WBEZ | crime http://www.wbez.org/tags/crime Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Spike Lee Declares An Emergency In 'Chi-Raq' http://www.wbez.org/news/spike-lee-declares-emergency-chi-raq-114054 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/cr_d01_001951446574522_wide-744b31997c353995d7ca5d730b36d00f7f4facce-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res458191115" previewtitle="Teyonah Parris as Lysistrata, a Chicago gang leader's girlfriend who rallies women to swear off sex with their men until they end their violence."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Teyonah Parris as Lysistrata, a Chicago gang leader's girlfriend who rallies women to swear off sex with their men until they end their violence." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/02/cr_d01_001951446574522_wide-744b31997c353995d7ca5d730b36d00f7f4facce-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 348px; width: 620px;" title="Teyonah Parris as Lysistrata, a Chicago gang leader's girlfriend who rallies women to swear off sex with their men until they end their violence. (Parrish Lewis/Courtesy of Roadside Attractions)" /></div><div><p>Answering one kind of madness with another, Spike Lee&#39;s&nbsp;Chi-Raq&nbsp;approaches the plague of gun violence in Chicago with a staggering disregard for propriety. Just the title alone &mdash; a reference to a fatality rate that&#39;s exceeded that of American soldiers fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan over the same period &mdash; was enough to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/17/spike-lee-chiraq-backlash-mayor-rahm-emanuel_n_7089574.html" target="_blank">raise the ire</a>&nbsp;of the city&#39;s image-conscious elite, but that&#39;s merely a throat-clearing for the operatic fantasia to come. With Aristophanes&#39;&nbsp;Lysistrata&nbsp;serving as an audacious starting point, Lee&#39;s musical/satire/feature-length editorial lurches from genre to genre and tone to tone with as much freewheeling spontaneity as possible for a film where the dialogue is almost entirely in verse. It&#39;s a teeming repository of idea&mdash;by turns somber and profane, whimsical and hectoring, inspired and inexplicable.</p></div></div><p>This is how Spike Lee starts a conversation. Twenty-six years later, he&#39;s still Mookie, tossing the garbage can through the Sal&#39;s Famous window in&nbsp;Do The Right Thing, fearlessly provoking a response. The&nbsp;click-clack&nbsp;of reaction pieces can be heard over virtually every scene in&nbsp;Chi-Raq&mdash;and from all over the political spectrum, too&mdash;and Lee hasn&#39;t considered his arguments rigorously enough for the film to survive them all. But he wants the audience to think about the cycle of violence on Chicago&#39;s South Side and the array of contributing factors that perpetuate it. At the same time, he&#39;s made a thoroughly unruly work of art that sets the realities of the streets against the artifice of Greek theater and a cartoon gangland that recalls&nbsp;The Warriors.</p><p>Reaching back to Lee&#39;s three earliest films,&nbsp;Chi-Raq&nbsp;could be described as a fusion of the dodgy sexual politics of&nbsp;She&#39;s Gotta Have It, the music and intra-racial disputes ofSchool Daze, and all-points sermonizing of&nbsp;Do The Right Thing. Co-scripting with Kevin Willmott &mdash; whose brilliant mockumentary&nbsp;C.S.A: The Confederate States of America&nbsp;imagines what might have happened if the South won the Civil War &mdash; Lee structures the film around Aristophanes&#39; outrageous premise of sex as a leverage for peace. The electric Teyonah Parris, previously seen in&nbsp;Dear White People, stars as Lysistrata, a beautiful woman who takes decisive action after witnessing a pair of shootings.</p><p>Lysistrata&#39;s boyfriend, Demetrius Dupree (Nick Cannon), who raps under the name &quot;Chi-Raq,&quot; heads up a purple-clad gang called the Spartans, and he looks for revenge after Cyclops (Wesley Snipes) and the rival Trojans, wearing orange, open fire during one of his club shows. When a stray Spartan bullet fells an 11-year-old girl and Lysistrata sees the anguish of the child&#39;s mother (Jennifer Hudson, whose own personal tragedies are brought to the surface), she persuades the wives and girlfriends of gang members, as well as other women in the community, to withhold sex until the men come to their senses.</p><p>Samuel L. Jackson turns up as Dolmedes, the one-man Greek chorus who introduces the verse and ties the disparate story threads together, and John Cusack and Angela Bassett both do vital work as an activist priest and an intellectual, respectively, who lend their voices to the cause. Among the root causes batted around are the macho intransigence of gang leaders, faulty and corrupt institutions, mass incarceration, high unemployment and poverty, and Lee tosses in up-to-the-minute talk about Sandra Bland and the church shooting in Charleston, S.C. &quot;THIS IS AN EMERGENCY&quot; scream the opening titles in big bold letters, and&nbsp;Chi-Raq&nbsp;seeks to stay right in the moment.</p><p>Lee&#39;s compulsion to jam every idea he has into the frame gives&nbsp;Chi-Raq&nbsp;an instability that often sacrifices coherence for vitality. Though&nbsp;Lysistrata&nbsp;is a satire, Lee&#39;s film uses it mainly as a conceptual hook, so elements that are completely absurd and outrageous, like Lysistrata&#39;s bizarre encounter with a neo-Confederate officer, are juxtaposed with scenes where Cusack and Bassett sound off earnestly about the issues of the day. They may share the same subject, but they don&#39;t share the movie that comfortably.