WBEZ | Access Living http://www.wbez.org/tags/access-living Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en One take on what’s wrong with Chicago’s schools budget http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-19/one-take-what%E2%80%99s-wrong-chicago%E2%80%99s-schools-budget-112684 <p><p>Tuesday night, Chicago Public Schools held three simultaneous hearings, where the public got to weigh in on the district&rsquo;s proposed budget for the 2016 fiscal year. That budget includes hundreds of layoffs, and a variety of other cuts. It also relies on 480 million dollars from Springfield that may or may not materialize. Rod Estvan is the education policy analyst for Access Living, the disability advocacy group. He says 2015-2016 is an especially critical year for special education. He was at the public hearing at Schurz High School on the Northwest Side to testify about changes he&rsquo;d like to see CPS make before the board votes on the budget next week.</p></p> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:05:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-19/one-take-what%E2%80%99s-wrong-chicago%E2%80%99s-schools-budget-112684 CPS budget cuts hit special education students http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-budget-cuts-hit-special-education-students-112512 <p><p dir="ltr">Phillip Cantor got called into an emergency meeting last week at the school where he teaches&mdash;North-Grand High School on Chicago&rsquo;s West Side. The district&rsquo;s central office had just sent over the budget for the coming school year.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We had some cuts at our school, but seemed to be doing better than other schools in our area,&rdquo; Cantor, who&#39;s chair of the Science Department, said. &ldquo;And then we realized when we got further into the budget, we were losing $318,000 specifically for special ed services.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">It would mean the school would have to cut about three special education teachers or six full-time aides.</p><p dir="ltr">Cantor said there&rsquo;s no way it would work.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re barely meeting the kids&rsquo; requirements now,&rdquo; he said.</p><p dir="ltr">Earlier this month, Jesse Ruiz, the vice president of the School Board who at the time was leading the district interim CPS CEO, announced that more than 500 special education teachers would be laid off districtwide. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the cuts, which included special ed, &ldquo;unconscionable and intolerable.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The move, he said, came after Chicago Public Schools conducted an 18-month review of services and staffing for students with special needs and found that even as enrollment in special ed was declining, the number of staff was increasing.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The long-term goal is for more students with unique learning needs to be able to receive services at their neighborhood schools,&rdquo; he said.</p><p dir="ltr">But the district has kept pretty quiet about how it&rsquo;s going about making changes to how special education is delivered.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;When we looked more closely, there was a line in the budget that said All Means All pilot,&rdquo; Cantorsaid. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">If you haven&rsquo;t heard of All Means All, you&rsquo;re not alone. The district made no formal announcement about it and some of the 102 schools now in the pilot didn&rsquo;t know they would be part of it until their budgets came. Last year, about two dozen schools were part of the program.</p><p dir="ltr">Internal district documents provided to WBEZ outline how the All Means All program is designed, and it&rsquo;s complicated, but boils down to what some call &ldquo;student-based budgeting for special education.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Principals get a lump sum amount for special needs students instead of specific staff positions. If that sounds familiar, it&rsquo;s because that&rsquo;s the way the <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-principals-get-more-flexibility-likely-less-money-budget-107560">rest of Chicago schools have been funded</a> for the last few years. &nbsp;Principals get a lump sum for each student and then they decide what to do with it.</p><p>The internal document about All Means All did not list the actual per pupil amounts for students with special needs. CPS spokeswoman Emily Bittner provided the following chart to WBEZ.</p><div><img alt="" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-30%20at%2012.11.46%20AM.png" style="width: 100%;" title="" /></div><div><p dir="ltr"><em>*CPS refers to students with special needs as &ldquo;diverse learners&rdquo;. They get a base amount under the main student-based budgeting formula, reflected in the Column 2. Column 1 includes the flat amounts per student for additional special education services under &ldquo;All Means All.&rdquo; Added together, in Column 3, is the total amount a school will get for a student with special needs in each category. These amounts are being used at just 102 schools this year. The remaining 500-plus schools will continue to be staffed under the old formula, where the Board provides positions based on enrollment and need.</em></p><p dir="ltr">The system is meant to give principals more flexibility and bring the funding formula for special education in line with the formula for all students in CPS. Student-based budgeting is something many urban districts are using now. In theory, money follows students, creating a more equitable formula.