WBEZ | Chicago Police Department http://www.wbez.org/tags/chicago-police-department Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Three police officers in Asian salon raid recommended for suspension http://www.wbez.org/news/three-police-officers-asian-salon-raid-recommended-suspension-112786 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Salon IPRA.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><em>Updated 1:30 p.m.</em></p><p dir="ltr">The agency that reviews allegations of police misconduct in Chicago has recommended suspension for three officers in a racially-charged police raid of a West Town tanning salon. The salon manager, Chinese-American Jessica Klyzek, alleged that officers beat her, verbally abused her and that one officer threatened to put her in a UPS box and send her &ldquo;back to wherever the f---&rdquo; she came from.</p><p dir="ltr">The investigation by the Independent Police Review Authority centered on twelve named and one unknown officer alleged to have raided the salon on July 31, 2013, for suspected prostitution services. <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2633418/Video-shows-abusive-Chicago-police-threatening-deport-woman-UPS-box-f-came-from.html#v-3577642050001">A surveillance video of the incident</a>, shared widely online and via social media, prompted outrage among Asian-Americans in Chicago who saw the police actions as racially-tinged and demanded greater accountability from the city.</p><p dir="ltr">According to Public Affairs Director Larry Merritt, IPRA has recommended a 25-day suspension for Officer Gerald Di Pasquale, who allegedly made the UPS remark; an 8-day suspension for Officer Frank Messina who allegedly struck Klyzek on the head while she was handcuffed and on her knees; and a one day suspension for Sergeant Brian Blackman for failing to stop and report Di Pasquale&rsquo;s verbal abuse. IPRA issued its report on June 19.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s absurd,&rdquo; said Torreya Hamilton, a Civil Rights attorney who represented Ms. Klyzek in a federal lawsuit against the city and ten officers that was settled last year for $150 thousand. Citing a letter that Mayor Rahm Emanuel sent to the owner of the salon after the raid, Hamilton said the public should have expected harsher discipline for the officers.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Mayor Emanuel watched this video and publicly decried the officers&rsquo; behavior as despicable. and yet the internal workings of the police department still did not see fit to fire these officers.&rdquo; Hamilton, who has represented several plaintiffs in lawsuits alleging police brutality, said she has long believed that IPRA does not operate truly independently of the Chicago Police Department.</p><p dir="ltr">According to Merritt, the matter now rests with Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy. As a result of mediated settlements between IPRA and the three officers, Merritt said McCarthy can either implement IPRA&rsquo;s recommendations or fire the officers.</p><p dir="ltr">In an e-mail, the Chicago Police Department said the recommendations are still pending final disposition, and that two of the officers are on active duty and one is retired. A spokesperson for the department said he could not verify which of the officers is retired.</p><p dir="ltr">In total, IPRA sustained six claims of abuse or misconduct out of 49, finding all other alleged actions by the police to be justified or unfounded.</p><p dir="ltr">Andy Kang, the Legal Director at Asian Americans Advancing Justice Chicago, said IPRA&rsquo;s recommendations are unacceptable. &ldquo;As Asian-Americans, we&rsquo;re constantly viewed as perpetual foreigners,&rdquo; he said, &ldquo;and (in) our society immigrants, women, people who are undocumented are continually devalued as human beings, and I think this slight punishment is unfortunately evidence of that problem.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Klyzek is an American citizen who has lived in the U.S. for a decade, according to her lawyer.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/wbezoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 01 Sep 2015 11:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/three-police-officers-asian-salon-raid-recommended-suspension-112786 Morning Shift: August 21, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-21/morning-shift-august-21-2015-112703 <p><p>On one side you have aspiring data scientists eager to put their knowledge to work. On the other side, you have non-profits and other groups trying to come up with innovative ways to make the world a better place. We talk to a couple of guys who are putting those sides together at the University of Chicago. Then, remembering your lines for a play is hard. Remembering them without any cues from other actors has got to be really hard. Actor Ronald Keaton talks about flying solo on stage when he becomes Winston Churchill. Plus, some soaring harmonies from the DuPont brothers. And we start the show by speaking with Chicago Police Department communications director about the department&#39;s tweetalong.