WBEZ | Police http://www.wbez.org/tags/police Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en With fewer cops, Gary preacher conducts own nighttime patrols http://www.wbez.org/news/fewer-cops-gary-preacher-conducts-own-nighttime-patrols-113035 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Gary-thumb-3-small.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been a challenging year for Gary, Indiana.</p><p>Crime is a constant problem and its police force is undermanned because of budget constraints. That&rsquo;s left some some neighborhoods feeling vulnerable.</p><p>But one local preacher is doing whatever it takes to protect his neighbors &mdash; even if it means staying up all night.</p><p>Apostle Marvin East lives in Gary&rsquo;s Marshalltown Terrace. The truck driver-turned-preacher says there aren&rsquo;t enough cops to patrol the neighborhood overnight.</p><p>So he does it himself.</p><p>&ldquo;What community can operate without police presence?&rdquo; Apostle East asks. &ldquo;I would love to be in bed [at night] but once this community goes backward you&rsquo;ll never get it back.&rdquo;</p><p>More than 20 police officers have left the Gary Police department this year, many for better paying jobs elsewhere. A Department spokeswoman says the city is trying to boost pay and hire new recruits to beef up patrols.</p><p>In the meantime, Apostle East says it&rsquo;s up to him to protect those who still call Marshalltown Terrace home, including his own mother.<br />&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 23 Sep 2015 08:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/fewer-cops-gary-preacher-conducts-own-nighttime-patrols-113035 North and South Korea avert crisis, but what's next? http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-24/north-and-south-korea-avert-crisis-whats-next-112715 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220712357&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">North and South Korea avert further escalation</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>North and South Korea are still holding high level talks in an attempt to defuse the tension between the two nations, which has escalated in recent weeks over a series of incidents. South Korea&rsquo;s presidents says she wants the North Koreans to apologize for recent provocations, including landmine blasts that badly wounded two South Korean soldiers. Last week, the North Koreans fired shells that seemed to be aimed at loudspeakers blaring propaganda messages near the border. North Korea has also deployed more artillery, soldiers and submarines along the border, as the talks are taking place. We&rsquo;ll discuss the tension and potential for conflict between North and South Korea with Charles K Armstrong, a global fellow at The Wilson Center.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong><em>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-1741a482-6176-ce07-1f6d-46d4816fbdb3">Charles K Armstrong is a global fellow at The Wilson Center and author of several books on North and South Korea, including, most recently </span>Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950-1992</em>.</p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220712849&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Police brutality rises in Brazil</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Brazil has one of the world&rsquo;s highest murder rates. A disproportionate number of Brazil&rsquo;s murder victims (77 percent) are black. Afro-Brazilians make up about 50 percent of the country&rsquo;s population. On-duty police officers are responsible for 15 percent of all murders in Rio De Janeiro, according to government statistics. Amnesty International tracks and researches murders in Brazil. Their new report is called You Killed My Son: Homicides by Military Police in the City of Rio De Janeiro. Renata Neder is an advisor for Amnesty International-Brazil. She&rsquo;ll talk about what she calls the &ldquo;shocking behavior&rdquo; of Rio police and the&nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/tags/BlackYouthAlive">#BlackYouthAlive</a>&nbsp;movement and social media campaign, similar to&nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/tags/BlackLivesMatter">#BlackLivesMatter</a>&nbsp;campaign in the U.S that is taking place in Rio. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1741a482-617c-13d7-c4b3-4f391ed69bcc"><a href="http://twitter.com/renataneder">Renata Neder</a> is an &nbsp;advisor for Amnesty International-Brazil.&nbsp;</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 24 Aug 2015 15:40:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-24/north-and-south-korea-avert-crisis-whats-next-112715 Norway's gun-free approach to policing http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-21/norways-gun-free-approach-policing-112441 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Harald%20Groven.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Harold Groven)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215736644&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Norwegian police practices</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The Norwegian government recently released new data about how the country&rsquo;s police use guns. The report found that in 2014 Norwegian police threatened to use their weapons 42 times but only two shots were actually fired during the entire year. Nobody was killed or wounded in either incident. Prior to the terrorist attack of 2011, Norwegian police did not even carry weapons. The majority of Norway&rsquo;s police, like forces in Britain, Ireland and Iceland, patrol unarmed and carry guns only under special circumstances. Margaret Hayford O&rsquo;Leary, a professor at St. Olaf College joins us to discuss the Norwegian police force.