquo;s&nbsp;Louisa Chu and Monica Eng discuss how we&#39;ve developed our concepts of pet food and baby food and if they&rsquo;ve been any good for those actually eating them.</p><p><strong>Guests: </strong><em><a href="http://twitter.com/meng">Monica Eng</a> and <a href="http://twitter.com/louisachu">Louisa Chu</a> are the co-hosts of WBEZ&#39;s <a href="http://wbez.org/podcasts">Chewing the Fat</a>. </em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/188320015&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Grading Rahm: How is the Mayor handling public safety?</span></p><p>This week, we&rsquo;re asking experts to give Mayor Rahm Emanuel grades in four key areas that he outlined as priorities during his tenure. Wednesday we&rsquo;re <a href="http://interactive.wbez.org/gradingrahm/#public_safety">tackling public safety</a>. How has he battled violence in the city, and what&rsquo;s his role been in police and community relations?</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em>Tracy Siska is the <a href="http://www.chicagojustice.org/about/staff">Executive Director of the Chicago Justice Project</a></em></li><li><em>Art Lurigio is a <a href="http://www.luc.edu/psychology/facultystaff/lurigio_a.shtml">professor at Loyola University Chicago</a></em></li><li><em>Eric Hudson is a Logan Square CAPS volunteer</em></li></ul></p> Wed, 28 Jan 2015 07:45:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-01-28/morning-shift-grading-rahm-public-safety-111467 Chicago mayor's commission unveils plan for a safer Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-mayors-commission-unveils-plan-safer-chicago-111241 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP973232440855.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The city of Chicago released <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/mayor/supp_info/the-mayor-s-commission-for-a-safer-chicago.html" target="_blank">a report</a> today with 28 recommendations to address the city&#39;s youth violence problem.</p><p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the Mayor&#39;s Commission for a Safe Chicago released the report. The recommendations include adding eight &quot;peace rooms&quot; in Chicago Public schools for conflict resolution and connecting families with counseling.</p><p>&ldquo;Every child in the city of Chicago deserves a childhood, and that childhood cannot be stolen from them,&rdquo; Emanuel said in unveiling the plan. &ldquo;And every adolescent deserves their adolescence free of violence. So I hope we take this work &hellip; not just as another report [but as] a call to action.&rdquo;</p><p>While it is billed as a strategic plan for 2015, most of the report&rsquo;s 64 pages are dedicated to celebrating past accomplishments by the Emanuel administration. Of the 60 violence prevention programs highlighted in the report&rsquo;s executive summary, 13 of them are new or updated for 2015.</p><p>One of the new ideas presented in the plan calls on the Chicago Police Department to explore alternatives to arresting first-time juvenile offenders.</p><p>&ldquo;We recommend exploring possible alternatives to arrest for first-time juvenile offenders such as tickets or &hellip; community service,&rdquo; said co-chair Eddie Bocanegra with the YMCA.</p><p>And the written report says the police department will do just that in 2015. But spokesmen for the mayor&rsquo;s office and CPD declined to provide any specifics on the plan.</p><p>The commission&rsquo;s plan focuses on youth violence because, according to the city, people 29 and younger have made up more than 60 percent of Chicago&rsquo;s homicide victims over the past five years. It aims to decrease crime by treating youth violence as a public health issue. That means a focus on education, trauma therapy and youth employment.</p><p>Emanuel pointed to <a href="https://soundcloud.com/afternoonshiftwbez/new-study-reveals-local-summer-jobs-program-reduces-youth-violence" target="_blank">a recent study by the University of Chicago Crime Lab and the University of Pennsylvania</a> that showed the One Summer Plus youth jobs program helped reduce arrests by more than 40 percent over a 16-month period.</p><p>This is the first report by the Mayor&rsquo;s Commission for a Safer Chicago. It was written after three forums held over the summer attended by government representatives, faith groups and community organizations.</p><p>The commission also sought out opinions from about 200 young people in more than a dozen Chicago communities.</p><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ reporter and producer. Follow him on twitter <a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid" target="_blank">@pksmid</a>. The Associated Press also contributed to this report.</em></p></p> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 14:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-mayors-commission-unveils-plan-safer-chicago-111241 Lawsuit seeks information on alleged CPD spying http://www.wbez.org/news/lawsuit-seeks-information-alleged-cpd-spying-111202 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/sskc.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Activists say the Chicago Police Department is monitoring their cell phones at protests, and they are trying to use a lawsuit to prove it.