</p></p> Fri, 21 Aug 2015 12:43:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-21/morning-shift-august-21-2015-112703 Chicago police host “tweetalong” to show a night on the job http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-21/chicago-police-host-%E2%80%9Ctweetalong%E2%80%9D-show-night-job-112702 <p><p>The Chicago and Baltimore Police Departments teamed up Thursday night and hosted a tweet-along...a virtual ride-along for people to get an inside look into a night on the job for a police officer. Many residents are pushing for Chicago and other departments to be more transparent. But online activists, including the hacking group Anonymous, used the tweetalong as an opportunity to criticize the police. Meanwhile, at last night&rsquo;s Police Board meeting, a group of protesters continued to call for detective Dante Servin to be fired for the shooting death of an unarmed woman, Rekia Boyd. The meeting was shut down, after just 20 minutes. Anthony Guglielmi, communications director for the Chicago Police Department, joins us with more. (Photo: Flickr/Arvell Dorsey Jr.)</p></p> Fri, 21 Aug 2015 11:27:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-21/chicago-police-host-%E2%80%9Ctweetalong%E2%80%9D-show-night-job-112702 Fired investigator: Policy change could help cover up police misconduct http://www.wbez.org/news/fired-investigator-policy-change-could-help-cover-police-misconduct-112614 <p><p>I spent months trying to reach Lorenzo Davis, an investigator at the Independent Police Review Authority, the Chicago agency that looks into shootings by officers and police-brutality complaints. I had heard that Davis, a former police commander for the city, was clashing with his bosses, the folks in charge of the agency.<br /><br />When Davis finally called me back last month, IPRA had fired him. He had something big to tell me, and there was written evidence.<br /><br />The bosses, according to his final performance evaluation, had ordered him to change findings in at least a dozen cases, all shootings or alleged excessive-force incidents.</p><p>His findings were that the officers had violated laws or police department rules, he said. The bosses included Scott M. Ando, promoted to be chief administrator by Mayor Rahm Emanuel last year.<br /><br />Davis also wanted to tell me about IPRA&rsquo;s internal procedure for handling disagreements, between the investigator and superiors, about a case&rsquo;s findings.<br /><br />For years, the procedure was for the investigator to attend a meeting with the higher-ups. &ldquo;You would discuss the case and come to some sort of consensus,&rdquo; Davis said. &ldquo;But if you did not agree or refused to change your findings, there would be what we call an internal non-concurrence.&rdquo;<br /><br />The &ldquo;non-concurrence&rdquo; meant a boss was overturning the findings with a written explanation. That memo &mdash; an actual sheet of paper &mdash; would go on top of the case file. And the investigator&rsquo;s findings would stay in the file for all to see.<br /><br />&ldquo;This year,&rdquo; Davis said, &ldquo;Ando decided that he did not want to write a non-concurrence.&rdquo;<br /><br />The new policy, disseminated by Ando in March, says investigators &ldquo;do not have the right to refuse to make changes as directed by a superior. Anyone who refuses . . . will be considered insubordinate and may be subject to discipline.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-10%20at%2011.51.32%20PM.png" style="height: 309px; width: 620px;" title="Screencap of an email informing IPRA staff of the March policy change." /></div><p><br />The policy&rsquo;s purpose was to eliminate certain paper trails, Davis said. &ldquo;There would not be a record of what the findings were, initially, before they were changed.&rdquo;<br /><br />IPRA&rsquo;s chief administrator, of course, has always made final decisions about the agency&rsquo;s findings.</p><p>But Davis pointed out that some of these cases end up in court, which can be problematic. &ldquo;Often times, investigators and supervisors are called to do either depositions or actually appear in court to testify about a finding that they were forced to make [and] did not initially make and that they do not believe in.&rdquo;<br /><br />Davis said his bosses ordered him to change findings in six shooting cases, three of them fatal.<br /><br />Those are among nearly 400 shootings by officers that IPRA has investigated since its 2007 creation. The agency has found that just one, an off-duty incident, was unjustified.<br /><br />We asked IPRA to explain how it handles internal disagreements but did not get answers. We kept asking for the information and went ahead with our story, which broke the news of Davis&rsquo;s termination and led to a protest at the agency&rsquo;s headquarters three days later.<br /><br />&ldquo;The firing of Lorenzo Davis is yet another example of how IPRA continues to cover up crimes by officers of the Chicago Police Department,&rdquo; a protest leader said.</p><div class="image-insert-image">Later that day, IPRA delivered a written statement from Ando that said some of Davis&rsquo;s findings left out important evidence. The statement also included this line: &ldquo;No one at IPRA has ever been asked to change their findings.&rdquo;</div><p>That left us scratching our heads. We had already reported about Davis&rsquo;s final performance evaluation, which focused on his resistance to &ldquo;management directing him to change improper findings.&rdquo; We had seen the policy Ando had sent out, which threatened discipline for any investigator who refused to change a finding.<br /><br />Why would an agency&rsquo;s chief ban something he says never happens?