</p><p dir="ltr">But its roll out in Chicago was not well-received, in part because it came at a time of financial crisis and at many schools, the total amount of funding has not been enough to cover existing programs and staff.</p><p dir="ltr">But having money follow students gets more complicated with special education, Cantor points out. That&rsquo;s because you can&rsquo;t easily change a student&rsquo;s schedule. It&rsquo;s dictated by a legal document called an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a process for changing IEPs, you can&rsquo;t just change it,&rdquo; Cantor said. &ldquo;It has to be done at a meeting with the parents with parent&rsquo;s permission.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Rod Estvan, education policy analyst with the disability-rights group Access Living, said there&rsquo;s a reason special education is expensive. Those IEPs outline, down to the minute, when students should be working with trained adults, like social workers, speech therapists, and certified teachers. The students may be deaf or dyslexic or have one of many conditions that make it harder for them to learn.</p><p dir="ltr">Federal law dictates students in special education must also be spending as much time as possible in regular classrooms. Creating schedules that fulfill both requirements can be a nightmare for principals.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;These are not easy choices that are being thrown down on principals to make,&rdquo; Estvan said, noting that many principals do not have any background in special education.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;CPS will, over the course of the school year, be forced to reallocate additional staff to schools and open positions,&rdquo; Estvan predicts. &ldquo;Whether or not they can fill them or not is another question that late in the year.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">District spokeswoman Emily Bittner said the district is working closely with principals at these 102 schools on scheduling special needs students most efficiently. She said an 18-month review of special education found that the number of students with special needs in district-run schools declined 3.4 percent over the last five years, but staff serving them increased 13 percent.</p><blockquote><p dir="ltr"><strong>LISTEN</strong><em>:CPS Cheif Education Officer Janice Jackson&nbsp;special education cuts won&#39;t hurt students</em></p><p dir="ltr"><iframe frameborder="no" height="20" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/217623452&amp;color=ff5500&amp;inverse=false&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_user=true" width="100%"></iframe></p></blockquote><p dir="ltr">Earlier this month, in announcing the cuts, then CEO Ruiz said the changes coming with All Means All would save $42.3 million.</p><p dir="ltr">Bittner said CPS would make sure schools have enough staff to work with special needs students and will absolutely meet all students&rsquo; IEP requirements, as outlined by law. She said the overall funding for special education is decreasing by five percent and still remains 14 percent of the district&rsquo;s total budget.</p><p dir="ltr">But some still are worried that the shift in the formula could still give principals and staff mostly bad choices.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I think that&rsquo;s going to lead to a lot of pressure on principals and teachers to do the wrong thing in order to get services for their kids,&rdquo; said Kristine Mayle, financial secretary for the Chicago Teachers Union and a former special education teacher. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re already hearing they&rsquo;re trying to take kids out of self-contained classrooms and put them into regular ed classrooms. I fear that across the district, kids are going to be moved into placements that are not appropriate.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The All Means All program also includes a financial bonus for schools who successfully transition students out of special education or move more kids into mainstream classrooms. Bittner said the intent is to better prepare special needs students for life beyond school, when the same services aren&rsquo;t guaranteed.</p><p dir="ltr">CPS is in <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-emanuel-warn-deep-cuts-layoffs-school-district-112301">a financial crisis</a> and it&rsquo;s looking everywhere to cut costs. Nothing is off-limits. Not even special education.</p><p dir="ltr">But Cantor, the teacher at North-Grand, thinks that&rsquo;s a big legal risk that could cost the district in the long run.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to become more expensive when they do this because parents are going to sue,&rdquo; Cantor said. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s going to be massive lawsuits. There&rsquo;s going to be massive settlements. We&rsquo;ve seen this over and over in the city. It&rsquo;s this short-term managerial thinking that&rsquo;s going lead to long term costs for the city.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Right now, CPS can&rsquo;t really afford any more unexpected costs.</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 29 Jul 2015 15:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cps-budget-cuts-hit-special-education-students-112512 Friends honor disabled brother's legacy http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/friends-honor-disabled-brothers-legacy-111510 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150206 Scott Nance Adam Ballard.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Scott Nance and Adam Ballard are part of a network of disability activists who frequently shut down intersections and grind business to a halt in order to draw attention to the needs of the disabled.