WBEZ | Iran http://www.wbez.org/tags/iran Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en A Jewish reporter in Iran http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-18/jewish-reporter-iran-112678 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219829863&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">A Jewish reporter in Iran</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>It took The Forward&rsquo;s Larry Cohler-Esses two years to get a journalist&rsquo;s visa to enter Iran. He became the first journalist from an American Jewish publication to be given an Iranian visa since 1979. While reporting in Iran, Esses was required to use a government approved fixer to set up his interviews but he says he was able to choose who he wanted to interview. He wrote about his trip in a recent article, &#39;A Jewish Journalist&rsquo;s Exclusive Look Inside Iran&#39;. Esses joins us to tell about his trip and what he learned about the country&rsquo;s attitudes towards Israel, Jews and the West.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong><em>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-02eb1e6b-4267-0513-7b5b-c2445433270b">Larry Cohler-Esses is </span>assistant managing editor for news at <a href="http://twitter.com/jdforward">&#39;The Forward&#39;</a>.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219830177&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Refugees flock to Kos</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Europe&rsquo;s refugee crisis is front and center on the island of Kos. The Greek island has been overwhelmed by migrants in recent months. It&rsquo;s estimated that about 124,000 people have come by sea to the Greek islands this year, many fleeing the war in Syria. Kos has found itself unprepared for the large numbers and people have been camping out on the beaches and on the streets. Tensions are high on the island which is normally a popular tourist destination. We&rsquo;ll talk with AP correspondent Nicholas Paphitis, who has been reporting on the conditions in Kos.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-02eb1e6b-4269-7962-da35-086a93d594b7">Nicholas Paphitis is a correspondent with the <a href="http://twitter.com/AP">Associated Press</a>.</span></em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219831035&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Garbage collection, presidency suffer, in Lebanon&#39;s political stalemate&nbsp;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Lebanon&rsquo;s parliament failed, for the 27th consecutive time, to elect a president. One consequence of failure is that Lebanese citizens are not receiving essential goods and services. For example, lack of garbage pickup has caused an environmental and health crises in Beirut. The stalemate has many observers concerned that the fragile peace between Christians and Muslims could be in jeopardy. In Syria, a tentative cease-fire fell apart between opposition forces and president Bashar al-Assad&rsquo;s government. While some EU leaders and President Obama still call for regime change, there are reported rumors of back-channel talks between al-Assad and the West that could leave him in power. We&rsquo;ll get updates on Lebanon and Syria with Joe Kechichian, a Gulf States scholar and senior writer for the Dubai-based Gulf News. He&rsquo;s written numerous books on the Gulf region, including his latest, Legal and Political Reforms in Saudi Arabia.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-a921ae59-426c-11f9-e505-00960c837608">Joe Kechichian</span> is a senior writer for the Dubai-based <a href="http://twitter.com/gulf_news">Gulf News</a> and an author specializing on the Gulf region. His latest book is &#39;Legal and Political Reforms in Sa&lsquo;udi Arabia&#39;.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 14:56:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-18/jewish-reporter-iran-112678 World powers come to comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-14/world-powers-come-comprehensive-nuclear-agreement-iran-112388 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/U.S. Embassy Vienna.jpg" title="(Photo; Flickr/U.S. Embassy Vienna)" /><br />&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214720025&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Breaking down the new Iran deal</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The United States, China, Russia, France, United Kingdom, Germany and Iran have reached a comprehensive deal to curb Iran&rsquo;s nuclear program in exchange for the easing of international sanctions. The deal still needs approval from the U.S. Congress. President Obama called today&rsquo;s agreement a step toward a &quot;more hopeful world.&quot; We talk about the significance of the deal and the road ahead with a panel of experts.</p><p><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li><em>Trita Parsi is president of the National Iranian American Council. </em></li><li><em>Steve Clemons is the Washington editor-at-large for The Atlantic.</em></li><li><em>David Cortright si the&nbsp;associate director of policy studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214720765&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">What the &#39;El Chapo&#39; escape means for Mexico</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Joaquín &#39;El Chapo&#39; Guzmán, king of Mexico&rsquo;s Sinaloa drug cartel, escaped from a maximum security prison outside of Mexico City over the weekend . His escape came despite a guarantee by Mexico&rsquo;s President, Enrique Peña Nieto, that Guzman, who&rsquo;s broken out of prison numerous times, would never escape again on his watch. We&rsquo;ll talk about the jailbreak with Laura Carlsen, director of the Americas Program for the Center for International Policy, based in Mexico City. She also hosts an online television program called, &ldquo;Interview from Mexico&rdquo;. Carlsen will tell us why she believes complicity by the Mexican government, and neglect by the U.S. government, were responsible for Guzman&rsquo;s escape.