WBEZ | CPD http://www.wbez.org/tags/cpd Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Crowded Chicago Police office forces sex offenders to violate parole http://www.wbez.org/news/crowded-chicago-police-office-forces-sex-offenders-violate-parole-109798 <p><p dir="ltr">The Chicago Police Department forces sex offenders to violate their parole. I know that sounds crazy. I thought it was crazy when I first heard about it, but I&rsquo;ve spent a lot of time in the last two weeks with sex offenders waiting -- for hours and hours -- outside police headquarters and watching a Kafkaesque process play out.</p><p dir="ltr">Every morning sex offenders start lining up at 6, while it&rsquo;s still dark out, sometimes even earlier than that, and I probably don&rsquo;t have to remind you how cold it&rsquo;s been this winter. Tracy Wright was one of a couple dozen men on a recent morning.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s freezing out here,&rdquo; said Wright. &ldquo;Man, I had frost bites today. Somebody gave me some gloves to put on my hands.&rdquo;</p><p>It&rsquo;s often like this, with the men stomping their feet on the cold concrete, trying to stay warm. For some reason, there&rsquo;s no waiting room. A small vestibule acts as a makeshift waiting room but there are 20 guys stuck outside. By 10:30 a.m. all of the men are cold and frustrated. &ldquo;I been here since 7 o&rsquo;clock waiting in line trying to see these people to keep me from being locked up,&rdquo; said Wright.</p><p><strong>Ambulance needed</strong></p><p dir="ltr">On this morning an ambulance was called for one of the men because he had numbness in his feet. After that, the men were allowed to wait in the main lobby of police headquarters but that&rsquo;s the exception to the rule.</p><p>People convicted as sex offenders have to register once a year. It basically means they have to go to the police department registration office and update their personal info and show proof of their current address. And if they move, they have to go back to re-register within three days. If they enroll in school they have to re-register within three days. If they change jobs they have to re-register within three days.</p><p>There are a lot of requirements and in Chicago, and they can be nearly impossible to meet, not because the offenders don&rsquo;t want to meet them but because of the way the Chicago Police Department runs the registration office.</p><p>When I met Wright in line it was his third time trying to get in the office to register. &ldquo;Every time we come here they have us standing in this line out here in this cold,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Wright was turned away the other two days because the office doesn&rsquo;t have the capacity to process all the sex offenders who show up to register, and Wright&rsquo;s worried the same thing is going to happen again. &ldquo;At 12 o&rsquo;clock they&rsquo;ll cut the line, they&rsquo;ll stop the line and tell us to come back tomorrow but I been standing out here already four to five hours,&rdquo; said Wright.</p><p><b>Go home, but you can still be arrested</b></p><p dir="ltr">Sure enough, an hour later, at 11:45 a.m., &nbsp;a man comes out of the registry office and tells Wright and the two dozen other men who have been waiting in the cold all morning, that they won&rsquo;t be able to register today. But then it gets weirder. The police department employee tells the men they can sign a list that will prove they showed up today to register but then he tells them that even if they&rsquo;re on the list, they can still be arrested for failing to register.</p><p>In a written statement, Adam Collins, a spokesman for the Chicago Police, said the list is collected and the department &ldquo;proactively sends their names to Illinois State Police &hellip; to minimize any potential criminal registration problems for the individuals.&rdquo;</p><p>Of course letting the men actually register would be an even more effective way to minimize registration problems. For clarity, I asked Collins several times, aren&rsquo;t the men at risk of being arrested? He simply resent a portion of his written statement.</p><p>For the offenders being turned away every day -- sometimes 10, 20, or even more of them -- the message they&rsquo;re getting is that the department prefers to risk their arrest rather than process this paperwork more quickly.</p><p><strong>Violating registration rules can mean prison</strong></p><p dir="ltr">The men are nervous and they have good reason. According to the Illinois Department of Corrections there are currently 841 people in prison for violating registration requirements.</p><p>&ldquo;You know, I think we&rsquo;re caught up in the machine,&rdquo; said Terry as he walked away from police headquarters after being told he wouldn&rsquo;t be able to register. Terry didn&rsquo;t want to give his last name. He says he&rsquo;s trying to fulfill the registration requirements and get on with his life, which includes a job in sales that he&rsquo;s missing so he can stand in line. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re the guys that are trying to do the right thing. We&rsquo;re showing up here, we&rsquo;re trying to do the right thing we&rsquo;re trying to follow the law to the letter of what&rsquo;s on that piece of paper and they turn us away and say sorry, but you can still be arrested. Yeah, well, how are we supposed to feel?&rdquo; he asked.</p><p>After most of the men have left William White is still sitting in his wheel chair outside the registry office. I saw him arrive before noon but that was too late and now he&rsquo;s locked outside in the cold in a T-shirt and a light jacket. He has one leg. Because of that he had to get a ride from his brother Reggie and he&rsquo;s waiting for his brother to pick him up. When Reggie shows up he can&rsquo;t believe his brother couldn&rsquo;t register because there&rsquo;s a sign on the locked door that says the office is open till 3.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not even one o&rsquo;clock yet! Five minutes to one,&rdquo; said White.</p><p>&ldquo;This is horrible. It&rsquo;s like they&rsquo;re purposely setting people up to be violated to go back to jail. You can&rsquo;t conclude nothing else but that. And they came out, they didn&rsquo;t even have any sympathy, his limb is missing. They didn&rsquo;t even care, you know? So they won&rsquo;t even see you or anything, won&rsquo;t register you or nothing. They told him to come back Tuesday but I have to work and I won&rsquo;t be able to bring him Tuesday,&rdquo; said White.