WBEZ | video http://www.wbez.org/tags/video-0 Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Hammond mayor rejects comparisons to Ferguson http://www.wbez.org/news/hammond-mayor-rejects-comparisons-ferguson-110916 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/hammond.png" alt="" /><p><p>The breakfast was the same, but the conversation among regulars at Frankie&rsquo;s Restaurant in Hammond, Ind. yesterday morning was a little livelier than usual.</p><p>Many, like Michael Bullock and John Gunn, were buzzing&nbsp;about a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsW-QCxXkQA">video that has gone viral on YouTube</a> and attracted national media attention.</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XsW-QCxXkQA?rel=0" width="620"></iframe></p><p>&ldquo;He just mentioned the video,&rdquo; the 52-year-old Bullock said as I joined them at their table.</p><p>The video, recorded from the back seat by the driver&#39;s 14-year-old son, captured a Sept. 24 confrontation between the police and two adults in the car. It&rsquo;s now the basis of a lawsuit filed this week in U.S. District Court against several officers and the city of Hammond.</p><p>After police pulled over the driver, Lisa Mahone, for a minor seatbelt violation officers demanded that passenger Jamal Jones produce identification &mdash; something the lawsuit says Jones did not have with him.</p><p>After several tense minutes, the video shows an officer smashing the front passenger-side window with a club, showering shards of glass on the vehicle&#39;s four occupants, including Mahone&#39;s son and daughter in the back seat. An officer then stuns Jones with a taser before dragging him out and arresting him.</p><p>The incident happened on 169th Street and Cline Avenue, very close to Frankie&rsquo;s Restaurant.</p><p>From what he&rsquo;s seen of the video, John Gunn believes the officers overstepped their bounds.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t see the justification for knocking the window out,&rdquo; Gunn, 62, said. And they got a kid in the back seat. Now, how does that affect the kids?&rdquo;</p><p>Hammond&nbsp;police&nbsp;spokesman Lt. Richard Hoyda issued an earlier statement saying Jones had refused to comply with orders to get out of the car and that officers were concerned for their safety after seeing him &quot;repeatedly reach towards the rear seats of the vehicle.&quot;</p><p>Neither Gunn nor Bullock say they&rsquo;ve had a bad experience with Hammond police. But Bullock says he makes sure to cooperate when he&rsquo;s pulled over. &nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;When they get my license and they see that I&rsquo;m 6&rsquo;6&rdquo; and weigh over 300 pounds that in itself creates an issue,&rdquo; Bullock said. &ldquo;I see it in their eyes that it becomes an issue so I&rsquo;ve personally stepped back from not presenting any drama.&rdquo;</p><p>Still, Bullock says he&rsquo;s not surprised that a racially-charged police incident occurred in Northwest Indiana.</p><p>&ldquo;This is one of the most segregated areas in the country. You&rsquo;ve got whites in their area, blacks in their area, Latinos in their area and there&rsquo;s no really intermingling,&rdquo; Bullock said.</p><p>But Hammond Mayor Thomas McDermott, Jr. doesn&rsquo;t see his city the same way Bullock does. &nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;Hammond&rsquo;s a very diverse city. The people that live in Hammond know that it&rsquo;s a diverse city and they&rsquo;re comfortable with it,&rdquo; McDermott told WBEZ on Wednesday afternoon at his City Hall office.</p><p>Since the incident came to light, McDermott&rsquo;s been fending off comparisons by the national media and others to what happened in Ferguson, Missouri two months ago.</p><p>&ldquo;They want this to be another Ferguson but it&rsquo;s not, and it&rsquo;s not going to be,&rdquo; McDermott, who is also an attorney, said.</p><p>McDermott says the city&rsquo;s 211 member police department reflects the 80-thousand residents, where nearly half are white, 30 percent Latino and a quarter black.</p><p>&ldquo;Around 25 percent of our officers are either Hispanic or African-American. It&rsquo;s important for the police department to reflect the community,&rdquo; McDermott said.</p><p>The Mayor defends the actions of his officers, saying the cell phone video shot by the 14 year old son of Lisa Mahone doesn&rsquo;t tell the whole story.</p><p>&ldquo;The video that they&rsquo;ve seen is 3 minutes long, and it&rsquo;s minutes 11, 12 and 13 of a 13 minute traffic stop,&rdquo; McDermott said. &ldquo;A lot of stuff happened that led up to this video.&rdquo;</p><p>Apparently a longer video was recorded from the officers&rsquo; squad car, but the city has yet to release it.</p><p>McDermott says that video shows officers repeatedly asking Jones to exit the vehicle, but he refuses and fails to show identification.</p><p>&ldquo;999 times out of 1,000, the person is going to show identification. This didn&rsquo;t happen in this case and things escalated more than I wish it would have,&rdquo; McDermott said.