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-022dec3f-8e16-6499-4a1d-8e5ecbf4c718">Laura Carlsen is the director of the Americas Program for the Center for International Policy.</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 14 Jul 2015 14:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-14/world-powers-come-comprehensive-nuclear-agreement-iran-112388 Greece and its creditors agree to new deal http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-13/greece-and-its-creditors-agree-new-deal-112370 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/European%20Parliament.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/European Union)" /><br />&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214565302&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size:22px;"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The politics and potential impact of the latest Greek bailout&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">package</span></span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>After a marathon session that lasted all weekend, Eurozone leaders came to an agreement that granted Greece a third bailout, and, for now, keeps the country in the euro. The agreement starts negotiations on a loan package for Greece worth $91-96bn in exchange for reforms that aim to streamline the pension system, boost tax revenue, privatize electricity, and extend common business hours, among other reforms. Endy Zemenides discusses the latest developments and what they mean for Greece&rsquo;s economic future.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Zemenides">Endy Zemenides</a> is executive director of the <a href="http://hellenicleaders.com/">Hellenic American Council</a> and an Emerging Leaders fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214564633&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Negotiators keep working for nuclear deal with Iran</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Negotiators are continuing to hash out the remaining details of a deal that would limit Iran&rsquo;s nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. Earlier today the Associated Press reported that a deal would be announced this evening, but so far, no official announcement has been scheduled. We discuss the final hurdles with Joseph Cirincione of Ploughshares Fund.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><a href="https://twitter.com/Cirincione">Joseph Cirincione</a> is president of <a href="http://www.ploughshares.org/">Ploughshares Fund</a>, a global security foundation</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214564042&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: An ancient discovery</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Historian John Schmidt tells us about July 13, 1923, a day when a team led by American explorer and naturalist, Roy Chapman Andrews, made the first discovery of dinosaur eggs.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/">John Schmidt</a>&nbsp;is a historian and author of &ldquo;On This Day in Chicago History.&rdquo;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 13 Jul 2015 15:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-13/greece-and-its-creditors-agree-new-deal-112370 Fiddlers of the world do battle http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-10/fiddlers-world-do-battle-112360 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Dennis%20Jarvis.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 375px;" title="(Photo: Flickr/Dennis Jarvis)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214170111&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Fiddlers of the world do battle</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Behold the fiddle: the shoulder-mounted king of instruments. The fiddle is featured prominently in musical traditions from virtually every corner of the globe. And, for the past several years fiddlers have squared off at an annual Battle of the Bands, sponsored by the Fiddle Club of the World, to find out which global style reigns supreme. This year marks the 4th annual Battle of the Bands which you can catch that at the Old Town School of Folk Music&#39;s Square Roots Festival this weekend. But we&#39;ve got a preview today. Three different styles performed by six different Chicago-based musicians brought together by Paul Tyler, convener of the Chicago Chapter of the Fiddle Club of the World and instructor at the Old Town School of Folk.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="https://www.oldtownschool.org/teachers/Paul-Tyler/">Paul Tyler</a> is a fiddle teacher, ethnomusicologist, and convener of the Chicago Chapter of the Fiddle Club of the World.</em></li><li><em>Genevieve Harris Koester and Smith Koester play in the band <a href="https://www.oldtownschool.org/concerts/2014/11-21-2014-gdp-white-mule-830pm/">White Mule</a>.</em></li><li><em>Juan Rivera plays in <a href="https://www.facebook.com/LosCondenadosHuastecos">Los Condenados Huastecos</a>.</em></li><li><em><a href="https://soundcloud.com/izaki-metropoulos">Izaki and Sofiya Metropoulos</a> play in Jim Stoynoff&#39;s Greek Band.</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214170110&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br /><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Negotiations with Iran continue</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Negotiators from the P5+1 countries (US, France, UK, Germany, Russia, China) continue in talks with Iran in the hopes of reaching an agreement that would curb Iran&rsquo;s s nuclear program in return for the lifting of crippling economic sanctions. The main worry is that Tehran will develop the capacity to enrich uranium on an industrial scale &mdash; the fuel required for nuclear weapons &mdash; build more reactors, and be in a position to build a nuclear warhead in a short period of time. Several self-imposed deadlines have passed and it remains unclear whether a deal will be made. Iranian-Americans Nari Safavi and Ahmad Sadri join us to discuss to discuss the talks.