WBEZ | violence http://www.wbez.org/tags/violence Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Amid Growing Youth Violence In Chicago, One Woman Offers A Safety Net http://www.wbez.org/program/weekend-edition/2015-11-23/amid-growing-youth-violence-chicago-one-woman-offers-safety-net <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/diane1edit_custom-d047dcd6695b373dc24bd52889c2fe27c73515d2-s800-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res456781576" previewtitle="The youngest child remembered at Chicago's Roseland neighborhood memorial was just one year old."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="The youngest child remembered at Chicago's Roseland neighborhood memorial was just one year old." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/20/stones3edit_custom-5c7b923c2c79004121b200f7eeb5271f668d7371-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 454px; width: 620px;" title="The youngest child remembered at Chicago's Roseland neighborhood memorial was just one-year-old. (Peter Breslow/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>In a run-down stretch of Chicago&#39;s South Michigan Avenue, miles from the museums and skyscrapers, an army of foot-high paving stones stand on shelves along the street. It&#39;s a handmade memorial to honor the young people who have died at the hands of the city&#39;s street violence. A name is written on each of the 574 stones.</p></div></div></div><p>But they are not just names to Diane Latiker.</p><p>&quot;This is the first stone that went up, Blair Hope, coming home on the school bus, 14-year-old got on the bus, sprayed the bus, trying to protect his classmate, girls next to him, and he was killed,&quot; Latiker says. &quot;Arthur Jones, 10 years old, going to get some candy. Fred Couch, he got killed a couple of blocks from here.&quot;</p><p>Just last weekend, 20 people were shot in Chicago and one died. The city&#39;s had about a 20 percent increase in shootings and homicides in the first half of this year, and an epidemic of gun violence the past few years. Most of the killings have occurred in neighborhoods on the South Side, most of those victims have been African-American and many have been teenagers and younger.</p><p>On any given day, sirens and shots ring through the night. And in the morning, children, like the bright-eyed and bold 11-year-old boy Amari, often don&#39;t want to walk to school.</p><p>&quot;Somebody, they tried to jump me,&quot; Amari says. &quot;I was walking my little sister. They said they going to kill us and stuff. I don&#39;t know, I think they must have thought I was somebody they was looking for or something.&quot;</p><p>Amari is one of Diane Latiker&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.examiner.com/article/chicago-youth-organization-struggling-to-stay-afloat">Kids Off the Block</a>, a group she began in her home in the city&#39;s Roseland neighborhood in 2003.</p><p>In a neighborhood where people bolt iron doors and lash down their window shades, Latiker opened her door.</p><p>She and her husband have eight children, and she&#39;s become what amounts to an activist mother to her neighborhood. She invites young people into her house, and into her life.</p><p>She says she tries to make a difference with these kids on a personal level.</p><p>&quot;The only way I can help them is if I listen and know what they need,&quot; she says. &quot;Because they have so many issues and I just try to be on the personal side with them. And if a kid needs a coat to go to school, I try to find a coat. If he needs a way back and forth to school because of <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-11-18/gang-truces-then-vs-now-113835" target="_blank">gang lines</a>, we gonna take him back and forth to school. We do traditional programs of course, like tutoring and mentoring and conflict resolution stuff like that, but I found out you have to get into their lives. You know, you have to. Because the only way to help them is to realize that they have a life worth living.&quot;</p><div id="res456782016" previewtitle="Anti-violence activist Diane Latiker stands before the memorial for young people lost to violence in Chicago over the last several years. More than 500 stones honor the victims and there are hundreds more that still need to be added."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Anti-violence activist Diane Latiker stands before the memorial for young people lost to violence in Chicago over the last several years. More than 500 stones honor the victims and there are hundreds more that still need to be added." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/11/20/diane1edit_custom-d047dcd6695b373dc24bd52889c2fe27c73515d2-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 456px; width: 620px;" title="Anti-violence activist Diane Latiker stands before the memorial for young people lost to violence in Chicago over the last several years. More than 500 stones honor the victims and there are hundreds more that still need to be added. (Peter Breslow/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>In the beginning, she says she took a naïve approach.</p></div></div></div><p>&quot;I thought everybody wanted to help the kids and the young people. So when I invited those kids into our house, I never thought it would go this far. I never thought all those other kids were out there,&quot; she says. &quot;When those kids, the ones I invited to my house, the nine, they went out there and told other kids, &#39;There&#39;s this lady can help,&#39; and they started coming.&quot;</p><p>Latiker works with about 50 kids at the moment. She receives support from local churches, city agencies and neighborhood groups, and has become well-known. The mayor of Chicago has paid his respects. She was one of CNN&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cnn.heroes/archive11/diane.latiker.html" target="_blank">Heroes of the Year in 2011</a>.