WBEZ | violence http://www.wbez.org/tags/violence Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Compare: Illinois governor candidates' views on concealed carry http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/compare-illinois-governor-candidates-views-concealed-carry-109845 <p><p><em>Editor&rsquo;s note: This episode of the Curious City podcast includes a story about what the candidates for Illinois governor think about the state&rsquo;s new concealed-carry law. It starts 6 minutes, 30 seconds into the program. (Subscribe via <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/curious-city/id568409161">iTunes </a>or <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/CuriousCityPodcast">Feedburner</a>!) This topic was also <a href="https://soundcloud.com/afternoonshiftwbez/curious-city-gay-marriage-and" target="_blank">discussed on WBEZ&#39;s The Afternoon Shift</a>.&nbsp;</em></p><p>Cheryl Brumbaugh-Cayford of Elgin, Ill., had a perception about guns and violence that made her curious about the crop of primary candidates vying to be the state&rsquo;s governor. Her suspicion? The more that people carry guns in public, the higher the likelihood of gun violence.</p><p>With this highly-debated viewpoint in hand, she sent Curious City this question, just in time for the March 18 primary:</p><p style="text-align: center;"><em>What would the candidates for Illinois governor do to prevent gun violence once thousands of residents are granted concealed carry permits?</em></p><p>There&rsquo;s a lot to unpack here, including some basic information about the state&rsquo;s concealed carry law.</p><p>First, Illinois was the last state in the country to adopt concealed carry and, even then, the lawmakers didn&rsquo;t act on their own; they were forced to pass a bill &mdash; any bill &mdash; by a federal judge who had ruled it&rsquo;s unconstitutional to not allow people to carry concealed guns in public. The legislature approved such a bill in May 2013.</p><p>The timing&rsquo;s not lost on Cheryl, who tells us she once appreciated that Illinois had not allowed concealed carry, and she feels the policy was foisted on the state.</p><p>But now, she said, &ldquo;The way our elected officials respond is going to be crucial.&rdquo;</p><p>Cheryl&rsquo;s onto something here. The first few thousand applicants have just begun receiving their concealed carry permits from the Illinois State Police. That means that &mdash; between the primary and November&rsquo;s general election &mdash; state residents will have a better idea of what living in a state with concealed carry really feels like.</p><p>And there may be pressure, one way or another, to rework the policy.</p><p>So how would the candidates respond?</p><p>To the best of our ability, we let the<a href="#views"> candidates themselves speak to this</a>. But since several of them cite studies about the relationship between violence, crime and concealed carry policy, we also compared their statements to what&rsquo;s being said about concealed carry by academics. While answering Cheryl&#39;s question, we found the bottom line is that the lack of consensus among the candidates is pretty much reflected by a lack of consensus in the research.</p><p><strong>Good guy gun ownership, bad guy gun ownership</strong></p><p>So what effect do concealed carry laws have on violence? It&rsquo;s important to tease out because politicians often cite research to back their positions. And &mdash; as you&rsquo;ll read and hear below &mdash; the academic findings run the gamut..</p><p>(A clarification: Cheryl asked about positions related to concealed carry and violence. Researchers we reached out to look at violent crime, but other types of crime, as well.)</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Tio%20H%20from%20campaign.jpg" style="margin: 5px; height: 190px; width: 285px; float: right;" title="Tio Hardiman is challenging Governor Quinn in the Democratic Primary. (Photo courtesy of the Tio Hardiman campaign)" /><a href="http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/493636.html" target="_blank">John Lott</a> has studied the effects of concealed carry laws on crime rates. He wrote a book called More Guns, Less Crime, which pretty much sums up where he stands.</p><p>&ldquo;The fact that a would-be victim might be able to defend themselves also deters crime,&rdquo; Lott said in a phone interview with WBEZ.</p><p>Lott&rsquo;s research of municipal crime data from across the country suggests crime drops after concealed carry laws take effect, and the more concealed carry permits that are issued, the more it drops.</p><p>&ldquo;You know, all sorts of claims about &lsquo;Bad things are gonna happen, you know, blood in the streets?&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;A year from now, everybody&rsquo;s gonna say, &lsquo;What was this debate all about?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>That&rsquo;s particularly true for Illinois, Lott said, because strict requirements on obtaining a concealed carry permit may limit the number of people who get them.