WBEZ | Chicago Public Library http://www.wbez.org/tags/chicago-public-library Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Libraries: Beyond the books http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/libraries-beyond-books-108170 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/117674644" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Shanlie Ann Stead says she&rsquo;s had a lifelong love of libraries and, as she recollects it, she personally experienced how far that love could go &mdash; straight from a library to her own apartment&rsquo;s walls.</p><p>She tells a story of being at the Waukegan library several years ago and noticing stacks of paintings. She says she perked up when a passing librarian said &ldquo;&lsquo;You know, you can check those out.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Shanlie took the library up on the offer.</p><p>&ldquo;That made a huge difference for me,&rdquo; Shanlie said, &ldquo;because &nbsp;I could actually check out paintings and decorate my apartment.&rdquo;</p><p>This nugget of curiosity about libraries stuck with her, and she wondered how other libraries handle checkouts and what&rsquo;s beyond books on the shelves. Figuring that there must be &ldquo;some unique things&rdquo; available for the taking, she asked us:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>&ldquo;What are some of the most curious and surprising things one can check out from a public library?&rdquo;</em></p><p>Well, we talked to staff at dozens of area libraries and posed them your very question, which led many librarians to talk about what role the public library plays for all of us today.</p><p>&ldquo;It used to be about the physical object and now it&#39;s about the knowledge,&rdquo; said Kelly Cuci, head of outreach services in Orland Park. &ldquo;It&#39;s about exporting knowledge to anybody. &hellip; It&#39;s about the knowledge package given to the person or the skill program, rather than the book.&rdquo;</p><p>You can see this principle across our area&rsquo;s libraries. Take the one in Orland Park, which is set to unveil a collection of nearly 200 artifacts from NASA on Sept. 15. The Waukegan Public Library recently inherited the personal library of native son Ray Bradbury. Of course, several librarians brought attention to their e-books and devices like the Nook, which would allow the contents of a basic book to be read in a digital format.</p><p>Nonetheless, the three most curious and surprising things we found available to take home from local libraries are physical &mdash; not digital &mdash; objects. In their own way, these objects can be used to impart knowledge in library patrons, just like books.</p><p><strong>Fishing pole</strong><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/fishing rod OUTSIDE FOR WEB.jpg" style="float: right; height: 233px; width: 350px;" title="Nine of the 79 Chicago Public Library branches offer fishing poles for check-out. (WBEZ/Bill Healy)" /></p><p>Out of the Chicago Public Library&#39;s 79 branches, <a href="https://www.chipublib.org/eventsprog/programs/nature_conn.php">nine offer fishing poles </a>with a tackle and bait set. (Worms not included.)</p><p>Unsurprisingly, the nine branches are close to the fishing waters of Lake Michigan, the Chicago River or lagoons.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s important because people who are normally in the inner city don&rsquo;t normally get an opportunity to go fish,&rdquo; said Lala Rodgers, who manages the Sherman Park branch, where 30 poles can be taken out on loan.</p><p>Just like most materials, poles can be checked out for three weeks at a time.</p><p>The poles can be checked out of the following branches: Albany Park, Blackstone, Douglass, Hegewisch, Humboldt Park, McKinley Park, Rogers Park, Sherman Park and Uptown.</p><p><strong>Sculptures</strong></p><p>The <a href="http://www.aurorapubliclibrary.org">Aurora Public Library</a> had spent decades building a catalog of art (all copies, not originals), but for the past dozen years or so, it&rsquo;s been disbanding it.</p><p>Life goes on, though, for the library&rsquo;s 30 sculptures, almost all of which cost less than $100. They&rsquo;re still available for checking out for eight weeks at a time.</p><p>Becky Tatar, the library&rsquo;s audiovisual head, chose the collection based on what she thinks would interest her patrons, both from an aesthetic and educational standpoint.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/STATUE FOR WEB.jpg" style="float: left; height: 233px; width: 350px;" title="You can check out sculptures at the Aurora Public Library for eight weeks at a time. (WBEZ/Billy Healy)" />&ldquo;There&#39;s things for all interests,&rdquo; Tatar said. &ldquo;People can check things out for their office. They can check things out for their home.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Why do people have art in their home?