<br /><br />We did everything we could to get an answer from the city. We called IPRA and Mayor Emanuel&rsquo;s office. We sent written questions to both. We asked to interview Ando.<br /><br />Almost a week later, IPRA sent us what it called a &ldquo;revised&rdquo; statement from Ando. It was the same as the other one &mdash; except it was missing the part about the agency never ordering investigators to change their findings.<br /><br />That left us wondering whether IPRA ought to be changing an investigator&rsquo;s findings in the first place.<br />&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Ando8cropsmall.jpg" style="float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" title="Scott M. Ando, IPRA’s chief administrator. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)" />Ando reports directly to Emanuel so we took the question to one of the mayor&rsquo;s press conferences.<br /><br />Emanuel listened to the question but did not specifically answer it. Instead he referred to a study he had commissioned. He called the study, completed last December, &ldquo;a total review of both IPRA, the Police Board, any kind of the oversight of police actions and misconduct.&rdquo;<br /><br />So we went to the study&rsquo;s main author, Ron Safer, a former top official of the U.S. attorney&rsquo;s office in Chicago.<br /><br />We asked again whether IPRA should be directing investigators to change their findings or whether it should stick to the practice in which a boss who disagrees with an investigator writes up an explanation for overturning the findings and leaves them in the file.</p><p>Safer pointed out that his study did not look at these questions. But he shared what he called his &ldquo;uninformed&rdquo; view: &ldquo;Often these are investigations where there are shades of gray and, always, where there are two sides to the story. The ultimate conclusion can be a matter of honest disagreement.&rdquo;<br /><br />&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a good idea to have the investigators&rsquo; original thoughts &mdash; at least factual findings &mdash; in the record because the investigator is the closest person to the facts,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />Safer, again, is the expert the mayor led us to.<br /><br />And he is not the only one with that view. We found police-accountability agencies in other big cities that handle their internal disagreements that way. The Chicago Police Department&rsquo;s Internal Affairs Division does too.<br /><br />At IPRA, nevertheless, an investigator&rsquo;s findings will not stay in the record unless the agency&rsquo;s leaders want them to.<br /><br />That brings us back to Lorenzo Davis, the investigator IPRA fired after he did not go along with the bosses. &ldquo;Usually what they want said is [a finding] that the officer had a reasonable fear for his life and, therefore, the officer used deadly force,&rdquo; he said.<br /><br />In some of his shooting cases, Davis insists, deadly force was not necessary.</p><p>What worries him now is not just that those findings will be overturned but that they will be erased &mdash; that there will be no sign they ever existed.</p><p><em>WBEZ&rsquo;s Lauren Chooljian contributed. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 10 Aug 2015 23:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/fired-investigator-policy-change-could-help-cover-police-misconduct-112614 Deal allows independent stop-and-frisk evaluations of CPD http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-07/deal-allows-independent-stop-and-frisk-evaluations-cpd-112592 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/stopandfrisk FlickrMichael Gil.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Under Chicago law, police can pat down &mdash; or frisk &mdash; anyone they stop on the street. But according to the American Civil Liberties Union, most of those stopped and frisked have been African American males...and that looks a lot like racial profiling.</p><p>The Chicago Police Department has said it does not allow racial profiling. Nonetheless, the CPD has agreed to make changes to its policy after an ACLU investigation raised questions about the legality of certain police stops. As part of an agreement announced Friday morning between the ACLU and the police department, there will be an independent evaluation of CPD&rsquo;s practices and procedures. There will also be more transparency and public disclosure when it comes to police stops, as well as additional training for officers.</p><p>We speak with Harvey Grossman, legal director for the ACLU&rsquo;s chapter here in Illinois, about the deal, and why it was needed in the first place.&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 07 Aug 2015 11:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-07/deal-allows-independent-stop-and-frisk-evaluations-cpd-112592 Chicago Police wraps up listening tour http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-21/chicago-police-wraps-listening-tour-112438 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/listening tour APFile.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Last night was the final stop for Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy&rsquo;s listening tour. This one took place on the city&rsquo;s south side: Temple of Glory Church on 95th Street in the Roseland neighborhood. Most of these dozen or so meetings have taken place in churches and, like every other meeting, this one was invite only. WBEZ&rsquo;s Patrick Smith was at last night&rsquo;s event. He joins us with a recap of the listening tour and an update on what happens next. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-21/chicago-police-wraps-listening-tour-112438 City fires investigator who found cops at fault in shootings http://www.wbez.org/news/city-fires-investigator-who-found-cops-fault-shootings-112423 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Lorenzo Davis 3 crop.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A Chicago investigator who determined that several civilian shootings by police officers were unjustified was fired after resisting orders to reverse those findings, according to internal records of his agency obtained by WBEZ.</p><p>Scott M. Ando, chief administrator of the city&rsquo;s Independent Police Review Authority, informed its staff in a July 9 email that the agency no longer employed supervising investigator Lorenzo Davis, 65, a former Chicago police commander. IPRA investigates police-brutality complaints and recommends any punishment.</p><p>Davis&rsquo;s termination came less than two weeks after top IPRA officials, evaluating Davis&rsquo;s job performance, accused him of &ldquo;a clear bias against the police&rdquo; and called him &ldquo;the only supervisor at IPRA who resists making requested changes as directed by management in order to reflect the correct finding with respect to OIS,&rdquo; as officer-involved shootings are known in the agency.</p><p>Since its 2007 creation, IPRA has investigated nearly 400 civilian shootings by police and found one to be unjustified.</p><p>WBEZ asked to interview Ando, promoted last year by Mayor Rahm Emanuel to head the agency. The station also sent Ando&rsquo;s spokesman questions about sticking points between IPRA investigators and managers, about the agency&rsquo;s process for overturning investigative findings, and about the reasons the agency had reversed many of Davis&rsquo;s findings.</p><p>The spokesman said there would be no interview and sent this statement: &ldquo;This is a personnel matter that would be inappropriate to address through the media, though the allegations are baseless and without merit. IPRA is committed to conducting fair, unbiased, objective, thorough and timely investigations of allegations of police misconduct and officer-involved shootings.&rdquo;<br /><br />The performance evaluation covered 19 months and concluded that Davis &ldquo;displays a complete lack of objectivity combined with a clear bias against the police in spite of his own lengthy police career.&rdquo;</p><p>Davis served in the police department for 23 years. As a commander, he headed detective units, the department&rsquo;s Austin district and, finally, its public-housing unit. He retired from the department in 2004.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="100" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215914655&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=true&amp;show_comments=false&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">▲&nbsp;</span><strong>LISTEN: </strong><em>Lorenzo Davis told host Melba Lara in a July 22 interview that he hopes there is a federal investigation into his claims about the Independent Police Review Authority.</em><br /><br />&ldquo;I did not like the direction the police department had taken,&rdquo; Davis said. &ldquo;It appeared that officers were doing whatever they wanted to do. The discipline was no longer there.&rdquo;<br /><br />After leaving the department, Davis says, he kept thinking about police conduct, especially shootings. Davis, who had a law degree, says he wondered how often the officers really faced life-threatening dangers that would justify deadly force.<br /><br />&ldquo;If there are a few bad police officers who have committed some shootings that are unnecessary or bad then it erodes the public&rsquo;s confidence in all the other police officers out there,&rdquo; Davis said.<br /><br />A series of police-conduct scandals, meanwhile, led Mayor Richard M. Daley to move a unit called the Office of Professional Standards from the police department to his direct control. He renamed the unit the Independent Police Review Authority.<br /><br />IPRA hired Davis as an investigator in 2008. Two years later, around the time he completed a master&rsquo;s degree in criminal justice, IPRA promoted him to lead a team of five investigators.</p><p>Through most of his IPRA tenure, Davis&rsquo;s performance evaluations showered him with praise. They called him an &ldquo;effective leader&rdquo; and &ldquo;excellent team player.&rdquo;</p><p>The final evaluation, issued June 26, said he &ldquo;is clearly not a team player.&rdquo;<br /><br />Davis, who earned $93,024 a year in the job, says he applied at different points for higher IPRA posts, including chief administrator. He says getting passed over for them did not affect his performance.<br /><br />&ldquo;Things began to turn sour, I would say, within the last year,&rdquo; Davis said. &ldquo;Chief Administrator Ando began to say that he wanted me to change my findings.&rdquo;<br /><br />Davis says he helped investigate more than a dozen shootings by police at the agency. He says his superiors had no objections when his team recommended exonerating officers. The objections came, he says, after each finding that a shooting was unjustified. He says there were six of those cases.