WBEZ | Cardinal Francis George http://www.wbez.org/tags/cardinal-francis-george Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Remembering Chicago's Cardinal Francis George http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/remembering-chicagos-cardinal-francis-george-111900 <p><p><em>Updated at 11:06 a.m.</em></p><p><em>Visitation and funeral arrangements are at the bottom of the story</em></p><p>Chicago&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.archchicago.org%2FCardinal%2FBiography.aspx&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNEGx5I7_Ml3Zb-0rkLV73BOMh_BXg">Cardinal Francis George</a> is being remembered as a kind, devout man whose strict view of church teachings was applauded by some and called rigid by others.</p><p>George, who stepped down from his post late last year to fight cancer for the third time, died at home on Friday. He was 78.</p><p>He&nbsp; was the leader of 2.2 million Roman Catholics in Lake and Cook Counties for more than 17 years. He retired in November 2014 due to his health.</p><p>When asked at the time about his legacy, George told WBEZ:</p><p>&ldquo;I just hope people remember I tried to be a good bishop. It is administrative. You have to take care of the institutions that protect the mission. What I discover now in many letters is truly touching because people write and tell me, &lsquo;You don&rsquo;t remember me, but 10 years ago or five years ago, I was transformed (or helped anyway spiritually) by something you said or you did.&rsquo; And when I hear that, I realize the Holy Spirit is making use of me to make his people holy. And that&rsquo;s all the legacy I want. It&rsquo;s an unknown legacy. It has to be because it&rsquo;s invisible. But if you touch people, your work lasts forever.&rdquo;</p><p>George was the first Chicago native to become archbishop here. But he gained renown far beyond the Chicago region.</p><p>As former president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the cardinal led high-profile fights against same-sex marriage and the Obamacare contraception mandate. He was internationally known as an advocate for religious liberty.</p><p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve always been able to fall back on the law to protect us,&rdquo; George said. &ldquo;Now we feel it&rsquo;s the law that&rsquo;s writing us out of the American consensus, and it&rsquo;s a huge cultural problem.&rdquo;</p><p>He often said he viewed things as either gospel truth, or not: &ldquo;Jesus didn&rsquo;t die on the cross so you could believe anything you want to. There is a faith. You can say, &lsquo;I&rsquo;m Catholic but I don&rsquo;t believe this, I don&rsquo;t believe that.&rsquo; Well, you&rsquo;ve created your own church.&quot;</p><p>That stance won him many fans, including Mary Anne Hackett, who heads the conservative <a href="http://catholiccitizens.org/">Catholic Citizens of Illinois</a>.</p><p>&ldquo;What he tried to do was restore the church in Chicago to what the church teaches about various things,&rdquo; Hackett said. &ldquo;You could call that conservative, I would call that Catholic.&rdquo;</p><p>But George&rsquo;s tenure wasn&rsquo;t without controversy. Supporters and critics alike described him as a reserved but kind man with keen intelligence and a quick wit.</p><p>They shared Hackett&rsquo;s respect for how he publicly endured both cancer and complications from polio, which he&rsquo;d contracted as a teen.</p><p>&ldquo;I was impressed that during all the time that he&rsquo;s been fighting these cancers, he&rsquo;s had an unbelievably busy schedule,&rdquo; Hackett said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s really been admirable, and it&rsquo;s been a wonderful example to all of us how he has withstood this suffering and done his duty.&rdquo;</p><p>While George&rsquo;s strict interpretation of church doctrine won praise from many, it drew criticism from others.</p><p>&ldquo;Certainly if you&rsquo;re a progressive Catholic, your view of him was tainted by his stance on things,&rdquo; said Linda Pieczynski. She&rsquo;s the long-time former spokesperson and president of <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fcta-usa.org%2F&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNH4W8mFnqT1vzViU7zOfyXAS2oFPg">Call to Action</a>, a national group of progressive Catholics based in Chicago. She&rsquo;s active in Dignity USA, which supports LGBT rights in the church.</p><p>&ldquo;But I do think he was a good man,&rdquo; Pieczynski said. &ldquo;I don&#39;t think we harbor any anger toward him as an individual. I think we recognize he was a product of his time and upbringing and being in a very isolated clerical culture. It would be surprising if he had been more open about dialoguing with people.&rdquo;</p><p>She lauded George&rsquo;s stances on immigration reform and helping the poor. But she said his opposition to same-sex marriage and women in church leadership could be &ldquo;tone-deaf.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;He just did not seem to want to engage in a dialogue about these types of issues,&rdquo; Pieczynski said. &ldquo;It was very dogmatic &mdash; this is what the church said, this is what it&rsquo;s always going to say and it&rsquo;s going to be that way forever. And of course, that&rsquo;s not true. Church teachings evolve.&rdquo;</p><p>The cardinal <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.huffingtonpost.com%2F2010%2F04%2F16%2Frev-michael-pfleger-apolo_n_540220.html&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNFXZ_AYI3npP0b4rzRnC_r0R8eHZw">asked some priests</a> who openly supported women&rsquo;s ordination - a stance against church teachings &mdash; to apologize.</p><p>In 2011, <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.chicagotribune.com%2F2012-01-06%2Fnews%2Fchi-cardinal-george-apologizes-for-linking-pride-parade-to-kkk-20120106_1_pride-parade-equality-illinois-lesbian&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNEpHm1xfvBuztgiBpC-cCRDdQo4WA">he likened gay Pride Parade organizers</a> to &ldquo;something like the Ku Klux Klan&rdquo; when he feared the parade route would disrupt mass at a local church. He later apologized for the remark.