&rdquo; she asked, rhetorically. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the same thing for why we would have art in the library. Because it makes people think. It looks nice. It creates interest.&rdquo;</p><p>The sculptures used to be a popular option to spruce up office spaces back in the 1990s. But the sculptures aren&rsquo;t checked out very often anymore. Tatar says just one item &mdash; an angel holding two vases, a copy of a 14th century French original &mdash; has been checked out multiple times this year.</p><p>Other sculptures include busts of Martin Luther King Jr., Beethoven and the University of Illinois&rsquo; Chief Illiniwek. There&rsquo;s also a miniature edition of Rodin&rsquo;s <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thinker">The Thinker</a>.</p><p><strong>A green screen (and other video producing equipment)</strong></p><p>The <a href="http://www.skokielibrary.info/s_about/how/Tech_Resources/DML.asp">Skokie&rsquo;s Public Library&rsquo;s digital media lab</a> is outfitted with the latest tech, &nbsp;from computers to drawing tablets to guitars that patrons can use for their creative needs.</p><p>&quot;It is a really awesome place because it&#39;s a place where people can create knowledge,&quot; said Mick Jacobsen, who oversees the lab. &quot;We create a space where people can use really great computers, really great equipment, really great software and create some amazing media.&quot;</p><p>Much of that gear can&rsquo;t be checked out due to licensing arrangements, but there among the items you can walk out with are: hard drives, audio recorders and simple video cameras. The latter include the GoPro, which can be attached to a person&rsquo;s head or body for action shots.<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/GREEN SCREEN for web.jpg" style="float: right; height: 233px; width: 350px;" title="In an effort to keep up with the YouTube age, Skokie Public Library has a green screen available for checkout. (WBEZ/Bill Healy)" /></p><p>But perhaps the oddest thing that can be taken home from this lab is the green screen, which costs no more than $80.</p><p>&ldquo;If you&#39;ve got a family photo &mdash; you didn&#39;t make it to Paris this year, you know, you never know what happened &mdash; you can still get to Paris,&rdquo; Jacobsen said. &ldquo;Well, not really, but you can certainly take your picture.&rdquo;</p><p>Jacobsen said in the age of YouTube, his library is stepping into the role of &ldquo;community access television&rdquo; by giving patrons equipment they might otherwise use at most twice in their lives.</p><p>Asked if patrons find a library offering this kind of equipment on loan as &ldquo;weird,&rdquo; Jacobsen replied: &quot;Weird is not really what they say. It&#39;s more surprise like &#39;Really?&#39; We are just branded books and that&#39;s just the way we are seen.&quot;</p><p><strong>How did Shanlie take this?</strong></p><p>After getting a preview of our list, Shanlie Ann Stead called the idea of public libraries stocking sculptures as &quot;cool&quot; and fishing poles as &quot;romantic.&quot; She also recognized the significance of libraries like Skokie moving to offer equipment like green screens for media production.</p><p>&ldquo;I find that very progressive. Personally I think that was a really great thing for them considering the age of technology we live in,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Compare that to a fishing pole. There&#39;s a lot of area in between there.&quot;</p><p><strong>The honorable mentions</strong></p><p>Here are other interesting items available in metropolitan Chicago libraries:</p><ul dir="ltr"><li><p>At the Joliet Public Library, <strong>two American Girl dolls</strong>, Addy and Josefina, are hot items.</p></li><li><p>At the Waukegan Public Library, people can check out <strong>3D puzzles</strong>.</p></li><li><p><strong>Video games</strong> are available at various libraries including Libertyville&rsquo;s Cook Memorial Public Library and in Aurora.</p></li><li><p>Though Aurora has disbanded its <strong>art print collection</strong>, the Des Plaines Public Library still lends out similar art.</p></li><li><p>Aurora also has about 20 file cabinets of <strong>sheet music</strong>.</p></li><li><p>Skokie lends out <strong>animal puppets</strong> to go along with certain children&rsquo;s books.</p></li><li>Along the lines of creation at the public library, Chicago&rsquo;s Harold Washington Library Center recently became home to a &quot;maker lab,&quot; which allows those taking classes to use software to create objects using <strong>3D printers and computerized wood carving machines.</strong></li></ul><p>Did we miss anything Shanlie Ann Stead should know about? Drop a comment below if you&rsquo;ve checked out something notable from a Chicago area library. What was it? Where did you check it out from? When?