</p><p>But here&rsquo;s where things get a little complex, if not outright confusing.</p><p><a href="http://www.law.stanford.edu/profile/john-j-donohue-iii" target="_blank">John Donohue</a>, a professor at Stanford, has also studied the effects of concealed carry laws on crime rates, and his research suggests the exact opposite of what Lott found.</p><p>&ldquo;If I had to bet my house, I&rsquo;d say more likely that they have adverse impacts than that they have a beneficial impact,&rdquo; Donohue said, adding the caveat that the current available research models aren&rsquo;t perfect.</p><p>Still, Donohue said he&rsquo;s doing preliminary work with a new research model that suggests right-to-carry laws lead to more aggravated assaults.<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/4655925819_1f5bc72c99_o.jpg" style="margin: 5px; float: left; height: 183px; width: 275px;" title="Incumbent Pat Quinn advocates for firmer restrictions on concealed carry. (Flickr/Chris Eaves)" /></p><p>And then there&rsquo;s a third position held by other researchers about what happens to crime rates in right-to-carry states, as expressed by Prof. <a href="http://www.criminology.fsu.edu/p/faculty-gary-kleck.php" target="_blank">Gary Kleck</a> from Florida State University.</p><p>&ldquo;Other things being equal, nothing happens,&rdquo; Kleck said. &ldquo;Good guy gun ownership has crime-reducing effects and bad guy gun ownership has crime-elevating effects.&rdquo;</p><p>The reason there are so many contradictory opinions is that none of these folks can agree on what data they should be looking at or how they should be looking at it. Kleck said this gets into differences over the minutiae of crime research models.</p><p>&ldquo;There may be only one right way to do it, but there&rsquo;s like a million different wrong ways to do it. And yeah, if you&rsquo;re a layperson, you&rsquo;re just &lsquo;Joe Regular Guy&rsquo; trying to figure it out, you&rsquo;re doomed,&rdquo; Kleck said. &ldquo;I mean, there&rsquo;s nothing I can say to help you out because you&rsquo;re not gonna be qualified to see those ... flaws in the research.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP463233027879.jpg" style="margin: 5px; height: 303px; width: 450px;" title="The GOP candidates, from left to right, state Sen. Bill Brady, state Treasurer Dan Rutherford, state Sen. Kirk Dillard, and businessman Bruce Rauner prepare to debate. (AP Photo/Chicago Tribune, Terrence Antonio James, Pool)" /></div><p><strong>Where the candidates stand</strong></p><p>All this is to show that concealed carry is a complicated, controversial issue. But we wanted to illustrate that even among the experts &mdash; the folks whom politicians are citing &mdash; there&rsquo;s not a consensus.</p><p>We posed Cheryl&rsquo;s question to all six major party campaigns, but we had to track down responses in very different ways. In three cases we were able to ask candidates directly, either at press conferences or via phone calls. For the others, we had to search for answers through other avenues. In some cases, we extrapolated a position based on the candidate&rsquo;s previous statements on concealed carry, crime, violence and guns.</p><p><strong>Democrat Tio Hardiman</strong></p><p>He is the only candidate who acknowledged the conflicting research that we encountered.</p><p>&ldquo;I cannot penalize, not with a good conscience, penalize legal gun owners for the violence problem in Illinois. There&rsquo;s no data to back it up. So if people would like to exercise their right to the Second Amendment, they should be able to do so.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Republican State Sen. Bill Brady</strong></p><p>&ldquo;We also have to understand that this is about public safety and driving down crime. We know that in every state where concealed carry took place, crime went down. And we need to give our citizens the opportunity to protect themselves and watch crime go down.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Republican State Sen. Kirk Dillard</strong></p><p>&ldquo;Illinois is the last state in America to allow people to protect themselves. It took the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals to force the state of Illinois to allow people to have the same right they had in all 49 other states, let alone keep the criminals guessing. I take a wait and see approach. I think we ought to wait and see how this law unfurls for a while before we make any changes, pro or con, to it.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Republican businessman Bruce Rauner</strong></p><p>We didn&rsquo;t get a direct response from Bruce Rauner, but he addressed themes in Cheryl&rsquo;s question during a debate.</p><p>&ldquo;I think concealed carry was long overdue. Gun ownership is an important constitutional right. We should end the approach that many politicians take in Illinois and that is to blame our crime problems on gun ownership. Our crime problems are one of, crimes about inadequate police staffing, high unemployment and horrible schools, not about gun ownership.