</p><p>But some Hammond residents sympathize with the officers. &nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;When a police officer stops you and asks you for something, I just believe that you should comply. Don&rsquo;t be suspicious, don&rsquo;t provoke any other actions,&rdquo; said longtime Hammond resident Nilda Rivera.</p><p>Rivera, 46, says she&rsquo;s always felt safe and has never had issues with police. As for the video that&rsquo;s captured the nation&rsquo;s attention, she wants to know why it exists at all.</p><p>&ldquo;That kind of makes you wonder what is this child is being told about the police? Are they being forced to think the worse thing is going to happen and in that respect is that why they were video taping,&rdquo; Rivera said.</p><p>But in the wake of other high-profile racially charged incidents, is it possible the cops may have also assumed the worst about the passengers in the car?</p><p>Michael McCafferty is a one-time Chicago police officer who now teaches law and criminal justice at Calumet College of St. Joseph in Hammond. He also is chair of the college&rsquo;s Public Safety Institute.</p><p>&ldquo;Police are very sensitive to what&rsquo;s occurring. I think officers are more likely to try to avoid these incidents right now,&rdquo; McCafferty said. &ldquo;These videos can go viral. You can go to work in the morning as a patrol officer and then being sued or facing charges or losing your job that afternoon.&rdquo;</p><p>According to the lawsuit, Jones had surrendered his driver&#39;s license after being stopped for not paying his insurance and instead tried to show the officers a ticket with his information on it. The lawsuit says the officers rejected the ticket, but police said Jones had refused to hand it over.</p><p>The complaint alleges officers shocked Jones a second time after removing him from the car, and accuses them of excessive force, false arrest, assault and battery and other charges. It seeks unspecified damages.</p><p>The lawsuit mentions that two of the officers had been sued in the past for excessive force or unlawful arrest. Court records indicate an undisclosed settlement in one of the cases.</p><p>As of now, Patrick Vicari and Charles Turner, the two Hammond officers named in the lawsuit remain on active duty.</p><p><em>Michael Puente is WBEZ&rsquo;s Northwest Indiana Reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/mikepuentenews">@MikePuenteNews</a> and on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/WBEZ-Northwest-Indiana-Bureau/701257506570573">WBEZ&rsquo;s NWI Bureau Facebook page</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 09 Oct 2014 07:53:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/hammond-mayor-rejects-comparisons-ferguson-110916 Early 1960s look at bustling Gary, Indiana http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-08/early-1960s-look-bustling-gary-indiana-108458 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2013-08-20 at 10.20.02 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="415" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PISaDmq73LQ" width="620"></iframe></p><p>We&#39;ve viewed and thought of Gary, Indiana as an urban ruin for so long, we&#39;ve forgotten what the city once was.</p><p>I found the above video on YouTube yesterday. It shows what the steel town looked like around 1960: a vibrant city of more than 100,000 souls. Broadway &mdash; Gary&#39;s main drag &mdash; bustles with commerce and even a parade in the video. We see a new, modern school, the Marquette Park bathhouse, designed by Chicago architects Maher &amp; Sons and more.</p><p>The video was posted on YouTube by Anthony Diaz, director of imaging for the Mid-American Heritage Preservation Foundation, a non-profit group in Whiting, Indiana that digitally restores old film depicting Northwest Indiana. More good stuff <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/mahpfoundation?feature=watch">to watch here.</a></p></p> Tue, 20 Aug 2013 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-08/early-1960s-look-bustling-gary-indiana-108458 The Valentine's Day Baby http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey/2013-02/valentines-day-baby-105527 <p><p>Last year I shared with my readers the wonderful Valentine&#39;s Day video my husband makes for me <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/claire-zulkey/2012-02-14/some-valentines-videos-96380">every February 14</a>. This year, he had an accomplice:</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/GyjXc6kCrew?rel=0" width="640"></iframe></p><p>Bonus: this is what my computer looked like when I came downstairs this morning:</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/2013-02-14_06-38-02_475.jpg" title="" /></div></p> Thu, 14 Feb 2013 09:11:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey/2013-02/valentines-day-baby-105527 Nostalgia trip: 1970s video shows one L of a ride down the Dan Ryan http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-01/nostalgia-trip-1970s-video-shows-one-l-ride-down-dan-ryan-104812 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Screen Shot 2013-01-10 at 10.25.37 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NmHmRBPI1rs" width="420"></iframe></p><p>If you are of a certain age--and, boy, I am--the early 1970s video of a Dan Ryan Line el train making a 95th Street-to-downtown run is a real trip...back in time.