</p><p>Then again, a little misbehavior is the point. The fantasy and realism of&nbsp;Chi-Raq&nbsp;may go together like plaids and stripes, but Lee isn&#39;t one to let perfect be the enemy of good. If nothing else, the film asserts the value of trying something and failing rather than retreating to safe spaces. It turns candor into the highest possible virtue.</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/12/03/458188846/spike-lee-declares-an-emergency-in-chi-raq?ft=nprml&amp;f=458188846" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Fri, 04 Dec 2015 13:38:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/spike-lee-declares-emergency-chi-raq-114054 Anti-violence programs shut down as Chicago shootings climb http://www.wbez.org/news/anti-violence-programs-shut-down-chicago-shootings-climb-113266 <p><p>Captured in a documentary that brought national attention to Chicago&#39;s&nbsp;violence, Operation CeaseFire deployed former gang members and felons to intervene in feuds that too often ended in fatal gunfire on the city&#39;s streets.</p><div><p>Now that operation has become another casualty in the financial meltdown enveloping Illinois, even as the city still struggles to stop shootings.</p><p>Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner froze money for CeaseFire, featured in the <a href="http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/interrupters/" target="_blank">2011 documentary &quot;The Interrupters,&quot;</a> as Illinois began running out of money because Democrats passed a budget that spent billions more than the state took in.</p><p>The program was cut off before receiving all of the $4.7 million it was budgeted last fiscal year, and it has gotten no state funding this year as the fight between Rauner and Democrats who lead the Legislature drags on and several programs in&nbsp;Chicagoland elsewhere in Illinois shut down.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.wbez.org/tags/caught-middle" target="_blank"><strong>Hear stories of everyday people Caught in the Middle of Illinois&#39; budget impasse.</strong></a></p><p>Meanwhile,&nbsp;Chicago&nbsp;has seen a roughly 20 percent increase in shootings and homicides so far this year compared with the same period in 2014. That included a July 4 weekend that left 48 people shot, including a 7-year-old boy who police say was killed by a shot intended for his father, described as a &quot;ranking gang member&quot; by officers.</p><p>None of those holiday weekend shootings occurred in two police districts covered by a Ceasefire-affiliated program that managed to fund itself for the month of July.</p><p><a href="http://crime.chicagotribune.com/chicago/shootings" target="_blank">The same area saw nearly 50 shootings in August.</a></p><p>Operation CeaseFire supporters say&nbsp;Chicago&nbsp;and roughly a half-dozen other current or former CeaseFire communities need all the resources they can get.</p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_136363581679.jpg" style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; height: 225px; width: 300px;" title="In this Sept. 30, 2015 photo, Autry Phillips, left, director of Target Area Development in Chicago’s Auburn Gresham neighborhood, talks with area resident Justin Garner, 27, during a walk along 79th Street. Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner froze funding for the anti-violence program Operation CeaseFire because of the state budget crisis, forcing Target Area and other organizations to shut down the program at a time of year when shootings spike. (AP Photo/Sara Burnett)" /><p>&quot;Our kids in our communities are still dying,&quot; said Autry Phillips, executive director of Target Area Development, a nonprofit agency on&nbsp;Chicago&#39;s&nbsp;South Side that had to end its CeaseFire program. &quot;We&#39;re going to do what we can do, but we need funding. That&#39;s the bottom line.&quot;</p><p>Even before the freeze, Rauner proposed cutting CeaseFire funding by nearly $3 million this year.</p><p>His spokeswoman blamed Democrats who have refused pro-business changes sought by the former venture capitalist and first-time office holder, such as weakening labor unions.</p><p>&quot;The governor has asked for structural reforms to free up resources to balance the budget, help the most vulnerable and create jobs,&quot; spokeswoman Lyndsey Walters said this week. &quot;Unfortunately, the majority party continues to block the governor&#39;s reforms and refuses to pass a balanced budget.&quot;</p><p>&quot;The Interrupters&quot; aired as part of the &quot;Frontline&quot; documentary series on PBS and at film festivals across the U.S. The film featured<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXmm0MZLGxY" target="_blank"> three former gang members working to &quot;interrupt&quot;&nbsp;Chicago&nbsp;violence</a>, though programs using the model have been implemented in cities nationwide and overseas.</p><p><span style="font-size:9px;"><strong><em>The following video contains explicit language.</em></strong></span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SC1EOm4o_0A?rel=0" width="560"></iframe></p><p>CeaseFire uses an approach founded by an epidemiologist who argued violence should be attacked like a disease &mdash; by stopping it at its source. It&#39;s overseen by <a href="http://cureviolence.org/" target="_blank">Cure Violence</a>, an organization based at the University of Illinois at&nbsp;Chicago&#39;s&nbsp;School of Public Health. Researchers say CeaseFire has reduced gang involvement, shootings, and retaliatory killings.</p><p>But it hasn&#39;t been universally embraced. In 2013,&nbsp;Chicago&nbsp;Mayor Rahm Emanuel <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/ceasefire-program-shrinking-due-funding-woes-108673" target="_blank">opted not to renew</a> a one-year, $1 million contract for CeaseFire programs in two neighborhoods. The decision followed <a href="http://www.wbez.org/despite-agreement-top-cop-not-big-fan-chicago-anti-violence-group-100027" target="_blank">criticism by&nbsp;Chicago&nbsp;police</a> that CeaseFire staff weren&#39;t sharing information or working closely enough with them. Some program members also were getting into trouble of their own.