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Republican State Treasurer Dan Rutherford</strong></p><p>In previous statements, including this one from a debate in northwest suburban Hoffman Estates, he&rsquo;s said he wants the Illinois State Police to oversee gun licenses efficiently.</p><p>&ldquo;If I was king of the forest or if I was the governor and I was able to help influence it, it would be a different bill than what it was. I think what we need to be very, very sensitive to, though, is the evolution of this. The evolution could be, as you suggested, perhaps making it better and more enhancing. But as well an evolution could also put us backwards if we don&rsquo;t have the right people in the governor&rsquo;s office, we don&rsquo;t have the right people in the General Assembly. One of the performance reviews that I will be doing is with regards to State Police. Why does it take so long to process a FOID card? Why does it take so long to process the application for your concealed carry? Those are unacceptable.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Democratic incumbent Gov. Pat Quinn</strong></p><p>The governor didn&rsquo;t seem to like any part of the process of negotiating the concealed carry bill last year, and he <a href="http://www3.illinois.gov/PressReleases/ShowPressRelease.cfm?SubjectID=2&amp;RecNum=11323" target="_blank">vetoed parts of it </a>in the name of safety. Those changes were overridden by the General Assembly.</p><p>&ldquo;This is about public safety. I think that public safety should never be compromised, never be negotiated away. The governor, that&rsquo;s me, my job is to protect public safety and I think that&rsquo;s what I&rsquo;m doing here with these common sense changes. I think we need to repeat that over and over again. The things I&rsquo;ve outlined today that have changed this bill are all about common sense and public safety and I think the General Assembly and the members should put aside politics and focus on people and their safety.&rdquo;<a name="views"></a></p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="400" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/26501739&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em>Tony Arnold covers Illinois politics for WBEZ. Follow him <a href="http://twitter.com/tonyjarnold">@tonyjarnold</a>.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/akeefe">Alex Keefe</a> is a political reporter at WBEZ. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZpolitics">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/102759794640397640028">Google+</a>.</em></p><p><em>This report received additional support through <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/front-center">Front &amp; Center</a>, an occasional WBEZ series funded by The Joyce Foundation.</em></p></p> Wed, 12 Mar 2014 19:02:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/compare-illinois-governor-candidates-views-concealed-carry-109845 Northwestern trauma surgeon finds link between booze and bullets http://www.wbez.org/news/northwestern-trauma-surgeon-finds-link-between-booze-and-bullets-108728 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Liquor Store.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Dr. Marie Crandall was at UCLA when riots broke out in Los Angeles in the early &lsquo;90s. In the aftermath, activists there zeroed in on liquor stores, identifying them as as hotspots for violence. Many sought to have licenses revoked&mdash;but store owners rebuffed and said there was no data to support the claims. And they were right.</p><p>While the discussion about a potential link between booze and bullets has persisted over the last 20-plus years, the data dam remained dry.</p><p>So Crandall, now an associate professor of surgery at Northwestern&rsquo;s Feinberg School of Medicine, decided to crunch Chicago&rsquo;s numbers. She and her research partners used data from the Illinois State Trauma Registry from 1999 - 2009 to geocode all the gunshot wounds that presented to trauma centers in Chicago during that period. They cross referenced the data with the locations of liquor licenses held in the area.</p><p>&ldquo;I was not surprised that there was an association in our again, already distressed communities. I was surprised at the strength of the association in a few of these areas,&rdquo; Crandall said.</p><p>The study found that in some South and West Side neighborhoods, a person is up to 500 times more likely to get shot hanging out by a place with a liquor license than they are standing three blocks away.</p><p>That was not the case in more affluent areas of the city. And Crandall said she thought the geographic trend reflected other issues facing Chicago.</p><p>&ldquo;If you looked at the maps, you would see that the trauma deserts, and these neighborhoods that have the association with liquor licenses and food deserts and places where we&rsquo;re closing elementary schools&mdash;all seem to overlap,&rdquo; she explained.