</p><p><em>Tanveer Ali is a freelance producer who has worked for organizations that include WBEZ, the Chicago News Cooperative and DNAinfo.com. Follow him @tanveerali.</em></p></p> Wed, 24 Jul 2013 14:50:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/libraries-beyond-books-108170 Perusing Chicago Public Library data: Rogers Park ranks high among bookworms, Great Gatsby flies off shelf and eBook checkouts on the rise http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-06/perusing-chicago-public-library-data-rogers-park-ranks-high-among-bookworms-great <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/cardcat.jpg" title="(Flickr/Megan Amaral)" /></div><p>Chicago&#39;s open data program has some detractors, but most can agree that we like books. Or at the very least Rogers Park does, according to city data.</p><p>The Chicago Public Library system, one of the largest in the country and in place since 1873, has kept a meticulous set of records.</p><p>Libraries could well be considered some of the earliest adopters of open data as they ditched card catalogues&nbsp;and rubber stamps for computerized records. Librarians are professional catalogers, and so to bridge the print and digital worlds, we wanted to take a look at some of the data CPL has to offer.</p><p>What we found:</p><ul><li>The Great Gatsby saw a resurgence as interest was likely piqued by a movie release&nbsp;</li><li>Rogers Park ranks among the highest in checkouts for neighborhood branches&nbsp;</li><li>eBook checkouts are on the rise</li></ul><p>What&#39;s in CPL&#39;s data trove?<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPLcard.jpg" style="float: right;" title="" /></p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;">Among the data sets on the city&#39;s portal site:</p><ul><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-2013-Circulation-by-Location/ti44-vee7">2013 - circulation by branch</a></li><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-2012-Circulation-by-Location/jsdv-pwf2">2012 -&nbsp;circulation by branch</a></li><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-2011-Circulation-by-Location/tfmt-mmy2">2011 -&nbsp;circulation by branch</a></li><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-2013-Visitors-by-Location/x74m-smqb?utm_source=twitterfeed&amp;utm_medium=twitter">2013 - visitors by location</a></li><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-Popular-Fiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Pu/nv46-bxa3">Current Popular Fiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library</a></li><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Popular-Nonfiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Public-Li/6mc3-ah7p">Current Popular Nonfiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library</a></li><li style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-WiFi-Usage/vbts-zqt4">2011-2012 monthly wifi usage</a></li></ul><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><strong>The Great Checkout</strong></p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;">According to the popular fiction titles, &quot;The Great Gatsby,&quot; first published in 1925, now ranks among the top reads in Chicago. After tabulating the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.chipublib.org/search/details/cn/834986">data from CPL&#39;s website</a>, we&#39;ve found that Chicagoans are moving the copies between libraries, interest has started to wane in some branches and a decent amount of copies were placed on hold.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;">Why the uptick?</p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;">&ldquo;We often do, a lot of people when you know you want to go see a movie and when you read the book you want to read the book first,&rdquo; said Ruth Lednicer, spokesperson for CPL.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><em><strong>Chart:</strong> Checkouts, holds and available copies of &quot;The Great Gatsby&quot; in the Chicago Public Library system as of 6/11/2013</em></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/gatsby-chart.jpg" title="" /></p><p><strong>eBooks are on the rise</strong></p><p>While CPL has grown its eBook capabilities, starting first with Sony and Barnes &amp; Noble Nook readers, the greatest increase came after <a href="http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/7826261-418/chicago-public-libary-now-has-kindle-books.html">Amazon launched its library lending program</a>, which at the time opened up over 3,536 titles to Chicagoans using Kindles.</p><p>How many checkouts are we talking about?</p><p>Well, in January of 2011, there were 13,841 eBook checkouts. In April of 2013, there were 35,651. That&#39;s a 158 percent increase.