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Sex Registry Sign.JPG" style="height: 214px; width: 300px; float: left;" title="CPD spokesman Adam Collins says the criminal registry office is open standard business hours, but a sign on the door tells a different story. Sex offenders who show up when they’re supposed to show up often find the door locked. They end up leaving angry and confused and concerned that they’ll be arrested for failing to register. (WBEZ/Robert Wildeboer)" /></div><p>In a written statement police spokesman Adam Collins insisted the office is open standard business hours. That&rsquo;s not what I saw. In fact while I talk to Reggie White and his brother a young man walks up and pulls on the locked door. White shouts over to him, &ldquo;They not taking anybody else.&rdquo;</p><p>After a short conversation the young man walks away mystified and angry. I saw a lot of men arrive in the afternoon, when the office is advertised as being open. They all found a locked door and got no explanation.</p><p><strong>Increased registration, says CPD</strong></p><p>CPD spokesman Collins says there&rsquo;s been an increase in registrations in the last two years. He says they&rsquo;ve detailed additional officers to the criminal registration section and they are in the planning stage of an expansion of the office to accommodate additional personnel, but he didn&rsquo;t provide any details about a timeline despite our request. He also didn&rsquo;t answer questions on whether there are plans for a waiting room.</p><p>The whole process is especially frustrating for men who have jobs and are trying to keep their lives on track, like Byron Williams. He says he&rsquo;s shown up to this office 8 or 9 times in the last couple weeks, a not uncommon story. Williams is a security guard and his boss is letting him work the night shift right now so he can stand in line during the day, but he doesn&rsquo;t get off the night shift till 6 a.m. so he&rsquo;s not getting in line early enough. He hasn&rsquo;t been able to register.</p><p>&ldquo;My boss is like, okay you need to make something happen, but every time I get up to close by they cut it off and say we can&rsquo;t register, you got to come back the next day. I&rsquo;m explaining that to my boss and he&rsquo;s understanding but he&rsquo;s not understanding and I&rsquo;m at risk of losing my job and you know how hard it is for a sex offender to find a job?&rdquo; said Williams.</p><p>Given the weather at the end of last week, Williams decided he wasn&rsquo;t going to stand out in the cold again and waste his time. However, Monday is his last day to register before he&rsquo;s in violation. He says he&rsquo;ll be in line again, to give it another try.</p></p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/crowded-chicago-police-office-forces-sex-offenders-violate-parole-109798 Teens learning radio skills in Chicago police program http://www.wbez.org/news/teens-learning-radio-skills-chicago-police-program-109447 <p><p>A pair of police officers on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side are helping teens learn radio production in an effort to keep them off the streets and improve their views on cops.</p><p>The program in the Englewood neighborhood fits with a push by Chicago Police Department Superintendent Garry McCarthy to improve the relationship between police officers and the people they serve.</p><p>It is called the 7th District Youth Anti-Violence Media Program. It introduces teens to the ins and outs of radio production, and gives them a chance to get on the air.</p><p>The classes are held three days a week at Kennedy-King College. The broadcasting instructors there pitch in to teach the kids.</p><p>The program was started by Daliah Goree-Pruitt and Claudette Knight, both community policing (or CAPS) officers. The two started out as beat cops. Now they are in charge of neighborhood outreach, counseling crime victims, and running community meetings &nbsp;in a neighborhood struggling with some of the highest crime rates in the city.</p><p>The two had a lot to do already. Knight and Goree-Pruitt also do a weekly food give-away and hand out turkeys before Thanksgiving. On the Saturday before Christmas, they gave away toys at the station house located at 1438 W. 63rd Street.</p><p>But 7th District Deputy Chief Leo Schmitz came to them last spring with a new task.</p><p>&ldquo;He was like, &lsquo;Think of something that we can do for the kids,&rsquo;&rdquo; Goree-Pruitt said.</p><p>Schmitz was worried about the summer then coming up, when hot temperatures and idle teens could contribute to a spike in violent crime.</p><p>Knight said they wanted to do something new.</p><p>&ldquo;You know, something different, some other added activity because you always hear basketball, baseball, but not all kids are sports-inclined,&rdquo; Knight said.</p><p>They wanted to do a swim program, but they could not get the funding. Goree-Pruitt said the only thing the department had money for was t-shirts for the participants. So Goree-Pruitt and Knight needed partners.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CAPS%202%20%281%29.jpg" style="height: 272px; width: 350px; float: right;" title="Jamar Houston of WKKC teaches Jermaine Robinson how to DJ. (WBEZ/Patrick Smith)" /></div><p>Kennedy-King College, about a mile west of the 7th District station, has a broadcasting department and its own radio station, WKKC. Knight said it was the &ldquo;perfect opportunity.&rdquo; They approached the college and got the OK.</p><p>So all they needed were students. This turned out to not be easy. The two went personally to high school principals in the area, asking them to recommend students for the program&hellip; and they got almost no response. Then they asked area pastors - again, nothing.</p><p>So Goree-Pruitt and Knight just started approaching random kids on the street and around the neighborhood.</p><p>That&rsquo;s how Genavie Clark heard about it.</p><p>&ldquo;One day [I was] sitting in Dunkin&rsquo; Donuts, and all the officers were sitting in Dunkin&rsquo; Donuts, and Officer Goree came up to my table and she told us about the radio program. So I signed up for it,&rdquo; Genavie said.</p><p>Ultimately, the two got 20 teens of high school age for that first summer class, and it went so well they did a smaller after-school version this fall.</p><p>The program gets by mostly on the power of Goree-Pruitt and Knight&rsquo;s charisma, which is considerable. But these two career cops know nothing about radio production, and they do not have any money to pay instructors.</p><p>So the students learn mostly by observing WKKC in action.</p><p>The kids are exposed to a lot of the skills that go into producing a radio show: hosting, logging tape, mixing audio - even DJ-ing.</p><p>Station manager Dennis Snipe comes in every once in awhile to talk to the students about diction and public speaking, the assistant program director lets them look over her shoulder while she logs tape, and the hosts give them pointers during music breaks.