</p><p>Dignity Chicago spokesperson Chris Pett said those remarks were hurtful and alienating for LGBT people and their families.</p><p>&ldquo;In some ways he tried to provide ministries to LGBT Catholics. Leadership from Dignity met with him, and we were always treated with respect and enjoyed his intelligence and wit,&rdquo; Pett said. &ldquo;But like many church leaders, his opposition to marriage equality put the church on the wrong side of history, and he made many Catholics, straight and gay, question whether they were really welcome in the church.&rdquo;</p><p>Pieczynski reserved her sharpest criticism for the cardinal&#39;s handling of the priest sex abuse crisis.</p><p>On the one hand, the cardinal was credited with leading a delegation to press the Vatican on a zero tolerance policy for priest sex abuse, which led to a series of reforms in 2002. And a review of thousands of pages of church records showed he did more than his predecessors to help victims and report abusers to police and prosecutors, rather than just moving credibly accused priests around to different parishes. After the 2002 reforms passed, George moved to pull numerous priests from active ministry and to defrock some of them.</p><p>But he still let some priests <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.andersonadvocates.com%2FArchdiocese-of-Chicago-Documents.aspx&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNEijX6uWoyVpuMszQE6HmY1VH5Ggw">stay in their positions despite abuse allegations, and sometimes even after the church review board recommended their removal</a>. Most notably, Pieczynski said, he didn&rsquo;t act quickly enough to get rid of Daniel McCormack, who molested numerous boys before being arrested and defrocked.</p><p>&ldquo;I really thought he got it, which is why is was such a disappointment when he didn&rsquo;t follow his own rules in terms of removing Father McCormack,&rdquo; Pieczynski said. &ldquo;And that was a real tragedy, a Shakespearean tragedy, in terms of here was a person who knew better.&rdquo;</p><p>George said he was &ldquo;saddened by my own failure, very much so.&quot;</p><p>&ldquo;Oh, by far, the most difficult challenge has been the terrible fallout from the sexual abuse of children by some priests,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I pray for victims, I&rsquo;m concerned as we try to accommodate victims and help them. That&rsquo;s been the overwhelming weight in a sense that has stayed with me.&rdquo;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/george%20and%20cupich.jpg" style="height: 403px; width: 620px;" title="Cardinal George welcomes Bishop Blase Cupich as the 9th Archbishop of Chicago. (Twitter/CardinalFGeorge)" /></div></div><p>Near the end of his tenure, the cardinal reflected on his accomplishments and his regrets.</p><p>&ldquo;I regret very much mistakes that were made, particularly if people were hurt. I regret that I tried sometimes to listen but didn&rsquo;t succeed either in understanding or agreeing, and I couldn&rsquo;t, I didn&rsquo;t think sometimes. I regret a certain bitterness that you find occasionally in people,&rdquo; he said, adding he also was encouraged by all the good and holy people he met at various parishes.</p><p>George gained national and international prominence for his defense of religious liberty and his warnings about the dangers of growing secularism.</p><p>&quot;I expect to die in bed, my successor will die in prison and his successor will die a martyr in the public square. His successor will pick up the shards of a ruined society and slowly help rebuild civilization, as the church has done so often in human history,&quot; <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.catholicnewworld.com%2Fcnwonline%2F2012%2F1021%2Fcardinal.aspx&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNFd3Lfvm2tOP3QKccApGDcXvpZUjQ">he famously said</a>,</p><p>Locally, he steered the Archdiocese through the Recession, was a staunch supporter of Catholic schools, and worked to improve the seminary, lay ministry and catechismal programs &mdash; anything, he said, that affected people.</p><p>George was honored by the Jewish and Muslim communities for working to improve dialogue with them.</p><p>He also served as chancellor of <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.catholicextension.org%2F&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNFI6FXyXVY3KXtLanGjepDsEP2xrg">Catholic Extension</a>, a national group that sends funds and other resources to poor Catholic communities.</p><p>Catholic Extension President Father Jack Wall, the longtime former pastor of Old St. Patrick&rsquo;s Church, called George a &ldquo;man of deep faith, of great wisdom,&rdquo; with a &ldquo;missionary heart&rdquo; in his desire to help the poor.</p><p>&ldquo;Cardinal George was not a very demonstrative person in terms of his emotions but at the level of conviction he was very, very strong,&rdquo; Wall said, pointing to George&rsquo;s correspondence and meetings with many of his fellow cancer patients. &ldquo;Many of (his) acts of kindness and compassion were felt on a really very personal level.&rdquo;</p><p>Catholic Theological Union President Emeritus Father Donald Senior described George as deeply religious, brilliant, articulate and fearless about holding his positions.</p><p>&ldquo;Something I admired greatly in him, he was very direct. What you saw was what you got,&rdquo; Father Senior said. Even though some found that trait difficult, Senior said, that clarity of view made the cardinal a touchstone for Catholics. He said George&#39;s deep religious belief was the key to the man.</p><p>The cardinal himself said he never expected to become a bishop.