</p><p>At issue are cell-phone interceptors called stingrays. These force mobile phones to communicate with them by mimicking a cell tower. For years, Chicago police denied owning any of these stingrays, but a 2014 lawsuit forced the department to turn over records proving the department had purchased several of them.</p><p>Government transparency attorney Matt Topic was the lead attorney on that case.</p><p>&ldquo;Once the stingray has tricked phones in the vicinity into thinking it&rsquo;s talking to a cell tower when it&rsquo;s actually talking to the police,&quot; Topic said. &quot;It can force the phones to broadcast to the police things like &hellip; the call logs and many think these can actually be used to intercept the content of the communications themselves.&rdquo;</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/www.wbez.org/news/who-polices-police-chicago-its-increasingly-ex-cops-111194" target="_blank">Who polices the police? In Chicago, it&#39;s mostly ex-cops</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>Topic, who is an attorney at Chicago firm Loevy and Loevy, says because the interceptor mimics a cell tower it can only work within a certain radius.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know what that radius is, but I believe it&rsquo;s a large enough radius that if the police department put one of these devices into a truck or into a car and drove it up next to a reasonably sized protest, they could certainly secretly obtain a lot of information from protesters who are there.&rdquo;</p><p>Topic says it is a reasonable concern that the Chicago Police Department may be using these stingrays to get information during demonstrations. He pointed to a post by the hacker group Anonymous of a recording allegedly taken from the Chicago police scanner. In the recording a man, who Anonymous says is a Chicago police officer, asks if the department is monitoring a protest organizer&rsquo;s cell phone conversation.</p><p>That recording, and pictures of an Office of Emergency Management and Communication vehicle allegedly following marchers, has sparked several allegations of police spying.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-protestors-focus-future-111201" target="_blank">From pulpits to protests, Chicago clergy lead demonstrations</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>An OEMC spokeswoman says the SVU that has raised demonstrators&rsquo; suspicious is a vehicle equipped with mobile field cameras the city uses often in planned and unplanned large scale events and that it&rsquo;s nothing more. She says it does not have any sort of spying or monitoring capabilities beyond the ability to shoot video.</p><p>And a Chicago Police Department spokesman says the department hasn&rsquo;t used the stingrays during demonstrations.</p><p>But Ed Yohnka with the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois says that isn&rsquo;t good enough. Yohnka says the department refuses to admit how they are using the stingrays, which naturally leads people to be suspicious.</p><p>Yohnka says their use has been &ldquo;treated as a great secret by government at all levels.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;We know that this technology has been used in connection with protests in other places,&rdquo; Yohnka said. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know whether or not that&rsquo;s been used in Chicago. I would say that if this technology is being used to track people, if there are technologies that are being used to collect large swaths of communication, those are things that are very troubling and very wrong and I think people would rightly be concerned about them.&rdquo;</p><p>Topic&rsquo;s latest lawsuit, brought on behalf of privacy advocate Freddie Martinez, is meant to compel the Chicago Police Department to say when and where the stingrays are being used.</p><p>&ldquo;The second suit, which asks for broader records (as to the extent to which the equipment is being used, with what constitutional safeguards, what happens with data), that complaint was filed a while back and we&rsquo;re expecting the police department&rsquo;s answer to that complaint [this] week,&rdquo; Topic said.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re very interested to see &hellip; whether these are wholesale constitutional violations and if so we intend to explore what can be done about them,&rdquo; Topic said.</p><p><em>Patrick Smith is WBEZ&rsquo;s morning news producer. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid" target="_blank">@pksmid </a></em></p></p> Mon, 08 Dec 2014 15:33:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/lawsuit-seeks-information-alleged-cpd-spying-111202 The Michael Brown Law: Chicago's reception to cops wearing body cameras http://www.wbez.org/michael-brown-law-chicagos-reception-cops-wearing-body-cameras-111173 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/police_body_cameras.