</p><p>Nance and Ballard had volunteered separately to scope out the site of the group&rsquo;s next protest when they met.</p><p>Nance hadn&rsquo;t planned to be on the same bus as Ballard that day. But when the two friends interviewed at Access Living earlier this month for StoryCorps, they agreed it was a fitting place for their friendship to begin. Since then, the two have been arrested together for protesting for the rights of people living with disabilities.</p><p>Ballard uses a wheelchair and though he has been disabled his entire life, only sought out a community of other disabled people as an adult. That came after he had an accident that put him in a nursing home for several months.</p><p>Nance, on the other hand, was born with an audio disability, as were his brother and sister. But Nance&rsquo;s brother Devin also had physical, developmental, growth, learning and speech disabilities. For many years, Scott Nance acted as his brother&rsquo;s personal attendant. But then Devin died suddenly and tragically. &quot;That put me in a really dark place,&quot; Nance says. &quot;And I didn&#39;t crawl out of that hole until we did this march in front of the White House.&quot;</p><p>Nance was passing out flyers with other disability activists in Washington, DC, when he had a realization. A woman asked him why he was there and &quot;in that moment I had to challenge myself and think. And I gave her an honest answer. I&#39;m here for my brother.&rdquo;</p><p>&quot;He died at the age of 26,&quot; Nance says, of his brother Devin. &quot;And that&#39;s ridiculous that we live in a society where that still happens. He was someone who loved life. Loved playing catch. Loved going out in the community. He died alone and he never should have been in a position to die alone like that.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;I never met Devin,&rdquo; Ballard says. &ldquo;You entered my life after all that had gone down. But a couple years ago I think we were out drinking and it happened to be Devin&#39;s birthday so I offered a toast to your brother. And I said, &lsquo;Here&#39;s to your brother because if he&#39;s even halfway responsible for the man you are now then I&#39;m really sad that I didn&#39;t know him.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p></p> Fri, 06 Feb 2015 09:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/friends-honor-disabled-brothers-legacy-111510 CHA runs program to help disabled get own homes http://www.wbez.org/news/housing/cha-runs-program-help-disabled-get-own-homes-97818 <p><p>Lawrence Matthews isn't even sure how he ended up in the nursing home. The 56-year-old remembers falling on the ice in January 2009, waking up in the hospital, groggily signing some papers then being moved to a facility he's spent the last three years trying to get out of.</p><p>Now, he and his wife — who he met in the nursing home — recently moved into a place of their own along Chicago's lakefront thanks to a federal program that helps people with disabilities who are 61 and younger leave institutions and secure apartments using public housing vouchers.</p><p>The Non-Elderly Disabled program administrated by the Chicago Housing Authority has helped dozens of low-income people like Matthews who landed in nursing homes because of a medical need then couldn't afford to move out once their conditions improved.</p><p>There's a movement to transition people out of nursing facilities and into homes of their own. In December, a federal judge in Chicago approved a settlement in a class-action lawsuit that could help thousands of disabled, low-income Illinois residents move out of nursing homes.</p><p>Government officials say such programs save tax dollars, while advocates believe everyone benefits from having people with disabilities better integrated into communities. Matthews says he's grateful to no longer feel stuck.</p><p>"Money keeps you in the nursing home," he said. "It's not where we wanted to spend the rest of our lives."</p><p>The CHA has partnered with Access Living, an advocacy group for the disabled, to administer the voucher program. Access Living helps identify residents in institutions who are interested in relocating, finds accessible living arrangements in the private market and works to smooth the transition, including taking people shopping for groceries and appliances. (Disclosure: Access Living is a partner of Chicago Public Media, WBEZ's parent company.)</p><p>Participants pay 30 percent of their annual adjusted income for rent, and the federal Housing Choice Voucher program pays the rest.</p><p>Independent living costs about half of what it costs to house someone in an institution, where the money must cover facility expenses such as staff, maintenance and insurance, advocates say. In a home setting, the expenses are rent, medical costs and personal assistants if they're needed for just one person, rather than an entire building.</p><p>"The state doesn't need to be charged 24 hours for everyone who's in a nursing facility," said Rahnee Patrick, director of independent living at Access Living. "Some people may, not everybody will."</p><p>Federally mandated surveys at nursing homes show one in five residents would rather live in the community, Patrick said.</p><p>For the CHA, the so-called NED program has been a chance to help a unique and previously unreached population.</p><p>Amanda Motyka, Americans with Disabilities Act compliance manager for the CHA, remembers walking into an Access Living event and getting a hero's welcome.</p><p>"They pointed CHA out, 'that's who freed you from your nursing home,'" she said. "Everyone's clapping...it's very touching."