</p><p>Crandall said she hopes that when the study is published in a couple of months, it will inform discussions at the city level about potential to engage the business community and public health officials about this association and potential solutions.</p><p><em>Katie O&rsquo;Brien is a WBEZ reporter and producer. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/katieobez">@katieobez</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 19 Sep 2013 20:32:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/northwestern-trauma-surgeon-finds-link-between-booze-and-bullets-108728 Morning Shift: Food for thought (and a chocolate croissant, too) http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-21/morning-shift-food-thought-and-chocolate-croissant <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/CSA-Flickr- Edsel L.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We critique some new breakfast options at Starbucks, and offer new ways to deal with your Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) provider. And, a shooting on a CPS &quot;safe passage&quot; route raises questions as the new school year approaches.&nbsp;</p><p><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-48/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-48.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-48" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Food for thought (and a chocolate croissant, too)" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Wed, 21 Aug 2013 08:41:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-21/morning-shift-food-thought-and-chocolate-croissant Lawmakers: Federal involvement needed to curb illegal gun trafficking http://www.wbez.org/news/lawmakers-federal-involvement-needed-curb-illegal-gun-trafficking-108456 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Gun Checks_130819_AYC.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Lawmakers said Illinois&rsquo;s new gun law needs federal involvement to truly stop or even curb illegal gun trafficking.</p><p>Illinois Governor Pat Quinn this weekend signed a new law that requires gun owners to report within 72 hours any lost or stolen gun .</p><p>The law also requires background checks for all gun purchases, including private sales.</p><p>But State Senator Kwame Raoul said there&rsquo;s more to be done.</p><p>&ldquo;We can continue to do (more) at the state level, but the reality is a lot of the gun trafficking occurs across the state lines,&rdquo; Raoul said. &ldquo;Enacting law is only one measure that we can do to combat gun violence, but we also need the help from the federal level.&rdquo;</p><p>Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney Anita Alvarez said the new requirement gives police more control in keeping track of illegal firearms.</p><p>&ldquo;This lost or stolen requirement will help police identify suspicious patterns of behavior by persons who fail to file reports yet continually claim their guns were lost or stolen after they are recovered at a crime scene,&rdquo; she said in a press release.</p><p>Illinois is the 9th state to require the reporting of lost or stolen guns. Michigan and Ohio are the only two nearby states with the same requirement.</p><p>The reporting requirement takes effect immediately, and the new background check system will start in the beginning of next year.</p><p><em>Aimee Chen is a WBEZ business reporting intern. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/AimeeYuyiChen">@AimeeYuyiChen</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 19 Aug 2013 16:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/lawmakers-federal-involvement-needed-curb-illegal-gun-trafficking-108456 Programs to keep kids off streets during violent summer may end http://www.wbez.org/news/programs-keep-kids-streets-during-violent-summer-may-end-108294 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Summer Stress 1_130805_kob.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Most kids can&rsquo;t wait for summer; they&rsquo;re itching to get out of school and into the world. But when that world lacks basic resources--like food, shelter and safety--summer could be the scariest time of year.</p><p>On the far south side of Chicago, there&rsquo;s a school that offers an oasis--but its funding might soon run dry.</p><p>And as a recent graduate Abryanna Morris put it, there&rsquo;s really nowhere else for kids to go.</p><p>&ldquo;Kids are involved in gangs because that&rsquo;s the only thing to turn to, at the end of the day. Because there&rsquo;s nothing at all in the Roseland community to do but to go be with a gang...there&rsquo;s nothing for us to do,&rdquo; Morris explained.</p><p>Roseland begins where the Red Line ends. Nearly 20 percent of residents are unemployed. In the last year, more than a dozen people were killed in Roseland.</p><p>Yolanda Lucas has lived in the community for 30 years. She said violence has changed the neighborhood--that it doesn&rsquo;t feel safe or secure.