</p><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0AoxVpL8Zenp3dGZiY1BHbXVnYVljM1JhSnlKS0MxcHc&transpose=1&headers=1&range=A6%3AAC7&gid=0&pub=1","options":{"titleTextStyle":{"bold":true,"color":"#000","fontSize":16},"vAxes":[{"title":null,"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"logScale":false,"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"logScale":false,"maxValue":null}],"series":{"0":{"color":"#ff9900","areaOpacity":"0.7"}},"title":"eBook checkouts for CPL for 2011-2013","booleanRole":"certainty","animation":{"duration":500},"backgroundColor":{"fill":"#6d9eeb"},"legend":"in","theme":"maximized","hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindowMode":null,"viewWindow":null,"maxValue":null},"tooltip":{},"isStacked":true,"width":620,"height":350},"state":{},"view":{},"isDefaultVisualization":true,"chartType":"AreaChart","chartName":"Chart 2"} </script><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Which neighborhood has the most bookworms?</strong></p><p>Chicagoans, ever competitive with their rival neighborhoods, may be interested to know how their library stacks up among others, or how often they&#39;re being utilized. Interestingly enough, Chicagoans read more during the winter months.</p><p>Also, the Rogers Park branch ranks among the highest in checkouts for 2012. This may be in part due to a heavy immigrant community, which adopts English by reading books and a neighboring school, according to CPL&#39;s Lednicer.</p><p>The Lincoln Belmont branch also ranks as one of the highest in checkins, just behind the Sulzer Regional Branch and the Harold Washington Library Center.</p><p>Sometimes the stats can be skewed, such as the Edgewater branch, which is currently operating out of a bookmobile while their new branch on Broadway is being contructed.</p><div><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><span style="color: rgb(128, 128, 128);"><span style="font-size: 9px;">Circulation figures include new checkouts as well as renewals. In January all branch locations were closed on Monday, January 9, Monday, January 23 and Monday, January 30. Beginning in February, all branch locations restored partial Monday hours, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. On June 18, all branch locations restored full Monday hours. Edgewater closed 6/16/11 for construction of a new branch scheduled to open in mid-2013. The library&rsquo;s bookmobile opened 6/24/11 for Edgewater holds pickup and returns. Douglass closed for 10 days in February for roof repairs. Humboldt Park closed 3/26/12 for facility improvements and expansion. Lincoln Park closed for four days in August for replacement of the air conditioning system. Many locations experienced sporadic closures in summer 2012 due to air conditioning issues and area power outages. Albany Park closed 9/22/12 for construction of a new branch and will remain closed until 2014. Brighton Park, Jefferson Park and Portage Cragin were closed 11/26/12-12/7/12 for replacement of their HVAC systems.</span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/2012-circulation-by-branch/7s85-yjiw" style="font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: arial;" target="_blank">2012 circulation by branch</a></p><iframe frameborder="0" height="600" scrolling="no" src="https://data.cityofchicago.org/w/7s85-yjiw/3q3f-6823?cur=2wxuuMTy5b2&amp;from=root" title="2012 circulation by branch" width="620">&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a data-cke-saved-href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/2012-circulation-by-branch/7s85-yjiw&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/2012-circulation-by-branch/7s85-yjiw&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; title=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;2012 circulation by branch&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; target=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;_blank&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;2012 circulation by branch&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe><p><a href="http://www.socrata.com/" target="_blank">Powered by Socrata</a></p><p>&nbsp;</p><div><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><span style="color: rgb(128, 128, 128);"><span style="font-size: 9px;">Circulation figures include new checkouts as well as renewals. The Chicago Public Library opened four new locations in 2011: Greater Grand Crossing (4/23/11); Dunning (5/6/11); Daley, Richard M.-W Humboldt (7/8/11) and Little Village (10/3/11). Edgewater closed 6/16/11 for construction of a new branch; a bookmobile for holds pickup and returns opened 6/24/11. Altgeld closed for extended periods in July and August for air conditioning installation. Back of the Yards closed permanently 8/22/11 due to repeated flooding. All locations were closed February 2-February 3 due to weather. In addition, many locations experienced sporadic closures in summer 2011 due to weather-related issues.