</p><p><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li><em>Nari Safavi is one of the co-founders of the <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/default.aspx">PASFARDA Arts &amp; Cultural Exchange</a>.</em></li><li><em><a href="https://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/faculty/sadri/">Ahmad Sadri</a> is Gorter Professor of Islamic World Studies and Professor of Sociology at Lake Forest College.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214170108&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">&nbsp;Czech film fest turns 50</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The Czech festival showcases the work of Central and Eastern European directors as well as filmmakers from the former communist block countries. We&rsquo;ll check in with film contributor Milos Stehlik, who is there checking out this year&rsquo;s films.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/milosstehlik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/facetschicago">Facets Multimedia</a> and WBEZ&rsquo;s film contributor.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 10 Jul 2015 15:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-10/fiddlers-world-do-battle-112360 Iran nuclear talks extended http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-30/iran-nuclear-talks-extended-112289 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Iran.jpg" title="(Photo: Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212695002&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Iran nuclear negotiations continue in Vienna</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">P5+1 nuclear talks with Iran, being held in Vienna, were due to end today, but talks were extended to July 7th. We&rsquo;ll talk with Reza Marashi of the National Iranian American Council. He&rsquo;s currently in Vienna and will tell us what he thinks is happening behind closed doors and what this delay may mean for the sensitive negotiations.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-3a9b1b5e-4649-3502-9d7f-75972bfc36c0"><a href="https://twitter.com/rezamarashi">Reza Marashi</a> is </span>director of research with the&nbsp;National Iranian American Council.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212694523&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><br />&nbsp;</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EPA sets new standards on Carbon emissions</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">The Environmental Protection Agency has set new Carbon emission standards to be met by 2030. This summer, the EPA will release its &ldquo;Clean Power Plan.&rdquo; It includes a &ldquo;non-mandatory&rdquo; benchmark for the year 2020. Illinois plans to be more than 80 percent compliant towards the 2020 goal, but many U.S. states are resisting the changes. We talk about the new Carbon standards and similar regulations abroad with energy policy expert, Steve Frenkel. He&rsquo;s Midwest director for the Union of Concerned Scientists.<br /><br /><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-3b29d40f-464d-7154-758e-34f53fdf9da6">Steve Frenkel is </span>Midwest director for the <a href="https://twitter.com/UCSUSA">Union of Concerned Scientists</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212692927&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EcoMyths: Composting without the stink</span></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Many shy away from composting because they have images of rotting food, scavenging animals and neighbors complaining about the smell. But EcoMyths Alliance wants you to know that composting can be odorless. Kate Sackman of EcoMyths and Eliza Fournier of Chicago Botanic Garden say, &quot;It only stinks if you&#39;re not going at it right.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em>Eliza Fournier is Community Gardening Coordinatior at <a href="https://twitter.com/chicagobotanic">Chicago Botanic Garden</a>.&nbsp;</em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-674e01c1-4651-6ae3-20ff-cc5a6e73bff5">Kate Sackman is </span>founder and president of <a href="https://twitter.com/EcoMyths">EcoMyths Alliance</a>.</em></li></ul></p> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-06-30/iran-nuclear-talks-extended-112289 Worldview in India: Rag pickers organized into recyclers http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-india-rag-pickers-organized-recyclers-111815 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/P1012950.jpg" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="A network of rag pickers and sorting stations is working with the waste of 3 million people in Delhi. (Jerome McDonnell)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198962227&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: Rag pickers in India</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><span id="docs-internal-guid-56944a80-7fbc-9b85-6c10-02228cd13ea8">Rag-pickers are people in India who rummage through refuge to make a living and for their very survival. </span>Worldview traveled to India with India Development Service (IDS) to meet with the organizers of an initiative to educate, house and uplift rag-pickers&#39; and their children. We spoke with Ashish Jain, director of Indian Pollution Control Association about how he is teaching the rag-pickers how to recycle and develop the garbage they sort. The group provided a space for this rag-picker community by building a small village within a Delhi garbage dump. And IDS helped fund an on-site school for the rag pickers&rsquo; children.