</p><p>Today, programs are operating in six&nbsp;Chicago&nbsp;neighborhoods. More than double that number have shut down in the city and in other Illinois communities, including East St. Louis and Rockford, because of funding cuts, said Kathy Buettner, Cure Violence communications director.</p><p>Target Area&#39;s grant was $220,000. Combined with another eliminated grant that helped ex-offenders leaving prison, the state dollars made up 21 percent of the agency&#39;s annual budget, Phillips said.</p><p>In July, Target Area used an anonymous donation to train several hundred people on how to prevent conflicts from escalating into violence. The neighborhood into which they were sent during the July 4 weekend saw none of the dozens of shootings and killings that plagued the city over those days, Phillips said.</p><p>The following month, when funding was gone and programs had ended, there were 46 shootings in the same area.</p><p>Inside Target Area&#39;s office, a large laminated map of the neighborhood hangs on a wall, dotted with stickers of various shapes and sizes that mark the locations where violence has occurred.</p><p>The biggest, red dots indicate the sites of multiple shootings. Phillips sees each one as a failure &mdash; a person his organization couldn&#39;t help.</p><p>&quot;I hate the dots,&quot; he said.</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 09 Oct 2015 12:06:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/anti-violence-programs-shut-down-chicago-shootings-climb-113266 With fewer cops, Gary preacher conducts own nighttime patrols http://www.wbez.org/news/fewer-cops-gary-preacher-conducts-own-nighttime-patrols-113035 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Gary-thumb-3-small.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been a challenging year for Gary, Indiana.</p><p>Crime is a constant problem and its police force is undermanned because of budget constraints. That&rsquo;s left some some neighborhoods feeling vulnerable.</p><p>But one local preacher is doing whatever it takes to protect his neighbors &mdash; even if it means staying up all night.</p><p>Apostle Marvin East lives in Gary&rsquo;s Marshalltown Terrace. The truck driver-turned-preacher says there aren&rsquo;t enough cops to patrol the neighborhood overnight.</p><p>So he does it himself.</p><p>&ldquo;What community can operate without police presence?&rdquo; Apostle East asks. &ldquo;I would love to be in bed [at night] but once this community goes backward you&rsquo;ll never get it back.&rdquo;</p><p>More than 20 police officers have left the Gary Police department this year, many for better paying jobs elsewhere. A Department spokeswoman says the city is trying to boost pay and hire new recruits to beef up patrols.</p><p>In the meantime, Apostle East says it&rsquo;s up to him to protect those who still call Marshalltown Terrace home, including his own mother.<br />&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 23 Sep 2015 08:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/fewer-cops-gary-preacher-conducts-own-nighttime-patrols-113035 Looking at prison overcrowding from a victim’s rights perspective http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-11/looking-prison-overcrowding-victim%E2%80%99s-rights-perspective-112621 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/prison FlickrKate Ter Haar.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>According to some experts, the incarceration rate in the US is 5 times pre-1975 levels, and 7 times the levels seen in Canada and in Europe. It&rsquo;s expensive, and legislators from both sides of the aisle as well as policy makers agree something needs to be done. We explored the notion of low-level offenders &mdash; who they are and what effect their release would have on the numbers. But others would take it even further, claiming that sentences in this country are too long, even for violent offenders like rapists and murders.</p><p>So how long should someone go to prison for a car theft, a rape, a murder? We talk about where you draw the line between punishment and rehabilitation in prison. One of the voices in this debate is that of crime victims and their families. For that we turn to Jennifer Bishop Jenkins, the Director of illinoisvictims.org, a group that provides resources for victims of violent crimes.</p></p> Tue, 11 Aug 2015 10:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-11/looking-prison-overcrowding-victim%E2%80%99s-rights-perspective-112621 Morning Shift: July 13, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/morning-shift-july-13-2015-112371 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214564263&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Morning Shift: July 13, 2015</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Today on the Morning Shift, we take a look back at Chicago&#39;s 1995 heat wave that killed 739 people. We also hear about artistic responses to the disaster. Plus, the FBI has been ensnaring young Muslims in the Chicago area on terrorism charges. We look at the bureau&#39;s tactics and whether, in some cases, they may go too far. We&#39;ll look at a &quot;not-in-my-backyard&quot; tussle over renting vs. owning in the West Loop. And finally, we get a review of last weekend&#39;s Taste of Chicago.