</p><p>&quot;There are two brothers up here, their mom lost them a week apart,&quot; she says, surrounded by the memorial stones. &quot;Shamiah Adams, 11; Antonio Smith, 9; Devonshay Lofton, 16; They all had lives.&quot;</p><div id="con456884754" previewtitle="related"><div id="res456884790"><div><div>&nbsp;</div></div></div></div><p>She can recall many young people who&#39;ve passed through her home, touched her heart and gone on to success. But she also remembers, just as sharply, a boy named Red who came to her when he was 15. She helped him get a summer job and he did better in school. But Red couldn&#39;t outrun the streets:</p><p>&quot;At 18, he got with the wrong crowd. He started dodging me, I couldn&#39;t find him. Next thing I know he&#39;s robbing people, shooting at people, throwing up gang signs, getting high,&quot; Latiker says. &quot;The last time I saw him was two weeks before he was killed. He said he didn&#39;t want to have anything to do with what I was talking about, he didn&#39;t believe in it. And he rode off.&quot;</p><p>She saw Red once more: dead in the street.</p><p>Now and then, another name rises to the top of the news. Three weeks ago, it was Tyshawn Lee, a 9-year-old boy who was&nbsp;<a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-tyshawn-killing-autopsy-results-met-20151118-story.html" target="_blank">lured into an alley and shot at close range</a>. Police say a gang wanted to terrorize Lee&#39;s father, who reputedly belongs to another gang.</p><p>Latiker has seen how gangs have begun to target the families of rivals, a cruelty she says she once thought was too brutal even for gangs.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t care how heartless you are, you couldn&#39;t imagine that &#39;I&#39;m risking my mother or that my four-year-old sister or brother is in danger coming from school because I made a decision&#39; &mdash; and you&#39;re still going to stay in it? Knowing that it&#39;s beyond you now and that your family is marked,&quot; she says. &quot;You couldn&#39;t have imagined that.&quot;</p><p>But she did imagine that an empty lot across the street behind all those names on stones could be a basketball court free from drugs and crime. A donor came forward to build it, and the hoops drew boys to her door.</p><p>Today, two 13-year-olds, Jaheim Elliot and Cinque Dunn, will receive Champions for Teens Awards.</p><p>Elliot&#39;s father died about five years ago, of a heart attack. Dunn&#39;s father was shot to death in the street two years ago.</p><p>They&#39;re both 8th graders who found Diane Latiker through playing on her basketball court.</p><p>&quot;I seen a whole full court basketball rim and then when I asked I came across the street and knocked on the door and asked could we play basketball and she said yeah...like a whole group of us ready to play basketball ... And she said we could come up here any time.&quot;</p><p>And they say she&#39;s helped a lot.</p><p>&quot;Diana&#39;s a grandma to me. She treat me like a grandma.&quot;</p><p>&quot;She takes care of us,&quot; &shy;&shy;Elliot agrees.</p><p>Their words touch Latiker.</p><p>&quot;When I&#39;m around Miss Diane I feel safe.&quot;</p><p>And they say she&#39;s helped a lot &mdash; that she&#39;s like a grandmother to them.</p><p>The boys and their friends play on as the sun comes down, and Diane Latiker looks on.</p><p>She has to add another 500 stones to the shelves on this lot, with more names of children who have died in Chicago&#39;s gun violence.</p><p>But for a moment she gets to watch five boys who have knocked on her door run, laugh and feel safe enough just to play basketball.</p></p> Mon, 23 Nov 2015 10:42:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/program/weekend-edition/2015-11-23/amid-growing-youth-violence-chicago-one-woman-offers-safety-net When social media fuels gang violence http://www.wbez.org/news/when-social-media-fuels-gang-violence-113212 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/7910370882_39d180fb66_z.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Facebook, YouTube and Twitter have become an everyday part of life for many young people &mdash; and increasingly, the way some, including rival gang members, threaten each other.</p><p>The practice is called &quot;cyber banging,&quot; and it&#39;s often led to fights and even death.</p><p>Jaime, 17, has been in a gang for two years and is trying to leave. NPR agreed to use only his first name for his safety. Logging onto a computer at the YMCA of Metro Chicago, he clicks on a video in his Facebook feed. It shows a group of young men mugging for the camera, flashing gang signs and guns. Jaime says it&#39;s one of many so-called gang pages online.</p><p>&quot;Social media is just endorsement, that&#39;s all,&quot; he says. &quot;To endorse where you come from, what gang you are in.&quot;</p><p>He points to one of the men who pushed his way to the front of the video for a just a moment. &quot;He got killed a week after [by] the rival gang. It was crazy, and now people actually make pictures making fun of him,&quot; Jaime says.</p><p>He says there will be retaliation over that disrespect. Using social media to gang bang reaches across all platforms. There is still rancor in some Chicago neighborhoods over a long-running feud on Twitter between Chicago rappers Chief Keef and Lil JoJo, both associated with rival gangs. Three years ago, shortly after Lil JoJo issued a taunt along with his location, he was killed.</p><p>This year, police say cyber banging fueled the death of another Chicago rapper.