WBEZ | disability rights http://www.wbez.org/tags/disability-rights Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en A Conversation with Albie Sachs http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/conversation-albie-sachs-107786 <p><div>While in Chicago, <strong>Albie Sachs</strong>&nbsp;visited Access Living, where he gave a public talk about his experiences with the anti-apartheid movement and his insight on the state of South Africa today, with a focus on disability rights.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Born in South Africa in 1935, Albert Louis Sachs has committed his life to recognition, enforcement and preservation of human rights for all people. Sachs earned a law degree at the age of 21, with which he defended mostly black clients, and others accused of rejecting repressive security laws. After multiple imprisonments for resisting apartheid, Sachs went into exile in 1966. He lived in England for 11 years before moving to Mozambique, which had just overthrown Portuguese colonial rule. In Mozambique, Sachs developed a close working relationship with Oliver Tambo, the President of the African National Congress, and continued his fight against apartheid. In 1988, while still in exile, he was nearly killed by a car bomb, which took his right arm and the sight in his right eye.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>After 24 years of exile, Sachs returned to South Africa after apartheid fell in 1990. He was appointed to the Constitutional Committee, on which he helped craft the new constitution, which included provisions ensuring inclusion of rights of people with disabilities. As a member of the committee, Sachs became a persuasive advocate for a Bill of Rights and an independent judiciary. After South Africa&rsquo;s first multiracial elections, Nelson Mandela appointed Sachs to the country&rsquo;s new Constitutional Court. While Sachs served, the court abolished the death penalty and overturned laws criminalizing homosexuality. In 2005, Sachs wrote the opinion in the landmark decision Home Affairs v. Fourie, legalizing same-sex marriage in South Africa. Sachs was also deeply involved with the development of the new Constitutional Court building, built on the site where Nelson Mandela and Mohandas Gandhi had been imprisoned. The Court building has won international acclaim for the integration of artistry.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>This event is presented by the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media Columbia College Chicago, and by Access Living.</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AL-webstory_0.jpg" title="" /><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/ISWG-webstory_3.jpg" title="" /></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Recorded live Monday, June 10, 2013 at Access Living.</div></p> Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:39:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/conversation-albie-sachs-107786 Disability parking crackdown leads to 60 citations http://www.wbez.org/news/disability-parking-crackdown-leads-60-citations-104033 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/7403121340_9a6fc9703c_z.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Police issued 60 citations in the first weekend of a crackdown on people who park illegally in disability spaces &mdash; and they&#39;re not done yet.</p><p>Secretary of State Jesse White said in a statement Monday the enforcement effort will continue throughout the holiday season at shopping malls statewide.</p><p>White said the goal of the crackdown is to ensure disability spaces are available for people who need them.</p><p>Among the malls patrolled last weekend were Water Tower Place in Chicago, Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg and shopping centers in Rockford, Springfield, Carbondale, Champaign and Peoria.</p><p>Anyone caught illegally using a placard or disability license plates could be fined up to $500.</p><p>This is the seventh year of the holiday parking enforcement program. Last year, Secretary of State police issued 187 citations.</p></p> Tue, 27 Nov 2012 08:05:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/disability-parking-crackdown-leads-60-citations-104033 Turkish lawmaker aims to bring the disabled out of the shadows http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-18/turkish-lawmaker-aims-bring-disabled-out-shadows-94154 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-November/2011-11-17/safak4.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Though rapidly modernizing, Turkey is behind in offering basic rights to its 8.5 million disabled citizens.</p><p><a href="http://www.safakpavey.com/" target="_blank">Şafak Pavey</a>, who lost an arm and a leg in a train accident in Switzerland, is the first disabled woman elected to parliament. She explains why she left her job as secretary of the UN’s Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and returned home to give voice to Turkey's disabled.</p></p> Fri, 18 Nov 2011 18:06:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-11-18/turkish-lawmaker-aims-bring-disabled-out-shadows-94154 Dear Chicago: Make neighborhoods accessible http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible <p><br> <div id="PictoBrowser120123132149">&nbsp;</div><script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.db798.com/pictobrowser/swfobject.js"></script><script type="text/javascript"> var so = new SWFObject("http://www.db798.com/pictobrowser.swf", "PictoBrowser", "500", "650", "8", "#EEEEEE"); so.addVariable("source", "sets"); so.addVariable("names", "Dear Chicago: Make neighborhoods accessible "); so.addVariable("userName", "chicagopublicmedia"); so.addVariable("userId", "33876038@N00"); so.addVariable("ids", "72157628999161379"); so.addVariable("titles", "off"); so.addVariable("displayNotes", "always"); so.addVariable("thumbAutoHide", "off"); so.addVariable("imageSize", "medium"); so.addVariable("vAlign", "top"); so.addVariable("vertOffset", "0"); so.addVariable("colorHexVar", "EEEEEE"); so.addVariable("initialScale", "off"); so.addVariable("bgAlpha", "80"); so.write("PictoBrowser120123132149"); </script><p>&nbsp;</p><div>Rene Luna, 55, became paralyzed after a car crash in 1977. Now he gets around town in a motorized wheelchair.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The federal Americans with Disabilities Act as well as state laws aim to provide Luna and other people with physical disabilities equal access to businesses and public places. The City of Chicago includes accessibility guidelines in its building code. However, advocates such as Luna feel the city doesn’t uniformly enforce these standards. This is especially problematic in poorer, older neighborhoods that have seen less investment or renovation. Ironically, many of these same neighborhoods have higher concentrations of people with disabilities.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Luna’s appeal to the new mayor: Ensure accessibility in all of Chicago’s neighborhoods, not just downtown. He took WBEZ to Pilsen, a mostly Latino neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side, to explain why accessibility should be a priority for Chicago’s new mayor and newly-elected city council.</div><div><em>&nbsp;</em></div><div><a href="http://wbez.org/dearchicago">Dear Chicago</a> is a project of WBEZ’s <a href="http://chicagopublicmedia.org/partnerships/content-initatives">Partnership Program</a>. Rene Luna was nominated for the series by <a href="http://www.accessliving.org/">Access Living</a>, where he works as a policy analyst.</div></p> Mon, 24 Jan 2011 13:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible Dear Chicago: Make neighborhoods accessible http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible-0 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Luna_4212.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Rene Luna, 55, became a quadriplegic after a car crash in 1977. Now he gets around town in a motorized wheelchair.</p> <div>The federal Americans with Disabilities Act as well as state laws aim to provide Luna and other people with physical disabilities equal access to businesses and public places. The City of Chicago includes accessibility guidelines in its building code. However, advocates such as Luna feel the city doesn&rsquo;t uniformly enforce these standards. This is especially problematic in poorer, older neighborhoods that have seen less investment or renovation. Ironically, many of these same neighborhoods have higher concentrations of people with disabilities.</div></p> Mon, 24 Jan 2011 11:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/access-living/dear-chicago-make-neighborhoods-accessible-0