</span></p></p> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 15:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/morning-shift-july-13-2015-112371 FBI watches as ISIS recruits in Chicagoland http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/fbi-watches-isis-recruits-chicagoland-112368 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214562183&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit;">FBI watches as ISIS recruits in Chicagoland</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The Islamic State has been recruiting young Muslims around the country, including the Chicago area where arrests have garnered national and even international attention. Chicago Reader&rsquo;s Mick Dumke reports on the tactics law enforcement has used to snare suspects...who in some instances could have developmental deficiencies and mental health issues. Dumke details the cases where these tactics are at play.</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span style="font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit;"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/mickeyd1971">Mick Dumke</a> is a reporter with the</em> Chicago Reader.</span></span></p></p> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 15:27:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-13/fbi-watches-isis-recruits-chicagoland-112368 Morning Shift: July 7, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/morning-shift-july-7-2015-112337 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213658550&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 07 Jul 2015 11:38:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/morning-shift-july-7-2015-112337 7-year-old felled by gun violence during holiday weekend http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-06/7-year-old-felled-gun-violence-during-holiday-weekend-112320 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213500003&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">7-year-old felled by gun violence during holiday weekend</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">At least 40 people were wounded by gunfire and eight dead over the Fourth of July weekend, including 7-year-old Amari Brown in Humboldt Park. While the violence tally was less than the last two July 4th weekends, the community said it&rsquo;s still too much and wonder when enough will be enough. There were several anti-violence measures in place over the last few days to help keep the shootings at bay. Last week we talked to Autry Phillips of Target Area Development Corp. about the grassroots organization putting 300 people on the streets in Englewood and portions of the West Side to reduce the violence. Phillips joins us on the line to discuss the group&rsquo;s effort. Father Michael Pfleger, head pastor at St. Sabina also joins us by phone to discuss the gun violence and the mens-only march the church organized through the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood to kick of what many hoped would be a safe holiday weekend.</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><strong>Guests:</strong> <em>Father <a href="https://twitter.com/MichaelPfleger">Michael Pfleger</a> is the pastor at St. Sabina in Auburn-Gresham. Autry Phillips is head of the <a href="http://targetarea.org/">Target Area Development Corporation</a>.&nbsp;</em></span></p></p> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 10:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-06/7-year-old-felled-gun-violence-during-holiday-weekend-112320 CPD 'listening tour' fuzzy on details http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/mccarthylistens.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cities across the country have been ripped apart by violent encounters between police and citizens.</p><p>Ferguson had Michael Brown, New York had Eric Garner, Baltimore had Freddie Gray &mdash; and Chicago had 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by a Chicago cop last October. There&rsquo;s also Chicago Police Commander Glenn Evans, indicted for allegedly ramming his gun into someone&rsquo;s mouth. And Detective Dante Servin, acquitted of killing 22-year-old Rekia Boyd.</p><p>That&rsquo;s part of the reason why the city&rsquo;s top cop, Supt. Garry McCarthy, recently announced a big, city-wide listening tour. It&rsquo;s a major initiative for the police department to communicate with the public.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a big anti-police sentiment both locally and nationally. And we&rsquo;re dealing with protests on a daily basis,&rdquo; McCarthy said in the Spring. &nbsp;</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-11/morning-shift-looking-mccarthys-listening-tour-112175"><strong>Morning Shift: Looking into McCarthy&#39;s listening tour</strong></a></p></blockquote><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">After Detective Servin was found not guilty by a judge in April, anger in Chicago reached a high point. And that&rsquo;s when McCarthy came out with a plan to repair the relationship between cops and residents: He called it the &ldquo;CPD Neighborhood Outreach Tour.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The idea was the department would open up a big public dialogue. McCarthy and police commanders would personally meet with people and really listen.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Mayor Rahm Emanuel threw his support behind the initiative.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;The listening tour, not just by Superintendent McCarthy, it&rsquo;s also by each of the commanders in the districts, is all a part of effort of building trust and relationships that are essential part of community policing,&rdquo; Emanuel said.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">There were no details about when the tour was starting, no big announcement about how anybody from the neighborhoods could take part. But then, all of a sudden at a Chicago City Club event in May, McCarthy said the listening tour was already underway &mdash; and that it was a big hit.