</p><p>Shaquon Thomas was called Young Pappy. On YouTube, there have been nearly 2 million views of his song &quot;Killa,&quot; which glorifies gang life and violence. He was gunned down in May.</p><p>Eddie Bocanegra, a co-director of Metro Chicago YMCA&#39;s Youth Safety and Violence Prevention program, says gang banging on social media for some is a way to get street credibility. Others that post gang raps think it&#39;s a way to make it big in the music industry, where dark and violent lyrics &mdash; so-called &quot;drill music&quot; &mdash; sells. But Bocanegra says the potential for violence spurred by social media extends even to those not in gangs.</p><p>&quot;This kid could simply say, &#39;Hey, I was in class today, and the girl next to me was really cute. Her name is so and so. I thought she was fine,&#39; &quot; he says. &quot;Well, this girl has a brother who is in the street who really already has a reputation of being violent or has a boyfriend, and he sees that post. Now it&#39;s like, &#39;Hey, why you making comments about my girl?&#39; &#39;Why you making comments about my sister?&#39; And it just escalates.&quot;</p><p>Chicago police do monitor social media sites, and they&#39;ve been able to work with school social workers to prevent some violence from occurring. Desmond Patton, a professor of social work at Columbia University, says he and fellow researchers want to take those efforts a step further.</p><p>&quot;One idea is that if we can decode the language, then perhaps we can send triggers to social workers, violence workers who are embedded in these neighborhoods already, so that they can utilize the strategies they already have to reach out to youth before the post becomes an injury or homicide,&quot; Patton says.</p><p>Patton conducted what he calls an &quot;Internet banging study.&quot; He interviewed current or former gang members between the ages of 14 and 24 in some of Chicago&#39;s toughest neighborhoods. He asked them what they see on social media, how they use it, how they believe it connects to violence in the neighborhood, and, he says, &quot;under what conditions are they responding to situations and posts online that they believe to be threatening.&quot;</p><p>One of the scientists working with Patton to create a cyber banging gauge is Henry Lieberman, a visiting professor at MIT&#39;s Media Lab. He plans to devise an algorithm to understand content on social media and how words turn to violence.</p><p>&quot;You want to be able to recognize patterns like that and then you can suggest to people to try to do things that de-escalate the situation,&quot; Lieberman says.</p><p>Meantime, Patton says there is much more to come, including more interviews and scientific testing, in the quest to use social media that&#39;s so essential to young people to curb gang violence.</p><p><em>&mdash; via <a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2015/10/07/446300514/when-social-media-fuels-gang-violence">NPR&#39;s All Tech Considered</a></em></p></p> Wed, 07 Oct 2015 09:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/when-social-media-fuels-gang-violence-113212 Dr. Carl Bell on effect of Chi-raq on community http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-14/dr-carl-bell-effect-chi-raq-community-112384 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/dr. carl bell.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214536016&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">The notion of community no longer exists in Chicago. Either neighbors don&rsquo;t know each other, or, they&rsquo;re scared of each other. That&rsquo;s the main problem when talking about violence, psychiatrist Carl Bell stressed Thursday during a panel discussion about the city&rsquo;s violence at the City Club of Chicago. Bell said he&rsquo;s been interested in the issue of violence since 1976 and began a quest four years later to address it. He says it starts with mental health and children. Dr. Bell -- Director of the Institute of Juvenile Research and a retired Professor of Psychiatry and Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago -- calls in to discuss his remarks at the City Club.</span></p></p> Fri, 10 Jul 2015 13:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-14/dr-carl-bell-effect-chi-raq-community-112384 7-year-old felled by gun violence during holiday weekend http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-06/7-year-old-felled-gun-violence-during-holiday-weekend-112320 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213500003&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 24px; line-height: 22px;">7-year-old felled by gun violence during holiday weekend</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">At least 40 people were wounded by gunfire and eight dead over the Fourth of July weekend, including 7-year-old Amari Brown in Humboldt Park. While the violence tally was less than the last two July 4th weekends, the community said it&rsquo;s still too much and wonder when enough will be enough. There were several anti-violence measures in place over the last few days to help keep the shootings at bay. Last week we talked to Autry Phillips of Target Area Development Corp. about the grassroots organization putting 300 people on the streets in Englewood and portions of the West Side to reduce the violence. Phillips joins us on the line to discuss the group&rsquo;s effort. Father Michael Pfleger, head pastor at St. Sabina also joins us by phone to discuss the gun violence and the mens-only march the church organized through the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood to kick of what many hoped would be a safe holiday weekend.