</p><p>The summer classes were from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., so the students had to be fed. The owner of a shopping plaza across the street from the station donated Subway sandwiches.</p><p>So it&rsquo;s a nice story. But at first glance, none of it seems much like police work.</p><p>Knight disagrees.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s all about community interaction, because the youth especially, most of their interaction with the police is negative. So if you start introducing a positive interaction at a teenage level, then they start to view us in a different way,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>WBEZ ran a story on Dec. 23 about <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/8000-chicago-cops-now-little-friendlier-109425">police legitimacy training: thousands of Chicago cops re-learning how to best interact with the people they serve.</a></p><p>Efforts such as the radio program and legitimacy training fit with Superintendent McCarthy&rsquo;s priority on what he calls a return to community policing.</p><p>A recent study by Yale criminologist Andrew Papachristos found that Chicago in 2013 has had its lowest violent-crime rate in the past three decades. McCarthy credits community policing with a decrease in crime.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt believes it&rsquo;s part of her job to connect with people.</p><p>&ldquo;I feel like I can help these kids. I may not help all of them, but the ones that I can help, they&rsquo;ll know the police department just don&rsquo;t lock kids up,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Besides teaching them how to produce a radio show and to like cops, the officers use the class as a way to help the students deal with their own issues. They talk to the students about resolving conflicts, safe sex, and staying out of trouble.</p><p>Before they start the radio lessons, the students gather around a round table in a small windowless room across from the WKKC studios.</p><p>One of the girls is talking to Goree-Pruitt about problems she is having with her stepmom. She says her dad is getting a divorce, and he blames her.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt councils her on being the mature one, even though her stepmom is the adult.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve had the same issues, having two parents to living with just my mom, to my mom getting remarried, to my mom getting rid of all four of her daughters to be with this new husband, to my dad raising four daughters by himself. So I am no different from you all. Like I tell you all, because we&rsquo;re the police doesn&rsquo;t mean that we&rsquo;re not human,&rdquo; Goree-Pruitt told them.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt and Knight look tougher than they sound, and they both spent time on the beat, dealing with high-stress situations. But they also have families of their own, so maybe it is not surprising that they connect so well with teens.</p><p>&ldquo;When I come here it just, all my stress just goes away,&rdquo; freshman Wattsita Henley said.</p><p>The fall class, which ended earlier this month, was five high schoolers, three girls and two boys, and most did not seem like the types police really need to worry about.</p><p>Freshman James Cross Jr. said the closest he has ever gotten to drugs is seeing weed in a bag at school.</p><p>&ldquo;One of my friends showed me a bag, and I don&rsquo;t know why but I just started laughing,&rdquo; James &nbsp;told the group.</p><p>The other boy, Jermaine Robinson, has gotten into some trouble in the past.</p><p>He left Englewood to live with his grandmother in suburban Hazel Crest for a few years. &nbsp;He said he came back because it was just too quiet out there.</p><p>Robinson is about to start at Winnie Mandela, an alternative high school in the South Shore neighborhood.</p><p>He likes working with his hands, so he is trying to learn how to DJ.</p><p>His ultimate goal is to be a computer engineer.</p><p>&ldquo;Because like, when I was in 5th grade we did a program, and I earned a computer and I was taking it apart and putting it back together and stuff like that,&rdquo; Jermaine said.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt said she is not worried about what type of kids they are reaching, adding that she is just glad to be reaching any.</p><p>&ldquo; All I can say is that you touch one you reach another one, because they&rsquo;ll tell, they&rsquo;ll tell their friends.&rdquo;</p><p>The next radio class starts in January.</p><p>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/pksmid">@pksmid</a>.</p></p> Fri, 27 Dec 2013 14:49:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/teens-learning-radio-skills-chicago-police-program-109447 8,000 Chicago cops now a little friendlier http://www.wbez.org/news/8000-chicago-cops-now-little-friendlier-109425 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Bruce Lipman.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>There&rsquo;s a video that&rsquo;s gone viral of a Baltimore police officer getting some kids in trouble for skateboarding. He puts a seemingly compliant 14-year-old in a headlock and pulls him to the ground. &ldquo;Sit down!&rdquo; the officer yells. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not a dude!&nbsp; When I&rsquo;m talking to you, you shut your mouth and you listen!&rdquo;</p><p>The officer is unhinged. The video is about three and a half minutes and there are several times when the confrontation seems to be over. The kids stand around looking down and shuffling their feet but then the cop turns around, comes back and kicks it off again.</p><p>&ldquo;Son, what is your problem?&nbsp; Do you go to school and give your teacher this kind of lip and back-talk your teacher?&nbsp; Now what makes you think you can do it to a police officer?&rdquo;</p><p>The teen, flabbergasted, says Duuuude.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Stop calling me dude!&rdquo; the officer yells. &ldquo;A dude is somebody who works on a ranch!&nbsp; I&rsquo;m not man, I&rsquo;m not dude, I am officer Rivieri.&rdquo;</p><p>It was probably helpful that Officer Rivieri identified himself on tape for future disciplinary proceedings. He was fired.</p><p>Cops are trained to take control, but Chicago police are being taught there&rsquo;s more than one way to do that. You don&rsquo;t always have to come on strong, yelling out commands. In fact, officers are learning that that approach can actually make policing much harder.