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m going out every single day to community meetings, sitting down with small groups of residents without the press, and we have conversations and we listen to people,&rdquo; McCarthy told a room full of business and civic leaders.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">But even after McCarthy gave his speech at the City Club, there was still no way to find out where and when the events of this big, public listening tour were happening.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">WBEZ has been trying to find out more about this outreach tour ever since it was first announced: We&rsquo;ve called, we&rsquo;ve emailed about half a dozen times and we&rsquo;ve asked in person. The main question is &mdash; where are these events listed for the public?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The tour is supposed to be a chance to hear from the public &mdash; to get &lsquo;resident feedback&rsquo; and to &lsquo;foster ongoing dialogue.&rsquo; But if people don&rsquo;t know about it, why do it?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Residents aren&rsquo;t the only ones struggling to get this information. People you&rsquo;d presume would absolutely know don&rsquo;t either.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;Seems like it&rsquo;s some kind of secret mission,&rdquo; said Ald. Pat Dowell, who represents the 3rd Ward on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">She said she would love to advertise the listening tour to her constituents, but she&rsquo;s been kept in the dark.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know anything about how they&rsquo;re organized, what he is trying to accomplish,&rdquo; Ald. Dowell lamented.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">An officer in charge of community relations for her district said she didn&rsquo;t know when the meetings were happening in her district. In fact, she already missed the one in her own district &mdash; she only found out about it from a resident &mdash; afterwards.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Dowell&rsquo;s fellow South Side alderman, Roderick Sawyer (6), said he got a list of the listening tour stops after he specifically asked the police. But he said he doesn&rsquo;t think most people have any way of finding out about the events.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Ald. Sawyer said he suspects the police want to handpick their audience, which he said defeats the whole purpose.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><a name="list"></a>Remaining Dialogue Tour Events</span></p><table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width: 620px;" width="883"><thead><tr><th scope="col" style="width: 79px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">District</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 144px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Date</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 76px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Time</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 416px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Location</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 168px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Contact</span></p></th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, June 11</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Garfield Hospital, 520 N. Ridgeway</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Chuck Levy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 17</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Urban League, 4510 S. Michigan</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Roderick Hawkins</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>014</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 24</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation, 2550 W. North</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Danny Serrano</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, Jul 2</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>People&#39;s Church of the Harvest, 3570 W. Fifth Avenue</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Eaddy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>010</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Tuesday, July 7</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Lawndale Christian Development Corporation,</p><p>2111 S. Hamlin Ave (Firehouse Community Arts Center) Ogden and Hamlin</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Tracie Worthy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, July 9</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>KLEO Community Family Life Center, 119 E. Garfield Blvd.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Torrey Barrett</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>007</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 13</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Embassy Church, 5848 S. Princeton</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Bishop Peecher</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>015</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, July 15</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Mars Hill Baptist Church, 5916 W. Lake St</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Stowers</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>005</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 20</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Temple of Glory Church 311 E. 95<sup>th</sup> St.