</p><p>Matthews, who was sidelined from his job as a laboratory optician by health problems, broke his hip during the fall on the ice and lost his place to live as he recuperated. He learned of Access Living from another resident at the nursing home, and he was pleasantly surprised that it only took months — not years — for him and his wife to move from the facility and into their apartment.</p><p>His wife immediately fell in love with the place, a 20th-floor duplex with dramatic views of Lake Michigan. The couple married on Valentine's Day 2010.</p><p>For the couple, having a home of their own means living by their own rules in their own space.</p><p>"There's too many similarities between prison and the nursing home," Matthews said.</p></p> Mon, 02 Apr 2012 10:22:11 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/housing/cha-runs-program-help-disabled-get-own-homes-97818 Poet Sheila Black considers pain, disability, selfhood and ‘the problem of normal’ http://www.wbez.org/story/poet-sheila-black-considers-pain-disability-selfhood-and-%E2%80%98-problem-normal%E2%80%99-97579 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//story/photo/2012-March/2012-03-23/AP071025036303.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2012-March/2012-03-23/AP071025036303.jpg" style="width: 512px; height: 511px;" title="Kahlo's 1939 painting 'Los Dos Fridas.' (AP/Collection Museo de Arte Moderno)"></p><p>Sheila Black was born with a rare medical condition that gave her crooked legs. Then when she was 13 years old, she underwent a procedure to straighten them -- although the word “procedure” might not adequately describe what she went through.</p><p>“I had my legs radically straightened,” she says. In the first of a number of surgeries Black would have over the course of her life, doctors performed a double osteotomy -- breaking her legs in six places, then re-pinning the bones back together. “I walked a lot better [after the surgery],” Black recalls. “But I had the strange sense of having betrayed the person I was.” Black elaborated: “For me the question of disability was really a problem of normal. The problem was all the normal people out there."</p><p>Black grew into an award-winning poet whose creative interests include what a collaborator has described as “anomalous embodiment,” or what one might more simply describe as physical disability. In one poem she channels that moment of teenage post-surgical self-betrayal, and imagines herself as two people – the person she was before the surgery, and the person she became afterward, as if existing side by side:</p><p style="margin-left: 0.5in;">She<br> was me before I became so fallen. Sneaking<br> Salem cigarettes with the other girls on the fourth<br> floor bathroom. Trying so hard to fit in you could<br> see that desire—a sheen on my skin. The year I<br> learned to walk again—a wheelchair, crutches, crutches<br> discarded, everyone said how it was a miracle, so<br> wonderful, such a great, great thing, as if I could now<br> be welcomed into the club of people. A door closed<br> somewhere, and she was behind it.</p><p>The poem’s title, “Los Dos Fridas or Script for the Erased,” alludes to the title of a 1939 self-portrait by Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, in which Kahlo also depicts two versions of herself side by side: one injured and one healthy, arteries intertwined. Kahlo was in a bus crash at age 18 that left her with a horrifying array of broken bones – pelvis, spine, clavicle, ribs, plus 11 fractures in her leg – as well as permanent damage to her reproductive system. She went through more than 30 surgeries over the course of her life, and was often in so much pain that she had to remain bedridden for weeks at a time.&nbsp;</p><p>Black says that she too experienced extreme pain because of her disability and surgeries, but that Kahlo’s work and legacy proved to be a powerful example of working through the pain. “Frida Kahlo taught me to see [pain] as sort of a forceful, creative thing,” Black explains. “A way of making me pay attention to the world around me.”</p><p>Together with co-editors Jennifer Bartlett and Michael Northen, Black helped assemble the anthology <em>Beauty is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability</em> (Cinco Puntos Press, 2011), which collects the work of several differently-abled writers.</p><p>Nine poets from the anthology read in Chicago earlier this month, including Black. You can hear her recite “Los Dos Fridas” in the audio above.</p><p><a href="../../series/dynamic-range">Dynamic Range </a><em>showcases hidden gems unearthed from </em>Chicago Amplified’s <em>vast archive of public events and appears on weekends. Sheila Black read at an event presented by </em><a href="http://www.accessliving.org/"><em>Access Living</em></a><em> in March. Click </em><a href="../../story/beauty-verb-97306"><em>here </em></a><em>to hear the event in its entirety.</em></p></p> Sat, 24 Mar 2012 11:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/poet-sheila-black-considers-pain-disability-selfhood-and-%E2%80%98-problem-normal%E2%80%99-97579 Settlement improves living opportunities for disabled Chicagoans http://www.wbez.org/story/settlement-improves-living-opportunities-disabled-chicagoans-91260 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-30/748709408_ae955a68f6.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Disabled Cook County residents have reached a settlement with the state of Illinois about the rights of disabled Medicaid residents in nursing homes. U.S. District Judge Joan Humphrey Lefkow in Chicago ruled Tuesday that people living outside of nursing homes can receive state-provided services in their alternate housing.