</span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 3px;"><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/2011-circulation-by-branch/mfzh-6ud2" style="font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: arial;" target="_blank">2011 circulation by branch</a></p><iframe frameborder="0" height="600" scrolling="no" src="https://data.cityofchicago.org/w/mfzh-6ud2/3q3f-6823?cur=d4_htKt3S7C&amp;from=root" title="2011 circulation by branch" width="620">&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a data-cke-saved-href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/2011-circulation-by-branch/mfzh-6ud2&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/2011-circulation-by-branch/mfzh-6ud2&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; title=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;2011 circulation by branch&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; target=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;_blank&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;2011 circulation by branch&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe><p><a href="http://www.socrata.com/" target="_blank">Powered by Socrata</a></p><p><strong>What&#39;s trending in CPL?</strong></p><p>While the New York Times Bestseller List may be a good indicator of what the nation is reading, in Chicago, the closest thing we may have is the most popular titles data set.</p><p><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Popular-Nonfiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Public-Li/6mc3-ah7p" style="font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: arial;" target="_blank">Popular Nonfiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library</a></p><div><iframe frameborder="0" height="600" scrolling="no" src="https://data.cityofchicago.org/w/6mc3-ah7p/3q3f-6823?cur=Qf_PBMqsn3D&amp;from=root" title="Popular Nonfiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library" width="620">&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a data-cke-saved-href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Popular-Nonfiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Public-Li/6mc3-ah7p&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Popular-Nonfiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Public-Li/6mc3-ah7p&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; title=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Popular Nonfiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; target=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;_blank&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Popular Nonfiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe><p><a href="http://www.socrata.com/" target="_blank">Powered by Socrata</a></p><p><a href="https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-Popular-Fiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Pu/nv46-bxa3" style="font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: arial;" target="_blank">Libraries - Popular Fiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library</a></p><div><iframe frameborder="0" height="600" scrolling="no" src="https://data.cityofchicago.org/w/nv46-bxa3/3q3f-6823?cur=Y8D_UbXD1sl&amp;from=root" title="Libraries - Popular Fiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library" width="620">&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a data-cke-saved-href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-Popular-Fiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Pu/nv46-bxa3&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; href=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;https://data.cityofchicago.org/Education/Libraries-Popular-Fiction-Titles-at-the-Chicago-Pu/nv46-bxa3&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; title=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Libraries - Popular Fiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; target=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;_blank&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Libraries - Popular Fiction Titles at the Chicago Public Library&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe><p><a href="http://www.socrata.com/" target="_blank">Powered by Socrata</a></p><p>In a sea of Twitter and Facebook updates, the data does indicate the Chicago&#39;s libraries are not just well used, they&#39;re booming from computer use, eBook checkouts and more.&nbsp;</p><p>The data would seem to suggest: Chicagoans give a hoot.