</p><p><strong>McCarthy cites research</strong></p><p>The video with Officer Rivieri is being used in a class at the Chicago police academy in what NOT to do. The one-day training on something called police legitimacy, an idea based on academic research into effective policing. Superintendent Garry McCarthy has been pushing it since he came to Chicago. He often drops the names of researchers and academics Tracey Meares and Tom Tyler who have articulated and championed the twin ideas of procedural justice and police legitimacy.</p><p>McCarthy explained those ideas on WBEZ&rsquo;s Afternoon Shift in February of 2012.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not what you do, it&rsquo;s how you do it,&rdquo; said McCarthy. &quot;So you can stop somebody but when you explain to them why you stopped them, and when you leave them with a different taste in their mouths rather than saying now, get the hell off the corner, there&rsquo;s a whole different intention that people take away from that encounter.&rdquo;</p><p>So, let&rsquo;s say you get pulled over and get a ticket but the cop was really nice. The research finds that you could leave that interaction feeling good about police even though you got a ticket. On the flip side, let&rsquo;s say you don&rsquo;t get the ticket but the cop is a total&hellip; well, let&rsquo;s keep it clean for the kids and just say he&rsquo;s not nice. Even though you didn&rsquo;t get a ticket you&rsquo;ll likely leave that interaction with a negative view of police.</p><p>The point is, it&rsquo;s not just the outcome that matters. The process is important, hence the name: procedural justice. McCarthy explains. &ldquo;You explain to them why you stopped them, somebody got shot here, there&rsquo;s somebody with a gun around the corner, whatever the case might be, instead of just saying, &lsquo;Shut up.&nbsp; I&rsquo;ll ask the questions.&rsquo;&nbsp; Whole different dynamic there, so that&rsquo;s a cultural change in policing that we have to infuse into the department-- of respect.&rdquo;</p><p>Since McCarthy made those comments almost two years ago the department has trained 8,000&nbsp; officers. McCarthy says this is a step towards repairing the legacy of mistrust between poor communities of color and the police.</p><p><strong>At the police academy</strong></p><p>By seven on a fall morning, Mike Reischl is getting a couple dozen officers settled in a class room at the Chicago Police Academy on the city&rsquo;s West Side. He tells the officers there&rsquo;s coffee in the back and asks them to contribute 50 cents. He clarifies that all the money goes to purchasing the coffee and drinks at the back. I guess it&rsquo;s just in case you think someone might be skimming a couple quarters here and there.</p><p>&ldquo;Police legitimacy, it&rsquo;s got a lousy name doesn&rsquo;t it?&nbsp; It does!&rdquo; Reischl tells the class. &ldquo;Somewhere along the line you get the connotation that somehow you&rsquo;re illegitimate, right?&nbsp; So you got to come here and be legitimate.&rdquo;</p><p>Reischl tells the officers that they&rsquo;re not here because something went wrong, or because someone filed a lawsuit.</p><p>Like the other instructors Reischl wears a shirt and tie and there&rsquo;s a gun on his hip. Police officers sit in plainclothes at desks pushed together into groups of four. Half the lights are off in the room so it&rsquo;s easier to see the powerpoint presentation on the screen. Reischl casts a shadow on the screen as he moves around the front of the classroom and lays out a scenario.</p><p>&ldquo;You got four gangbangers up against the car,&rdquo; Reischl says. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s Friday night in the summertime, it&rsquo;s a real hot night.&nbsp; It&rsquo;s going to be rocking and rolling all night long and all weekend long.&nbsp; So you start your tour of duty, you want to find out what&rsquo;s going on, what&rsquo;s the conflicts?&nbsp; What&rsquo;s the problems I&rsquo;m going to have to manage?&nbsp; So you see the usuals on the corner and you throw &lsquo;em up against the car and you start going through &lsquo;em. You want that intelligence, okay, you build that rapport. All of a sudden they start talking to you. Yeah, Junebug&rsquo;s mad at Mookie.&nbsp; Mookie&rsquo;s mad at Junebug, all that kind of nonsense. Alright?&nbsp; But there&rsquo;s four of them and there&rsquo;s two of you. Good officer safety technique, hey get another unit over there. Go on the radio get back-up. The gangbangers, they start giving you the information you need. All weekend long you&rsquo;re going to need this information. All of a sudden your back-up shows up, car pulls up, all of a sudden copper hops out of the car, starts walking toward those kids, every one of those kids shut up because they realize who&rsquo;s walking towards them. All of a sudden all of that intel goes out the window.&nbsp; Why did they shut up when that one officer shows up on the scene?&nbsp; Didn&rsquo;t treat them fairly and respectfully, and now guess what?&nbsp; You don&rsquo;t know what&rsquo;s going on on your beat.&rdquo;</p><p>I can&rsquo;t help but think that if there are any cops in this room who have used bull-headed techniques in the past, they might be shrinking in their chairs at the thought that their brothers and sisters in blue might view their tactics as moronic. Reischl goes on to tell his students they need to listen to the citizens they&rsquo;re serving.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;If you don&rsquo;t give anybody a voice and you don&rsquo;t listen, the people on the other end get irritated and get mad.&nbsp; How many coppers, &lsquo;sit down, shut up.&rsquo;&nbsp; &lsquo;I didn&rsquo;t even tell you why I&hellip;.&rsquo; &lsquo;Sit down and shut up!&rsquo;&nbsp; Well, I didn&rsquo;t even tell you why i called you&hellip;.&rsquo;&nbsp; &lsquo; SIT DOWN AND SHUT UP I&rsquo;M THE POLICE I&rsquo;LL LOCK YOU UP!&rsquo;&nbsp; Coppers do that, right?&nbsp; They don&rsquo;t give em the voice,&rdquo; says&nbsp; Reischl.</p><p>All this training is based on research measuring how citizens engage with police. But Reischl knows his audience and he and the other instructors sometimes poke fun at the &ldquo;pointy headed&rdquo; researchers and academics who come up with the phrases like, &ldquo;giving voice.&rdquo; But one instructor tells the cops that even the best batters in the major leagues take advice on their swing from people who can&rsquo;t hit a ball but know the physics of hitting the sweet spot on the bat.</p><p>And the instructors appeal to the officers&rsquo; self-interest.</p><p><strong>Chill out.&nbsp; You&rsquo;ll be less stressed.</strong></p><p>Reischl asks each pod of four officers to write down their goals on a large white sheet of paper that&rsquo;s taped to the wall. Each group comes up with essentially the same list. The officers want to make it home safe each night, make it to retirement and avoid lawsuits or getting sent to prison themselves.