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Margaret Hayford O&#39;Leary is the author of &#39;The Culture and Customs of Norway&#39; and head of the Norwegian department at St. Olaf College.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215737089&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Japan&#39;s declining birth rate</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Japan&rsquo;s birthrate, which has been declining for decades, reached a record low last year. More than a quarter of the country&rsquo;s population is over the age of 65. The decline in births has come as many Japanese have decided to marry later or not at all. The changing demographics have all kinds of implications for Japan, everything from a shortage of workers to take care of the elderly to issues for maintaining social security and pensions. The Japanese government has attempted all sorts of policy changes to try to address the issue. Liv Coleman, a professor of government and world affairs at the University of Tampa, joins us to talk about how the country is dealing with its declining population.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Liv Coleman is a professor of government and world affairs at the University of Tampa.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-21/norways-gun-free-approach-policing-112441 Chicago Police wraps up listening tour http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-21/chicago-police-wraps-listening-tour-112438 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/listening tour APFile.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Last night was the final stop for Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy&rsquo;s listening tour. This one took place on the city&rsquo;s south side: Temple of Glory Church on 95th Street in the Roseland neighborhood. Most of these dozen or so meetings have taken place in churches and, like every other meeting, this one was invite only. WBEZ&rsquo;s Patrick Smith was at last night&rsquo;s event. He joins us with a recap of the listening tour and an update on what happens next. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-21/chicago-police-wraps-listening-tour-112438 Despite tensions, city lets police-community meetings dwindle http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-tensions-city-lets-police-community-meetings-dwindle-112340 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/CAPS-Lindsey-regular.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago shootings and murders are up this year. In many cases, police officers are having a hard time finding witnesses willing to talk.</p><p>This is not a new problem. It&rsquo;s a reason Chicago helped pioneer what&rsquo;s known as community policing &mdash; the sort of crime fighting that focuses on trust between officers and residents. But a cornerstone of that approach is crumbling, according to internal police numbers obtained by WBEZ.</p><p>That cornerstone consists of meetings that bring together residents and cops across the city. The meetings, designed to take place monthly in each of the city&rsquo;s 280 police beats, made Chicago policing a national model in the 1990s.</p><p>The city called its approach the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy. CAPS beat-meeting attendance peaked in 2002, when the citywide total was 70,024.</p><p>Since then turnout has fallen by more than two-thirds, according to the police figures, obtained through an Illinois Freedom of Information Act request. During Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s administration, it has dropped every year. Last year&rsquo;s attendance &mdash; 20,420 &mdash; was less than half the turnout in 2010, the year before Emanuel took office.</p><p data-pym-src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/caps-attendance/child.html">&nbsp;</p><script src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/caps-attendance/js/lib/pym.js" type="text/javascript"></script><p>One reason for the decline could be simple. Compared to when Chicago launched CAPS, crime is down. So residents have fewer problems to take to the police.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not the whole story. Over the years, the city has cut down on CAPS officers and the program&rsquo;s paid civilian organizers. It has cut overtime for officers to attend the beat meetings. And it has cut the number of meetings. Residents have fewer opportunities to participate.</p><p>&ldquo;Most police officers hated beat meetings,&rdquo; said former Chicago cop Howard Lindsey, who helped with CAPS in the city&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood before retiring from the police department last year. &ldquo;The officers didn&rsquo;t believe in CAPS. They just felt like it was a waste of time to actually go to these meetings and listen to the citizens complain.&rdquo;</p><p>Emanuel says the city remains committed to community policing. This year he created a top police position to focus on it. Police Supt. Garry McCarthy, for his part, is on an &ldquo;outreach tour&rdquo; this summer. The tour consists of closed-door meetings with residents of more than a dozen neighborhoods.</p><p>The department says it is also developing a new community-policing strategy, but so far is not talking with WBEZ about what role the CAPS beat meetings would play.</p><p>Our audio story (listen above) looks at the status of the beat meetings through the eyes of Lindsey as well as a former civilian beat-meeting facilitator in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, a Loyola University Chicago sociologist who studied CAPS after working three decades as a Chicago police officer, and a current beat-meeting attendee in West Humboldt Park.