</p></div></div></div></div><p><em>&mdash; Elliott Ramos is a data reporter and Web producer for WBEZ (and a card-carrying member of Chicago&#39;s Public Library system). Email him at&nbsp;<a href="mailto:eramos@wbez.org">eramos@wbez.org</a>&nbsp;or follow at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.twitter.com/ChicagoEl">@ChicagoEl</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 11 Jun 2013 10:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2013-06/perusing-chicago-public-library-data-rogers-park-ranks-high-among-bookworms-great Poetry Saloon at Noon & the Sulzer Library http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/poetry-saloon-noon-sulzer-library-107730 <p><div>Twenty-five years ago, saloon poetry and slam poetry were being birthed in the vibrant arts scene in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago. &nbsp;Saloon poetry differed from slam poetry in several important ways. &nbsp;Sometimes poets simply wanted to recite their poetry. &nbsp; They wanted an alternative to the raucous competition of the poetry slams. &nbsp;Poets and artists that built community, sometimes just wanted to relax and enjoy the abundance of poetry, art, and music that flourished in the mid-80&#39;s. &nbsp;Spend time in the neighborhood bar, coffee house, tea house, or gallery and be surrounded by other artists.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Saloon Poetry was the slam&#39;s after-party. &nbsp;And Saloon Poetry&#39;s red-carpet was the sidewalk that led to a favored oasis, that served beverages and nourishment and most of all, fostered camaraderie and friendly competition.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Poetry Saloon at Noon is the brick &amp; mortar venue of the poetry &amp; arts publishing website, www.SaloonPoetry.com. The venue has rotated between different sites in the city and usually features an open-mic.&nbsp;</div><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_39.jpg" title="" /></div><div>Recorded Live Monday, June 10, 2013 at the Chicago Public Library&#39;s Sulzer Regional Library.</div></p> Mon, 10 Jun 2013 12:45:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/poetry-saloon-noon-sulzer-library-107730 David Misch: A History of Comedy http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/david-misch-history-comedy-107270 <p><p><strong>David Misch</strong>&nbsp;discusses his new book <em>Funny: The Book &mdash; Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Comedy</em>. Ripped from the pages of his award-eligible book <em>Misch presents</em> <em>The History of Ha!</em>&nbsp;a some-holds-barred survey of absolutely everything funny that&#39;s ever happened. From ancient Tricksters to&nbsp;<em>Modern Family</em>, Mr. Misch looks at what comedy is, where it comes from and where it&#39;s going (oddly enough, Philadelphia).</p><p>Among David Misch&#39;s TV and movie credits are the Emmy-nominated <em>Mork and Mindy</em>, the Emmy-losing <em>Duckman</em>, the Emmy-besotted <em>Saturday Night Live</em>, and the Emmy-ineligible <em>The Muppets Take Manhattan</em>. &nbsp;He&#39;s also a playwright, songwriter, blogger, teacher and recovered stand-up comic.</p><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_38.jpg" style="float: left;" title="" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Recorded live Monday, May 13, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library Center.</p></p> Mon, 13 May 2013 10:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/david-misch-history-comedy-107270 'The Great Migration' Conversation with Timuel D. Black Jr., Linda Johnson Rice & Adam Green http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/great-migration-conversation-timuel-d-black-jr-linda-johnson-rice-adam <p><p>As part of the programming for the 2013-14 One Book, One Chicago selection, Isabel Wilkerson&rsquo;s <em>The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story Of America&rsquo;s Great Migration</em>, the Chicago Public Library welcomed&nbsp;<strong>Timuel D. Black Jr</strong>., <strong>Linda Johnson Rice</strong> and <strong>Adam Green</strong> for an engaging conversation of how the Great Migration shaped their lives and the city of Chicago.&nbsp;</p><div>Timuel D. Black, Jr., a recent Champion of Freedom Award recipient, is a Chicago educator, activist and historian who has written extensively on the Great Migration in his books <em>Bridges of Memory: Chicago&rsquo;s First Wave of Black Migration </em>and <em>Bridges of Memory Volume 2:Chicago&rsquo;s Second Generation of Black Migration</em>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Linda Johnson Rice&rsquo;s parents, <strong>John and Eunice Johnson</strong>, came to Chicago from the South and built the Johnson Publishing Company, one of the world&rsquo;s most successful black-owned media companies of which Ms. Rice is President and CEO.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>University of Chicago History Professor Adam Green, writes about the Great Migration in his books <em>Selling the Race: The Culture and Community in Black Chicago, 1940-1955</em> and <em>Time Longer than Rope: Studies in African American Activism, 1850-1950</em>.&nbsp;</div><p>&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_36.jpg" style="float: left;" title="" /></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><br />Recorded live Monday, May 6, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library Center.