<br /><br />&ldquo;They have shot people dead when they did not have to shoot,&rdquo; Davis said about those officers. &ldquo;They were not in reasonable fear for their lives. The evidence shows that the officer knew, or should have known, that the person who they shot was not armed or did not pose a threat to them or could have been apprehended by means short of deadly force.&rdquo;<br /><br />Davis says he can&rsquo;t go into detail about the cases because some are still pending and because the city considers them confidential. Emanuel&rsquo;s office did not respond to WBEZ questions about Davis&rsquo;s termination or about IPRA&rsquo;s record investigating shootings by officers.</p><p>Former IPRA Chief Administrator Ilana Rosenzweig, who hired both Ando and Davis before leaving the agency in 2013, declined to comment about the termination.<br /><br />Anthony Finnell, a former IPRA supervising investigator, says he considers Davis a mentor. He says the two would confer on cases.</p><p>&ldquo;When the investigators would bring cases to us, as supervisors, we would look, first, to see if the officer was justified in his actions,&rdquo; said Finnell, who now heads a police-oversight agency in Oakland, California.<br /><br />Finnell, who left IPRA last year, says the agency&rsquo;s investigators were better situated than its management to size up a case.</p><p>&ldquo;Many times we would look at the situation and say, &lsquo;Well, I don&rsquo;t think that reasoning makes sense or that officer is not being as truthful as I think he should be,&rsquo; &rdquo; Finnell said. &ldquo;In fact, many times we may have thought they had lied.&rdquo;<br /><br />Finnell, who worked at IPRA only 15 months, says he was never asked to change findings. If he had been, he says, he would have followed Davis&rsquo;s example.</p><p>&ldquo;As an investigator,&rdquo; Finnell said, &ldquo;I wouldn&rsquo;t just change findings because someone told me to.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/city-fires-investigator-who-found-cops-fault-shootings-112423 Despite tensions, city lets police-community meetings dwindle http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-tensions-city-lets-police-community-meetings-dwindle-112340 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/CAPS-Lindsey-regular.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago shootings and murders are up this year. In many cases, police officers are having a hard time finding witnesses willing to talk.</p><p>This is not a new problem. It&rsquo;s a reason Chicago helped pioneer what&rsquo;s known as community policing &mdash; the sort of crime fighting that focuses on trust between officers and residents. But a cornerstone of that approach is crumbling, according to internal police numbers obtained by WBEZ.</p><p>That cornerstone consists of meetings that bring together residents and cops across the city. The meetings, designed to take place monthly in each of the city&rsquo;s 280 police beats, made Chicago policing a national model in the 1990s.</p><p>The city called its approach the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy. CAPS beat-meeting attendance peaked in 2002, when the citywide total was 70,024.</p><p>Since then turnout has fallen by more than two-thirds, according to the police figures, obtained through an Illinois Freedom of Information Act request. During Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s administration, it has dropped every year. Last year&rsquo;s attendance &mdash; 20,420 &mdash; was less than half the turnout in 2010, the year before Emanuel took office.</p><p data-pym-src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/caps-attendance/child.html">&nbsp;</p><script src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/caps-attendance/js/lib/pym.js" type="text/javascript"></script><p>One reason for the decline could be simple. Compared to when Chicago launched CAPS, crime is down. So residents have fewer problems to take to the police.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not the whole story. Over the years, the city has cut down on CAPS officers and the program&rsquo;s paid civilian organizers. It has cut overtime for officers to attend the beat meetings. And it has cut the number of meetings. Residents have fewer opportunities to participate.</p><p>&ldquo;Most police officers hated beat meetings,&rdquo; said former Chicago cop Howard Lindsey, who helped with CAPS in the city&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood before retiring from the police department last year. &ldquo;The officers didn&rsquo;t believe in CAPS. They just felt like it was a waste of time to actually go to these meetings and listen to the citizens complain.&rdquo;</p><p>Emanuel says the city remains committed to community policing. This year he created a top police position to focus on it. Police Supt. Garry McCarthy, for his part, is on an &ldquo;outreach tour&rdquo; this summer. The tour consists of closed-door meetings with residents of more than a dozen neighborhoods.</p><p>The department says it is also developing a new community-policing strategy, but so far is not talking with WBEZ about what role the CAPS beat meetings would play.</p><p>Our audio story (listen above) looks at the status of the beat meetings through the eyes of Lindsey as well as a former civilian beat-meeting facilitator in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, a Loyola University Chicago sociologist who studied CAPS after working three decades as a Chicago police officer, and a current beat-meeting attendee in West Humboldt Park.