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s no jobs, there&rsquo;s so much tension out there on the street. Everything is a little...like, panicky. I don&rsquo;t know how to explain it, it&rsquo;s just not comfortable,&rdquo; Lucas said.</p><p>Lucas and her husband have five kids---her babies, twin girls, will be juniors next year at <a href="http://www.fengerhighschool.org/" target="_blank">Fenger High School</a>. They, like many kids in the neighborhood, take a strategic route to school. Along the way, there are safety officers posted in what are called &ldquo;hot zones.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;For my kids, because now they have all this block-to-block gang activity...&lsquo;I don&rsquo;t like 111th, 113th is over here, we don&rsquo;t get along with them...&rsquo;&rdquo; Lucas described. &ldquo;It used to be neighborhood by neighborhood...no, it&rsquo;s block by block: State, Michigan, Wentworth, Yale...all the blocks against each other...so that mean I gotta go around this way to get to school versus going this way,&rdquo; Lucas continued.</p><p>Some likened it to a war zone.</p><p>&ldquo;What&rsquo;s happening in Afghanistan and Iraq is happening in Roseland...there are incidents of post-traumatic stress that our young people are facing,&rdquo; <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/front-center/restoring-roseland-confronting-violence-peaceful-practices-106651" target="_blank">Robert Spicer</a>, culture and climate specialist at Fenger High School, said.</p><p>Spicer&rsquo;s job is to create a culture of peace at a school where high-risk is the norm. He said many kids aren&rsquo;t getting the mental health supports they need to deal with violence-related post-traumatic stress that&rsquo;s going on in the community.</p><p>Spicer and Fenger&rsquo;s principal, <a href="http://www.fengerhighschool.org/apps/pages/index.jsp?uREC_ID=123989&amp;type=u" target="_blank">Elizabeth Dozier</a>, both remembered noticing early on in their tenures that things were especially heated before a long break.</p><p>&ldquo;Before Christmas and Thanksgiving breaks, spring breaks, we used to have here in our first couple years, the kids would just fight...what we realized it&rsquo;s the stress, honestly speaking, the stress of, OK so a lot of kids are going to go home, there&rsquo;s not going to be a meal, they&rsquo;re going to go into some really trying situations...we have children living in abandoned buildings; it&rsquo;s real, real deal stuff...&rdquo; Dozier recalled. &ldquo;And so they get stressed out and then that comes out in the form of aggression because they&rsquo;re teenagers.&rdquo;</p><p>And so, she reasoned, that as teenagers, that stress tends to come out in the form of aggression.</p><p>Nearly four years ago, after the particularly brutal death of Fenger honors student Derrion Albert, attention and resources flooded the school. Dozier took a $6-million federal grant and poured it into mentoring, after-school programs, counselors and security officers trained in de-escalation.</p><p>Fenger became an oasis--a safe place full of opportunities for every student.</p><p>Psychiatrist and violence-prevention expert <a href="http://www.psych.uic.edu/ijr/facultymember.asp?p=cbell" target="_blank">Carl Bell</a> said it&rsquo;s not surprising then that Fenger students would be anxious to be out for summer.</p><p>&ldquo;Let me put it to you this way: If I lived in a war zone and I was safe, away from the front lines...and you told me, &quot;OK, time for you to go back to the front lines...I&#39;d be kind of upset,&rdquo; Bell said.</p><p>Which is why Dozier and her team have developed a strategy to deal with summer breaks.</p><p>In the school&rsquo;s teachers lounge, Dozier erected a board with every student&#39;s name on it. Colors and tiers track the kids&rsquo; summer activities. She wanted every kid, especially those who are likely to find trouble, to do something, to remain connected to the school in some way. But even with a strategy in place, Dozier couldn&rsquo;t ensure their safety after leaving the confines of the school.&nbsp;</p><p>A student was shot late one Saturday night or early Sunday morning over one of the summer&rsquo;s early weekends. Dozier was notified by Chicago Public Schools the following Monday morning. She went to the hospital, thinking he might be there--but he wasn&rsquo;t. So then she went to his home...and he wasn&rsquo;t there either. As she was running around the neighborhood looking for him, she got a call from her staff at Fenger--the student was at school.</p><p>&ldquo;He got on his crutches and walked here [Fenger], he wanted to make sure he was here for the program that started on Monday...&rdquo; Dozier said. &ldquo;These programs are important to kids; and you would think a kid like that would be at home, in bed or whatever, but no, he&rsquo;s here. Him and his mom came to the school, made sure he was all set to go...and he was here,&rdquo; Dozier marveled.</p><p>But many of those programs may soon be unavailable. Fenger&#39;s federal grant runs out at the end of August.