</p><p>Completed in 1969, the line was only a few years old when this video was made; the sleeker new trains glided down the median of the still new Dan Ryan Expressway, stopping at modernist stations designed by Myron Goldsmith of Skidmore Owings &amp; Merrill. Back then, the old Lake/Dan Ryan Line went north, passed through downtown, connected to older Lake Street el and traveled west to Oak Park. Today, the Ryan trains compose the south end of the Red Line, while the firner west leg is now part of the Green Line.</p><p>As the train travels north in the video, some long-gone landmarks and structures can be seen, such as the lip-shaped Magikist carpet cleaners sign kissing the sky near 85th. As the train pulls into the 47th Street station at 6:45, the now-demolished massive Robert Taylor Homes are visible on the right. At 35th, the camera pans to the left and gets a good view of old Comiskey Park.</p><p>Placing a high capacity rail line in an expressway median was revolutionary in the 1950s and 1960s. It lessened the cost of land clearance for mass transit and created a train system that didn&#39;t darken roadways, as do the city&#39;s overhead lines. It was efficient people-moving, but bad urban planning. The platforms are isolated, surrounded by expressway concrete and speeding cars rather than vibrant street life. The station entrances sit in the middle of blocks-wide deadzones for pedestrians, due to the width of the expressway. A planned redo of the 95th Street terminal could rectify some issues at the station--retail and food vendors could be added. That&#39;s just one spot along the line. But it&#39;s better than none.</p><p>The video above comes courtesy of YouTube, posted by a rail fan who goes by the name &quot;msibnsf,&quot; who has loads of other vintage and contemporary <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/msibnsf?feature=watch">CTA and train footage.</a></p></p> Thu, 10 Jan 2013 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2013-01/nostalgia-trip-1970s-video-shows-one-l-ride-down-dan-ryan-104812 On video: Marina City in its youth http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2012-11/video-marina-city-its-youth-103807 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/marina city vintage footage.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="338" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/wSUvsHy537Q" width="601"></iframe></p><p><em>Updated 9:07 a.m.</em></p><p>The first residents of Marina City &mdash; architect Bertrand Goldberg&#39;s architectural and urban planning <em>tour de force</em> &mdash; moved in 50 years ago this week.</p><p>Goldberg&#39;s <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2012-11/historic-meeting-city-landmarks-commission-gives-prentice-thumbs-%E2%80%94-then-down">other Chicago landmark may be under attack</a>, but this city-within-a-city is still going strong. So let&#39;s mark the occasion by digging some silent footage taken when the complex and its remarkable twin cylindrical residential towers were still new.&nbsp;The crisp, color images were uploaded to YouTube by a company called Clips &amp; Footage, an ofutfit whose YouTube channel describes it as &quot;a friendly and independent supplier of high quality archive film.&quot;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Resident Steve Dahlman, who operates the indispensable Marina City Online website, said he discovered this video a few years ago.&nbsp;&quot;The footage is most likely from 1964,&quot; Dahlman said. &quot;All we know for sure is it was from a mid-1960s travel film, <em>Chicago Believe it or Not</em>.&quot;</p><p>It&#39;s a fun clip, particularly when the camera moves inside and shows funky and overstuffed late 1960s interiors that far divorced from the cool modernity of the buildings&#39; exteriors. There are pretty good shots of the old plaza level Marina 300 restaurant, too. The helicopter shots show just how much the River North area has developed since the 1960s.</p><p>Enjoy.</p></p> Wed, 14 Nov 2012 05:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/lee-bey/2012-11/video-marina-city-its-youth-103807 Livestream: Police arrest Occupy protesters trying to block traffic in NYC financial district http://www.wbez.org/content/livestream-police-arrest-occupy-protesters-trying-block-traffic-nyc-financial-district <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-November/2011-11-17/occupy protests.jpg" alt="" /><p><p style="text-align: center;">Streaming Video: Occupy Wall Street Protests<br> <iframe src="http://www.ustream.tv/embed/9488285" style="border: 0px none transparent;" width="480" frameborder="0" height="386" scrolling="no"></iframe><br> This is a live stream from The Other 99’s channel.</p><p>NEW YORK (AP) - Protesters have been chanting "Shut down Wall Street" and sitting in the streets of New York's financial district this morning.</p><p>Police in riot gear have been hauling them to their feet and handcuffing them.</p><p>The confrontations took place at an intersection about a block from Wall Street. After several arrests, most of the protesters retreated, followed by a line of riot police.</p><p>The congestion brought taxis and delivery trucks to a halt, but the trading day has opened as normal on the New York Stock Exchange.