</p><p>That attendee, an elementary-school clerk named Antwan McHenry, says the beat meetings could play an important role as police officers face more suspicion due to events in places like Ferguson and Baltimore.</p><p>&ldquo;African Americans have been taught things like, &lsquo;You don&rsquo;t talk to police, you don&rsquo;t snitch,&rsquo; &rdquo; McHenry said. &ldquo;So if you grow up thinking that, you don&rsquo;t get to see the other part &mdash; like when, if your neighbor gets shot, you have to work hand-in-hand with the police to solve murders and to solve crimes.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 Jul 2015 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-tensions-city-lets-police-community-meetings-dwindle-112340 7-year-old felled by gun violence during holiday weekend http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-06/7-year-old-felled-gun-violence-during-holiday-weekend-112320 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213500003&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">7-year-old felled by gun violence during holiday weekend</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">At least 40 people were wounded by gunfire and eight dead over the Fourth of July weekend, including 7-year-old Amari Brown in Humboldt Park. While the violence tally was less than the last two July 4th weekends, the community said it&rsquo;s still too much and wonder when enough will be enough. There were several anti-violence measures in place over the last few days to help keep the shootings at bay. Last week we talked to Autry Phillips of Target Area Development Corp. about the grassroots organization putting 300 people on the streets in Englewood and portions of the West Side to reduce the violence. Phillips joins us on the line to discuss the group&rsquo;s effort. Father Michael Pfleger, head pastor at St. Sabina also joins us by phone to discuss the gun violence and the mens-only march the church organized through the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood to kick of what many hoped would be a safe holiday weekend.</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><strong>Guests:</strong> <em>Father <a href="https://twitter.com/MichaelPfleger">Michael Pfleger</a> is the pastor at St. Sabina in Auburn-Gresham. Autry Phillips is head of the <a href="http://targetarea.org/">Target Area Development Corporation</a>.&nbsp;</em></span></p></p> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 10:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-06/7-year-old-felled-gun-violence-during-holiday-weekend-112320 CPD 'listening tour' fuzzy on details http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/mccarthylistens.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cities across the country have been ripped apart by violent encounters between police and citizens.</p><p>Ferguson had Michael Brown, New York had Eric Garner, Baltimore had Freddie Gray &mdash; and Chicago had 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by a Chicago cop last October. There&rsquo;s also Chicago Police Commander Glenn Evans, indicted for allegedly ramming his gun into someone&rsquo;s mouth. And Detective Dante Servin, acquitted of killing 22-year-old Rekia Boyd.</p><p>That&rsquo;s part of the reason why the city&rsquo;s top cop, Supt. Garry McCarthy, recently announced a big, city-wide listening tour. It&rsquo;s a major initiative for the police department to communicate with the public.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a big anti-police sentiment both locally and nationally. And we&rsquo;re dealing with protests on a daily basis,&rdquo; McCarthy said in the Spring. &nbsp;</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-11/morning-shift-looking-mccarthys-listening-tour-112175"><strong>Morning Shift: Looking into McCarthy&#39;s listening tour</strong></a></p></blockquote><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">After Detective Servin was found not guilty by a judge in April, anger in Chicago reached a high point. And that&rsquo;s when McCarthy came out with a plan to repair the relationship between cops and residents: He called it the &ldquo;CPD Neighborhood Outreach Tour.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The idea was the department would open up a big public dialogue. McCarthy and police commanders would personally meet with people and really listen.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Mayor Rahm Emanuel threw his support behind the initiative.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;The listening tour, not just by Superintendent McCarthy, it&rsquo;s also by each of the commanders in the districts, is all a part of effort of building trust and relationships that are essential part of community policing,&rdquo; Emanuel said.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">There were no details about when the tour was starting, no big announcement about how anybody from the neighborhoods could take part. But then, all of a sudden at a Chicago City Club event in May, McCarthy said the listening tour was already underway &mdash; and that it was a big hit.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m going out every single day to community meetings, sitting down with small groups of residents without the press, and we have conversations and we listen to people,&rdquo; McCarthy told a room full of business and civic leaders.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">But even after McCarthy gave his speech at the City Club, there was still no way to find out where and when the events of this big, public listening tour were happening.