</p></p> Mon, 06 May 2013 13:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/great-migration-conversation-timuel-d-black-jr-linda-johnson-rice-adam Woman Made Gallery Poets Showcase at the Chicago Public Library Poetry Fest http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/woman-made-gallery-poets-showcase-chicago-public-library-poetry-fest-107268 <p><p>For over twenty years, Woman Made Gallery has offered stimulating and educational programs with a focus on women artists, performers and writers who share an interest in the interaction of the arts in contemporary culture. Over the past few years, the poetry series has ventured into the community, with readings at Chicago Public Library and the Poetry Foundation&rsquo;s Printer&rsquo;s Ball.</p><div>This group reading offers a sampling of the diversity of women&rsquo;s voices, topics and writing styles that can be heard at the gallery. Featured poets include <strong>Yolanda Nieves</strong>, <strong>Robin Fine</strong>, <strong>Kelly Norman Ellis </strong>and curator <strong>Nina Corwin</strong>. In addition, three younger poets from area schools are presented: <strong>Nina Li Coones</strong>, <strong>Natalie Richardson</strong> and <strong>Jennifer Linstrom</strong>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/WMG-webstory_NEW_4.jpg" style="float: left;" title="" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><br />Recorded live Saturday, April 27, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library Center.&nbsp;</p></p> Sat, 27 Apr 2013 09:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/woman-made-gallery-poets-showcase-chicago-public-library-poetry-fest-107268 'Push' author Sapphire revisits childhood abuse in second novel http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range/push-author-sapphire-revisits-childhood-abuse-second-novel-106243 <p><p><strong><em>[Trigger Warning] </em></strong></p><p>Sapphire does not shy away from difficult subjects.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/sapphire%20penguin%20press.jpg" style="height: 450px; width: 300px; float: right;" title="Sapphire (Courtesy of Penguin)" />The author, who chose her pen name as a salute to strong black women, is known for penning devastatingly realized stories of childhood sexual abuse and trauma. Her 1996 novel <em>Push&nbsp;</em>tells the story of Claireece &ldquo;Precious&rdquo; Jones, an illiterate, obese, 16-year-old girl pregnant with a second child by her own father. The novel was adapted in 2009, and the resulting film, <em>Precious</em>, garnered many accolades, including two Academy Awards. But the film also stirred controversy with its graphic depictions of incest and domestic abuse. &nbsp;</p><p>Sapphire was herself the victim of childhood sexual assault. In 2010 <a href="http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/how-author-created-film-character-precious-through-her-own-sexual-abuse-6735992.html">she told the <em>London Evening Standard</em></a> that her father, a Korean War vet, had molested her at age eight. Her mother abandoned their family five years later.</p><p>&ldquo;It was traumatic &mdash; but to be left with our crazy dad, doubly so,&quot; she told the paper.</p><p>She created the character precious from an amalgam of her own experiences and those of students she later mentored in Harlem.</p><p>Sapphire followed <em>Push</em> with a sequel, <em>The Kid</em>, in 2011. As the novel opens, we learn that Precious has died of AIDS, leaving her nine-year-old son Abdul alone in the world.</p><p>Abdul is sent to live in a Catholic orphanage, and what befalls him there is brutal and heartbreaking -- and all too familiar to anyone who follows the ever-unfolding story of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church. (A new wrinkle in that story unfolded just this week, as files released by the Diocese of Joliet <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/suburbs/joliet_romeoville/chi-open-files-part-of-settlement-for-priest-sex-abuse-victim-20130320,0,440885.story">revealed decades of abuse</a> hidden by high-level clergy.)</p><p>Abdul is sexually assaulted by a priest during his time in the orphanage. And as sometimes happens to those who have been abused, he goes on in turn to become an abuser, raping younger, weaker boys living in the orphanage.</p><p>&ldquo;While numerous heterosexual black male writers and critics have bemoaned the . . . one-dimensional portrait of black man as victimizer, few have been interested in or have had the courage to explore the obvious other end of the stick: the black male as victim of sexual abuse,&rdquo; Sapphire said at a talk in Chicago last week, reading from a Q &amp; A section published alongside her novel. &ldquo;<em>The Kid</em>, among other things, begins an accurate portrayal of what happens to many young males who have been abused and their sometimes hideous response.