</p><p>Two months after the demonstrations began, members of the Occupy Wall Street movement say they've reached a "critical moment," with authorities in a number of cities, including New York, forcibly removing protesters from parks and tearing down their camps.</p><p>The confrontations in New York followed arrests early this morning in Dallas. Police cited public safety and hygiene issues as they evicted dozens of protesters from their campsite near City Hall.</p></p> Thu, 17 Nov 2011 16:16:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/content/livestream-police-arrest-occupy-protesters-trying-block-traffic-nyc-financial-district Onion City gives experimental film and video the spotlight http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-06-23/onion-city-gives-experimental-film-and-video-spotlight-88236 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2011-June/2011-06-23/onioncity.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The 23<sup>rd</sup> Annual <a href="http://www.chicagofilmmakers.org/onion_fest/" target="_blank">Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival</a> opens Thursday in Chicago. The four-day fest features an array of experimental works from around the world. For WBEZ, Film Critic Jonathan Miller provided a preview of the opening program.<br> <br> The American twin-brother filmmakers, the <a href="http://www.egs.edu/faculty/stephen-timothy-quay/biography">Brothers Quay</a> are master animators. They have a long career using stop motion puppetry techniques. In their newest film, <em>Mask</em>, they have incorporated digital effects. <em>Mask</em> is an adaptation of a novel by Stanislaw Lem. It’s a retro-futuristic intrigue set in a feudal royal court. The story commences with a character named Duenna who tells of finding herself come to life. She’s been created for a purpose, but one that unfolds for her as both mystery and destiny. The Quay’s hallmark creepy decadent ambience imbues the tale with a compelling emotional tone that artfully meshes with the philosophical threads weaving through Lem’s narrative.<br> <br> Like Duenna, experimental artists are constantly questioning — inquiring into what the media they work with can do. Now in the waning decades of photochemical methods, experimental filmmakers can invent unique hybrids that work the overlaps and interstices of digital and analog. <a href="http://www.filmalchemist.de/">Jurgen Reble’s</a> <em>Zagreb Tram Station</em> is an example. In this film, cinematographic imagery of moving vehicles and commuters stretch and shift in slow motion, as the frames of film morph one into another. The effect is mesmerizing and disorienting; an everyday slice of life unfolds with a combination of restless ephemerality and stately timelessness.</p><p>Reble’s commuters are on-screen kin to the creatures in <em>Toads</em>, a film whose title aptly sums up its subject. Filmmaker Milena Gierke turned the lens of her super8 camera on the amphibians living in the rippling shallow waters of a river. The water’s flow creates optical distortions that endow the toads with extraordinary elasticity as they move about in their sub-aquatic habitat.&nbsp; The toads oscillate between blending in with their environment and standing out from it. Blowing up her original super8 footage to 35mm makes this less of a zoological document than an essay in pattern recognition. Rocks, toads and moving water create a rapidly shifting visual field.&nbsp; But that’s not the whole of it: Gierke’s film brings us the pure crystalline pleasure of looking, exactly as we might have indulged when gazing in fascination at water’s edge at something moving that, surprisingly, turned out to be a humble toad.</p><p>We don’t often attend to the more humble side of our world, as filmmaker Thom Andersen makes evident in his new film.&nbsp; A few years ago, Andersen presented the urban epic <em>Los Angeles Plays Itself</em>. That film detailed the way city has been represented in the cinema.&nbsp; Anderson has now made his own city film about film city, entitled <em>Get out of the Car</em>. Shot on 16-millimeter film, it focuses on the signage, facades and details of the city. Andersen guides us on a tour of the overlooked textures and corners of the Los Angeles. He directs our attention to the peeling, fading signs, the billboards, murals and mashed-up urbanscapes that create the locale’s distinctive identity.&nbsp; He also gives us the sounds of the city, including some of its musical history, with trips to spots where the action was, but is no more. There’s an understated emotional current flowing through the film — not quite nostalgic, not quite haunted, but ripe with riffs of poetry from the dusty romantic margin and gusts of hot Southern California breezes from a lost world.</p><p>In a suite of films that provide such qualities — the pure pleasure of looking, cutting-edge technique, enigmatic narrative and emotional subtlety — the <a href="http://www.chicagofilmmakers.org/onion_fest/">Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival</a> once again clears the eye, refreshes the mind, and sets summer reeling off the beaten path.