</p><p>George first felt a pull toward the priesthood while receiving his first communion. Then polio struck when he was 13, and Quigley Preparatory Seminary turned him away. He found another religious school downstate and later joined that order, the <a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oblatesusa.org%2F&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNFy3zSlnpXo1NeOtakoVf5RaN0glA">Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate</a>.</p><p>He started as a theologian, earning master&rsquo;s and doctorates in both philosophy and theology. He quickly rose through the ranks of his order before being appointed bishop of Yakima, Wash., and then Portland, Oregon. Then he returned home to Chicago as archbishop. He described his path as one of obedience.</p><p>&ldquo;Many times I heard Cardinal George say he wanted to be a pastor, but his job prevented it, and I think that with all the administrative things at times kept him from being just a priest and the pastor that he sort of yearned to be,&rdquo; Father Senior said.</p><p>The cardinal had hoped to spend his retirement speaking and writing, but mostly focusing on doing pastoral work at local parishes like hearing confessions.</p><p>But the cancer didn&rsquo;t leave him much time.</p><p>Still, Father Senior said, George accepted those losses with serenity.</p><p>&ldquo;The skill of living is to live as if you&rsquo;re going to die tomorrow and still do your job,&rdquo; the cardinal said. &ldquo;In a sense prayer does that. You live for a while in a moment where you&rsquo;re not in charge, you&rsquo;re just at God&rsquo;s disposition. And as long as that&rsquo;s the case, then, well, I don&rsquo;t want to die tomorrow, but if I did, I&rsquo;m sure the Lord would still be providential in his care of the Earth. It doesn&rsquo;t depend on me.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Lynette Kalsnes covers religion and culture for WBEZ. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em></p><p><br /><strong>Schedule of Services and Public Visitation</strong><br /><em>All services, including public visitation and the Funeral Mass, will take place at Holy Name Cathedral (<a href="http://holynamecathedral.org/" target="_blank">http://holynamecathedral.org/</a>), State and Superior Streets in Chicago. <em>Immediately following the Funeral Mass, the Committal Service will take place at All Saints Cemetery<em><em>, 700 North River Road in Des Plaines.</em></em> <em>(<a href="http://www.catholiccemeterieschicago.org/locations.php?cem=2" target="_blank">http://www.catholiccemeterieschicago.org/locations.php?cem=2</a>). </em>Per the Cardinal&rsquo;s wishes, he will be buried in the George family plot. (Open to the Public)</em><br /><br />Tuesday, April 21<br />1 p.m.&nbsp; Holy Name Cathedral Doors Open<br />2 p.m.&nbsp; Rite of Reception (Open to the Public)<br />2:30 to 6:30 p.m.&nbsp; Visitation (Open to the Public)<br />7:30 p.m.&nbsp; Prayer Vigil for Priests and Seminarians (Attendance by Ticket Only)<br />9 to 11 p.m.&nbsp; Visitation (Open to the Public)<br />11 p.m.&nbsp; Holy Name Cathedral Doors Close<br /><br />Wednesday, April 22<br />7 to 9:30 a.m.&nbsp; Visitation (Open to the Public)<br />10:30 a.m.&nbsp; Interfaith Service (Open to the Public)<br />11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.&nbsp; Visitation (Open to the Public)<br />7:30 p.m.&nbsp; Prayer Vigil for Women and Men Religious, Deacons and their Wives (Attendance by Ticket Only)<br /><br />9 p.m.&nbsp; Wednesday, April 22 until 7:30 a.m. Thursday, April 23<br />Visitation and All Night Vigil Conducted by Lay Ecclesial Movements (Open to the Public)<br /><br />Thursday, April 23<br />7:30 a.m.&nbsp; Prayer Service (Open to the Public)<br />8 a.m.&nbsp; Holy Name Cathedral Closed for Funeral Mass Preparation<br />11 a.m.&nbsp; Holy Name Cathedral Doors Open for Funeral Mass (Attendance by Ticket Only)<br />12 p.m.&nbsp; Funeral Mass (Attendance by Ticket Only)<br /><br />In lieu of flowers, donations to the Cardinal&rsquo;s favorite charities will be appreciated -- Priests Retirement and Mutual Aid Association (PRMAA) (<a href="https://www.givecentral.org/location/91" target="_blank">https://www.givecentral.org/location/91</a>) or To Teach Who Christ Is (<a href="https://givecentral.org/ttwci/" target="_blank">https://givecentral.org/ttwci/</a>), a campaign to support scholarships for students in Catholic Schools.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 17 Apr 2015 13:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/remembering-chicagos-cardinal-francis-george-111900 Meet Bishop Blase Cupich, Chicago's incoming archbishop http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/meet-bishop-blase-cupich-chicagos-incoming-archbishop-110828 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/greeting.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated 5:30 p.m.</em></p><p>Bishop Blase Cupich will be installed as the next archbishop of the Archdiocese of Chicago on Nov. 18. He&rsquo;s currently the bishop of Spokane, Wash., and previously served as bishop of Rapid City, S.D.</p><p>He began a press conference Saturday by asking the people of Chicago to pray for him, as Pope Francis did right after he became pontiff.</p><p>Cupich&rsquo;s appointment came as something of a surprise to many who have been closely watching the succession process. The bishop comes from a smaller diocese, and hadn&rsquo;t been on most of the short lists. But he&rsquo;s known as a moderate who observers expect will follow the pastoral approach of Pope Francis.</p><blockquote><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/cupich-be-next-chicago-archbishop-110827">Observers, parishioners</a></strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/cupich-be-next-chicago-archbishop-110827"><strong>&nbsp;discuss Cardinal George&#39;s legacy</strong></a></blockquote><p>That viewpoint was evident at his first press conference here, where he was informal and used short parables to get his point across. In Spanish, he said he comes as a pastor, but he also comes here as a brother.