</p><p>That attendee, an elementary-school clerk named Antwan McHenry, says the beat meetings could play an important role as police officers face more suspicion due to events in places like Ferguson and Baltimore.</p><p>&ldquo;African Americans have been taught things like, &lsquo;You don&rsquo;t talk to police, you don&rsquo;t snitch,&rsquo; &rdquo; McHenry said. &ldquo;So if you grow up thinking that, you don&rsquo;t get to see the other part &mdash; like when, if your neighbor gets shot, you have to work hand-in-hand with the police to solve murders and to solve crimes.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 Jul 2015 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-tensions-city-lets-police-community-meetings-dwindle-112340 'A gun that could never have been fired' http://www.wbez.org/news/gun-could-never-have-been-fired-112226 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/photo 4-1.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Calvin Cross was two blocks from his home on a spring night in 2011. He had just returned from Job Corps, where he earned a certificate for brick laying; and had recently learned that his longtime girlfriend was pregnant. After finishing dinner at home, where he lived with his mom and two older sisters, Cross went out with a friend Ryan Cornell. Both men were 19 years old&mdash;and black&mdash;walking in the West Pullman neighborhood.</p><p>Just about a month later, Cross&rsquo; girlfriend Tunoka Jett would give birth to a baby boy: A son Cross would never meet.</p><p>Near the corner of 124th and Wallace streets, a Chicago police car with three on-duty officers inside pulled up next to the teens. The police officers would later say they were responding to reports of gunshots in the area&mdash;and that Cross was holding his waistband, as if he had a gun.</p><p>The chronology of events after the car pulled up is in dispute&mdash;and will never be settled&mdash;but new light has been shed on the case by a <a href="http://t.co/hybHJukcUj" target="_blank">recently released report</a> from the city agency charged with investigating police misconduct.</p><p>What is known is that, at some point, the officers got out of the car, Cross started running&mdash;and the three cops chased him, firing 45 shots and hitting Cross five times.</p><p>According to the Cook County Medical Examiner&rsquo;s report, a bullet to Cross&rsquo; face was the shot that ultimately killed him.</p><p>&ldquo;My client runs, Ryan Cornell stays put. The three officers chase my client, Ryan Cornell goes back to my client&rsquo;s home and tells his mom they&rsquo;re shooting at Calvin,&rdquo; Cross family attorney Tony Thedford said of that night.</p><p>And Cross&rsquo; mom, Dana, said she heard the gunshots from her home.</p><p>Thedford said Calvin Cross&rsquo; fatal decision to run from the police, rather than stay put like Cornell, was the result of Cross&rsquo; relative inexperience dealing with police.</p><p>The 19-year-old had never been arrested; his mom described her youngest child as a &ldquo;homebody.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;He was an easygoing person, well liked&hellip;he was in the men&rsquo;s choir at our church,&rdquo; Dana Cross said. &ldquo;He didn&rsquo;t hang out&hellip;he liked to stay at home [and] play games.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago Police Department referred questions about the shooting to the city&rsquo;s law department; and an attorney for the three cops involved declined a request to interview the officers. So this account is based on federal court filings, testimony by a city attorney, a report from the Independent Police Review Authority, Cross&rsquo; mother and her family&rsquo;s attorneys.</p><p>The officers involved said while Cross was running, he opened fire, forcing them to shoot back.</p><p>The Independent Police Review Authority&mdash;the agency charged with investigating officer-involved shootings&mdash;ruled the shooting justified; but the final report, released Friday, notes that the weapon recovered was never fired, directly contradicting the officers&rsquo; version of events.</p><p>&ldquo;The detectives&rsquo; Supplementary Report indicates that, although the involved officers all reported that Subject 1 fired at them, the recovered revolver was fully-loaded,&rdquo; the IPRA report reads, and goes on to say, that &ldquo;a gunshot residue examination on [Cross] was negative.&rdquo;</p><p>And the Illinois State Police Crime Lab ruled that the gun recovered at the scene was &ldquo;inoperable.&rdquo;</p><p>Also, family attorney Torreya Hamilton said there were no fingerprints on the gun.<br /><br />&ldquo;Why, when the police department learned that these police officers were fired at with a gun that was impossible to be fired, why weren&rsquo;t they looked at for criminal charges?&rdquo; Hamilton asked. &ldquo;Unless you have a video, apparently&hellip;you&rsquo;re not going to be looked at for criminal charges if you&rsquo;re a police officer. And these police officers are still out on the street. They&rsquo;re still telling the story about being shot at with a gun that could never have been fired at them.&rdquo;</p><p>And Thedford says the unusable weapon found by police was hundreds of feet away from the crime scene, and out of Cross&rsquo; path.