</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;"><strong>Guests:</strong> <em>Father <a href="https://twitter.com/MichaelPfleger">Michael Pfleger</a> is the pastor at St. Sabina in Auburn-Gresham. Autry Phillips is head of the <a href="http://targetarea.org/">Target Area Development Corporation</a>.&nbsp;</em></span></p></p> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 10:47:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-06/7-year-old-felled-gun-violence-during-holiday-weekend-112320 300 men and women to take over streets this month to stem violence http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-02/300-men-and-women-take-over-streets-month-stem-violence-112306 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/violence seth anderson.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212960440&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 22px;">The Fourth of July weekend is near and along with fireworks, there&rsquo;s usually gunshots. One organization is putting 300 men and women on the streets in two police districts each weekend this month to help cease the gunfire and prevent a repeat from last July. Nine people were shot every day in July 2014. 30-percent of those shootings happened during the holiday weekend. 25 people were murdered, and of those, 16 occurred in the 7th and 11th police districts. Target Area Development Corp. works with ex-offenders to get them re-acclimated into society and help reduce violence in their respective neighborhoods. Autry Phillips, executive director of the Target Area, will be in studio and Fred Seaton, an anti-violence credible messenger join us to discuss the anti-violence initiative that kicks off this weekend.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 22px;">.&nbsp;</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Guests:&nbsp;</strong><a href="http://targetarea.org/">Autry Phillips</a> is the Executive Director of Target Area Development Corp.&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><a href="http://targetarea.org/public-safety/">Fred Seaton</a> is a credible messenger for Target Area</p></p> Thu, 02 Jul 2015 11:45:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-02/300-men-and-women-take-over-streets-month-stem-violence-112306 The economic cost of global violence http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-19/economic-cost-global-violence-112223 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jayel%20Aheram%20Flickr.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Jayel Aheram)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/211097532&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Peace Index reveals economic impact of violence</span></font></p><p>An annual report on the state of world peace, the Global Peace Index, published by the Australia-based Institute for Economics and Peace, states that violence has cost the global economy over 14 trillion dollars or over 13 percent of global GDP. Iceland scores as the most peaceful country on Earth, while Syria bottoms out the list. Aubrey Fox, executive director for the U.S. Office of the Institute for Economics and Peace, will talk about this year&rsquo;s report and how factors like economics, war and social unrest affect the current state of peace in our world.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/aubreyfox1">Aubrey Fox</a> is the&nbsp;United States Executive Director of the Institute for Economics and Peace.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/211097521&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">&#39;The Wolfpack&#39; explores the secluded life of a cloistered family</span></font></p><p>WBEZ Film Contributor, Milos Stehlik of Facets Multimedia, gives his take on the The Wolfpack, a documentary about the extreme lengths to which a Peruvian-American man has gone to do what he thinks will keep his family safe from the outside world. The Wolfpack opens tonight at Music Box Theatre.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/milosstehlik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the director of <a href="http://www.facets.org/">Facets Multimedia</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/211097506&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Weekend Passport: Japanese kimono exhibit and Puerto Rican People&#39;s Circus</span></font></p><p>Each week, global citizen Nari Safavi, helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week, we&rsquo;ll talk about an exhibition of Japanese kimonos and the Puerto Rican People&rsquo;s Parade in Humboldt Park.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em>Nari Safavi is a co-founder of <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/default.aspx">PASFARDA Arts &amp; Cultural Exchange</a>. </em></li><li><em>Charles Harris is a Professor of Ikebana at the <a href="http://chicagoikenobo.org/Home_Page.html">Ikenobo School</a>.</em></li></ul></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 14:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-19/economic-cost-global-violence-112223 CPD 'listening tour' fuzzy on details http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/mccarthylistens.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cities across the country have been ripped apart by violent encounters between police and citizens.</p><p>Ferguson had Michael Brown, New York had Eric Garner, Baltimore had Freddie Gray &mdash; and Chicago had 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by a Chicago cop last October. There&rsquo;s also Chicago Police Commander Glenn Evans, indicted for allegedly ramming his gun into someone&rsquo;s mouth. And Detective Dante Servin, acquitted of killing 22-year-old Rekia Boyd.</p><p>That&rsquo;s part of the reason why the city&rsquo;s top cop, Supt. Garry McCarthy, recently announced a big, city-wide listening tour. It&rsquo;s a major initiative for the police department to communicate with the public.