</p><p><strong>Bishop Cupich&rsquo;s style of leadership</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168607075&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>This is the Pope&rsquo;s first major selection in the U.S., so the appointment has been closely watched as indicative of the direction in which the pontiff may hope to lead the U.S. Roman Catholic church.</p><p>&ldquo;I think the holy father is a pastoral man,&rdquo; Cupich said. &ldquo;...I think that I wouldn&rsquo;t want to in any way overly politicize or put this in a different context. I think he cares a lot about people, and he took his time, and he wanted to provide a pastor. And so I think he sent a pastor, not a message.&rdquo;</p><p>Bishop Cupich said he was humbled and encouraged by the appointment, calling it a &ldquo;blessed opportunity.&rdquo; He said surprise doesn&rsquo;t come close to describing his reaction.</p><p><strong>Bishop Cupich&rsquo;s reaction to his selection:</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168607361&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Cardinal George said he was relieved and grateful the Pope had honored his request to retire. Each time that was mentioned at the press conference, he punched his arm in the air in apparent joy. All the previous bishops here had died in office.</p><p>George said he&rsquo;s relieved, too, to leave the Archdiocese with &ldquo;such an able and experienced man.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I described him as well-prepared for his new responsibilities, bringing to them a deep faith, a quick intelligence, personal commitment and varied pastoral experience, and I hope you&rsquo;ve seen that in action in just a very few minutes, and you&rsquo;ll see it in action for many years to come,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><strong>Cardinal George on why he&rsquo;s grateful:</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168607598&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>The Cardinal is facing his third battle with cancer, and is undergoing experimental treatment. Yet he&rsquo;s largely maintained his bruising schedule.</p><p>George will stay in office for the next two months, while Cupich will continue serving as bishop of Spokane. They plan to stay in touch to plan a smooth transition. Once he&rsquo;s retired, George said he hopes to help the new archbishop in any way he can, and to perform confirmations and confessions.</p><p>If he&rsquo;s strong enough, Cardinal George plans to journey to see Pope Francis in Rome in November.</p><p>Bishop Cupich said his first priority will be getting to know people here and the area, talking about the position as an &ldquo;enormous upgrade&rdquo; in reference to the size of the Archdiocese of Chicago compared to his previous dioceses.</p><p>He said he&rsquo;s worked among diverse cultures, including Latinos and Native Americans, and said that it&rsquo;s important for groups to bring their cultures to their religious experience. He&rsquo;s also pushed for immigration reform.</p><p>The bishop -- who headed the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops&rsquo; Committee for the Protection of Children and Young People from 2008-2011 -- said the church must continue to &nbsp;work to protect children from priest sexual abuse and to help heal victims, adding he&rsquo;ll try hard to make that an important part of the ministry.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b8538668-952b-9c4f-7503-0ff9223cf947">Reaction to the selection was mixed in greater Chicago.</span></p><p>Mary Anne Hackett, president of the conservative Catholic Citizens of Illinois, said she&rsquo;s taking a wait-and-see approach.</p><p>&quot;Personally I don&rsquo;t like the designation moderate for anybody,&quot; she said. &quot;I think it would be nice to take a stand one way or another. That might just be a nice way of saying his position. That will unfold as time goes on.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">But the Chicago-based national liberal group Call to Action said it&rsquo;s quote &ldquo;relieved&rdquo; to learn Cupich is moderate. In a statement, they said the Pope&rsquo;s selection shows quote &ldquo;a desire for a humbler, more pastoral church.&rdquo;</p><div><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-8140c6a7-952d-3d48-9bec-bb2f36214810">Local theologian Mike Murphy, who&nbsp;</span><span id="docs-internal-guid-8140c6a7-952d-3d48-9bec-bb2f36214810">h</span>eads Catholic Studies at Loyola University Chicago, called Cupich a good fit for the city. He said the bishop is in line with Pope Francis&rsquo; vision for leadership.</p><p dir="ltr">&quot;He is prepared to lead in a way that shepherds the people and not be anchored down to ideology,&quot; Murphy said. He added that he views Cupich as a moderate who&rsquo;s doctrinally very serious while seeing a need for conversation in a polarized society. Murphy also pointed to the bishop&#39;s work&nbsp;serving the poor.</p><p dir="ltr">Bishop Cupich is now archbishop designate. It&rsquo;s likely he&rsquo;ll someday be appointed cardinal, but that wouldn&rsquo;t happen until after Cardinal George -- who&rsquo;s 77 -- turns 80.</p></div><p>Cupich will be formally installed as the new archbishop of Chicago on Nov. 18 at Holy Name Cathedral.</p></p> Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/meet-bishop-blase-cupich-chicagos-incoming-archbishop-110828 Survivors, lawyers say documents prove priest sex abuse cover-up http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/survivors-lawyers-say-documents-prove-priest-sex-abuse-cover-109557 <p><p>Newly released documents offer the most sweeping look yet at how the Archdiocese of Chicago has handled cases of sexual abuse by priests. Attorneys and victims contend they provide clear evidence of a cover-up that started in the 1950s and continues today.