WBEZ | Ethiopia http://www.wbez.org/tags/ethiopia Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Foreign Policy Questions the 2016 Presidential Candidates Aren't Asking http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-02-01/foreign-policy-questions-2016-presidential-candidates-arent-asking <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Campaign3.jpg" title="Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016, in Council Bluffs, Iowa. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/244955466&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;">National Security Issues &ldquo;Missing&rdquo; in the 2016 Presidential Campaign</span><br />The Iowa Caucuses are in full swing. &nbsp;Polls show that Hilary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are in a tight race on the Democratic side and Ted Cruz and Donald Trump are also close. &nbsp;The presidential debates and the 2016 candidates have focused on a range of issues up until now, ranging from ISIS to income inequality. &nbsp;Still, in a recent article in The Nation, author Andrew Bacevich &nbsp;argues there are big, important &nbsp;national security issues that none of the candidates are talking about, things like nuclear weapons and European security. &nbsp;Bacevich, professor emeritus of international relations and history at Boston University and author, most recently of <em>Breach of Trust: &nbsp;How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country</em>, joins us to talk about the issues he says, are missing from the campaign trail. &nbsp;His article &ldquo;6 National Security Questions the Establishment Candidates don&rsquo;t want to Answer,&rdquo; appears in the Nation.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> Andrew Bacevich is professor emeritus of international relations and history at Boston University and author, most recently of <em>Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country</em>.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/WHM---Nasser.jpg" title="Gamal Abdul Nasser receives the Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie at airport on his arrival to attend the Pan African summit conference scheduled to open in Cairo on Friday, July 17, 1961. (AP Photo/Jim Pringle)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/244955474&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;">World History Moment: United Arab Republic</span><br />February 1, 1958 marks the founding of the United Arab Republic. In the late 1950s Gamal Abdul Nasser was a hero in the Arab world. &nbsp;As President of Egypt, he&rsquo;d resisted foreign domination. &nbsp;He was also adept at Cold War politics and the United Arab Republic was an attempt to formalize the growing pan-Arabism movement, the idea that the Arab peoples of the Middle East and North Africa should be united into one nation. &nbsp;Historian John Schmidt tells us how it began and how it ended.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> John Schmidt is a historian and the author of &ldquo;On This Day in Chicago History.&rdquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Ethopia.jpg" title="Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn attends the opening ceremony of the 26 ordinary of the African Summit in Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene)" /></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/244955479&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;">Ethiopia&rsquo;s new anti- terrorism law</span><br />The 26th African Union Summit came to a close over the weekend. It was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Despite the fact that human rights were a major focus of the gathering, Ethiopia&rsquo;s government is under heavy international scrutiny, accused of continued human rights and civil liberty abuses. A new report by the policy and human rights think tank, Oakland Institute, titled <em>Ethiopia&#39;s Anti-Terrorism Law: A Tool to Stifle Dissent</em>, details how the Ethiopian government imprisons, oppresses and harasses critics under its &ldquo;2009 Anti-Terrorism Proclamation.&rdquo; Anuradha Mittal is executive director of the Oakland Institute. Mittal and Lewis Gordon, co-author and editor of the report, &nbsp;join us to discuss their findings. Gordon will tell us why he wrote that the &ldquo;law defines terrorism in an extremely broad and vague way so as to give the government enormous leeway to punish words and acts that would be perfectly legal in a democracy.&rdquo;</p><p><br /><strong>Guests:</strong>&nbsp;Anuradha Mittal is executive director of the Oakland Institute, a policy think tank on social, economic, and environmental issues.</p><p>Lewis Gordon is executive director of the Environmental Defender Law Center, editor and co-author of the Oakland Institute report, &ldquo;Ethiopia&#39;s Anti-Terrorism Law: A Tool to Stifle Dissent&rdquo;</p></p> Mon, 01 Feb 2016 16:13:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-02-01/foreign-policy-questions-2016-presidential-candidates-arent-asking President Jimmy Carter: 'Reflections at Ninety' http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-27/president-jimmy-carter-reflections-ninety-112486 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/OZinOH.