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a big anti-police sentiment both locally and nationally. And we&rsquo;re dealing with protests on a daily basis,&rdquo; McCarthy said in the Spring. &nbsp;</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-06-11/morning-shift-looking-mccarthys-listening-tour-112175"><strong>Morning Shift: Looking into McCarthy&#39;s listening tour</strong></a></p></blockquote><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">After Detective Servin was found not guilty by a judge in April, anger in Chicago reached a high point. And that&rsquo;s when McCarthy came out with a plan to repair the relationship between cops and residents: He called it the &ldquo;CPD Neighborhood Outreach Tour.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The idea was the department would open up a big public dialogue. McCarthy and police commanders would personally meet with people and really listen.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Mayor Rahm Emanuel threw his support behind the initiative.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;The listening tour, not just by Superintendent McCarthy, it&rsquo;s also by each of the commanders in the districts, is all a part of effort of building trust and relationships that are essential part of community policing,&rdquo; Emanuel said.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">There were no details about when the tour was starting, no big announcement about how anybody from the neighborhoods could take part. But then, all of a sudden at a Chicago City Club event in May, McCarthy said the listening tour was already underway &mdash; and that it was a big hit.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m going out every single day to community meetings, sitting down with small groups of residents without the press, and we have conversations and we listen to people,&rdquo; McCarthy told a room full of business and civic leaders.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">But even after McCarthy gave his speech at the City Club, there was still no way to find out where and when the events of this big, public listening tour were happening.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">WBEZ has been trying to find out more about this outreach tour ever since it was first announced: We&rsquo;ve called, we&rsquo;ve emailed about half a dozen times and we&rsquo;ve asked in person. The main question is &mdash; where are these events listed for the public?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">The tour is supposed to be a chance to hear from the public &mdash; to get &lsquo;resident feedback&rsquo; and to &lsquo;foster ongoing dialogue.&rsquo; But if people don&rsquo;t know about it, why do it?</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Residents aren&rsquo;t the only ones struggling to get this information. People you&rsquo;d presume would absolutely know don&rsquo;t either.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;Seems like it&rsquo;s some kind of secret mission,&rdquo; said Ald. Pat Dowell, who represents the 3rd Ward on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">She said she would love to advertise the listening tour to her constituents, but she&rsquo;s been kept in the dark.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know anything about how they&rsquo;re organized, what he is trying to accomplish,&rdquo; Ald. Dowell lamented.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">An officer in charge of community relations for her district said she didn&rsquo;t know when the meetings were happening in her district. In fact, she already missed the one in her own district &mdash; she only found out about it from a resident &mdash; afterwards.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Dowell&rsquo;s fellow South Side alderman, Roderick Sawyer (6), said he got a list of the listening tour stops after he specifically asked the police. But he said he doesn&rsquo;t think most people have any way of finding out about the events.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;">Ald. Sawyer said he suspects the police want to handpick their audience, which he said defeats the whole purpose.</p><p style="margin-left:4.5pt;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><a name="list"></a>Remaining Dialogue Tour Events</span></p><table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width: 620px;" width="883"><thead><tr><th scope="col" style="width: 79px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">District</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 144px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Date</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 76px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Time</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 416px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Location</span></p></th><th scope="col" style="width: 168px;"><p><span style="font-size:18px;">Contact</span></p></th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, June 11</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Garfield Hospital, 520 N. Ridgeway</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Chuck Levy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 17</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>5:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Urban League, 4510 S. Michigan</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Roderick Hawkins</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>014</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, June 24</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation, 2550 W. North</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Danny