</p><p>Instructors then talk about how treating citizens with respect is a way to get more trust and compliance from citizens. Compliance means less stress and less physical contact and that means cops get to go home safe.</p><p>For Officer Nicholas Gould, a lot of this is just common sense. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a good day if you don&rsquo;t throw down.&nbsp; I don&rsquo;t need to come to work and get hurt.&nbsp; I don&rsquo;t need broken bones or skinned knees or, what&rsquo;s the one rule?&nbsp; To go home safely,&rdquo; Gould says.</p><p>Gould is 6&rsquo;1&rdquo; and more than 300 pounds and in this classroom he kind of looks like an adult sitting in a child-sized desk. We chat during a break and he tells me perhaps because of his size, he rarely needs to put his hands on people to get them to comply ,but he also says he&rsquo;s respectful and able to keep his cool even in heated situations.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m able to, I don&rsquo;t know how you say this, like, just calm people.&nbsp; I&rsquo;m very good at that,&rdquo; he says..</p><p><strong>Does it work?</strong></p><p>A couple officers I talk to make fun of this class. One who is a couple months from retirement says it&rsquo;s a little bit late.&nbsp; But most of the officers say it&rsquo;s a good reminder. That&rsquo;s what Lt. Bruce Lipman hoped when he developed the training.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a fairly nasty part of society that police see,&rdquo; Lipman says during the lunch break of the legitimacy training. &ldquo;We very seldom get called to a house and asked, &lsquo;Hey listen, you want to come over and have tea and coffee?&rsquo; Even people who are, you know, just victimized, we feel bad for those victims. Just over time, just starts to make officers cynical and they start to kind of lose their way a little bit about why they started on the job.&nbsp; Most of the officers, 99 percent of the time, I mean really, and the statistics bear this out, do the right thing. They&rsquo;ve learned this is the way to do it but this is more like a refresher for them.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>More research</strong></p><p>Lipman says the police department isn&rsquo;t just hoping that this training has an impact. They&rsquo;re measuring it with help from Wesley Skogan at Northwestern University. Lipman says thousands of officers have been surveyed, some before taking the training and some after. They were asked to rate statements like &ldquo;listening and talking to people is a good way to take charge of situations.&rdquo; Officers who filled out the survey after the training gave that statement significantly more importance than officers who hadn&rsquo;t yet had the training.</p></p> Sat, 21 Dec 2013 23:29:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/8000-chicago-cops-now-little-friendlier-109425 Police Board fires cops for conduct captured on gang video http://www.wbez.org/news/police-board-fires-cops-conduct-captured-gang-video-107131 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Cop Video Capture.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>The Chicago Police Board has fired two officers for conduct captured on a 2011 gang video (above) discovered by WBEZ.</p><p>The board found patrol officers Susana La&nbsp;Casa, 49, and Luis Contreras, 44, guilty of numerous administrative charges and decided the fitting punishment was dismissal, according to James P. Lynch, the attorney who represented the police department in the case.</p><p>The guilty charges, Lynch said, included unlawfully restraining a youth, transporting him without a valid police purpose to the turf of a gang that would threaten him, and making a false statement about the incident to an Internal Affairs detective.</p><p>La Casa and Contreras arrived March&nbsp;19, 2011, on a Logan Square block to assist two officers who had handcuffed a gang member named Miguel &ldquo;Mikey&rdquo; Castillo. The youth ended up in the backseat of the SUV that La&nbsp;Casa and Contreras were driving. They drove him to a block of nearby Humboldt Park that a rival gang claimed as its territory.</p><p>A 90-second amateur video shot there shows La&nbsp;Casa and Contreras outside the SUV, a Chevrolet Tahoe with standard police markings. Three of the doors are open as onlookers converge, peer in on Castillo, taunt him and flash their gang&rsquo;s hand signal. As Castillo tries to cover his face, La&nbsp;Casa tells him, &ldquo;Put your fucking hand down.&rdquo;</p><p>The video appeared briefly on YouTube, where WBEZ spotted it. The department quickly stripped La&nbsp;Casa and Contreras of their police powers and began an investigation. Interim police Supt. Terry Hillard called the incident &ldquo;not professional&rdquo; and said &ldquo;scared straight&rdquo; tactics were always inappropriate.</p><p>Supt. Garry McCarthy, Hillard&rsquo;s successor,&nbsp;recommended last September that the board dismiss the officers. At the board&rsquo;s evidentiary hearing, which lasted two days in February, La&nbsp;Casa and Contreras insisted they were just trying to give the young man a ride home and he never faced danger.</p><p>La&nbsp;Casa declined to comment about the dismissal.&nbsp;Contreras and attorney William N. Fahy, who represented the officers,&nbsp;did not return calls.</p><p>Neighborhood reactions varied. Eric Hudson, a homeowner who worked with La&nbsp;Casa and Contreras against Logan Square gang activity, said the dismissal stemmed from a police department culture &ldquo;weighted to Irish male cops.&rdquo;</p><p>Hudson called La&nbsp;Casa, an Illinois-licensed clinical counselor, a hard worker who did not deserve to be branded as abusive. &ldquo;This woman is a social worker, not Jon Burge,&rdquo; Hudson said, referring to the notorious Chicago detective imprisoned in connection to police torture cases.</p><p>But Rev. Kenny Ruiz, the former head of a gang-intervention program at the McCormick Tribune YMCA, hopes the dismissal sends a message to other officers. &ldquo;Do what the side of the police car says: &lsquo;Serve and Protect.&rsquo; That means everyone,&rdquo; Ruiz said. &ldquo;They can be the conduit for something positive for the young people and the challenges that they face.&rdquo;</p><p>The board, a nine-member panel appointed by the mayor, does not usually dismiss officers recommended for that punishment. During this year&rsquo;s first three months, the board fired just three of 13 officers that either the police department or the Independent Police Review Authority had recommended for discharge. In eight of those cases, the board ruled that the fitting punishment was a suspension or reprimand. In another case, the respondent resigned. In another, the department withdrew the charges.