</p><p>Victims&rsquo; attorneys put 6,000 pages online Tuesday. They detail alleged abuse by 30 priests against about 50 victims.</p><p>Kathy Laarveld&rsquo;s son was one of those molested by a priest. For years, she was a staunch supporter of her parish. She was the secretary, the cook, even did the laundry for the priests, who were regular dinner guests.</p><p>She had no idea that Vincent McCaffrey, one of these priests she trusted, was abusing her son.</p><p>&ldquo;McCaffrey actually took advantage of my son on his First Communion in my home, in front of my family,&rdquo; Laarveld said.</p><p>It was not until her son told her about 10 years ago -- 20 years later -- that she learned the truth. McCaffrey admitted during court hearings to molesting so many children that he lost count. The documents show he offended at every parish where he served, including that of Laarveld and her son.</p><p>&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t forgive myself, I&rsquo;m his mother. I would have jumped in front of a bus or a train before I would ever have let anybody touch him,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Laarveld and her husband, Jim, are among survivors of priest sex abuse and their families who worked to get these papers released. Their attorneys say they refused to settle their cases unless the files went public.</p><p>The 30 priests described in the documents are about half the number the Archdiocese lists as credibly accused.</p><p>Attorney Jeff Anderson, who represented victims in these cases, spell out the accusation of a cover-up. He said, &ldquo;Priests were offending children, and they made intentional and conscious choices to conceal that, protect the priests, protect the reputation of the Archdiocese, and in effect conceal the crime and give safe harbor to the offender.&rdquo;</p><p>The documents show that offending priests moved in and out of treatment and from parish to parish, over and over, without the old parish or new one knowing what had happened.<br /><br />They show monitoring failed repeatedly. Priests and nuns who were selected to keep abusive priests from re-offending told the highest church officials they were not clear what their jobs were. They told officials the priests were breaking restrictions and hanging around kids again. And often, the records show, nothing was done.</p><p>&ldquo;It shows a pattern of repeated abuse, repeated allegations, the Archdiocese working hard to keep that all bottled up in secret and then transferring these gentleman from one parish to another so they can abuse again,&rdquo; said Chicago Marc Pearlman, who has represented nearly 100 victims along with Anderson.</p><p>&ldquo;What is striking to me is every file is very similar,&rdquo; Pearlman added. &ldquo;Each file tells the same story. The only difference is the perpetrator&rsquo;s name and the victims&rsquo; names.&rdquo;</p><p>Consider the case of Daniel Holihan. In 1986, a mom wrote to Cardinal Joseph Bernardin to tell him that the kids called Holihan &ldquo;Father Happy Hands.&rdquo;</p><p>Holihan was reportedly touching and fondling many boys and bringing them to his cottage. When the police showed an abuse-prevention movie on &ldquo;good touch, bad touch,&rdquo; a bunch of boys told their teacher it had happened to them.</p><p>The State&rsquo;s Attorney&rsquo;s Office found at least 12 cases with credible evidence, but did not charge Holihan.&nbsp; A letter thanks the office for its efforts to &ldquo;minimize the negative impact on the parish.&rdquo;</p><p>The documents show the Archdiocese moved Holihan to senior ministry, but let him serve in a parish on weekends for a number of years.</p><p>The Archdiocese has apologized for its handling of cases such as this. In a statement, it&nbsp; acknowledged that leaders &ldquo;made some decisions decades ago that are now difficult to justify.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;The pain and the suffering of victims and their families is just something that continues to haunt me, and I think it is also a terrible thing for the church,&rdquo; said Bishop Francis Kane, who oversees pastoral care for the Archdiocese.</p><p>But Kane denied there was an orchestrated cover-up. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t believe there was ever an intention to hide what has happened,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;What happened, I believe, is we&rsquo;ve had a change in understanding. Forty years ago when many of these incidents took place, we treated sex abuse in a very different way.&rdquo;</p><p>The Archdiocese points out that nearly all these cases happened before 1988. None of the 30 priests remain in active ministry. Half are dead.</p><p>The attorneys for the victims do acknowledge some things are better, including a program to help victims and training to recognize abusers.</p><p>But they say they see signs of similar patterns still occurring.</p><p>In the past decade, Father Joseph Bennett was accused of multiple allegations, including penetrating a girl&rsquo;s rectum with the handle of a communion server. In a letter to the Gary (Ind.) Diocese, asking for help monitoring Bennett, the Archdiocese said it only knew of one allegation.</p><p>Attorney Jeff Anderson points out review board reporting to Cardinal Francis George -- Bernadin&rsquo;s successor -- recommended Bennett&rsquo;s removal from priesthood.</p><p>&ldquo;Cardinal George, instead of following that recommendation, took the Bennett file and made his own determination, notwithstanding the fact one of the witnesses in that file described Bennett&rsquo;s scrotum,&rdquo; Anderson said.</p><p>The Cardinal said in documents that he interceded to make sure Bennett -- who, like many of the priests, has maintained his innocence -- had a canon lawyer.