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guests:</strong></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Ashish Jain from the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ipcaworld.co.in/">Indian Pollution Control Association</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-104e7536-7c04-39a0-a4e6-ab69d78a7bb0">Nilesh Kothari is a founding board member of <a href="http://idsusa.org/">India Development Service</a>.</span></em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198964386&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Deal with Iran is reached, nuclear weapon manufacturing deemed &quot;impossible&quot;</span></font></p><p>After 18 months of deliberation a deal has been reached between major world powers and Iran. The deal would lift certain economic sanctions in favor of reducing Iran&#39;s nuclear capabilities and increasing the number of inspections leveled against it. We discuss the diplomatic implications for both Iran and the Western World with Trita Parsi and Amit Sadri.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-104e7536-7c07-79bb-5202-eef555c1d576"><a href="https://twitter.com/tparsi">Trita Parsi</a> is the </span>president of the <a href="https://twitter.com/niacouncil">National Iranian American Council</a>.</em></p><p><em>Ahmad Sadri is a professor of Islamic World Studies and professor of Sociology at <a href="https://twitter.com/LFCollege">Lake Forest College</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198966359&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World HIstory Moment: The Falkland Islands War</span></p><p>Every week, historian John Schmidt tells us about an important date in global history. Today he tells us about the anniversary of the Falkland Island War on April 2nd, 1982.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><a href="https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/">John Schmidt</a> is an historian and author of &ldquo;On This Day in Chicago History.&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 02 Apr 2015 16:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-india-rag-pickers-organized-recyclers-111815 Worldview: Negotiations with Iran continue to stall http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-01/worldview-negotiations-iran-continue-stall-111804 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP869056451626.jpg" style="height: 430px; width: 620px;" title="Head of Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, center, walks after an extended round of talks on Iran's nuclear program at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland, Wednesday April 1, 2015.(AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198787792&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Iran talks in limbo</span></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-1d59b81a-7678-b81e-4bd7-4f3d95cf1356">Initial reports of the six major powers coming to a tentative agreement with Iran on its nuclear program &nbsp;now describe the current state of events with words like &ldquo;chaos, disunity and cacophony.&quot; Though the parties are reportedly &ldquo;close&rdquo; to paving the way for future talks, movement has stalled on details such as the lifting sanctions on Iran. Joe Cirincione is a proliferation expert and president of the Ploughshares Fund. He&rsquo;ll tell us what he thinks is happening behind the scenes and what the chances are for success.</span></p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1d59b81a-7679-13b8-41f6-d4ac647c0d08"><a href="https://twitter.com/Cirincione">Joe Cirincione</a> is the </span>president of the <a href="https://twitter.com/plough_shares">Ploughshares Fund</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198787933&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Nigeria elects non-ruling party for first time in history</span></p><p>For the first time in Nigeria&rsquo;s history, a sitting president has been defeated. Muhammadu Buhari won the election and defeated incumbent Goodluck Jonathan by about two million votes. Buhari said his victory was proof that Nigeria has embraced democracy.&nbsp; Nigeria has a long history of military rule, coups and election fraud.&nbsp; We&rsquo;ll discuss the results of the vote with Clement Adibe, professor of political science at DePaul University.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cf48e13f-767b-a60f-a8b3-b4f0e88d89b4">Clement Adibe is a professor of political science at <a href="https://twitter.com/DePaulU">DePaul University.</a></span></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198788256&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Food Wednesday: Eastern Orthodox Lent and Chinese foods for the dead</span></p><p>It&rsquo;s a big week in international food news and religious customs. Even though Lent ends this week for many, Eastern Orthodox Lent still has more than a week to go. This Saturday is also the customary day for Chinese to visit their dead relatives and bring them ceremonial food. Finally, a Sri Lankan undergrad made a groundbreaking discovery about rice last week that is taking the food world by storm. WBEZ food contributor Louisa Chu and WBEZ producer Monica Eng fill us in on the details.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/louisachu">Louisa Chu</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/monicaeng">Monica Eng</a> are the hosts of the <a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/chewing-fat-podcast-louisa-chu-and-monica-eng">Chewing the Fat</a> podcast.