Serrano</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>011</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, Jul 2</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>People&#39;s Church of the Harvest, 3570 W. Fifth Avenue</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Eaddy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>010</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Tuesday, July 7</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>7:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Lawndale Christian Development Corporation,</p><p>2111 S. Hamlin Ave (Firehouse Community Arts Center) Ogden and Hamlin</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Tracie Worthy</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>002</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Thursday, July 9</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>KLEO Community Family Life Center, 119 E. Garfield Blvd.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Torrey Barrett</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>007</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 13</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Chicago Embassy Church, 5848 S. Princeton</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Bishop Peecher</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>015</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Wednesday, July 15</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:00 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Mars Hill Baptist Church, 5916 W. Lake St</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Stowers</p></td></tr><tr><td style="width:79px;"><p>005</p></td><td style="width:144px;"><p>Monday, July 20</p></td><td style="width:76px;"><p>6:30 p.m.</p></td><td style="width:416px;"><p>Temple of Glory Church 311 E. 95<sup>th</sup> St.</p></td><td style="width:168px;"><p>Pastor Wilson</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him </em><a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid"><em>@pksmid</em></a><em>.</em></p></p> Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cpd-listening-tour-fuzzy-details-112171 Chicago mayor's commission unveils plan for a safer Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-mayors-commission-unveils-plan-safer-chicago-111241 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP973232440855.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The city of Chicago released <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/mayor/supp_info/the-mayor-s-commission-for-a-safer-chicago.html" target="_blank">a report</a> today with 28 recommendations to address the city&#39;s youth violence problem.</p><p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the Mayor&#39;s Commission for a Safe Chicago released the report. The recommendations include adding eight &quot;peace rooms&quot; in Chicago Public schools for conflict resolution and connecting families with counseling.</p><p>&ldquo;Every child in the city of Chicago deserves a childhood, and that childhood cannot be stolen from them,&rdquo; Emanuel said in unveiling the plan. &ldquo;And every adolescent deserves their adolescence free of violence. So I hope we take this work &hellip; not just as another report [but as] a call to action.&rdquo;</p><p>While it is billed as a strategic plan for 2015, most of the report&rsquo;s 64 pages are dedicated to celebrating past accomplishments by the Emanuel administration. Of the 60 violence prevention programs highlighted in the report&rsquo;s executive summary, 13 of them are new or updated for 2015.</p><p>One of the new ideas presented in the plan calls on the Chicago Police Department to explore alternatives to arresting first-time juvenile offenders.</p><p>&ldquo;We recommend exploring possible alternatives to arrest for first-time juvenile offenders such as tickets or &hellip; community service,&rdquo; said co-chair Eddie Bocanegra with the YMCA.</p><p>And the written report says the police department will do just that in 2015. But spokesmen for the mayor&rsquo;s office and CPD declined to provide any specifics on the plan.</p><p>The commission&rsquo;s plan focuses on youth violence because, according to the city, people 29 and younger have made up more than 60 percent of Chicago&rsquo;s homicide victims over the past five years. It aims to decrease crime by treating youth violence as a public health issue. That means a focus on education, trauma therapy and youth employment.</p><p>Emanuel pointed to <a href="https://soundcloud.com/afternoonshiftwbez/new-study-reveals-local-summer-jobs-program-reduces-youth-violence" target="_blank">a recent study by the University of Chicago Crime Lab and the University of Pennsylvania</a> that showed the One Summer Plus youth jobs program helped reduce arrests by more than 40 percent over a 16-month period.</p><p>This is the first report by the Mayor&rsquo;s Commission for a Safer Chicago. It was written after three forums held over the summer attended by government representatives, faith groups and community organizations.</p><p>The commission also sought out opinions from about 200 young people in more than a dozen Chicago communities.</p><p><em>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ reporter and producer. Follow him on twitter <a href="http://twitter.com/pksmid" target="_blank">@pksmid</a>. The Associated Press also contributed to this report.</em></p></p> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 14:28:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-mayors-commission-unveils-plan-safer-chicago-111241 Tension in the South China Sea http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-14/tension-south-china-sea-110935 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP23336063099.