</p></p> Thu, 23 Jun 2011 14:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-06-23/onion-city-gives-experimental-film-and-video-spotlight-88236 Youth’s family hires lawyer after video with cops surfaces http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/youth%E2%80%99s-family-hires-lawyer-after-video-cops-surfaces-84740 <p><p>A veteran Chicago attorney says he is representing a young man <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">shown on video</a> in the backseat of a Chicago police SUV.<br> <br> The video, shot March 19, shows a backdoor of the SUV open as onlookers flash gang signs and taunt the young man. The officers are outside the vehicle, a Chevrolet Tahoe with police markings, and appear to be standing by.<br> <br> <a href="http://www.loevy.com/Attorneys/Arthur-Loevy.shtml">Attorney Arthur Loevy</a> says the young man is a minor whom the officers loaded into the SUV against his will before driving him to the Humboldt Park block where a bystander shot the 90-second video.<br> <br> Residents of that block say the house closest to the SUV is a base of a street gang that operates in the neighborhood. They say the officers drove away with the young man after about five minutes.<br> <br> Loevy says the officers then dropped the youth off nearby and did not charge him. The attorney says the young man made it home OK but is moving out of Chicago for his own safety.<br> <br> After WBEZ spotted the video, the police department said it put the officers on desk duty and began an internal investigation. Interim police Supt. Terry Hillard said tactics to scare kids straight are <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/chicago-police/chicago-police-superintendent-conduct-video-not-professional-84290">always inappropriate</a>.<br> <br> WBEZ is not naming the officers at this time.<br> <br> Meanwhile, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627">neighbors involved with CAPS</a>, the city’s community-policing program, want the department to return the officers to beat duty.</p></p> Tue, 05 Apr 2011 09:32:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/youth%E2%80%99s-family-hires-lawyer-after-video-cops-surfaces-84740 Police video: Cops’ supporter speaks out http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-April/2011-04-01/Eric_Hudson.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Here’s a follow-up on a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">video</a> WBEZ has been reporting about. That video, shot March 19, shows a young man in the backseat of a Chicago police SUV. A back door is open and he’s getting taunted by onlookers who flash gang signs — while two officers seem to stand by. The police department has assigned those officers to desk duty and started an internal investigation. WBEZ is not naming them at this time. Some Northwest Side residents, meanwhile, are petitioning the department to put those two cops back on their beat. WBEZ’s Chip Mitchell connected with Eric Hudson, a resident behind that effort. They spoke near Hudson’s home, just blocks from where the video was shot. Hudson has worked with the two officers to root out gangs from his own corner. As he explains in this six-minute interview (below), he has also worked to hold police accountable for abuses.</p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483429-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-april/2011-04-01/video2110401cm.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 01 Apr 2011 20:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627 Neighborhood residents defend Chicago cops shown on video http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/neighborhood-residents-defend-chicago-cops-shown-video-84518 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-31/ChiPolice-AP.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Two Chicago cops <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">shown on video</a> with a young man in the backseat of their SUV are getting support from some Northwest Side residents.<br> <br> In the video, recorded March 19 in Humboldt Park, the officers appear to be standing by as onlookers flash gang symbols and taunt the young man. After WBEZ spotted the video, the police department put the officers on desk duty and began an internal investigation. On Friday, interim police Supt. Terry Hillard called the incident “not professional.”<br> <br> The neighborhood residents say they’re drafting a petition to Hillard that praises the officers. They’re also organizing calls and messages to Ald. Roberto Maldonado (26th Ward) and Linda Flores, commander of the police department’s Shakespeare District.<br> <br> “I would never do this for any cops but these two,” said Eric Hudson, who knows the officers through CAPS, the city’s community-policing program. “These aren’t John Wayne Robocops out here. Their actions empower us to become more vocal and take back our corners.”<br> <br> Witnesses say the incident lasted about five minutes before the officers drove the young man away.</p><p><strong>Hear our interview with Eric Hudson at <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627">Police video: Cops’ supporter speaks out</a>.</strong></p></p> Thu, 31 Mar 2011 09:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/neighborhood-residents-defend-chicago-cops-shown-video-84518