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">The relationship between Chicago police and many residents has been tense and complicated for years. And for some, the events in Ferguson over the last few months have highlighted the tensions. Nineteen-year-old Shea was with other protesters outside Chicago Police Headquarters Monday night, waiting to hear the grand jury&rsquo;s decision. She said she doesn&rsquo;t trust the police, and feels like minorities in Chicago have targets on their backs.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;They put so much fear into people that we can&rsquo;t even trust them to even call them and say, &lsquo;Hey, someone&rsquo;s in my house, stealing something.&rsquo; We can&rsquo;t even trust them to do that,&rdquo; Shea told WBEZ.</p><p dir="ltr">Police are aware of the mistrust&nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(84, 84, 84); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; line-height: 16.5454540252686px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&mdash;&nbsp;</span>they feel it too. When Supt. Garry McCarthy first came to Chicago, he offered WBEZ some historical context. McCarthy said historically, police have been a de facto symbol of racist policies in this country.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Slavery was written into the Constitution, segregation, Jim Crow, you name it. The point is it was the police departments who enforced those laws. That builds natural distrust and a narrative in that community that before we even step on the block, there&rsquo;s a natural distrust,&rdquo; McCarthy explained back in 2012.</p><p dir="ltr">Attitudes like Shea&rsquo;s are omnipresent&nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(84, 84, 84); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; line-height: 16.5454540252686px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&mdash;&nbsp;</span>and that&rsquo;s why many Chicagoans are in favor of body cameras for police.</p><p dir="ltr">For a long time, residents had no way to legally document what the mistrust between citizens and police officers looked and sounded like. Illinois had a strict law against recording conversations without all parties&rsquo; consent. But that law was struck down by the Illinois Supreme Court earlier this year--and now, there&rsquo;s an opportunity to write legislation that includes police body cameras.</p><p dir="ltr">Dean Angelo represents more than 10,000 Chicago police officers as president of the local Fraternal Order of Police lodge. Angelo said many of his officers aren&rsquo;t ready to buy into police cameras. After all, Angelo said, the work of police officers makes them suspicious by nature. He was one of several local law enforcement officers who gave testimony before a joint Illinois judiciary committee hearing.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Our members sit in two camps: One is no. And the other one is, it&rsquo;s coming anyway,&rdquo; Angelo said.</p><p dir="ltr">But cops do like the idea of having an official video of record--instead of unofficial cell phone videos that can be manipulated.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I imagine that the people that are the proponents of the gotcha type of mentality with this environment of using body cameras are going to be extremely surprised what an officer confronts on each and every day of their watch,&rdquo; said Angelo.</p><p dir="ltr">Angelo added that &ldquo;a certain segment of the population&rdquo; has no respect for Chicago police officers. The benefit of these body cameras, he said, is revealing officers&rsquo; daily reality.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Eyes will be opened and you&rsquo;ll see what heroes you have on the streets every day. How tolerant they are, how professional they are and how good they are at their jobs,&rdquo; Angelo explained.</p><p dir="ltr">But Sean Smoot with the Illinois Police Benevolent and Protective Association worries that cameras won&rsquo;t capture the complete picture, or the whole experience of the street officer.</p><p dir="ltr">The cameras are about the size of a pager. They&rsquo;re usually worn on an officer&rsquo;s chest. They don&rsquo;t offer a 360-degree view--and there&rsquo;s no real depth perception.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We know from officers who are involved in critical incidents and frankly anyone who has a gun pointed at them, their eye, their brain immediately focuses on the barrel of the gun and what&rsquo;s happening on the sides or in the periphery, the brain doesn&rsquo;t process where a camera might,&rdquo; Smoot said.</p><p dir="ltr">And, Smoot added, a camera can&rsquo;t know when a witness or victim is feeling uncomfortable or overexposed.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think any of us want to see a YouTube video released of a police officer interviewing a rape victim for instance,&rdquo; Smoot said.</p><p dir="ltr">Local law enforcement agencies want officers to decide when cameras should be rolling. But with a history of mistrust and misconduct, that&rsquo;s likely a tough sell in Chicago.</p><p dir="ltr">State Rep. Elgie Sims raised questions about the merits of body cameras at the recent judiciary committee hearing. Sims represents Illinois&rsquo; 34th district, which covers the South and Southeast sides of Chicago and some surrounding suburbs. He said the district has some great police in the area--but there are also some bad actors.