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Tensions are increasing in the South China Sea. China is building islands there and the U.S. is establishing a larger military presence in the Philippines. Journalist Howard French&#39;s joins us to discuss what&#39;s happening.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-tension-in-the-south-china-sea/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-tension-in-the-south-china-sea.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-tension-in-the-south-china-sea" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Tension in the South China Sea" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 14 Oct 2014 11:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-14/tension-south-china-sea-110935 Standing in the gap: Parents in violent communities stress about keeping kids safe http://www.wbez.org/news/standing-gap-parents-violent-communities-stress-about-keeping-kids-safe-110670 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/kids.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>Fifty school-aged children died so far this year in Chicago. And in at least <a href="https://soundcloud.com/afternoonshiftwbez/arrest-made-in-shamiya-adams-murder">one case</a>, the child was killed while playing inside a friend&rsquo;s home&mdash;a setting that most parents would think is extremely safe. But for many parents living in neighborhoods where violence is a reality, even the most benign settings can feel unsafe and out of control.</p><p>Parents worry. Most never stop worrying about their children. It&rsquo;s a parent&rsquo;s job to protect and provide for their child; to help them grow and develop as individuals. So when a parent&rsquo;s abilities are compromised by things out of their control, it can be overwhelming.</p><p>On the far South Side of Chicago, in Roseland, crime and violence add to parents&rsquo; worries. Parents bite their fingernails in the summer months, when idle time leaves young people vulnerable to dangerous community elements.</p><p><a href="http://crime.chicagotribune.com/chicago/community/roseland">Fifty-five people</a> have been shot in Roseland so far this year; in the last month, there&rsquo;s been more than three dozen batteries and assaults in the neighborhood. The majority of the violent crimes in the neighborhood take place on the street or a sidewalk, which is why many parents say they&rsquo;re leery to send their kids outside to play.</p><p>James Brown, 44, keeps a close watch over his 12-year-old son Semaj. Brown says stories about stray bullets hitting innocent kids is a known factor in the community&mdash;and that the people pulling the triggers don&rsquo;t care who or what they&rsquo;re shooting. And so, Semaj isn&rsquo;t allowed to ride his bike unless his father&rsquo;s outside.</p><p>&ldquo;I just want to be out there...&rdquo; Brown explained, &ldquo;not saying I can protect them from it, I just want to be out there.&rdquo;</p><p>Brown wants to be everywhere when it comes to his only child. And he keeps Semaj very busy.</p><p>&ldquo;Right now, we playing baseball, then after baseball we play basketball...we play football. I have to keep him occupied..hanging out on the block is not an option at all, he knows that,&rdquo; Brown reasoned.</p><p>We. We play basketball, we play football: It would be hard for Brown not to feel like a member of the team, considering he goes to every game and practice.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s hard, it&rsquo;s hard...but I can&rsquo;t give my son to the streets. I can&rsquo;t give him to to the streets. I can&rsquo;t give him to people that act like they care but really don&rsquo;t care,&rdquo; Brown said.</p><p>Brown cares; not just about his son but about all the young men in Roseland. He&rsquo;s worked as a high school football coach in the community for the last two decades.</p><p>&ldquo;I coach football to save lives. I don&rsquo;t coach to be popular to be liked, I could care less if you like me. But it&rsquo;s an option for kids...to change their life,&rdquo; Brown said. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>But Brown felt there weren&rsquo;t any good little league options for his son in Roseland. So he spent the summer driving him to and from Englewood to play on its baseball team. His youngest sister, Victoria Harper Peeples, chose to do the same with her two boys. Both parents recognize the irony in taking their kids from one violent neighborhood to another to play little league.</p><p>&ldquo;People are immune to gunshots nowadays&mdash;as opposed to run for cover, they just sit there and act as if nothing happens&hellip;&rdquo; Harper Peeples lamented.</p><p>&ldquo;Well kids know &#39;hit the deck,&rsquo; wait for the shooting is over with and then get up and walk away. They know that. That&rsquo;s what we teach them. &lsquo;Cause you can&rsquo;t keep &lsquo;em in the house, you can&rsquo;t shelter them&hellip;&rdquo; Brown added.</p><p>Clinical psychologist <a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/physicians/physician.html?id=6146" target="_blank">Brad Stolbach</a>, with the University of Chicago, has focused his entire career on children affected by trauma and violence. For nearly 20 years, he ran the Chicago Child Trauma Center at La Rabida Children&rsquo;s Hospital on the city&rsquo;s South Side. Stolbach said the constant, real threat of violence in communities like Roseland can be extremely stressful and disruptive.</p><p>&ldquo;If that&rsquo;s your top priority, is watching out and knowing when to hit the deck, it&#39;s very hard to attend to the normal tasks of daily life,&rdquo; Stolbach explained.</p><p>Moreover, Stolbach continued, parents really struggle when they feel like their child&rsquo;s safety is out of their control.