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/OZinOhio)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216605492&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Jimmy Carter&#39;s new memoir, &#39;A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Former President Jimmy Carter&rsquo;s 29th book is titled &#39;A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety&#39;. In the book, Carter frankly reveals himself as a complex figure that differs from popular perceptions. We speak to Mr. Carter about his life, legacy and his thoughts on today&#39;s society.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em>Jimmy Carter is the 39th President of the United States, and Co-founder of the <a href="https://twitter.com/CarterCenter">Carter Center</a></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/216607044&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">President Obama visits Ethiopia</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>President Obama is in Ethiopia. Human rights advocates criticized his decision to the travel to the African nation. In a speech today, Mr. Obama praised Ethiopia&rsquo;s fight against terrorism, but urged its leaders to increase political openness and respect the freedom of the press. He said, &ldquo;When all voices are being heard, when people know they are being included in the political process, that makes a country more successful.&rdquo; Getachew Begashaw, a professor of economics at Harper College, joins us to discuss the President&rsquo;s visit.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Getachew Begashaw is a professor of economics at <a href="https://twitter.com/HarperCollege">Harper College</a>, originally from Ethiopia.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 27 Jul 2015 15:13:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-27/president-jimmy-carter-reflections-ninety-112486 Ethiopian elections http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-05/ethiopian-elections-112150 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/R%20Hagel%20flickr.jpg" style="width: 497px; height: 375px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/R Hagel)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208999630&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Ethiopia appears set to remain a one party country</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Ethiopia&#39;s ruling party appears to have won a landslide victory in the country&#39;s parliamentary elections. Opposition leaders accused the party of trying to intimidate and harass supporters of their parties. Girma Birru, the Ethiopian Ambassador to the United States, joins us to discuss the elections and the state of Ethiopian politics.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.ethiopianembassy.org/AboutEmbassy/AboutEmbassy.php?Page=Biography.htm">Girma Birru</a> is Ethiopian Ambassador to the U.S.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208999631&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">International films to see this weekend</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Film contributor Milos Stehlik reviews two films showing this weekend&nbsp;<em>Rebels of the Neon God&nbsp;</em>by Taiwanese director Tsai Ming-liang, and <em>A Wolf At the Door</em>, the debut film by Brazilian writer-director Fernando Coimbra.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/milosstehlik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/facetschicago">Facets Chicago</a> and the WBEZ film contributor.&nbsp;</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208999632&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Weekend Passport: International storytelling fesitval and food truck social</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll tell us about the Black Ensemble Theatre&rsquo;s first ever International Cultural Festival and a food truck event in Pilsen.<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><a href="http://www.lindagorham.com/">Linda Gorham</a> is a performer and storyteller.&nbsp;</em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Nari Safavi is one of the co-founders of the <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/default.aspx">PASFARDA Arts &amp; Cultural Exchange</a>.</em></li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 05 Jun 2015 17:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-05/ethiopian-elections-112150 Worldview: Western powers pull out of Yemen, political future uncertain http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-02-16/worldview-western-powers-pull-out-yemen-political-future-uncertain <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP678771867105.jpg" style="height: 389px; width: 620px;" title="An armed Houthi Shiite Yemeni stands guard outside the Republican Palace in Sanaa, Yemen, Monday, Feb. 16, 2015. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/191463775&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Fighting for control of Yemen</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7d4a2c7a-9412-dc0e-4b7a-fff77b9ae54f">The United Nations Security Council has unanimously adopted a resolution that demands that Houthi rebels immediately relinquish control of the government of Yemen. Saudi Arabia, Britain, France, Italy, Germany and the US have all suspended their diplomatic missions in Yemen. &nbsp;Countries evacuated their diplomatic staff last week &nbsp;as political unrest has grown in the country. Houthi rebels have taken over control of the government but are not necessarily in control of the country. &nbsp;Nabeel Khoury, a visiting </span>&nbsp;associate professor of Middle East Studies at Northwestern University and non-resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council&#39;s Hariri Center, joins us to discuss the future of Yemen.