</p><p>Here&rsquo;s an excerpt from a letter the Cardinal wrote to a Bennett supporter:</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/letter.PNG" style="height: 370px; width: 620px;" title="" /></div><p>It is this kind of response that angers Kathy and Jim Laarveld. They say their family has&nbsp; paid a high cost for priest sexual abuse, and how the Archdiocese handled it.</p><p>Jim no longer goes to Mass. Kathy tries, but she sometimes starts to sob when she begins to walk into church.</p><p>She says their son, as a boy, was carefree, a firecracker. Now he is a compassionate man who has struggled because of the abuse.</p><p>&ldquo;I look at him and I see the day he was born, all the hope, all the love, the sparkle in his eye, and his face,&rdquo; Kathy said. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s a very playful individual, but he&rsquo;ll catch himself, and I say, &lsquo;Go for it. Be that little boy you could never be. You always had that over your head.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Her husband, Jim, plans to look at the documents. Their parish had two abusive priests at the same time.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to hurt, although we know a lot of what&rsquo;s in there, I&rsquo;m sure there&rsquo;s stuff we don&rsquo;t know,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to hurt my son. Hopefully we can be with him when he looks at it, because I don&rsquo;t want him to be alone.&rdquo;</p><p>Kathy Laarveld expects that pain will be short-lived. She thinks seeing the documents -- and the acknowledgement this all happened -- will help her son, and her entire family, to heal.</p><p>And she hopes it brings healing to others as well.</p></p> Wed, 22 Jan 2014 12:31:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/survivors-lawyers-say-documents-prove-priest-sex-abuse-cover-109557 Churches take ‘leap of faith’ on Emanuel water deal http://www.wbez.org/news/churches-take-%E2%80%98leap-faith%E2%80%99-emanuel-water-deal-107089 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/burke.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Church leaders took a &ldquo;leap of faith&rdquo; Wednesday and got behind Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s compromise plan to charge non-profits for city water, after some last-second lobbying that ended with unanimous City Council approval.</p><p dir="ltr">The city will now charge non-profits based on a sliding scale, determined by their net assets. Groups and churches with less than $1 million in net assets will still get free water, while groups that are worth more than $250 million would pay full price.</p><p dir="ltr">Emanuel, aldermen and religious leaders whispered near the City Council bathrooms moments before the roll call vote - a rare scene for a legislative process where most votes are decided long before they hit the council floor.</p><p dir="ltr">A coalition of religious groups had objected to the plan, arguing that some old churches wouldn&rsquo;t get a break because they&rsquo;re situated on valuable land. Chicago&rsquo;s Catholic leaders were also worried that their 200 churches and 90 schools wouldn&rsquo;t qualify for any individual exemptions because they are all technically owned by one entity, the Archdiocese of Chicago.</p><p dir="ltr">Coalition leaders claim they had the City Council votes to block the mayor&rsquo;s plan, but withdrew their opposition after gaining assurances that administrative rules would later be written in their favor.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;In exchange for that commitment, we have - we have said we will support the passage of the ordinance today, and we will work it out,&rdquo; said Chancellor Jim Lago, with the Archdiocese of Chicago. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a leap of faith, and we&rsquo;re looking for the goodwill of those who will be in the room with us, and we expect that.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Lago would not say whether he trusted Emanuel to make sure nonprofits don&rsquo;t take a big hit when the rules for collecting water fees are written, but he said negotiations would continue in the coming weeks.</p><p dir="ltr">The mayor took heat from Chicago&rsquo;s non-profit community when he first proposed taking away free water as part of his plan to balance the city budget in 2011. He <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-backtracks-hiking-water-costs-nonprofits-106884">backed off</a> a bit with his compromise proposal last month, but church leaders were concerned about how the city would calculate net assets.</p><p dir="ltr">After Wednesday&rsquo;s City Council vote, Emanuel maintained he struck a fair balance.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I think we&rsquo;ve done it in a thoughtful way, reflective of every one of the non-for profits&rsquo; and religious entities&rsquo; different roles in the community - meaning, their net value - but nonetheless ended the practice where the taxpayers were on the hook for everybody else,&rdquo; Emanuel said.</p><p dir="ltr">During his campaign, Emanuel vowed to stop giving away city water and sewer service to nonprofits - a freebie he estimates costs the city $20 million a year.</p><p><em>Alex Keefe is a WBEZ political reporter. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/akeefe">@akeefe</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 May 2013 18:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/churches-take-%E2%80%98leap-faith%E2%80%99-emanuel-water-deal-107089 Doctors say Chicago's Cardinal George appears cancer free http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/doctors-say-chicagos-cardinal-george-appears-cancer-free-104337 <p><p>Cardinal Francis George says he appears to be cancer free after he started chemotherapy in September for cancer cells on his liver and kidney.</p><p>The head of Chicago&#39;s Catholic archdiocese tells the <a href="http://trib.in/X8Hy3P" target="_blank">Chicago Tribune</a> doctors were encouraged because &quot;they couldn&#39;t find any evidence of cancer where they found it before.