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198788826&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Notes:&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(41, 47, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 26px; letter-spacing: 0.259999990463257px; line-height: 32px; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Toña </span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">La Negra, the Queen of Mexican boleros</span></p><p>She was known as the &lsquo;&#39;queen of the Mexican bolero, but the artistry of María Antonia del Carmen Peregrino is almost entirely forgotten. This week on&nbsp;<em>Global Notes</em>,&nbsp;<em>Morning Shift</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Radio M</em>&nbsp;host Tony Sarabia brings us the music of the Veracruz Mexico native known as &quot;Toña le Negra.&quot;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is the host of <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZmorning">WBEZ Morning Shift</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 14:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-01/worldview-negotiations-iran-continue-stall-111804 Worldview: Nuclear talks with Iran to continue until Wednesday http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-31/worldview-nuclear-talks-iran-continue-until-wednesday-111794 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP233133249819.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, third left, chats with U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, as U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, second right, takes a note while waiting for the start of a meeting on Iran's nuclear program with other officials from Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia, the European Union and Iran at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday, March 31, 2015.(AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198621532&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Deal with Iran could be pushed to Wednesday</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Negotiations with Iran over a possible nuclear deal have reached their deadline. Signals are pointing to continuing the talks on Wednesday, with some of the more sensitive subjects to be dealt with three months from now, according to the New York Times. We opened the line to our listeners to chime in as we talked to John Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago and Nabeel Khoury from Northwestern University about the best and worst case scenarios on this deal.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-2db7f2a8-7185-01b3-c940-b7a5003e4384">John Mearsheimer is the</span> co-director of the Program on International Security Policy at the <a href="https://twitter.com/UChicago">University of Chicago</a>. He&rsquo;s written extensively on security issues and international politics, including the books </em>Why Leaders Lie: The Truth about Lying in International Politics.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><a href="https://twitter.com/khoury_nabeel">Nabeel Khoury</a> is a visiting associate professor of Middle East Studies at <a href="https://twitter.com/NorthwesternU">Northwestern University</a> and non-resident senior fellow at the <a href="https://twitter.com/ACmideast">Atlantic Council&#39;s Hariri Center</a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image "><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198631270&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Eco Heroes: Cheryl Besenjak of Growing Healthy People</span></p><p>Cheryl Besenjak is a Vietnam-era veteran and community gardener. She and her husband started out by asking people to plant an extra row or two in their gardens. In time, their idea blossomed into a life&rsquo;s mission to train people, especially veterans, to become farmers. We&rsquo;ll talk with Cheryl about her organization, Growing Healthy People. It&rsquo;s a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging health through growing organic produce, nutritional education and local food production.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-50e6cfce-7187-ada4-69a5-9a9aa2a73c6e">Cheryl Besenjak is a</span> community gardener and executive director of &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/GrwngHealthyPpl">Growing Healthy People</a>.</em></p></p> Tue, 31 Mar 2015 15:21:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-31/worldview-nuclear-talks-iran-continue-until-wednesday-111794 Worldview: Talks about nuclear Iran heads into final hours http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-30/worldview-talks-about-nuclear-iran-heads-final-hours-111787 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP783965890108.jpg" style="height: 395px; width: 620px;" title="Officials of Britain, Russia, China, France, Germany, European Union, the United States and Iran wait for the start of a meeting on Iran's nuclear program at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Monday, March 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198459815&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Iran nuclear talks continue as deadline looms</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-32665110-6c56-5ff1-1035-912bf926ef6d">Nuclear negotiations between the P5 + 1 countries are still under way in Switzerland. Ahmad Sadri, an Iranian American and professor of Islamic World Studies and sociology at Lake Forest College. He tells us what he thinks the odds are of reaching a deal</span> before the March 31 deadline.</p><p><strong><span>Guest:&nbsp;</span></strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-32665110-6c56-a481-3ca3-64526d97ea14">Ahmad Sadri is the </span>Gorter Professor of Islamic World Studies and Professor of Sociology at <a href="https://twitter.com/LFCollege">Lake Forest College.