&rdquo;</p><p>The results for Abdul are devastating, as they were for his mother. And while <em>Push</em> addressed the failure of the nuclear family to protect its children, <em>The Kid</em> takes up the failure of institutions charged with their care.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re really looking at the abandoning of the social contract in a way we didn&rsquo;t see in <em>Push</em>,&rdquo; Sapphire said. &ldquo;That was something I really wanted to show: What happens when everything except the soul of the individuals fails?&rdquo;</p><p>Sapphire read two passages from <em>The Kid</em> during her appearance at Chicago Public Library. We&rsquo;ve included an excerpt of her talk here in audio form, but please be warned. . . . &nbsp;</p><p><strong><em>TRIGGER WARNING</em>: <em>The book excerpt Sapphire reads here includes a graphic rape scene</em></strong><em>, </em>in addition to a later scene which shows some redemption and healing for her main character. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range">Dynamic Range</a></em>&nbsp;<em>showcases hidden gems unearthed from</em>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://soundcloud.com/chicago-amplified/a-conversation-with-u-s">Chicago Amplified&rsquo;s</a></em>&nbsp;<em>vast archive of public events and appears on weekends. Sapphire spoke at an event presented by Chicago Public Library in March. Click</em>&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/sapphire-discusses-kid-106224">here</a>&nbsp;to hear the event in its entirety.</em></p></p> Sat, 23 Mar 2013 08:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/dynamic-range/push-author-sapphire-revisits-childhood-abuse-second-novel-106243 Michael Hainey http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/michael-hainey-106719 <p><p><strong>Michael Hainey</strong>, Chicago native and deputy editor at <em>GQ</em> appears in conversation with Bill Savage of Northwestern University. In his gripping memoir <em>After Visiting Friends</em>, Hainey sets out to answer questions about his father&rsquo;s death at age 35. Bob Hainey was a rising star at the <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em> when he died, and Michael was six. Now a seasoned reporter himself, Hainey has written a stirring portrait of a family and an honest look at a legendary time in Chicago newspapers, when an honor code of secrecy and silence bonded newspaper writers together.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_32.jpg" title="" /></div><p>Recorded live Monday, Febrauary 25, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library Center.&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 25 Feb 2013 11:40:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/michael-hainey-106719 Gillian Flynn discusses new book, "Gone Girl" http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/gillian-flynn-discusses-new-book-gone-girl-105540 <p><p><strong>Gillian Flynn</strong> is the author of <em>Gone Girl</em>, a best seller on <em>The New York Times</em> best seller fiction list. &nbsp;The Chicago writer is a former TV critic for <em>Entertainment Weekly</em>. &nbsp;Her previous novels are <em>Sharp Objects</em>, an Edgar Award finalist and the winner of two of Britain&#39;s Dagger Awards, and <em>Dark Places</em>. This event was presented by the Society of Midland Authors, an organization established in 1915 for published authors in the Midwest. The Chicago Public Library &nbsp;co-hosted the event.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F79277248" width="100%"></iframe></p><div><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_29.jpg" title="" />&nbsp;&nbsp;<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/SMA-webstory_4.gif" title="" /></div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Recorded&nbsp;Wednesday February 13, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library Center.</div></p> Wed, 13 Feb 2013 15:05:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/gillian-flynn-discusses-new-book-gone-girl-105540 Neil Shubin http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/neil-shubin-106717 <p><p>From one of our finest and most popular science writers comes the answer to a scientific mystery as big as the world itself: How are the events that formed our solar system billions of years ago embedded inside each of us? <strong>Neil Shubin</strong> (<em>Your Inner Fish</em>) presents his new book, <em>The Universe Within</em>, in which he takes an expansive approach to the question of why we look the way we do. Presented in partnership with the Illinois Science Council.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPL-webstory_31.jpg" title="" /></div><p>Recorded live Monday, February 11, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library Center.&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 11 Feb 2013 11:32:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/chicago-amplified/neil-shubin-106717