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve had my own personal experiences with police officers where I know that if there were body cameras in play, the conversation and the interaction would&rsquo;ve been a lot different,&rdquo; Sims shared.</p><p dir="ltr">Sims said it&rsquo;s very difficult to have to explain those interactions to your children. He believes body cameras have the ability to curb bad behavior on both sides: Because there are folks, Sims said, who will make false accusations against officers. But he still wouldn&rsquo;t want to give one actor the ability to control the story.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;If you have the ability to turn the camera on when it&rsquo;s the most appropriate for you, it puts a different spin on the story,&rdquo; Sims explained.</p><p dir="ltr">Instead, show the whole story, start to finish, he said, and lay out exceptions to the rules--like when it would be unsafe for the officer, a witness or a victim.</p><p dir="ltr">There are other concerns being raised by law enforcement and lawmakers. Questions about privacy protections and data storage. And, of course, the cost.</p><p dir="ltr">The cameras are between $800 and $1,200 each&nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(84, 84, 84); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; line-height: 16.5454540252686px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&mdash;&nbsp;</span>but it&rsquo;s storing what the lens captures that&rsquo;s most costly. The New Orleans Police Department, for example, estimates it will pay $2 million per year to outfit 900 officers with cameras, and most of that goes to data storage.</p><p dir="ltr">When Illinois lawmakers discussed the issue, they&rsquo;d intended to bring up body cameras during the fall veto session. But as the political landscape has gotten more complicated, House Committee Chair Rep. Elaine Nekritz said she&rsquo;d be surprised if it came up in the veto session at all.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><em>Katie O&rsquo;Brien is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her<a href="http://twitter.com/katieobez" target="_blank"> @katieobez</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 01 Dec 2014 17:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/michael-brown-law-chicagos-reception-cops-wearing-body-cameras-111173 Alderman says police overtime is main reason he voted against mayor's budget http://www.wbez.org/news/alderman-says-police-overtime-main-reason-he-voted-against-mayors-budget-111140 <p><div>Just four out of 50 aldermen voted not to approve Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s $7.3 billion budget for next year. 32nd Ward Ald. Scott Waguespack said the main reason he voted against it was unanswered questions about the Chicago Police Department&rsquo;s portion of the pie. More specifically, the department&rsquo;s growing overtime costs&mdash;and the lack of information on the expense.<p>Waguespack said over the last couple of years, he and other members of the self-titled Progressive Caucus repeatedly have asked both the budget office and the police department for more information on police overtime. And, during budget hearings last month, Waguespack directly asked Supt. Garry McCarthy for a month-by-month breakdown of overtime costs. The superintendent and budget committee chair agreed it was a request the police department could fulfill&mdash;but it didn&rsquo;t.</p>&ldquo;What we&rsquo;re just gonna vote yes, even though we don&rsquo;t know about $100 million worth of budgeting and specifics on it? That is unacceptable,&rdquo; Waguespack said. &ldquo;We actually have to vote on it, which really puts us in a horrible position.&rdquo;<p>Waguespack said he didn&rsquo;t receive anything from CPD or the city budget office on the issue before he cast his vote Wednesday. Waguespack also said he and others were mocked by fellow aldermen for asking about hiring more officers in lieu of spending millions on overtime. Other members of the council echoed the superintendent&rsquo;s stance that it would cost more to employ additional officers.</p>&ldquo;I found that pretty offensive,&rdquo; Waugespack said, &ldquo;especially when the police department superintendent himself could not provide details about how his budget worked from month to month.&rdquo;<p>Waguespack believes the lack of transparency on the subject shows that the police department is &ldquo;out of control&rdquo; in the way it&rsquo;s budgeting for overtime. In 2013, CPD budgeted $32 million for overtime but wound up spending over $100 million. This year&rsquo;s projected expense is $95 - $100 million, more than $20 million over what was budgeted.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think they&rsquo;re providing evidence to the people of the city that shows they should be allowed to continue doing this,&rdquo; Waguespack said, adding that it&rsquo;s bad policy to carry on this way.