</p><p>Under Illinois law, officers can appeal their dismissals to Cook County Circuit Court.</p><p>Castillo, who did not suffer physical harm, received $33,000 from the city as part of a settlement in a civil suit over the incident, according to an attorney representing him. The suit, filed in federal court, alleged false arrest and intentional infliction of emotional distress.</p><p>State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez&rsquo;s office reviewed the incident but declined to bring a criminal case.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Sat, 11 May 2013 06:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/police-board-fires-cops-conduct-captured-gang-video-107131 Chicago police official: Congress Theater 'untruthful' on night of underage drinking http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/chicago-police-official-congress-theater-untruthful-night-underage <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/congress%20theater_flickr_ian%20friemuth_0.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px; " title="The Congress Theater, located at 2135 N. Milwaukee Ave., has been charged with five drug-related violations by the Chicago Liquor Control Commission. (Flickr/Ian Freimuth)" /></p><div class="image-insert-image ">A Chicago Police Department official has accused the Congress Theater of failing to cooperate with officers during an investigation into underage drinking at the venue.</div><p>Sgt. Joseph Giambrone testified that Congress staffers lied about serving alcohol when his unit arrived to investigate suspicions of underage drinking during a DJ Rusko set in the early hours of May 6, 2012.</p><p>Giambrone&rsquo;s testimony came during a disciplinary hearing at City Hall Tuesday morning, the second conducted by Chicago&rsquo;s Liquor Control Commission looking into alleged illegal activities at the Congress.</p><p>During his testimony, Giambrone described a call from the emergency room of Saints Mary and Elizabeth Medical Center in Wicker Park that reported several concertgoers &ldquo;of various ages&rdquo; arriving from the Congress Theater via private ambulance with symptoms of extreme intoxication, many of them &ldquo;barely breathing.&rdquo;</p><p>Giambrone said that when officers arrived on the scene, Congress managers Atieh Abdelhadi and Ahmad Mahidi met him outside the venue and denied serving alcohol during the show.</p><p>Next, Giambrone said he observed Mahidi talking on his radio in &ldquo;a language that wasn&rsquo;t English,&rdquo; and then witnessed Abdelhadi running ahead to unscrew taps in the lobby bar and place cups upside down over the spigots as officers entered the venue.</p><p>Once inside, Giambrone claimed to see employees &ldquo;activating tap devices&rdquo; and serving &ldquo;amber-hued&rdquo; liquid to patrons by the stage.</p><p>Giambrone said he was also present at the Congress on the night of April 13, 2012, when his unit responded to <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/jim-derogatis/2012-03-22/city-congress-theater-clean-your-act-97549">a large fight</a> during a Chief Keef show. The venue did not call 911 to report this incident; defense attorney Harlan C. Powell hypothesized that venue staffers may have tried to call out to police officers already on the scene.</p><p>Powell questioned the credibility of the city&rsquo;s investigation, calling the allegations against his client &ldquo;grossly prejudicial.&rdquo;</p><p>To support his claim, Powell brought up a meeting that took place between Giambrone and the Congress Theater following these incidents. Powell said that during the meeting, venue personnel said they understood that any calls made to the police by the Congress would not be brought up in disciplinary actions.</p><p>However, Deputy Hearings Commissioner Robert Nolan rejected Powell&rsquo;s argument, stating that the events at issue occurred before any alleged conversations took place.</p><p>Tuesday&rsquo;s hearing was originally scheduled for March 6. But Powell &ndash; <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-03/congress-theater-liquor-hearing-rescheduled-105941">the third attorney</a> to represent venue owner Erineo &ldquo;Eddie&rdquo; Carranza since his <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/jim-derogatis/2012-03-22/city-congress-theater-clean-your-act-97549">troubles with city agencies</a> began in March of 2012 &ndash; requested more time to review the case from Deputy Commissioner Nolan.</p><p>The next hearing is scheduled for April 30.</p><p><em>Prior reporting by Jim DeRogatis. Research assistance by Jennifer Grandy.</em></p><p><strong><u>Earlier reports about Carranza, the Congress and the Portage, from Jim DeRogatis:</u></strong></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-03/fate-portage-theater-remains-mystery-105970">March 8: The fate of the Portage remains a messy mystery</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-03/congress-theater-liquor-hearing-rescheduled-105941">March 6: Congress Theater hearing rescheduled</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-02/congress-theater-restoration-underway-it%E2%80%99s-got-long-way-go-105685">Feb. 22: Congress Theater restoration underway, but it&rsquo;s got a long way to go</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-01/congress-theater-liquor-hearings-begin-undercover-cops-testimony-104950">Jan. 16: Congress Theater liquor hearings begin with undercover cop&rsquo;s testimony</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-12/rally-save-portage-theater-we-know-it-104169">Dec. 3, 2012: A rally to save the Portage Theater &lsquo;as we know it&rsquo;</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-11/portage-theater-uses-graham-elliot%E2%80%99s-name-vain-104089">Nov. 28, 2012: The Portage Theater uses Graham Elliot&rsquo;s name in vain</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-11/congress-theaters-new-security-chief-ex-cop-troubled-past-103611">Nov. 2, 2012: Congress Theater&rsquo;s new security chief: An ex-cop with a troubled past</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-10/congress-theater-police-calls-rank-soldier-field-united-center-103569">Oct. 31, 2012: Congress Theater police calls rank with Soldier Field, United Center</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-09/how-did-things-turn-so-bad-so-fast-portage-theater-102606">Sept. 23, 2012: How did things turn so bad so fast at the Portage Theater?