</p><p>Ben Wolf, associate legal director of the ACLU, said the organization hopes the rest of the state will follow suit with Cook County. "We expect that the reform process will demonstrate both that people, many people want to move to the community when given the chance with the right services and support, and that moving them to the community will actually not cost the state more money, and in some instances will actually save the state money," Wolf said.</p><p>The lawsuit, <em>Colbert v. Quinn</em>, is not the first of its kind. The 1999 Supreme Court case <em>Olmstead v. L.C.</em> held that institutionalization of disabled people is discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Marca Bristo, President &amp; CEO of Access Living, a disability advocacy group, compared <em>Olmstead </em>to cases like <em>Brown v. Board of Education</em> and <em>Roe v. Wade</em>.</p><p>Wolf believes that that's an accurate comparison.&nbsp;"<em>Olmstead </em>is a case that crystallizes the rights of people with disabilities who were needlessly institutionalized," he said. "And we're delighted that Governor Quinn and Michael Gelder, his chief health advisor, have signed on to a legally enforceable committment to move the state in a different direction."&nbsp;</p><p>Plaintiffs, including Lenil Colbert, the disabled man for whom the case was named, claim that Illinois could save over two thousand dollars a year per person by housing patients in apartments and not nursing homes. After having a stroke at the age of 32, Colbert became partially paralyzed, and was placed in a nursing home. "I volunteered my time, my name, and my story to this case for several reasons," said Colbert. "I was never given the choice to receive support in my own home." Colbert now lives alone, where he receives about five hours of services a day.&nbsp;</p><p>The state of Illinois will be required to spend $10 million in the first 30 months of implemenation to help over a thousand residents move. Court approval, and a fairness hearing set for December 20, are required before the case becomes state policy.</p><p>"We expect and hope that the number of people who will be [in nursing homes] for long term stays will radically diminish," Barca said.</p></p> Tue, 30 Aug 2011 17:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/settlement-improves-living-opportunities-disabled-chicagoans-91260 Dear Chicago: Make neighborhoods accessible http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible <p><br> <div id="PictoBrowser120123132149">&nbsp;</div><script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.db798.com/pictobrowser/swfobject.js"></script><script type="text/javascript"> var so = new SWFObject("http://www.db798.com/pictobrowser.swf", "PictoBrowser", "500", "650", "8", "#EEEEEE"); so.addVariable("source", "sets"); so.addVariable("names", "Dear Chicago: Make neighborhoods accessible "); so.addVariable("userName", "chicagopublicmedia"); so.addVariable("userId", "33876038@N00"); so.addVariable("ids", "72157628999161379"); so.addVariable("titles", "off"); so.addVariable("displayNotes", "always"); so.addVariable("thumbAutoHide", "off"); so.addVariable("imageSize", "medium"); so.addVariable("vAlign", "top"); so.addVariable("vertOffset", "0"); so.addVariable("colorHexVar", "EEEEEE"); so.addVariable("initialScale", "off"); so.addVariable("bgAlpha", "80"); so.write("PictoBrowser120123132149"); </script><p>&nbsp;</p><div>Rene Luna, 55, became paralyzed after a car crash in 1977. Now he gets around town in a motorized wheelchair.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The federal Americans with Disabilities Act as well as state laws aim to provide Luna and other people with physical disabilities equal access to businesses and public places. The City of Chicago includes accessibility guidelines in its building code. However, advocates such as Luna feel the city doesn’t uniformly enforce these standards. This is especially problematic in poorer, older neighborhoods that have seen less investment or renovation. Ironically, many of these same neighborhoods have higher concentrations of people with disabilities.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Luna’s appeal to the new mayor: Ensure accessibility in all of Chicago’s neighborhoods, not just downtown. He took WBEZ to Pilsen, a mostly Latino neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side, to explain why accessibility should be a priority for Chicago’s new mayor and newly-elected city council.</div><div><em>&nbsp;</em></div><div><a href="http://wbez.org/dearchicago">Dear Chicago</a> is a project of WBEZ’s <a href="http://chicagopublicmedia.org/partnerships/content-initatives">Partnership Program</a>. Rene Luna was nominated for the series by <a href="http://www.accessliving.org/">Access Living</a>, where he works as a policy analyst.</div></p> Mon, 24 Jan 2011 13:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible Dear Chicago: Make neighborhoods accessible http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible-0 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//Luna_4212.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Rene Luna, 55, became a quadriplegic after a car crash in 1977. Now he gets around town in a motorized wheelchair.</p> <div>The federal Americans with Disabilities Act as well as state laws aim to provide Luna and other people with physical disabilities equal access to businesses and public places. The City of Chicago includes accessibility guidelines in its building code. However, advocates such as Luna feel the city doesn&rsquo;t uniformly enforce these standards. This is especially problematic in poorer, older neighborhoods that have seen less investment or renovation. Ironically, many of these same neighborhoods have higher concentrations of people with disabilities.</div></p> Mon, 24 Jan 2011 11:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible-0