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/chart.PNG" style="height: 172px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div></div><p>Waguespack was part of a group that last year supported an amendment to spend $25 million to hire 500 new cops to deal with violent crimes&mdash;but the plan was blocked in committee. Fellow Progressive Caucus member Ald. John Arena (45th) voted for that amendment too.&nbsp; He pointed out the trend to overspend on overtime during budget hearings last month&mdash;and asked Supt. Garry McCarthy if [the proposed] $71 million was going to be sufficient for next year?</p><p>&ldquo;You know what, alderman, I can&rsquo;t answer that...I really can&rsquo;t,&rdquo; McCarthy said. &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t answer that next year we&rsquo;re going to do that much better. We&rsquo;re trying to knock it down. We&#39;re putting systems in place to do that, and slowly but surely I anticipate we&#39;re going to bring it under control.&rdquo;</p><p>WBEZ pressed the police department for an explanation as to why Waguespack&rsquo;s request was not fulfilled before the budget was called for a vote. CPD spokesman Martin Maloney wrote in a statement that the CPD receives numerous information request during the budget process. And that &ldquo;if any of these responses have not yet made it to the inquiring aldermen, they will be delivered soon.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p><p><em>Katie O&#39;Brien is a WBEZ reporter and producer. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/katieobez" target="_blank">@katieobez</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 18:09:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/alderman-says-police-overtime-main-reason-he-voted-against-mayors-budget-111140 Campus police: real deal or rent-a-cops? http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/campus-police-real-deal-or-rent-cops-111071 <p><p>Say you are driving around Chicago and you happen to run a red light. There are no Chicago police officers around, but there is a university police car right behind you. Could you still get a ticket?</p><p>That&rsquo;s exactly what Jef Johnson was wondering when he started noticing University of Chicago Police Department cars all over his Bronzeville neighborhood.</p><p>Here&rsquo;s the question Jef sent our way:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>Are police forces at local universities real police or simply security companies? How much policing power do they have?</em></p><p>We found a straightforward legal answer about how this works in Illinois. There is a spectrum of authority that ranges from security guard to all-out cop. At the far end of that spectrum are Jef&rsquo;s own University of Chicago police. He didn&rsquo;t know it at the time but UCPD is almost unique, with a particularly strong hand when it comes to power and jurisdiction. Those officers don&rsquo;t just protect students, staff and campus &mdash; the UCPD serves as the primary police force for 65,000 Chicagoans, and most are not affiliated with the university.</p><p>That prompted a question that should interest anyone, even those who never encounter these officers: How can a private police force get jurisdiction over so much of the public?</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Not your father&rsquo;s rent-a-cops</span></p><p>Let&rsquo;s start with that legal distinction we found. If you&rsquo;re anything like Jef, you probably assume that campus police officers aren&rsquo;t real police, and they have little authority other than the power to break up rowdy parties.</p><p>&ldquo;I always thought somehow that they were rent-a-cops,&rdquo; Jef said.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not always the case, according Cora Beem, who manages mandated training for the<a href="http://www.ptb.state.il.us/aboutus.htm" target="_blank"> Illinois Law Enforcement Standards &amp; Training Board</a>. She said the big distinction to be made is between campus security guards and campus police. The latter undergo the same basic training and certification that state and municipal police officers do. With that certification, they have the same authority as any other police officer in the state, even if they are privately employed.</p><p>Illinois&rsquo; public universities employ campus police, but private universities can choose to hire plain old security guards. Those guards might be armed, but they don&rsquo;t have the power to give Jef Johnson a ticket, and they certainly cannot patrol off campus.</p><p>Like many private schools in Illinois, the University of Chicago voluntarily upgraded its security force to a police force 25 years ago. According to Beem, that means they are definitely not rent-a-cops.</p><p>&ldquo;They can write you a ticket. They can arrest you,&rdquo; Beem explained. &ldquo;They can counsel and release you, so yes, they&rsquo;re real cops.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">The UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction</span></p><p><iframe height="480" src="https://mapsengine.google.com/map/u/0/embed?mid=zD1cveoHRWh8.kfGTEakNbuXk" width="620"></iframe></p><p>With more than 100 full-time officers, the University of Chicago&rsquo;s police department is one of the largest private police forces anywhere. Not only that, UCPD also has a really big patrol area &mdash; they cover 6.5 square miles, most of which is beyond the core of the University of Chicago&#39;s South Side campus.