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">WBEZ has been trying to find out more about this outreach tour ever since it was first announced: We&rsquo;ve called, we&rsquo;ve emailed about half a dozen times and we&rsquo;ve asked in person. The main question is &mdash; where are these events listed for the public?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The tour is supposed to be a chance to hear from the public &mdash; to get &lsquo;resident feedback&rsquo; and to &lsquo;foster ongoing dialogue.&rsquo; But if people don&rsquo;t know about it, why do it?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Residents aren&rsquo;t the only ones struggling to get this information. People you&rsquo;d presume would absolutely know don&rsquo;t either.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;Seems like it&rsquo;s some kind of secret mission,&rdquo; said Ald. Pat Dowell, who represents the 3rd Ward on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">She said she would love to advertise the listening tour to her constituents, but she&rsquo;s been kept in the dark.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know anything about how they&rsquo;re organized, what he is trying to accomplish,&rdquo; Ald. Dowell lamented.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">An officer in charge of community relations for her district said she didn&rsquo;t know when the meetings were happening in her district. In fact, she already missed the one in her own district &mdash; she only found out about it from a resident &mdash; afterwards.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Dowell&rsquo;s fellow South Side alderman, Roderick Sawyer (6), said he got a list of the listening tour stops after he specifically asked the police. But he said he doesn&rsquo;t think most people have any way of finding out about the events.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Ald. Sawyer said he suspects the police want to handpick their audience, which he said defeats the whole purpose.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><a name="list"></a>Remaining Dialogue Tour Events</span></p><table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width: 620px;" width="883"><thead><tr><th scope="col" style="width: 79px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">District</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 144px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Date</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 76px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Time</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 416px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Location</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 168px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Contact</span></p></th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, June 11</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Garfield Hospital, 520 N. Ridgeway</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Chuck Levy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 17</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Urban League, 4510 S. Michigan</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Roderick Hawkins</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>014</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 24</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation, 2550 W. North</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Danny Serrano</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, Jul 2</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>People&#39;s Church of the Harvest, 3570 W. Fifth Avenue</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Eaddy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>010</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Tuesday, July 7</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Lawndale Christian Development Corporation,</p><p>2111 S. Hamlin Ave (Firehouse Community Arts Center) Ogden and Hamlin</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Tracie Worthy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, July 9</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>KLEO Community Family Life Center, 119 E. Garfield Blvd.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Torrey Barrett</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>007</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 13</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Embassy Church, 5848 S. Princeton</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Bishop Peecher</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>015</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, July 15</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Mars Hill Baptist Church, 5916 W. Lake St</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Stowers</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>005</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 20</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Temple of Glory Church 311 E. 95<sup>th</sup> St.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Wilson</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him </em><a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid"><em>@pksmid</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 Burge torture survivor speaks: "I faced my demon" http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/burge-torture-survivor-speaks-i-faced-my-demon-111939 <p><p>Last week Anthony Holmes testified before Chicago&#39;s City Council Finance Committee.</p><p>Holmes spoke in detail about being tortured by Former Police Commander Jon Burge in the 1970s. As part of our StoryCorps series, Holmes sat down with attorney Joey Mogul at the People&#39;s Law Office in Chicago, to relive his experience with Burge.