</p><p>&ldquo;Where he was found dead was at a fence. Our belief is that he was trying to get past that fence so he could keep running,&rdquo; Thedford said. &ldquo;We believe, and will always believe, that our client ran because he was afraid. He saw this weapon and he ran.&rdquo;</p><p>On May 31, 2012, exactly one year after Cross&rsquo; death, his family filed a federal lawsuit against the city and the officers involved. And on Wednesday, the Chicago City Council approved a $2 million payout to settle the case.</p><p>Thedford said Cross&rsquo; son, now 3 years old, was the impetus for settling a case they had long expected would go to trial.</p><p>And after taking out attorneys fees, all of the remaining settlement will go to the child - named Calvin, after his father - in monthly payments to a trust until he turns 30.</p><p>&ldquo;At least I know he&rsquo;ll be taken care of,&rdquo; his grandmother said. &ldquo;But if I could give all that money back so he can have his daddy back, that&rsquo;s what I&rsquo;d do.&rdquo;</p><p>Cross said she is too angry to talk about the fact that the shooting was ruled justified and the officers remain on the force. She&rsquo;s also haunted by the lack of attention paid to her son&rsquo;s death.</p><p>&ldquo;No police officer ever came to talk to me. No news people ever came to talk to me. Nobody. It&rsquo;s like my son was shot and killed and it&rsquo;s just that&rsquo;s it, that&rsquo;s all,&rdquo; Cross said.</p><p>Thedford thinks that silence is because of who Calvin was: A 19-year-old black man on the South Side of Chicago.</p><p>&ldquo;Is there an expectation that he&rsquo;s a part of some faceless, nameless horde that they always get shot, they&rsquo;re always up to something, there&rsquo;s always some assumption that he must have been up to no good? I think the reason that it was immediately believed that whatever version the police officers gave was correct is because he fit the mold,&rdquo; Thedford said.</p><p>On the same day the city approved the Cross settlement, the city council also agreed to pay $1 million to settle a lawsuit over the 2010 death of Joshua Madison. Taking these most recent settlements into account, the city has paid out a total of $8 million so far this year for Chicago police shootings.</p><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ Producer/Reporter. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/pksmid">@pksmid</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/gun-could-never-have-been-fired-112226 CPD 'listening tour' fuzzy on details http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/mccarthylistens.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cities across the country have been ripped apart by violent encounters between police and citizens.</p><p>Ferguson had Michael Brown, New York had Eric Garner, Baltimore had Freddie Gray &mdash; and Chicago had 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by a Chicago cop last October. There&rsquo;s also Chicago Police Commander Glenn Evans, indicted for allegedly ramming his gun into someone&rsquo;s mouth. And Detective Dante Servin, acquitted of killing 22-year-old Rekia Boyd.</p><p>That&rsquo;s part of the reason why the city&rsquo;s top cop, Supt. Garry McCarthy, recently announced a big, city-wide listening tour. It&rsquo;s a major initiative for the police department to communicate with the public.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a big anti-police sentiment both locally and nationally. And we&rsquo;re dealing with protests on a daily basis,&rdquo; McCarthy said in the Spring. &nbsp;</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-11/morning-shift-looking-mccarthys-listening-tour-112175"><strong>Morning Shift: Looking into McCarthy&#39;s listening tour</strong></a></p></blockquote><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">After Detective Servin was found not guilty by a judge in April, anger in Chicago reached a high point. And that&rsquo;s when McCarthy came out with a plan to repair the relationship between cops and residents: He called it the &ldquo;CPD Neighborhood Outreach Tour.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The idea was the department would open up a big public dialogue. McCarthy and police commanders would personally meet with people and really listen.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Mayor Rahm Emanuel threw his support behind the initiative.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;The listening tour, not just by Superintendent McCarthy, it&rsquo;s also by each of the commanders in the districts, is all a part of effort of building trust and relationships that are essential part of community policing,&rdquo; Emanuel said.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">There were no details about when the tour was starting, no big announcement about how anybody from the neighborhoods could take part. But then, all of a sudden at a Chicago City Club event in May, McCarthy said the listening tour was already underway &mdash; and that it was a big hit.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m going out every single day to community meetings, sitting down with small groups of residents without the press, and we have conversations and we listen to people,&rdquo; McCarthy told a room full of business and civic leaders.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">But even after McCarthy gave his speech at the City Club, there was still no way to find out where and when the events of this big, public listening tour were happening.