</p><p>But why can UCPD officers patrol so far from campus in the mid-South Side? According to Craig Futterman, a clinical professor of law at University of Chicago Law School, the department&rsquo;s status is almost unique.</p><p>&ldquo;The deal is that there is a city ordinance in Chicago that grants the police superintendent the power to appoint special policemen for the city of Chicago,&rdquo; he explained.</p><p>This <a href="http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Illinois/chicago_il/title4businessesoccupationsandconsumerpr/chapter4-340specialpolicemenandsecurityg?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:chicago_il$anc=JD_Ch.4-340" target="_blank">ordinance allows private police forces to assume the powers and responsibilities of municipal police</a>, not just on campus but in surrounding neighborhoods. UCPD is only one of two private forces in Chicago with this &ldquo;special police&rdquo; designation. The other force is that of Northwestern University Law School, but its <a href="http://directives.chicagopolice.org/attachments/S12-01_Att2.jpg" target="_blank">patrol area extends just a few blocks beyond its Streeterville campus </a>north of Chicago&rsquo;s Loop.</p><p>Once the ordinance was passed in 1992, UCPD negotiated its extended jurisdiction with Chicago&rsquo;s police superintendent. To the north, University of Chicago&rsquo;s main campus stops at 55th Street. UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction, however, extends all the way to 37th Street, even farther than Jef Johnson&rsquo;s home in Bronzeville.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/u%20of%20c%20charters.png" title="University of Chicago's Woodlawn Charter School, left, and Donoghue Charter School, right, are on the southern and northern ends of UCPD's extended jurisdiction. (Ellen Mayer/WBEZ) " /></div><p>Futterman says Chicago&#39;s police superintendent has granted UCPD more independence than it once had. In years&nbsp;past, university police needed administrative assistance to complete arrests.</p><p>&ldquo;The arrest, though, would be formalized and would be processed at a local chicago police department district station, usually whatever district the arrest was because UCPD operated in more than one Chicago police district,&rdquo; Futterman explained. Last year that changed. Now UCPD reports directly to the state and can process arrests independently. According to the university, this arrangement allows both departments to operate more efficiently.</p><p>Maintaining a large police force is expensive, but the university says its worth it. On this, an emailed statement from the UCPD reads: &ldquo;The extended patrol area enhances safety and security through the mid-South Side, which is home to a large number of University of Chicago faculty members, students and staff.&rdquo; The statement mentions the university&rsquo;s interest in protecting its charter schools and other properties within the extended patrol area.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">The community speaks</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/meeting%20WEB.jpg" title="University of Chicago students and South Side residents held a forum October 29, 2014, at Hyde Park's Experimental Station to discuss UCPD's presence in their neighborhoods. (WBEZ/Ellen Mayer)" /></p><p>UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction doesn&rsquo;t just include university students and employees; again, the department protects approximately 65,000 residents. How do they feel about UCPD&rsquo;s presence in their neighborhoods?</p><p>On Wednesday, October 29, <a href="http://www.experimentalstation.org/" target="_blank">Hyde Park&rsquo;s Experimental Station</a> held a forum for students and South Side residents to discuss exactly that. Organizers also invited former UCPD chief Rudy Nimocks. He was at the helm when UCPD expanded its jurisdiction. As he recalls it, the university received community support as it broadened its jurisdiction.</p><p>&ldquo;We had public hearings,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We were asked to come in. At each one of the sessions I said, &lsquo;We&rsquo;ll stay here as long as you want us.&rsquo; That&rsquo;s how it&rsquo;s been ever since.&rdquo;</p><p>Nimocks has a point. Almost every speaker at the community forum expressed gratitude that UCPD has made their neighborhoods safer. That being said, almost every speaker also had a story to tell about UCPD racially profiling black residents who live within the extended jurisdiction.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/triggs%20FOR%20WEB.jpg" style="float: left; height: 246px; width: 370px;" title="Jamel Triggs, who attended the recent forum on neighborhood UCPD presence, says he's been stopped by UCPD six times since returning from the Marine Corps in May. (Ellen Mayer/WBEZ)" />Jamel Triggs, a young black man who works at the Experimental Station&rsquo;s bike shop, said he had been stopped by UCPD six times since he returned from the Marine Corps in May. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re supposed to be protecting and serving us. That&rsquo;s supposed to be the goal,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, not the other way around.&rdquo;</p><p>According to Triggs, the neighborhood doesn&rsquo;t feel safer if he has to worry about being stopped by UCPD. He said he is also concerned about the safety of the younger kids he mentors at the bike shop. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want these kids walking around being scared of the police and being scared of the gangbangers out in the streets,&rdquo; he said, &ldquo;because I was, and it hurts.&rdquo;</p><p>A student group called South Side Solidarity Network has launched a campaign to end perceived racial profiling by UCPD. The trouble is, all their evidence is anecdotal. To firm up accusations of wrongdoing, SSSN has asked UCPD to release records indicating the race of residents the department stops and searches. So far, the department has refused.</p><p>Another emailed statement responds to accusations of racial profiling. &ldquo;The University of Chicago Police Department does not deploy tactics that support racial profiling,&rdquo; it states. &ldquo;As a department, we often and openly discuss our policing strategies to ensure our officers are not engaging deliberately or inadvertently in bias-based policing.&rdquo;</p><p>Without releasing records and data, however, UCPD is asking the public to take them at their word.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Private police and public accountability</span></p><p>This is where Jef Johnson&rsquo;s curiosity about &nbsp;potential traffic stops in Bronzeville morphed into a much bigger question about the transparency and accountability of a private police force. The 1992 Chicago ordinance that allows for the creation of special police includes technical language about certificates and licensing fees, but it doesn&rsquo;t address the public&rsquo;s right to information when a private force takes on the responsibilities of municipal police. UCPD is not a governmental agency, therefore it is not required to release records under Illinois&rsquo; Freedom of Information Act.</p><p>The University of Chicago does have a <a href="http://safety-security.uchicago.edu/police/contact_the_ucpd/complaint_process/" target="_blank">process for investigating complaints against UCPD</a>, but that process will soon get an overhaul. Until now, all investigations were performed in-house, by a fellow UCPD officer. In response to <a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140311/hyde-park/university-of-chicago-police-no-longer-accountable-petition-claims" target="_blank">criticism about UCPD&rsquo;s perceived lack of oversight</a>, the university recently announced the hiring of a new director of professional accountability. This new position will not be filled by a uniformed officer.</p><p>So what did Jef think about all this?</p><p>&ldquo;This is much bigger than I thought when I asked the question,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I worry about a private police force. It just sounds like maybe we&rsquo;re handing too much power to them.&rdquo; Jef said he is most concerned that the average Chicagoan might never know that UCPD had such a huge jurisdiction.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s scary in that sense,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m just finding this out, and I&rsquo;ve been living in this area ten years.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Now we have an answer. Who asked the question?</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jef.jpg" style="float: right; margin: 5px;" title="Jef Johnson asked our question about university police after noticing UCPD officers far from campus. (Photo courtesy of Jef Johnson)" />Judging by the number of questions Jef Johnson has submitted to our <a href="http://curiouscity.wbez.org/" target="_blank">list of question-based story pitches</a>, he is one very curious guy. (For the record, that would be seven ... and counting!) If you haven&rsquo;t run across any of his questions we haven&rsquo;t answered yet, you might remember Jef as the truck enthusiast who launched <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/question-answered-why-ban-pickups-lake-shore-drive-where-can-they-park-104631" target="_blank">our investigation about pickup truck laws in Chicago</a>.</p><p>It turns out this question about university police was also inspired by Jef&rsquo;s driving habits. He says he first began wondering about UCPD&rsquo;s authority on a day when President Barack Obama was visiting his home in the Kenwood neighborhood.</p><p>&ldquo;They blocked off a lot of my streets, so I was taking some back streets and I saw University of Chicago Police cars in areas that seem far away from the University of Chicago.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p><p>When Jef isn&rsquo;t thinking up questions for Curious City, he&rsquo;s a wedding minister employed by the city of Chicago.</p><p><em>Ellen Mayer is the Curious City intern. Follow her on Twitter at<a href="http://twitter.com/cementley" target="_blank"> @</a>ellenrebeccam.