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/khoury_nabeel">Nabeel Khoury</a> is a visiting associate professor of Middle East Studies at <a href="https://twitter.com/NorthwesternU">Northwestern University</a> and non-resident senior fellow at the<a href="https://twitter.com/AtlanticCouncil"> Atlantic Council&#39;s</a> Hariri Center.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/191464904&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Author Dinaw Mengestu talks about &quot;All Our Names&quot;</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-9a9b9e96-9416-8b53-2085-6f91699f40ac">Dinaw Mengestu was born in Ethiopia, but grew up in Chicago and Peoria. His critically acclaimed first novel, </span>The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears described the immigrant experience of struggling grocery store owners in Washington DC. Mengestu also won a MacArthur Fellowship in 2012 and &nbsp;worked as a journalist in Darfur, Congo, and Uganda. He talks with us about how his work as a journalist informed his latest novel, set in Kampala in the early 70&rsquo;s called, All Our Names. Mengestu spoke with us while in Chicago for an appearance at the Chicago Humanities Festival.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/dinawmengestu"><span id="docs-internal-guid-9a9b9e96-9416-cbef-0c32-cede6f9abe13">Dinaw Mengestu</span></a>, author of the historical novel, &quot;All Our Names.&quot;</em></p></p> Mon, 16 Feb 2015 14:09:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-02-16/worldview-western-powers-pull-out-yemen-political-future-uncertain The Mideast peace talks http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-28/mideast-peace-talks-110086 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/(AP PhotoGali Tibbon, Pool).jpg" alt="" /><p><div>Last week the Israeli government withdrew from current peace talks after the Palestinian Authority and Hamas announced plans to form a unity government. We&#39;ll discuss the state of the peace process with Roey Gilad, &nbsp;the Consul General of Israel to the Midwest</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-collapse-of-the-mideast-peace-talks/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-collapse-of-the-mideast-peace-talks.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-collapse-of-the-mideast-peace-talks" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The Mideast peace talks" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 28 Apr 2014 11:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-28/mideast-peace-talks-110086 Global Activism: A ‘Girl Manifesto’ from Ethiopia http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-%E2%80%98girl-manifesto%E2%80%99-ethiopia-108894 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/RS7386_LLTG group photo-lpr.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Amanda Lichtenstein and her colleague, Kidist Tariku, spent this past summer in Hawassa, Ethiopia leading writing workshops with young women and girls about gender issues. Lichtenstein, who co-directs <a href="http://www.breakarts.org/">Break Arts: International Arts and Education Collaborative</a>, and Tariku, who is the development director for Action for Youth and Community Change in Ethiopia, join us to share some of the girls&rsquo; work and talk about the themes that emerged in their writing.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F112655895&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 26 Sep 2013 14:39:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-%E2%80%98girl-manifesto%E2%80%99-ethiopia-108894 Global Notes: Chicago reggae club 'The Wild Hare' to close after 25 years http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-04/global-notes-chicago-reggae-club-wild-hare-close-after-25-years-86060 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2011-May/2011-05-04/gessesse photo.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>On May 15, The Wild Hare, one of Chicago’s few reggae-only music clubs, will shut its doors after 25 years. Owner Zeleke Gessesse is moving back to his native Ethiopia, where he’s building a Wild Hare in the capital, Addis Ababa. Jerome McDonnell, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/radio-m" target="_blank"><em>Radio M</em></a> host Tony Sarabia and Zeleke reflect on some of the club’s legendary performances.</p></p> Wed, 04 May 2011 15:34:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-05-04/global-notes-chicago-reggae-club-wild-hare-close-after-25-years-86060 Global Activism: The circus arts bring kids together http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/global-activism-circus-arts-bring-kids-together <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//segment/photo/2010-October/2010-10-21/Awassa 008_P.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Most kids love the circus but not everyone gets the chance to actually learn how to juggle or ride a unicycle. So a former Ringling Brothers clown decided to start an organization called<a href="http://circesteem.org/"> CircEsteem </a>that would use circus arts to help kids from diverse backgrounds build better self-esteem. Executive director Maribeth Joy says it was easy to find interested children; the hard part was finding enough space to accommodate all the acrobatics.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 21 Oct 2010 15:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/global-activism-circus-arts-bring-kids-together