</a></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198460507&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">How Engineers Without Borders helps people in the developing world</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-3ebb3117-6c58-8f2c-72d3-351f3c6ce968">Engineers Without Borders-USA (EWB-USA) is an NGO created to &ldquo;support community-driven development programs worldwide...that design and implement sustainable engineering projects, while creating transformative experiences that enrich global perspectives and create responsible leaders.&rdquo; It has so far recruited 15,000 members in 365 chapters across 39 countries. We sat down with EWB-USA co-founder, Bernard Amadei, to find out what led him to decide to&nbsp; utilize technology for the common good.&nbsp; Amadei is also chair of global engineering at the University of Colorado-Boulder and author of &nbsp;</span><em>Engineering for Sustainable Human Development: A Guide to Successful Small-Scale Community Projects.</em></p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/bamadei"><span id="docs-internal-guid-3ebb3117-6c59-61c3-90bc-7050b34a314d">Bernard Amadei </span></a>is the co-founder of <a href="https://twitter.com/EWBUSA">Engineers Without Borders-USA</a>, professor of Civil Engineering&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-3ebb3117-6c59-61c3-90bc-7050b34a314d">Mortenson chair in Global Engineering at the University of Colorado-Boulder, author of </span></em>Engineering for Sustainable Human Development: A Guide to Successful Small-Scale Community Projects</p></p> Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-30/worldview-talks-about-nuclear-iran-heads-final-hours-111787 Worldview: Group of republicans send letter to government of Iran http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-12/worldview-group-republicans-send-letter-government-iran-111692 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP745330664455.jpg" style="height: 458px; width: 620px;" title="Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark. arrives to pose for photographers in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 11, 2015. The rookie Republican senator leading the effort to torpedo an agreement with Iran is an Army veteran with a Harvard law degree who has a full record of tough rhetoric against President Barack Obama's foreign policy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195568203&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Republicans send letter to Iran</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c1b0020a-0fdd-b416-f4fb-ee478b0fe778">Earlier this week a group of 47 Republican senators sent a letter to the Iranian government explaining how the US Congress functions, noting that executive agreements can be overturned by Obama&rsquo;s successor &ldquo;with the stroke of a pen.&rdquo; The letter came as the U.S. and several other nations are engaged in negotiations over Iran&rsquo;s nuclear program. Today, Iran&rsquo;s Supreme Leader, &nbsp;Ayatollah Khamenei said the letter raised concerns about the trustworthiness of the US government and was &nbsp;&quot;a sign of the decay of political ethics in the American system.&quot; &nbsp;Richard Haas, &nbsp;president of the</span><a href="http://www.cfr.org/"> Council on Foreign Relations,</a> joins us to discuss how the state of the negotiations and the implications of the letter on US foreign policy.</p><div><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/RichardHaass">Richard Haass</a> is the president of the <a href="https://twitter.com/CFR_org">Council on Foreign Relations</a>.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195569343&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">A retrospective of Ruben Ostlund films</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-6cdcef99-0fe0-b45d-89b8-4d2309dcedda">&ldquo;Force Majeure&rdquo; was the first film by Swedish director Ruben Ostlund to get a U.S. release. It also won a major prize at this year&rsquo;s Cannes Film Festival. A retrospective of the films of Ruben Ostlund, shows this weekend and next weekend at Facets Multimedia. Film contributor Milos Stehlik and Alissa Simon, senior programmer of the Palm Springs International Film Festival and film critic for Variety join us to talk about Ostlund&rsquo;s work.</span></p><div><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em><a href="https://twitter.com/milosstehlik">Milos Stehlik</a> is the director of <a href="https://twitter.com/facetschicago">Facets Chicago</a> and the WBEZ film contributor.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Alissa Simon is the senior programmer of the Palm Springs International Film Festival and a film critic for <a href="https://twitter.com/Variety">Variety</a>.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195570088&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Global Activism: Chicago Danztheater Ensemble</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-31cd0f5d-0fe4-4599-7d54-d2c964aad823">Ellyzabeth Adler is founder and executive director of Chicago Danztheatre Ensemble. The performing arts group, &ldquo;through innovative, multidisciplinary storytelling...unite[s] varied art media to achieve an all-embracing, radical change in humankind.&rdquo; Ellyzabeth wrote us that she was so inspired by our </span>Global Activism segment, that she organized her own arts festival of &ldquo;music, dance, theatre, media and art all around activism.&rdquo; We invited Ellyzabeth to tell us about how she stresses activism in her art, at home and abroad.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-31cd0f5d-0fe4-9acc-b2ce-1116e88ca5db">Ellyzabeth Adler is the</span>&nbsp;founder and executive director of <a href="https://twitter.com/Chi_Danztheatre">Chicago Danztheatre Ensemble</a>.</em></p></p> Thu, 12 Mar 2015 16:11:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-12/worldview-group-republicans-send-letter-government-iran-111692