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 17:26:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/campus-police-real-deal-or-rent-cops-111071 Aldermen skip chance to ask about city's handling of police commander http://www.wbez.org/news/aldermen-skip-chance-ask-about-citys-handling-police-commander-111016 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Scott Ando HORIZONTAL.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Chicago City Council on Wednesday heard testimony from the head of the city agency that investigates police-brutality complaints. But the aldermen skipped the&nbsp;chance to ask him about the city&rsquo;s handling of a police commander who faces felony charges in a case that began with one of those complaints.</p><p>The occasion was the annual Independent Police Review Authority budget hearing. IPRA Chief Administrator Scott Ando (see photo) testified about a reduction in a&nbsp;backlog of open investigations and about new community outreach. Ando said the most important new outreach vehicles are IPRA&rsquo;s first two satellite offices, one on the West Side and another coming soon on the South Side.</p><p>The few aldermen who spoke at the hearing congratulated Ando. &ldquo;You&rsquo;re doing more with less,&rdquo; Ald. Matthew O&rsquo;Shea (19th Ward) said.</p><p>More notable was what did not come up. Aldermen asked no questions about IPRA&rsquo;s performance investigating fatal shootings by Chicago officers or about the number of excessive-force complaints the agency has sustained.</p><p>And they did not ask about Glenn Evans, the embattled commander, who allegedly rammed his service pistol down an arrested man&rsquo;s throat last year. In April, a test showed the arrestee&rsquo;s DNA on the gun. The test led Ando to recommend that police Supt. Garry McCarthy strip Evans of his police powers, pending the investigation&rsquo;s outcome. WBEZ revealed the case in July.</p><p>Despite IPRA&#39;s recomendation, McCarthy, backed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, continued to publicly support Evans. They left him in command of the Harrison District until the criminal charges August 27.</p><p>Outside the hearing, Ald. Howard Brookins Jr. (21st) said the Emanuel administration&rsquo;s handling of Evans &ldquo;sends a signal to the community that things have not changed since the Burge era,&rdquo; referring to former Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge, implicated in the torture of dozens of African-American men.</p><p>&ldquo;This behavior appears to be a systemic problem in the police department,&rdquo; Brookins said. &ldquo;The superintendent of police and all of the authorities have to show that this conduct will no longer be tolerated. And until there are outward expressions and actions to back that up, it is going to be hard to get away from that impression of the community just by opening a few satellite offices.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/aldermen-skip-chance-ask-about-citys-handling-police-commander-111016 Prosecutors want more of indicted police commander's 'bad acts' in court http://www.wbez.org/news/prosecutors-want-more-indicted-police-commanders-bad-acts-court-110987 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/glen_evans8 SQUARE.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><br />Cook County prosecutors on Thursday told a judge they would try to bring other &ldquo;crimes and bad acts&rdquo; into a felony case against a Chicago police commander.</p><p>Glenn Evans, photographed on his way out of the hearing by Charlie Billups for WBEZ, allegedly jammed his gun into an arrested man&rsquo;s mouth last year, pressed a taser to his crotch and threatened his life. Last month Evans pleaded not guilty to nine counts of aggravated battery and official misconduct.</p><p>During his 28 years in the police department, Evans has drawn at least 52 brutality complaints. Two led to 15-day suspensions from duty. Six others have led to federal lawsuits that the city paid to settle.</p><p>Evans&rsquo; attorney, Laura Morask, calls that history irrelevant. She says what matters are the allegations in the case&rsquo;s indictment, which focuses on the incident last year.</p><p>The commander, meanwhile, is trying to find out how a DNA report in the case went public. Morask is demanding records from WBEZ and the Independent Police Review Authority, one of several government entities that had the report. At the hearing, Morask said the records would show bias on the part of the case&rsquo;s investigators.</p><p>The judge, Rosemary Grant Higgins, pushed back. She said she would hear more from all sides but warned, &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not this court&rsquo;s job to plug leaks or interfere with the press.&rdquo;</p><p>From our West Side bureau, WBEZ&#39;s Chip Mitchell joined the&nbsp;&ldquo;Afternoon Shift&rdquo;&nbsp;with this update (click the photo above). For background, see all <a href="http://www.wbez.org/tags/glenn-evans">our coverage about the Evans case</a>.</p></p> Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:16:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/prosecutors-want-more-indicted-police-commanders-bad-acts-court-110987