&quot; This has been George&#39;s second bout with cancer. Six years ago, surgeons removed his bladder, prostate and part of his right ureter following the discovery that he had bladder cancer.</p><p>The 75-year-old George is the spiritual leader of the Chicago archdiocese, which serves more than 2 million Roman Catholics. George says a weakened immune system means he will miss his Christmas outings this year. George won&#39;t celebrate Mass at Cook County jail or visit patients at Lurie Children&#39;s Hospital.</p></p> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 10:16:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/doctors-say-chicagos-cardinal-george-appears-cancer-free-104337 Chicago Archdiocese: Tweak to birth control mandate a first step http://www.wbez.org/story/chicago-archdiocese-tweak-birth-control-mandate-first-step-96298 <p><p>Chicago's Catholic Archdiocese is not yet endorsing President Barack Obama's compromise on forcing religious institutions to provide birth control for employees.</p><p>Mr. Obama announced Friday that certain institutions can object on religious principle to directly provide birth control. In those cases, health insurance companies would be responsible for providing that care.</p><p>Father William Grogan, Vicar for Healthcare at the Chicago Archdiocese, said the Archdiocese stands by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), which, in a written statement said they take the announcement as a first step but continue to have concerns.</p><p>Father Grogan couldn’t specify what those particular concerns are, but said they likely result "from the fact that the president made a very sincere but general statement.” He added that they want to see how the proposals will work out in detail going forward.</p><p>Cardinal Francis George recently criticized the regulation in a letter saying, "We cannot - we will not - comply with this unjust law. People of faith cannot be made second class citizens because of their religious beliefs." Although that letter was written prior to Friday’s announcement by Mr. Obama, it has been distributed to churches in the Archdiocese. Priests will be reading that letter out loud to parishioners at Sunday mass.</p></p> Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:47:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/chicago-archdiocese-tweak-birth-control-mandate-first-step-96298 Cardinal George required to hand in letter of resignation http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-george-required-hand-letter-resignation-95555 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-January/2012-01-13/RS2444_AP060406015168-cardinal george Charles Rex Arbogast-scr.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Cardinal Francis George turns 75 on Monday, and that means he'll be submitting his mandatory letter of resignation.</p><p>In the Roman Catholic Church, bishops are required to write a letter of resignation when they hit 75. The pope doesn't have to accept it, however, so bishops often stay in office a few more years.</p><p>Cardinal George has said <a href="http://www.catholicnewworld.com/cnwonline/2011/0327/7.aspx">he doesn't want to retire yet</a>. He's survived cancer, and says he feels good about his health.</p><p>Cardinals can serve as electors of the pope until they’re 80.</p><p>“We have never experienced this problem in Chicago, since all my predecessors died before they were 75,” Cardinal George said in a statement. “I am eager to be the first Archbishop of Chicago to retire!”</p><p>The cardinal's known as a conservative bishop who's spoken out against gay marriage and the ordination of women.</p><p>George gained national prominence as president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, a post he held from 2007 to 2010.</p></p> Mon, 16 Jan 2012 11:53:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-george-required-hand-letter-resignation-95555 Quinn defends legislative actions after meeting with Catholic bishops http://www.wbez.org/story/quinn-defends-legislative-actions-after-meeting-catholic-bishops-95037 <p><p>Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn defended his actions as governor on Monday after a meeting with the state's Catholic bishops.</p><p>Over the weekend, Quinn described last week's meeting with Cardinal Francis George and Illinois' 13 bishops as productive and mostly about poverty, with small discussion on the governor's position in favor of abortion rights and gay rights laws regarding adoption.</p><p>In a written statement on Saturday, the 13 bishops accused the Catholic governor of mischaracterizing their meeting as mostly about the works of faith rather than its principles.</p><p>The bishops also said that as governor, Quinn's actions have not been consistent with a Catholic conscience.</p><p>"On several occasions, the Governor has referred to his Catholic conscience and faith as the justification for certain political decisions," read the Bishops' statement. "As Catholic pastors, we wanted to remind the Governor that conscience, while always free, is properly formed in harmony with the tradition of the Church, as defined by Scripture and authentic teaching authority. A personal conscience that is not consistent with authentic Catholic teaching is not a Catholic conscience. The Catholic faith cannot be used to justify positions contrary to the faith itself."</p><p>"I am who I am. I don't really wear my faith on my sleeve. I don't go around and say I'm carrying out anything other than my own conscience," said Quinn.</p><p>The bishops requested the meeting after a public disagreement with the governor last month. They were upset Quinn agreed to present an award at a ceremony hosted by an abortions-rights organization.