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Wilson</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him </em><a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid"><em>@pksmid</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 Morning Shift: The effect of homicide clearances on community http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-23/morning-shift-effect-homicide-clearances-community-111749 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/mikecogh.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Flickr/mikecogh" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296364&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Gov. Rauner&rsquo;s rhetoric raises questions on immigration</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">We discuss Gov. Bruce Rauner&#39;s stance on immigration in Illinois. Lawrence Benito, the CEO/Executive Director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights weighs in.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/llbenito">Lawrence Benito</a>&nbsp;is&nbsp;the CEO/Executive Director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296361&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Filmmakers and public meet to discuss future of indie films on PBS</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Last November, New York public television station WNET announced they&rsquo;d be moving the program&#39;s Independent Lens and POV to their less-watched sister station on Long Island. Indie filmmakers and members of the public soon began voicing their concern that the diversity of both the stories and the filmmakers featured on these programs, and the important content they contained, were being pushed aside by both WNET and PBS. In response, execs from the station and the network, along with producers from both shows, created a national listening tour to allay fears and talk about the future of independent film on PBS. The&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pbs-listening-tour-chicago-registration-15979967513">final meeting</a> is Monday in Chicago. Kartemquin Films is playing a big role in the meeting, and Gordon Quinn joins us to talk about what he wants to say, and what he wants to hear.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.kartemquin.com/about/history">Gordon Quinn</a> is the Founder and Artistic Director of <a href="https://twitter.com/Kartemquin">Kartemquin Films.</a>&nbsp;</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296354&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Life on Mars</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">It takes Mars almost twice as long as Earth to travel around the sun, which means the Martian year is much longer. Days on the red planet are roughly forty minutes longer than a day here. If we eventually travel there, how will humans have to adapt to cope with the Martian calendar? How will life be different on Mars? Shane Larson, astronomer at the Adler Planetarium, joins us to discuss what life would actually be like on Mars.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/sciencejedi">Shane Larson</a> is an astronomer at the Adler Planetarium.</em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296351&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">The effect of homicide clearances on community</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">As Mayor Rahm Emanuel runs for reelection, he&rsquo;s pointing to a slight decline in homicides during his term. He says he&rsquo;s promising to give parents in high-crime neighborhoods a greater sense of security. But a WBEZ investigation raises questions about how much the mayor&rsquo;s willing to do to put killers behind bars. We discuss how police clearing homicide cases can impact communities and what the Chicago might be able to learn from other departments around the country with Dr. David L. Carter, a former Kansas City Police Officer and now professor in the School of Criminal Justice and Director of the Intelligence Program at Michigan State University.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>&nbsp;<a href="http://cj.msu.edu/people/carter-david/">Dr. David L. Carter</a> is a professor and Director of the Intelligence Program at <a href="https://twitter.com/michiganstateu">Michigan State University.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197296345&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">Dance -&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit;">The Seldoms perform &lsquo;Power Goes&rsquo;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Body language says a lot; an erect&nbsp; posture indicates confidence while hunched shoulders may give away one&rsquo;s lack of self esteem. One man who used his body language to display his power over others was President Lyndon Johnson. He is the inspiration for the latest dance piece called &ldquo;Power Goes&rdquo; by Chicago&rsquo;s The Seldoms to explore power and its effects on us. The Seldoms Artistic Director and the writer of the show join us on the Morning Shift to talk about the broader themes behind the story.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><em>&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/carriehanson">Carrie Hanson</a> is the Artistic Director for <a href="https://twitter.com/The_Seldoms">The Seldoms.</a></em></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://www.chicagodramatists.org/Sys/PublicProfile/8101187/958233">Stuart Flack</a> is a a playwright and wrtier of <a href="http://www2.mcachicago.org/event/the-seldoms-power-goes/">&quot;Power Goes.&quot;</a></em></p></p> Mon, 23 Mar 2015 07:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-03-23/morning-shift-effect-homicide-clearances-community-111749