</p><p>&ldquo;It&#39;s just the way we&#39;re wired, especially moms, that protecting their children is a biological imperative. It&#39;s the number one priority in a lot of ways. And so feeling powerless to do that, can be not just frustrating but can really affect how you feel about yourself as a parent and as a person.&rdquo;</p><p>And when your kid turns out to be the perpetrator of violence...well, that&rsquo;s tough too.</p><p>Diane Latiker raised eight kids in Roseland. She described her parenting style as overprotective, relentless even.</p><p>&ldquo;I have four sons and when they were growing up, they were in gangs and I knew it. I mean, I tried my best to spearhead them other ways...I mean, I was relentless. But I had to get them away from here...literally, all four of them, to save their lives,&rdquo; Latiker recalled.</p><p>She sent the boys to live with their father in a nearby suburban Bellwood. She thought her worries were nearly over when her youngest daughter was about 13. She could almost see the finish line&mdash;her days of worrying about kids hanging out around the neighborhood were numbered. But it was around that time when Latiker realized, it wasn&rsquo;t just her kids who needed looking after.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;My mom worked; so when I came home from school, the block watched me when my mom was gone. Someone would see me out on the street and say, &lsquo;What are you doing Diane? Where you going Diane? Shouldn&rsquo;t you be in the house?&rsquo; So, you know, I never asked where their parents were or why they weren&rsquo;t doing...I just wanted to know what I could do to help fill in,&rdquo; she remembered.</p><p>Her foundation, <a href="http://www.kobchicago.org/">Kids Off the Block</a>, began with 10 of her daughter&#39;s friends. She invited them into her home and encouraged them to safely explore their interests and potential. Soon there were scores of kids in her living room and off the street. The kids no longer gather in her home, Latiker acquired a space next door. And while the network and foundation has grown, Latiker says the sense of community she remembers from her youth, or the &ldquo;neighbor - hood&rdquo; as she calls it, is still noticeably absent.</p><p>Latiker isn&rsquo;t the only person who thinks so.</p><p>Robert Douglas grew up in Roseland, on 114th and Prairie, in the late 80s and early 90s when the murder rate was double what it is today. Still, Douglas said he felt safer back then.</p><p>&ldquo;We had these backyards, right? That&rsquo;s where the neighbors got to know each other...now, they can&rsquo;t sit on the porch to get a breeze...because of the violence,&rdquo; Douglas said.</p><p>Douglas was a self-described &ldquo;gym rat&rdquo; growing up, which kept him out of trouble...for a while. But then his oldest brother was killed by gun violence.</p><p>&ldquo;My oldest brother was like...daddy. When he left, it was like...you know, hungry...where do we turn now?&rdquo; Douglas recalled.</p><p>Douglas never imagined what that kind of loss might feel like.</p><p>&ldquo;You don&rsquo;t know what it&rsquo;s like until you&rsquo;re burying someone to gun violence. You wouldn&rsquo;t...you could never imagine it,&rdquo; Douglas said.</p><p>He never imagined his response would be to turn to the streets. Douglas said the temptation was unavoidable.</p><p>&ldquo;Violence came to my front door,&rdquo; Douglas began. He rapped a few friendly but firm knocks onto the surface in front of him as he remembered his journey to a life of crime and violence. &ldquo;[Violence] said, &lsquo;Bob, what&rsquo;s up?&rsquo; And I opened the door and I went outside and I played.&rdquo;</p><p>Douglas doesn&rsquo;t want the same fate waiting for his children outside their door...no gangs, no drugs, no violence...none of it.</p><p>&ldquo;Ain&rsquo;t no way in the world I&rsquo;m gonna allow that to happen...and I&rsquo;m not moving out of Roseland. My wife want to go so bad...and she right...my children don&rsquo;t deserve it...they deserve better,&rdquo; Douglas said.</p><p>But Stolbach said it&rsquo;s important to understand that the idea of &ldquo;stopping the violence,&rdquo; is a fantasy until the reality of what causes it&mdash;poverty&mdash;is addressed.</p><p>&ldquo;If we continue to look at how horrible it is but that doesn&rsquo;t result in us trying to change what we&rsquo;re doing about it...that can be demoralizing,&quot; Stolbach explained.</p><p>But when parks and playgrounds are considered an unsafe place to play, when jobs and resources are limited, when neighbors have stopped looking out for one another, giving your kids better is hard.</p><p>And mom Harper Peeples said, it&rsquo;s already pretty tough.</p><p>&ldquo;We like superheroes for our children. Our kids look at us and be like, &lsquo;nothing goes wrong, we don&rsquo;t have any problems, we don&rsquo;t have any worries...&rsquo; But we be stressed out just trying to make sure, did I put them in the right school, did I let &lsquo;em hang with the right friends, did I put him on the right baseball team? There&rsquo;s just so many things that we have to do as parents, and we always put on the spotlight. I mean, it&rsquo;s no chance that mom or dad could make a mistake. We have to be almost like perfect individuals, at least in the sight of our children.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Katie O&rsquo;Brien is a WBEZ reporter and producer. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/katieobez">@katieobez</a>.</em></p></p> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:52:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/standing-gap-parents-violent-communities-stress-about-keeping-kids-safe-110670