</p><p>Ideally, Bell said, the playing field would be level and all kids would have the same opportunities. But given the reality in Roseland, he said it&rsquo;s better to have had something--even if only temporarily.</p><p>&ldquo;If there&#39;s a shipwreck and there&#39;s 20 people in the water but only 10 spots on the boat...don&#39;t just leave me in the water: take me on the boat, dry me off, feed me, let me be dry for a couple hours then push me back in the water and get somebody else on the boat. I&rsquo;d rather be on the boat for a minute or two than not be in the boat at all,&rdquo; Bell reasoned.</p><p>He said that getting something gives a person a sense that there is something good out there.</p><p>&ldquo;We&#39;re sorry they can&#39;t stay but knowing that there is a moral order that eventually prevails...an ideal where people are treated fairly is important,&rdquo; Bell said.</p><p>And, Bell emphasized, it is important to continue floating life rafts Roseland&#39;s way to help young people&rsquo;s resiliency.</p><p><a href="http://www.sgayouth.org/" target="_blank">SGA Youth and Family Services</a> has implemented over 300 out-of-school-time activities at Fenger over these past few years. SGA&rsquo;s vice president of programs Ron Migalski, said programs like Safe Passages, are part of their proactive approach.</p><p>&ldquo;We will have well over a dozen staff who are going to be strategically positioned between these elementary schools and &lsquo;hot zones,&rsquo;if you will, where high crime areas are. So, if we have staff put in place from a proactive standpoint, we can overcome some of these impending crises that can develop&rdquo; Migalski said.</p><p>SGA said it is committed to creating a cradle-to-career pipeline in Roseland. A couple of years ago, it received the only federally awarded Promise Neighborhoods planning grant in the state.</p><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/programs/promiseneighborhoods/index.html" target="_blank">Promise Neighborhoods</a> is a federal program meant to fund community initiatives to keep kids safe and in school. And Migalski said he is hopeful that SGA will be able to continue its work.</p><p>The Promise Neighborhood Implementation Grant is approximately $30 million over six years.</p><p>&ldquo;We&#39;re optimistic and hopeful. We have the support of nearly the entire community, residents, political leaders at the city, state and federal level. We can clearly justify the need why Roseland over any other,&rdquo; Migalski explained.</p><p>And Dozier said shootings like the one that happened this summer further underscore the need.</p><p>&ldquo;(Her student) was getting off a bus at 114th around, like 9 o&rsquo;clock at night, 9:30 at night and someone, two people came up to him, tried to rob him, take his cell phone and his wallet. And he started to run away and they started to shoot and they wound up shooting him in his foot. Is that wrong place, wrong time, can kids be out late? I don&rsquo;t know anymore...I just don&rsquo;t know,&rdquo; Dozier trailed off.</p><p><em>Katie O&rsquo;Brien is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/katieobez" target="_blank">@katieobez</a></em></p><p><strong>Crime around Fenger from Chicago Data Portal</strong></p><div><p style="margin-bottom:3px"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Public-Safety/Crime-around-Fenger-High-School/ub6r-nhvr" style="font-size:12px;font-weight:bold;text-decoration:none;color:#333333;font-family:arial;" target="_blank">Crime around Fenger High School</a></p><iframe frameborder="0" height="646px" scrolling="no" src="https://data.cityofchicago.org/w/ub6r-nhvr/3q3f-6823?cur=oArufQrgQjz&amp;from=qsbvIrRLQIC" title="Crime around Fenger High School" width="760px">&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a data-cke-saved-href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Public-Safety/Crime-around-Fenger-High-School/ub6r-nhvr&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Public-Safety/Crime-around-Fenger-High-School/ub6r-nhvr&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; title=&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Crime around Fenger High School&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; target=&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;_blank&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Crime around Fenger High School&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe><p><a href="http://www.socrata.com/" target="_blank">Powered by Socrata</a></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 06 Aug 2013 08:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/programs-keep-kids-streets-during-violent-summer-may-end-108294 Morning Shift: Patients turn to alternative medicine as option http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-29/morning-shift-patients-turn-alternative-medicine <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Accuptuncture-Flickr- Lars Plougmann.