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">WBEZ has been trying to find out more about this outreach tour ever since it was first announced: We&rsquo;ve called, we&rsquo;ve emailed about half a dozen times and we&rsquo;ve asked in person. The main question is &mdash; where are these events listed for the public?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The tour is supposed to be a chance to hear from the public &mdash; to get &lsquo;resident feedback&rsquo; and to &lsquo;foster ongoing dialogue.&rsquo; But if people don&rsquo;t know about it, why do it?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Residents aren&rsquo;t the only ones struggling to get this information. People you&rsquo;d presume would absolutely know don&rsquo;t either.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;Seems like it&rsquo;s some kind of secret mission,&rdquo; said Ald. Pat Dowell, who represents the 3rd Ward on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">She said she would love to advertise the listening tour to her constituents, but she&rsquo;s been kept in the dark.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know anything about how they&rsquo;re organized, what he is trying to accomplish,&rdquo; Ald. Dowell lamented.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">An officer in charge of community relations for her district said she didn&rsquo;t know when the meetings were happening in her district. In fact, she already missed the one in her own district &mdash; she only found out about it from a resident &mdash; afterwards.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Dowell&rsquo;s fellow South Side alderman, Roderick Sawyer (6), said he got a list of the listening tour stops after he specifically asked the police. But he said he doesn&rsquo;t think most people have any way of finding out about the events.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Ald. Sawyer said he suspects the police want to handpick their audience, which he said defeats the whole purpose.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><a name="list"></a>Remaining Dialogue Tour Events</span></p><table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width: 620px;" width="883"><thead><tr><th scope="col" style="width: 79px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">District</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 144px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Date</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 76px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Time</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 416px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Location</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 168px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Contact</span></p></th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, June 11</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Garfield Hospital, 520 N. Ridgeway</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Chuck Levy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 17</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Urban League, 4510 S. Michigan</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Roderick Hawkins</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>014</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 24</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation, 2550 W. North</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Danny Serrano</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, Jul 2</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>People&#39;s Church of the Harvest, 3570 W. Fifth Avenue</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Eaddy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>010</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Tuesday, July 7</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Lawndale Christian Development Corporation,</p><p>2111 S. Hamlin Ave (Firehouse Community Arts Center) Ogden and Hamlin</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Tracie Worthy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, July 9</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>KLEO Community Family Life Center, 119 E. Garfield Blvd.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Torrey Barrett</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>007</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 13</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Embassy Church, 5848 S. Princeton</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Bishop Peecher</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>015</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, July 15</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Mars Hill Baptist Church, 5916 W. Lake St</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Stowers</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>005</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 20</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Temple of Glory Church 311 E. 95<sup>th</sup> St.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Wilson</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him </em><a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid"><em>@pksmid</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171