</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-09/new-owner-portage-theater-moves-evict-current-operators-102602">Sept. 22, 2012: New Owner of the Portage Theater moves to evict current operators</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-09/congress-theater-splits-development-partner-102451">Sept. 16, 2012: Congress Theater splits with development partner</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-09/portage-theater-what%E2%80%99s-eddie-102350">Sept. 11, 2012: The Portage Theater: What&rsquo;s Eddie up to?</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-07/congress-theater-partners-up%E2%80%A6-and-looks-expand-101199">July 26, 2012: Congress Theater partners up&hellip; and looks to expand</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-04/more-trouble-congress-theater-98249">April 14, 2012: More trouble at the Congress Theater</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/jim-derogatis/2012-03-28/critical-congress-security-headliner-brings-his-own-97696">March 28, 2012: Critical of Congress security, headliner brings his own</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/jim-derogatis/2012-03-25/congress-theater-responds-complaints-97597">March 25, 2012: Congress Theater responds to complaints</a></u></p><p><u><a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/jim-derogatis/2012-03-22/city-congress-theater-clean-your-act-97549">March 22, 2012: City to Congress Theater: Clean up your act!</a></u></p><p><em>Leah Pickett blogs about pop culture for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/leahkpickett" target="_blank">@leahkpickett</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 27 Mar 2013 12:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/leah-pickett/2013-03/chicago-police-official-congress-theater-untruthful-night-underage Police on overtime target 'hot zones' http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/police-overtime-target-hot-zones-105888 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/McCarthy_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In a press conference Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy said the historically low crime rate in February, was due in part to a new strategy that places additional police in &ldquo;hot zones&rdquo; across the city.&nbsp;</p><p>McCarthy would not share the exact location of the areas. He did say the areas only compose 2 percent of Chicago&rsquo;s geography, but contain about 10 percent of the cities crime.<br /><br />The idea of deploying officer to &ldquo;hot spots&rdquo; has been used in the past. McCarthy actually shut down the mobile task force, who responded to hot spots, shortly after Mayor Rahm Emanuel took office.&nbsp;<br /><br />But McCarthy says tactic is better because of it&rsquo;s use of historical data.&nbsp;The area&rsquo;s were chosen based on three years of&nbsp;violent crime data, with a focus on the most recent year.&nbsp;<br /><br />Each zone will have an additional 20 police officers, for a total of 200 additional officers on the street.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /><br />&ldquo;The idea is you can&rsquo;t walk around the area without seeing a police officer,&rdquo; said McCarthy.&nbsp;<br /><br />McCarthy is accomplishing the increased staffing using overtime.<br /><br />Some Chicago residents and community leaders, as well as the &nbsp;Fraternal order of Police, have critiqued McCarthy for not growing the number of police. He said they are hiring more police. But in the meantime, overtime was cheaper than additional staff and could be implemented more quickly.</p></p> Mon, 04 Mar 2013 15:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/criminal-justice/police-overtime-target-hot-zones-105888 Chicago police chief wants officers caught on gang video fired http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-chief-wants-officers-caught-gang-video-fired-103905 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/police-mistreatment-video.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="396" mozallowfullscreen="" scrolling="no" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/21441880?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;badge=0&amp;color=b30000" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="590"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:11px;"><a href="http://vimeo.com/21441880">An amateur video shows Chicago officers Susana La Casa and Luis Contreras after bringing a young gang member to the 1600 block of North Spaulding Avenue on March 19, 2011.</a> (<a href="http://vimeo.com/wbez">WBEZ</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.)</span></p><p><br />Chicago Police Supt. Garry McCarthy is recommending the dismissal of two city cops based on charges they unlawfully restrained a young man in the Logan Square neighborhood and let suspected gang members threaten him.</p><p>The charges, kept quiet since filed with the Chicago Police Board in September, accuse officers Susana La Casa and Luis Contreras of holding the youth, Miguel &ldquo;Mikey&rdquo; Castillo, against his will on the 3500 block of West McLean Avenue and driving him about six blocks south &ldquo;without a valid police purpose.&rdquo;</p><p>The incident took place March 19, 2011. The officers brought Castillo, a gang member, to the 1600 block of North Spaulding Avenue &mdash; the turf of a rival gang. The incident came to light when WBEZ posted a 90-second amateur video that showed the cops standing outside their marked SUV and leaving the doors open as onlookers converged on the vehicle, taunted the young man inside and flashed gang symbols.</p><p>La Casa and Contreras, according to the charges, &ldquo;allowed suspected Latin King gang members to threaten&rdquo; Castillo and brought &ldquo;discredit upon the department.&rdquo;</p><p>The officers later each &ldquo;made a false oral statement&rdquo; about the incident to an Internal Affairs detective, according to the charges.</p><p>The board, a nine-member panel,&nbsp;has the final word about the charges and the punishment. The department must show &ldquo;a preponderance of the evidence,&rdquo; a standard less rigorous&nbsp;than the beyond-a-reasonable-doubt measure used in criminal courtrooms. Max Caproni, the board&rsquo;s executive director, says he expects the case&rsquo;s evidentiary hearing no sooner than January.</p><p>La Casa and Contreras, both suspended without pay, did not return WBEZ messages seeking comment about the charges.</p><p>A Fraternal Order of Police spokesman says the union has no comment about the case because the officers have chosen to defend themselves privately. That counsel could not be reached for comment.</p><p>The officers have not spoken about the incident publicly but, after WBEZ posted the video, some Logan Square homeowners rallied behind them and praised their efforts against gangs.</p><p>Castillo this summer reached a settlement in a federal civil suit he brought against the city of Chicago over the incident. The suit, which alleged false arrest and intentional infliction of emotional distress, will net the youth $33,000, according to the law firm representing him.