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago magazine reports on Northwestern Memorial Hospital as a center for alternative and complementary medicine for patients. What are patients seeking in these treatments? How are they received by the rest of the medical community?&nbsp;</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-patients-turn-to-alternative-medicin.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-patients-turn-to-alternative-medicin" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Patients turn to alternative medicine as option" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Mon, 29 Jul 2013 08:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-29/morning-shift-patients-turn-alternative-medicine Morning Shift: Black-on-black crime http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-18/morning-shift-black-black-crime-108098 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Crime-Flickr- Alessio Centamori PH.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago has become the poster child for violence, but none more pervasive than black-on-black crime. With black youths facing so many obstacles, how do we ensure that their futures can be bright, or that they will have a future at all?</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-black-on-black-crime.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-black-on-black-crime" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Black-on-black crime" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Thu, 18 Jul 2013 08:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-18/morning-shift-black-black-crime-108098 Morning Shift: Photos, vets and violence http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-10/morning-shift-photos-vets-and-violence-108009 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Guns-Flickr- tdub303.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Hiring Our Heroes works to get Vets back into the job force. Senior Director Ross Cohen explains challenges vets face with employment. Also, photographer Richard Renaldi&#39;s new project &quot;Touching Strangers&quot; explores our connection to each other.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-23.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-23" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Photos, vets and violence" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Wed, 10 Jul 2013 08:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-10/morning-shift-photos-vets-and-violence-108009 Morning Shift: Maxim's gets a makeover http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-08/morning-shift-maxims-gets-makeover-107965 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Maxims-Flickr-cityofchicago.org_.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We discuss restauranteur Brandan Sodikoff&#39;s plans to re-open Maxim&#39;s, a historical Chicago landmark. And Chicago magazine&#39;s Dennis Rodkin answers your questions on buying and selling a home in today&#39;s market.</p><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-22.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-22" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Maxim's gets a makeover" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p> Mon, 08 Jul 2013 08:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-07-08/morning-shift-maxims-gets-makeover-107965 Unwelcome summer break for Chicago violence prevention program http://www.wbez.org/news/unwelcome-summer-break-chicago-violence-prevention-program-107959 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Ceasefire_sh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Every June, Ceasefire sites across Chicago get an email saying that their program will shut down starting July 1st, and until further notice.</p><p>That&rsquo;s because it&rsquo;s the beginning of the state&rsquo;s fiscal year, and there is a gap before when the state sends out money and the organization can process it.</p><p>Many social service programs face a similar funding gap.&nbsp; But Josh Gryniewicz of Ceasefire says that it&rsquo;s particularly challenging for Ceasefire. Summer months are violent and it&rsquo;s when the program&rsquo;s staff, who intervene conflicts, are most needed.</p><p>&ldquo;It just an unfortunate perfect storm,&rdquo; said Gryniewicz.</p><p>In the past, workers have been on hiatus anywhere from 6 weeks to 6 months.<br />But Gryniewicz expects this year to be the shortest gap yet. That&rsquo;s because all the ceasefire sites got their budgets in ahead of time and the program is getting help streamlining the budget process.</p><p>A handful of Ceasefire sites with additional funding are still in operation.The program is looking for individual donations to keep other programs open.</p><p><em>Shannon Heffernan is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/shannon_h">@shannon_h</a></em></p></p> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 12:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/unwelcome-summer-break-chicago-violence-prevention-program-107959