</p></p> Mon, 19 Dec 2011 22:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/quinn-defends-legislative-actions-after-meeting-catholic-bishops-95037 Cardinal blesses ‘healing garden’ for sex-abuse victims http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-blesses-%E2%80%98healing-garden%E2%80%99-sex-abuse-victims-87664 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-09/CardinalGeorge_Healing_Garden.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago’s top Catholic official Thursday blessed what his archdiocese is calling its “healing garden” for survivors of clergy sexual abuse.<br> <br> The garden covers a plot next to Holy Family, a 19th century Chicago church at 1080 West Roosevelt Road, and includes more than two dozen varieties of trees, plants and flowers as well as a 600-pound bronze sculpture of a man, woman and child holding hands, dancing in a circle and smiling. An archdiocese committee that includes four abuse survivors started planning the project more than two years ago.<br> <br> At a prayer service before giving his blessing, Cardinal Francis George said the garden shows “a permanent voice of victims, a permanent apology on the part of the church, and a permanent commitment by the ministers of the church . . . that we are there” for victims who seek help.<br> <br> “We hope,” George added, “that, in the midst of this tragedy, there will be the possibility of new life, of resurrection of the heart in such a way that one can continue with new energy and new vigor and to be not trapped in something that brings death but, rather, find new life — with the help of others and the help of God — that will be, itself, a light to the world.”<br> <br> But the garden isn’t impressing some victims of Catholic clerical abuse.<br> <br> “Cardinal George and other church officials have empowered and enabled sexual predators to abuse more children,” said Barbara Blaine, president of the Chicago-based Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. “Instead of being punished for those reckless actions, many have been promoted.”<br> <br> Blaine says many church officials ought to face criminal investigation.</p></p> Thu, 09 Jun 2011 21:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/cardinal-blesses-%E2%80%98healing-garden%E2%80%99-sex-abuse-victims-87664 Father Pfleger reinstated to St Sabina for now http://www.wbez.org/story/father-pfleger-reinstated-st-sabina-86846 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-May/2011-05-21/Father Pfleger at pulpit_Getty_Erik Lesser.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated 5/23/11 at 9:13pm</em></p><p>Outspoken Catholic priest, Rev. Michael Pfleger, returned to the pulpit of St. Sabina Church on Sunday where he celebrated mass for the first time since his suspension. &nbsp;</p><p>Pfleger, who also celebrated his 62nd birthday on Sunday, received a standing ovation, but also apologized for his role in a high-profile standoff with the Archdiocese of Chicago during the past three weeks that left him banned from pastoral ministry and threatening to leave the Catholic church entirely.</p><p>Pfleger, the longtime pastor of the parish, was suspended last month after remarking during a National Public Radio interview that he would leave the church rather than be removed from St. Sabina Church, which he has headed for more than 30 years.</p><p>Previously, the Archdiocese had asked Pfleger to consider leaving the parish to take over leadership of a nearby Catholic high school.</p><p>In suspending Pfleger, Cardinal Francis George said if that was the priest’s attitude, he had already left the Catholic Church and therefore was "not able to pastor a Catholic parish."</p><p>Pfleger apologized for the remark Friday in a statement. He said he didn’t intend it as a threat to leave the priesthood, and he was committed to working with George to spread the Gospel.</p><p>The Archdiocese of Chicago announced Friday that it had reinstated Pfleger to full sacramental and pastoral ministry. Pfleger also said he will prepare a transition plan that he will present to George and the Priests’ Placement Board by Dec. 1.</p><p>"For the people of St. Sabina and the Church as a whole, I will do all in my power to foster healing for all," he said. "We trust in the healing power of God."</p><p>In reinstating Pfleger, George said the remarks made to National Public Radio seemed to place the priest outside the Catholic Church and constitute a threat to leave the priesthood. George said in a statement that he and Pfleger discussed how the church has been wounded and the need to find a way to heal the hurt and confusion.</p><p>"Father Pfleger’s statement, which he discussed with me, is a genuine step toward healing the hurt and clarifying the confusion," George said.</p><p>Pfleger has gained national attention for his protests of everything from gun violence to Jerry Springer’s television show. A white priest who runs a largely black parish, he has made racial equality a large part of his mission and appeared with major civil rights leaders.</p><p>He often wears African-style robes during services, and a mural of a black Jesus is behind the altar. Both of his adopted sons are black.</p><p>Pfleger has long appeared to have a strained relationship with the Chicago Archdiocese, which opposed his decision to adopt children. However, in his letter announcing the suspension, George said he has consistently supported Pfleger’s work for social justice and admired his passion for ministry.</p><p>Pfleger’s public comments have gotten him in trouble before. In 2008, he was suspended for nearly two weeks after mocking then-Sen. Hillary Clinton during her presidential run. Pfleger, who was preaching from the pulpit of President Barack Obama’s former Chicago church, pretended he was Clinton crying over "a black man stealing my show." He later apologized.</p><p>The latest disagreement stemmed from reports the archdiocese has wanted to put Pfleger in charge of a Catholic high school.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 20 May 2011 21:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/father-pfleger-reinstated-st-sabina-86846