</p><p>State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez&rsquo;s office reviewed the case last year but declined to bring criminal charges.</p></p> Fri, 16 Nov 2012 19:09:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-police-chief-wants-officers-caught-gang-video-fired-103905 Chief wants NATO lessons to translate to street corner policing http://www.wbez.org/news/chief-wants-nato-lessons-translate-street-corner-policing-99498 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/McCarthy and Emanuel 2.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy says hosting NATO this past weekend is going to have some long-term benefits for his department.</p><p>McCarthy has talked a lot about how officers working the NATO protests started out wearing just their regular uniforms.</p><p>&ldquo;If we just came out in the riot gear from day one, we would have had an entirely different dynamic going on in this city.&nbsp; The confrontational appearance would have resulted in confrontation,&rdquo; McCarthy said.</p><p>McCarthy said the officers saw this weekend that you can either escalate a situation or de-escalate it.</p><p>&ldquo;It&#39;s not gonna be a big shift to get them to understand that instead of cursing at somebody and telling them to get off the corner, you explain to them, somebody just got shot down the block and maybe this isn&#39;t a good place to stand.&nbsp; It&#39;s two totally different dynamics,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>McCarthy said when officers treat people with respect, the police are viewed as legitimate and citizens become more concerned about not violating the law.</p></p> Wed, 23 May 2012 18:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chief-wants-nato-lessons-translate-street-corner-policing-99498 Emanuel, McCarthy tout Chicago gang busts http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-mccarthy-tout-chicago-gang-busts-97642 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-March/2012-03-27/rahm mccarthy WBEZ Chip Mitchell.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2012-March/2012-03-26/Emanuel_McCarthy2tightercrop.jpg" style="margin: 9px 18px 6px 1px; float: left; width: 303px; height: 220px;" title="The mayor and police chief speak Monday at a West Humboldt Park news conference. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)">With Chicago’s annual homicide tally running its highest in years, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and police Supt. Garry McCarthy are talking up two big busts of alleged gang members on the city’s West Side.</p><p>In one, they say, city cops and federal Drug Enforcement Administration agents targeted a gang called the Four Corner Hustlers and arrested 28 people. In the other, the police went after the Traveling Vice Lords and charged 17 people with drug offenses.</p><p>Flanked by Emanuel at a West Humboldt Park news conference, McCarthy said these “takedowns” were just the beginning of police efforts in the territories where the drug rings operated. “If we allow these locations to regress to their previous conditions — if we allow people to buy those narcotics and fuel that narcotics market, which fosters the violence in our neighborhoods — we’re doomed to failure,” McCarthy said.</p><p>Emanuel called the police operations part of a comprehensive city approach to violence. He said the approach included increased funding for after-school programs and summer jobs for youths.</p><p>The question now is whether neighborhood residents will step up, Emanuel said. “Does the community come outside the church, outside the family room, and reclaim these street corners?”</p><p>Politicians, pastors and law-enforcement officials crowded behind Emanuel and McCarthy and applauded them at several points. But the event didn’t satisfy some neighborhood residents who observed.</p><p>Annette Britton, a volunteer at John Marshall Metropolitan High School, praised the idea of keeping teenagers occupied this summer but said city officials should do more to provide training and employment for the young-adult population behind most of the violence.</p><p>“They talk about gang bangers like they’re foreign invaders,” Britton said. “And the reality [is] they aren’t. They’re somebody’s children. They have become hardened criminals because of a lack of other kinds of opportunities.”</p><p>More than 100 homicides have taken place in the city this year, police spokeswoman Melissa Stratton said in a statement Monday. That’s 30 more than the homicide count during the same period last year, she said. The department is blaming most of this year’s violence on gangs.</p></p> Mon, 26 Mar 2012 21:42:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-mccarthy-tout-chicago-gang-busts-97642 Social media becoming important tool for policing http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-20/social-media-becoming-important-tool-policing-95676 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-January/2012-01-20/1884813924_893219388e_b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>For those who thought the future of crime fighting would look like <em>RoboCop</em>, think again. The future is here and it is social media. A recent incident where a 17-year-old Chicago Public School student was beaten in Bridgeport by a group of individuals shone a spotlight on law enforcement tactics. Specifically, the focus has been a sharp turn towards utilizing <a href="http://www.facebook.com" target="_blank">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://twitter.com/" target="_blank">Twitter</a> to catch bad guys.</p><p><em>Eight Forty-Eight </em>wondered how the <a href="https://portal.chicagopolice.org/portal/page/portal/ClearPath" target="_blank">Chicago Police Department</a> has been using social media--and how other cities have been using Twitter and Facebook?</p><p><em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> was joined in studio by Chicago Police Superintendent . Toronto Police Social Media liaison <a href="http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/socialmedia/" target="_blank">Scott Mills</a> and <a href="http://www.cityofevanston.org/police/" target="_blank">Evanston Police</a> Commander Jay Parrot and WBEZ's criminal and legal affairs reporter Robert Wildeboer joined the conversation.</p><p><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/insert-image/2012-January/2012-01-20/4897_transform.jpg" title="CPD Supt. Garry McCarthy with WBEZ's Robert Wildeboer. (WBEZ/Bill Healy)" height="526" width="630"></p></p> Fri, 20 Jan 2012 14:53:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-01-20/social-media-becoming-important-tool-policing-95676