</p><p><em>Andre Perez helped produce this story</em></p><hr /><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS7285_StoryCorps%20booth%20%282%29-scr_13.JPG" style="height: 120px; width: 180px; float: left;" title="" /></p><p><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;margin-top:23px;"><a href="http://storycorps.org/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 104, 150); outline: 0px;">StoryCorps</a>&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. This excerpt was edited by WBEZ.</em></p></p> Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/burge-torture-survivor-speaks-i-faced-my-demon-111939 Zion residents want body cameras for police officers http://www.wbez.org/news/zion-residents-want-body-cameras-police-officers-111926 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/policebodycams_ap.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>ZION, Ill. &mdash; Residents of the northeastern Illinois city of Zion are calling on all of its officers to be equipped with body cameras following the police-involved shooting death of 17-year-old Justus Howell.</p><p>The Chicago Tribune <a href="http://trib.in/1OFfLCW" target="_blank">reports</a> about 150 people attended a city council meeting Tuesday in Zion, where more than two dozen members of the Zion-Benton Ministerial Association made the plea for body cameras.</p><p>Pastor Robert Williams of Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, a member of the association, said the ministers also would like the city to hire a community liaison officer who can assist in communication between the police department and the community.</p><p>Mayor-elect Al Hill and new members of the city council are expected to consider the group&#39;s proposal at the next meeting.</p></p> Wed, 22 Apr 2015 16:06:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/zion-residents-want-body-cameras-police-officers-111926 WBEZ obtains 911 call from controversial Hammond traffic stop http://www.wbez.org/news/wbez-obtains-911-call-controversial-hammond-traffic-stop-111511 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/hammond_1_0.png" alt="" /><p><p><em>This American Life</em> and WBEZ have obtained the first copy of the 911 call from a controversial traffic stop in Hammond, Indiana. You can hear the full audio of the call above.</p><p>The Sept. 24 incident began when <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/disbelief-some-hammond-after-accused-cops-are-reinstated-111159">police in Hammond pulled over an African-American family</a> for a minor seatbelt violation.</p><p>During the stop, passenger Jamal Jones refused to exit the vehicle when ordered to by officers.</p><p>The driver of the car, Lisa Mahone, called 911 for help.</p><p>After several minutes of asking, police drew their weapons as Mahone&rsquo;s two young children watched from the back seat.</p><p>One of the kids recorded the incident on his phone, and the video went viral.</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="465" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XsW-QCxXkQA?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" width="620"></iframe></p><p>The video ends with the moment most people remember: the officers smash the window, drag the passenger from the car, and tase him. Police have said that they thought there might have been a gun in the car.</p><p>You can hear some of Mahone&rsquo;s side of the 911 call in the video &mdash; but for the first time the official 911 audio gives us both sides of the conversation that took place when Mahone essentially called the police...on the police.</p><p>Some of the 911 call is difficult to understand, but what&rsquo;s clear is the two women have completely different perceptions of what&rsquo;s happening.</p><p><strong>Raw Audio</strong></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="100" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/189826499&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Mahone says she&rsquo;s scared that an officer has drawn his weapon and doesn&rsquo;t want to leave the car.</p><p>The dispatcher repeatedly tries to make the case that Mahone is safe and that she and the passengers should follow the orders of the police officers.</p><p>The tape from the 911 call is about two minutes long, and cuts off when the window is smashed.</p><p>After the <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/recent-incidents-cast-doubt-hammond-police-accountability-critics-say-111228">incident originally came to light</a>, Hammond mayor Tom McDermott Jr. defended the actions of his officers.</p><p>Regarding the release of the 911 tape, McDermott responded to WBEZ&rsquo;s request for comment with a text message.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ll take a pass on commenting while the criminal case and civil cases are being litigated,&rdquo; McDermott wrote.</p><p>Meanwhile, Mahone and Jones continue to pursue their federal civil rights lawsuit against the Hammond police.</p><p>The FBI is <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/disbelief-some-hammond-after-accused-cops-are-reinstated-111159">still looking into</a> the actions of the police on that day.</p><p><em>WBEZ obtained a recording of the 911 call as part of a two episode project from </em>This American Life <em>examining the relationship between police and civilians. The first of those episodes called &ldquo;Cops See it Differently&rdquo; airs Feb. 6 on WBEZ at 7 p.m.</em></p><p><em>Michael Puente is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Bureau reporter. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/MikePuenteNews">@MikePuenteNews</a>.</em></p></p> Fri, 06 Feb 2015 13:21:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/wbez-obtains-911-call-controversial-hammond-traffic-stop-111511